35 Burst results for "Storm Water"

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:33 min | Last week

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"Is WTO news. It's 7 21 President Biden in Baltimore for the launch of a long awaited rail tunnel project. The Baltimore and Potomac tunnel is 150 years old and will cost about $4 billion to replace. Right now trains have to slow down to 30 miles an hour to navigate the curves that lie under parts of Baltimore. It's a problem the president knows well having used the Amtrak to commute from Delaware to Washington as a senator. 99% of the weekdays there's been a delay here somewhere. Trust me, I know. The new tun will fix those bottlenecks. It'll be named after the abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who boarded a train to freedom in Baltimore. The president announced construction will be fully funded by the bipartisan infrastructure law signed back in 2021. It's going to cost a lot more than first thought to build one of the most important projects in elegant cities flood mitigation plan. Howard county executive Calvin ball says the design phase of the extended north tunnel is almost finished and construction will start soon. The tunnel will carry storm water from the West End of eloquent city and dump it directly into the patapsco river, about the price tag for the tunnel, 25% higher than when the project started back in 2019, Calvin ball says it's because of inflation. The county announced in May that it got a $75 million loan from the EPA for that tunnel. It's not clear how the county plans to cover the increased construction cost. It's 7 23 right now. Did D.C. leaders want to put young people to work and keep them off the streets, submit a rise in gun violence. The hope is

Baltimore President Biden Potomac tunnel Calvin ball WTO Frederick Douglass Delaware patapsco river Howard county Washington EPA D.C.
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

". Metro says 9% of its riders use Twitter for information on delays and service, metro has multiple channels to communicate with its riders, including metro alert text messages, and their shared data with Google and Apple maps. There's an effort to wait how to speed up the renaming process for more than 40 streets in Alexandria. They are named after confederate leaders or other problematic figures, mayor Justin Wilson, wants a committee to rename three streets per year as part of the city budget. The Washington Post reports the mayor floated this idea and a memo to city council members, new names would be drawn from a list formed by the historic Alexandria resources commission as it's known, that list would then include names of people and places deemed deserving of dishonor. The memo instructs the commission to consider honoring women, minorities and previously retired street names. A project that's hoped to be the big fix for historic elegant cities flooding problems, facing a delay this morning. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the potassium river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil Logan stain doubled. And this actually comes after elegant city saw 2000 year storms and only a couple of years the floods were deadly and devastated the historic downtown area. You are listening to 103.5 FM at WTO fee dot com. Money news at 25 and 55 brought to you by pen fed credit union. Great rates for everyone. This is a Bloomberg money minute, a Mac laptop with a touch screen would have been unthinkable if Steve Jobs was still around. He famously called it ergonomically terrible, but now the company is working on it. Sources tell Bloomberg the first touchscreen Mac could come with the updated MacBook Pro in 2025, but the sources also say plans could change. Microsoft is joining the ranks of companies that offer workers unlimited time off, the new policy will go into effect for full-time U.S. employees next week. It's popular with workers, of course, but employers also like it because it means less paperwork and the company doesn't owe any accrued time to workers who quit. Would be home buyers are getting a break to start the new year, the mortgage bankers association says mortgage rates edged lower this week, averaging 6.42%. It was the first decline in three weeks. Freddie Mac will have its rate update later today. From the Bloomberg newsroom, I'm Lowry kofsky, on WTO. I can also make. Visit a bright focus Buddha

historic Alexandria resources Howard county Calvin ball Justin Wilson Neil Logan WTO Alexandria The Washington Post Metro pen fed credit union Twitter Apple Google Steve Jobs Bloomberg Microsoft mortgage bankers association
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"Twitter for information on delays and service, metro has multiple channels to communicate with its riders, including metro alert text messages, and their shared data with Google and Apple maps. Ridiculous news. There's an effort to wait how to speed up the renaming process for more than 40 streets in Alexandria. Named after confederate leaders or other problematic figures, mayor Justin Wilson, wants a committee to rename three streets per year as part of the city budget. The Washington Post reports the mayor floated this idea and a memo to city council members, new names would be drawn from a list formed by the historic Alexandria resources commission as it's known. That list would then include names of people and places deemed deserving of dishonor. The memo instructs the commission to consider honoring women, minorities and previously retired street names. A project that's hoped to be the big fix for historic elegant cities flooding problems, facing a delay this morning. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the potassium river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil Logan stain double TLP noon. And this actually comes after elegant city saw 2000 year storms and only a couple of years the floods were deadly and devastated the historic downtown area. You are listening to 103.5 FM and WTO feed dot com.

historic Alexandria resources Justin Wilson Calvin ball Howard county Alexandria The Washington Post Twitter Apple Google WTO Neil Logan
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"Says 9% of its riders use Twitter for information on delays and service, metro has multiple channels to communicate with its riders, including metro alert text messages, and their shared data with Google and Apple maps. Particularly on WTO P news. An Amtrak trip from Northern Virginia to Florida took almost a day longer than it should have. The train was delayed for 20 additional hours because it had to take a detour to avoid a derailed freight train. Then it got stranded in rural South Carolina for hours because the train had to change crews since the hours for the previous crew had expired. The train reached his destination in Sanford, Florida, earlier today. A project that's hoped to be the big fix for historic elegant cities flooding problems faces a delay. Back in May, Howard county executive Kelvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the patapsco river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil law can stay in this comes after Elliott city saw a couple of thousand year storms in just two years. The floods were deadly and devastated, the historic downtown area. 8 55. Money news of 25 and 55 brought to you by pen fed credit union, great rates for everyone. Here's Larry koshki. This is a Bloomberg money minute. Apple founder Steve Jobs once called touchscreens on laptops, ergonomically terrible. But that may not stop the company from adding them to its Mac computers. Sources say engineers are working on the project, though no launch date has been set. Hopes for a mild reading on retail inflation tomorrow gave Wall Street room to extend its recent gains. The NASDAQ led the way up more than one and a half percent. Now industrials jumped 269, the S&P 500 added 50, the NASDAQ gained one 89. Another round of Wall Street job cuts this time at asset manager BlackRock. If plans to dismiss about 500 employees, the job cuts or BlackRock's first since 2019. Your Xbox is getting greener. Microsoft is rolling out an energy saving update to its game console, which will allow idle xboxes to use less power than they do in sleep mode. It'll be tested first with a small group of users. From the Bloomberg newsroom, I'm Larry kofsky, on WTO. Asian markets are up between half a percent and 1% tonight, and coming up here on WTO P more on the breaking story of the evening locally to children shot in northwest D.C. as they were getting off a metro bus on their way home from school. We'll have a report from the scene. The FAA says it was a damaged database that caused the outage leading to a nationwide ground stop of planes that the aviation system hasn't quite recovered from tonight. Stay with us on WTO for all the breaking news. Hey guys, this is Kenan Thompson. I have a problem with you. Yes, you. None of y'all told me that auto trader has millions of

WTO Howard county Kelvin ball patapsco river Elliott city Florida pen fed credit union Larry koshki Northern Virginia Apple Sanford BlackRock South Carolina Bloomberg Twitter Google Neil
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"And get your life back. Call monument medical clinic now to qualify. This offer ends today Wednesday, 202-908-5555. You're listening to WTO P in Euros. At 5 23, despite a call from D.C.'s congressional delegate to duel away with him, the national zoo says timed entry passes are here to stay. D.C. delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton in a letter to the zoo on Monday says she's concerned the passes for which you need a computer or smartphone to get, maybe limiting access to the zoo. Now the zoo is responded, making a case to keep the passes. A director at the zoo brandy Smith says the pass is allowed for the zoo to better manage visitor capacity and limit traffic congestion in the area and to that Norton says. First of all, I said the winter time. I'm not sure that this such crowding of the zoo at this time of the year. The director also says now on the zoo's website a better spells out that there are some same day passes available. Norton says her next step is having the zoo here directly from residents on this at an expected town hall with the zoo, though no date for that has been set. Mike Murillo WTO news. We're learning that groundbreaking has been delayed for a crucial part of Howard county's plans to reduce flooding and historic elegant city. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball said he expected to break ground by the end of 2022 on a 5000 foot long tunnel. The goal of the $75 million tunnel is to keep storm water off Main Street and dump it into the patapsco river. Now WTO has learned the design for the tunnel is expected to be completed within the next month, but the county has not yet provided a new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water, so it doesn't flood downtown Main Street. Neil can stay in double you TLP news. Now the project comes after Ellicott City saw two deadly and devastating thousand year storms in just two years. WTO had 5 25 money news 25 and 55 off we go to Jeff clay bob. Wall Street end of the day with a late day rally by the close the Dow was up 269

Call monument medical clinic brandy Smith D.C. WTO Howard county Eleanor Holmes Norton national zoo Norton Mike Murillo Calvin ball patapsco river Ellicott City Neil Jeff clay bob
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"News that at least one additional batch of classified documents has been found by aids to President Biden. The discovery was made in a location separate from the Washington office he used after leaving the Obama administration, NBC News reports since November after the discovery of documents with classified markings in his former office. The president's team has been searching for any additional classified materials that might be in other locations he used. At last report, no comment from The White House. For 11, a project that is hoped to be a big fix for historic allocate cities flooding problems. It's now facing a delay. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the potassium river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil law can stay in double TLP news. Now all this comes after Ellicott City saw 2000 years storms and only a couple of years. The floods were deadly, and they devastated the historic downtown area. Well, Sean, you'd better sharpen up that sweet tooth. Oh yeah? It's girl scout cookie time. As the girl scouts say in this vintage ad. Every cookie sold in the girl scout cookie program helps girls learn lifelong lessons. This year, there's a new flavor to try out. It's the raspberry rally, which the organization considers to be the sister cookie to the thin mints. And there's last year's new tree called the adventures, kind of like a brownie cookie with caramel cream and a dash of sea salt. Of course, the old favorites are still around from the samoas to the trefoils. Allison keyes, CBS News. Hey stay with us here on WTO both the caps and the wizards

President Biden Obama administration Calvin ball Howard county NBC News aids White House Washington WTO Ellicott City Neil Sean Allison keyes CBS News wizards
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"WTO P news. It's two 22 following reports of another suicide at the taft bridge in northwest, D.C. leaders are responding, saying they are in the process of adding suicide prevention barriers there. This is a very important step. Chelsea van Thoth lost her partner to suicide last year when he jumped off the taft bridge, so the news this week that another person died the same way brought back tragic memories, though she was encouraged to see that D.C.'s Department of Transportation released a statement saying it's working to install suicide prevention barriers at the bridge. Them making a public statement did give me a glimmer of hope. I remain cautiously optimistic. The department says it's currently working on the design and securing funding for the project. Nikki and Ellie double TOP news. If you or someone you know needs help, please call the national suicide prevention lifeline, the number is one 802 7 three 8 two 5 5. Two 23, a project that's hoped to be the big fix for historic elegant city's flooding problems is facing a delay. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the potassium river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil Logan stain doubled news. And all this comes after Elliott city saw 2000 year storms in just two years, the floods were deadly, and they devastated the historic downtown area. 14 years behind bars is the sentence for a Maryland man who pleaded guilty to sexually abusing an 8 year old girl in the district. The U.S. attorney's office says 31 year old Sean Moses of suitland was also ordered to pay $100,000 in restitution to the victim, served ten years of supervision after he's released from prison and register as a sex offender for life. Nobody TLP of two 25, we've got money news at 25 and 55 off we go to Jeff claw. John Wells Fargo already the largest home mortgage

taft bridge Chelsea van Thoth D.C. WTO Calvin ball Howard county national suicide prevention li Department of Transportation northwest Ellie Nikki Neil Logan Elliott city Sean Moses suitland Maryland U.S. Jeff claw
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:36 min | 3 weeks ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"What happened before they make an arrest. Neighbors and Quran's family have set up a memorial at the spot where he was shot. Kyle Cooper, WTO news. I'm Mike Murillo. I don't care what nobody say what she say, what he say, what the chief police say. He's supposed to go to jail. That's the call from Quran Blake's grandfather, Sean long. This whole predictment is wrong. To get some justice. That's all we ask for, justice. He says if an arrest is made now. Nay, if he beat this justice system, okay. We can't say nothing. We just gotta work with it. Long says his grandson is the second member of the family to be shot and killed. Quran's father was also killed in a shooting. Long during a community meeting did try to calm the crowd at times. His concern he says moving forward. I want to stop this before we get out of here. In northeast D.C., Mike Murillo WTO P news. The D.C. council is planning an override of the mayor's veto of a sweeping revision of the city's criminal code or two council member Brooke Pinto and ward 6 council member Charles Allen, are moving that vote forward in November, the council unanimously voted to update the code. The first time that's happened at a hundred years mayor Mariel Bowser vetoed the measure last week saying she felt more community to discussion was needed. The proposal brings sweeping changes to everything from jury trials to sentencing rules in the district. The project touted as the big fix for historic elegant cities flooding problems is now facing a delay. Back in May, Howard county executive Calvin ball announced they'd secured funding for a 5000 foot long tunnel. It's supposed to keep storm water off Main Street in the downtown shopping area and dump the water right into the potassium river. The goal was to break ground by December of 2022. Now WTO has learned the design of the tunnel won't be completed until next month, so far there's no new target date for the groundbreaking. Howard county is set to open its second storm water storage pond uphill from the shopping district to capture water so it doesn't flow onto Main Street. Neil law can stay in double TLP news. Straight ahead a check of traffic and our forecast and then how long could it take to get things semi back to normal for the airlines? We'll take a closer look at that with CBS travel editor Peter Greenberg. 1207. Every small business owner knows business can happen anytime anywhere. The office. The warehouse. Or on the road, and no matter where it takes you, there's one solution to help your business thrive Comcast business complete

Mike Murillo Kyle Cooper Quran Blake Sean long Quran D.C. council Brooke Pinto WTO Mariel Bowser Charles Allen Nay Calvin ball Howard county D.C. Long Neil Peter Greenberg CBS Comcast
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:38 min | 5 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"That police will find his attacker. We only know him as max, he's 17 and lives in Arlington, max spent two days in the ICU after the stabbing near Curtis trail, not far from Washington boulevard in I 66. His father told NBC four, there's still in the dark about why this happened. That's probably the hardest part, I think, that we just have no idea if it was a botched robbery that was botched so badly that the robber forgot to ask for, you know, give me your phone and your money, or if it was a disturbed person, police are checking security cameras. Meantime, max and his dad have put flyers on the trail to warn other runners of what happened. A major construction project will be ramping up in Alexandria next month. Most people won't even notice it's going on because it's happening 12 stories below the city. A massive two mile long tunnel will stretch from the city's wastewater treatment center to Pendleton street. The tunnel boring machine called hazel will head east under south royal street and then head north under the Potomac river, Justin Carl was the program manager. She's essentially like an underground factory to each ground and extrudes a ton of behind her city as an outdated combined sewer system meaning humans who just combined with storm water and all sent to the treatment center when it rains heavily can cause issues. About a 140 million gallons of combined sewer overflows occur each year in Alexandria. The new tunnel should eliminate that issue and boring will go almost completely unnoticed. Our criteria for movement at the surface is about the thickness of two nickels. Most of the time when we build these types of tunnels rarely see any movement. Money news at 25 and 55, this is a Bloomberg money minute, almost 20 years after Concorde stopped flying, we're seeing renewed interest in supersonic air travel.

Curtis trail max ICU Justin Carl Arlington Alexandria NBC flyers Washington Pendleton Potomac river Bloomberg Concorde
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:11 min | 5 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"Project will be ramping up in Alexandria next month. Most people may not even notice it's going on. It's going to be 12 stories below the city. A massive two mile long tunnel will stretch from the city's wastewater treatment center to Pendleton street. The tunnel boring machine called hazel will head east under south royal street and then head north under the Potomac river, Justin Carl was the program manager. She's essentially like an underground factor to each ground and extrudes a tunnel behind her city as an outdated combined sewer system, meaning humans who just combine with storm water and all sent to the treatment center when it rains heavily can cause issues. About a 140 million gallons of combined sewer overflows occur each year in Alexandria. The new tunnel should eliminate that issue and boring will go almost completely unnoticed. Our criteria for movement at the surface is about the thickness of two nickels. Most of the time when we build these types of tunnels rarely see any movement. Luke Luger WTO, P news. Money news at 25 and 55 here's Jeff clay ball. The historic asbury church in middleburg dates back to the 1820s, but it's in need of stabilization and repairs, the town of middleburg, had planned to sell it to a preservation minded buyer, but I'll keep it and fix it itself. Thanks to a budget surplus, visitorship and tourism is a significant component of the town of middleburg, a majority of our tax revenues are based on that and coming out of the pandemic. Has been blessed to do very well with visitorship and tourism. That's middleburg mayor bridge littleton, future uses may include community activities and private events, but it will also work with historians. The biggest most important thing is to capture the stories and capture the history of asbury church and what it's meant to middleburg, working with those groups to capture that story and share that story is the primary focus in 1864, asbury church was donated to the African American Methodist Church. It hasn't been used in two decades. Jeff claw will be news. Coming up after traffic and weather more migrants dropped off in D.C. also New York, Texas says they're not done yet. They're going to continue. We'll keep you up to date on that and more. It's two

middleburg asbury church Justin Carl Alexandria Luke Luger Jeff clay Potomac river Pendleton littleton African American Methodist Chu Jeff claw D.C. Texas New York
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:37 min | 5 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"MEL WO OD dot org. This is WTO P news, it's 1223, a major construction project will be ramping up in Alexandria next month. Most people won't even notice that it's going on because it'll be around 12 stories below the city. A massive two mile long tunnel will stretch from the city's wastewater treatment center to Pendleton street. The tunnel boring machine called hazel will head east under south royal street and then head north under the Potomac river, Justin Carl was the program manager. She's essentially like an underground factory to each ground and extrudes a tun behind her city has an outdated combined sewer system meaning humans who just combined with storm water and all sent to the treatment center when it rains heavily can cause issues. About a 140 million gallons of combined sewer overflows occur each year in Alexandria. The new tunnel should eliminate that issue and boring will go almost completely unnoticed. Our criteria for movement at the surface is about the thickness of two nickels. Most of the time when we build these types of tunnels rarely see any movement. Luke Luger WTO P news. You're being warned about a trending scam. This one takes advantage of a popular way to send money from your bank account. It's called the pay yourself scam and Bank of America is alerting its customers about it. The scam starts with a text message that appears to be from your bank about unusual activity. If you respond, scammers follow up with a call from a number that appears to be from a bank. The scammers say they can stop the alleged fraud by having you send money to yourself using Zelle. They then ask for a one time code in order to take money from your account, Bank of America says to not trust caller ID and to not share

Justin Carl Alexandria WTO Potomac river Pendleton Luke Luger Bank of America
"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:56 min | 7 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTOP

"Resumes next hour at one 45 will let you know where the nationals got their first ten picks from. Dave Preston WTO sports Out of the top stories we're following on WTO, marylanders are collecting their I voted stickers today. They're casting ballots in the Republican and democratic primaries, both parties with close contests for governor, voters are also selecting candidates for Congress, their state lawmakers, county executives, and local council and school board races, polls close at 8 p.m.. The mayor of London says a heat wave is causing a huge surge in the number of fires there. A hundred firefighters are tackling a grass fire on the eastern edge of the city. England, which is used to more temperate conditions is the latest to be walloped by unusually hot dry weather that has triggered wildfires and led to hundreds of heat related deaths across Europe. Much more on these stories in just a few minutes. The price tag for metro silver line out to Delos is going up. The Washington Post reports the metropolitan Washington airport's authority is asking for an additional $250 million for the project, raising the total to around 3 billion the original estimate was about 2.8 billion. They say delays caused by updating storm water management, supply chain issues and inflation are behind the increased costs. The airport's authority completed phase two of the silver line extension in October. It took control last month of the line for testing before it opens. No word on when it will be ready for passenger travel. Coming up in money news. That was up 568 points. A big Twitter victory over Elon Musk. I'm Jeff cable. It's one 18. Time for traffic and weather on the 8s. Rita Kessler in the WTO traffic center. Right now in Maryland on inbound 50 watch for a delay that's beginning after two O two,

Dave Preston WTO metropolitan Washington airpor Delos Congress The Washington Post London England Europe Jeff cable Elon Musk Rita Kessler Twitter Maryland
"storm water" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:30 min | 7 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WCPT 820

"A forest, it slowly absorbed into the soil. But in urban and suburban areas, the water rushes across roofs, roads, and sidewalks. All that water kind of goes downstream and off site to the nearest lower location. And that can be a good thing except for the places that are downstream where all that water is collecting. So those are the places oftentimes that are a lot more vulnerable to flooding. That's Evan bean of the university of Florida. He says that to prevent flooding, many communities direct excess rainwater into basins. Then it can seep into the soil or be slowly released downstream. But typically, these stormwater systems were not designed with climate change in mind. And in Florida and many other states, heavy downpours are becoming more frequent and intense as the climate changes. So bean says many communities need to upgrade their stormwater systems to prevent overflow. The decisions that we make today, they kind of lock in place the storm water management of the future. The more that we address these issues now and come up with more sustainable solutions for the future, the better off we're going to be in the better legacy that we'll have in the future. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org. My simple solution to their problem was remove people from the scene and help them feel safer. In response to a tax against Asian Americans

Evan bean university of Florida bean Florida Yale center for environmental
"storm water" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"storm water" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Where you can hear the Stephanie Miller show every weekday 8 to 11 a.m. because facts matter. I'm doctor Anthony Elizabeth, and this is climate connections. When heavy rain falls on a field or in a forest, it slowly absorbed into the soil. But in urban and suburban areas, the water rushes across roofs, roads, and sidewalks. All that water kind of goes downstream and off site to the nearest lower location. And that can be a good thing except for the places that are downstream where all that water is collecting. So those are the places oftentimes that are a lot more vulnerable to flooding. That's Evan being of the university of Florida. He says that to prevent flooding, many communities direct excess rainwater into basins. Then it can seep into the soil or be slowly released downstream. But typically, these stormwater systems were not designed with climate change in mind. And in Florida and many other states, heavy downpours are becoming more frequent and intense as the climate changes. So bean says many communities need to upgrade their stormwater systems to prevent overflow. The decisions that we make today, they kind of lock in place the storm water management of the future. The more that we address these issues now and come up with more sustainable solutions for the future, the better off we're going to be in the better legacy that we'll have in the future. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Elizabeth Stephanie Miller university of Florida Evan bean Florida Yale center for environmental
Virginia Is Seriously Considering Taxing Residents for Rain

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Virginia Is Seriously Considering Taxing Residents for Rain

"Listen to this, the fairfax Virginia city manager, guy named Robert stalzer has proposed taxing local residents and businesses for the amount of rainwater that falls on their roofs, driveways and parking lots. This is very similar to the measure they've already adopted in La La Land of Maryland. Now, when they did that a few years ago, that contributed to flipping party control of the governorship and was repealed by the state legislature two years after it imposed the tax. They are seriously talking about taxing residents for rain. It's called impervious services. Surfaces. The revenue, they think it'll be a lot of money. It's called The Rain tax by many. The proposal would establish a new enterprise fund, supported by customer fees that are based on the amount of impervious surface on a property. And the city manager says the current revenues are not sufficient to meet the regulatory infrastructure maintenance and drainage improvement demands of the storm water program. So instead of spending less, the city manager wants to increase taxes based on a fee for service approach under which residents would pay in proportion to the surface area of their roof, driveway, parking lot gravel, concrete surfaces or any man-made feature that creates water runoff resulting from

Robert Stalzer Virginia City Fairfax La La Maryland Legislature
"storm water" Discussed on Way Too Broad

Way Too Broad

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"storm water" Discussed on Way Too Broad

"It is the estimations mora anaerobic. So it's expensive. It's like twenty dollars for answers. I spent a little less on it. I got it from a local place. yeah check this out Poop poop poop poop poop. Okay everything other than the coffee. Cherry skin is added to the green pro bags in combined with one kilo of cinnamon powder for every forty six kilos of coffee. Cherry this mixture ferment in the anaerobic environment for six days idea what that means before being moved to concrete patios to begin drying. We've anaerobic means without access to oxygen. Maybe i made that up though. That's true that's true. What is for anaerobic fermenting without oxygen. The which i think is what renting's so it means like adding fancy words it gets then ferments with with cinemas which is why it tastes like sediments. Nice plural every cinnamon cinnamon. Then what are you drinking water heist a storm water one or two two but one's already empty consistent consistent. We are recording this at midday on saturday so i am drinking. I don't know why this is related. But i'm drinking coke zero classic jane saturday during a coca cola zero sugar. Excuse me which is the new version of coke zero that says now more delicious on the front is immortal ships. Yeah it's it's. I liked coke zero before so i i think it takes less like a diet soda. Which is good for other people. I don't care at all. But yeah i had. I had a coffee too. But i finished before we started. I topped off my coffee. Before we started also had morning tuffy far regarded disoriented and one of the stands had ground cherries or they were calling them husk cherries. I'd have to say. I liked him better than the ones that mom grew. No offense. wow they they had a lot less funk. I have like a whole bag of them remaining downstairs. They were smaller and they were sweeter general. I'm only had a few. But i really like them. I mean i liked the ones that mom's house too so yeah. Mother grew here as well. They really cool look into tastes like shit. They say the the cherry this weary of the bite. Yup oh wow look at this pretty necklace. Song ground cherries..

coke coca cola
Flooding Is Getting Worse. Can Tech Help Us Deal With It?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Flooding Is Getting Worse. Can Tech Help Us Deal With It?

"Infrastructure. It's boring visible. We only care about it when things go wrong. Things have been going wrong. Punishing storms have caused catastrophic flooding in new york texas louisiana. The list goes on but water systems are expensive time. Consuming and hard to fix technology may provide some relief. Paul robinson is executive director of rise. A nonprofit accelerator in norfolk virginia. That helps develop climate tech. He says one of the companies they fund is stormcenter which put sensors in storm and sewer pipes. They measure the amounts of flow and in which direction is flowing. And how food the pri- the pipe is and you want to know when if you're pipe is full or blocked or flowing the wrong way. That's important for the city to know they can react to that. Why how hard is it for cities to know what the status of their pipes are right. Now it's not easy because the pipes are buried and there's no one down there on a regular basis so you don't know if sediments building up or if there's a garbage bag in some sticks down there this creating a blockage so having sensors placed within the storm water pipe making measurements and reporting them out to the cloud for analysis is pretty important and that's what storm sensors come in and done in in our region. They put twenty sensors that will start to detect the direction of the flow. We're on a river and the river is on the coast and so We're affected by high tight the river and the ocean come up stormwater system and when there's a a storm surge it can go really far up the storm water system and come out the drains and start to flood the city streets and so knowing that that's going to happen. Helps the city understand how their streets are going to be affected. Also if they can detect parts of the system is being clogged with sediment that helps them send a crew over with a vacuum truck to clean up the blockage. So that doesn't get any

Paul Robinson Louisiana Norfolk Texas Virginia New York
This Is Why Larry Elder Should Be Governor of California

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:37 min | 1 year ago

This Is Why Larry Elder Should Be Governor of California

"So talk about how that's the most important question isn't it. Larry that we gotta get fifty plus one to say yes. We want gavin newsom out. That's why by far is the most important question you pointed out fifty percent plus one vote yes to recall gavin newsom in the second part is who do you want to replace him and obviously i want people to vote for me but you asked me what i would do if i became governor. Tell you what i won't do. I won't impose statewide mandates the way. This guy has on bass face masks. In on vaccines he has mandated that every government worker who's not been vaccinated be tested once a week and we'll be required to wear face masks. Get work i don't get it. I've been vaccinated. I'm not antibac- because the by age because of other underlying calmer abilities but for crying out loud a lot of people and made it very different decision And for him to do Tell people who assume the risk you need to wear a mask at work to protect yourself against other people whom the risk if anti signed and and he's supposed to be the one pro science i'm also going to declare a state wide emergency on housing. We have environmental law that prevents developers from developing low cost housing. Which is why the price of a home in california as eight hundred thousand dollars which is anywhere from a hundred and fifty percent of the two hundred percent above the national average. I'm also going to declare a state wide work on water. We have all sorts of projects for more reservoirs to raise dams and the storm water underground. We do have our west seasons and we're not doing that waters rainy right out into the pacific ocean because of these projects are being held up for fear of lawsuits. I'm gonna declare statewide emergency on water. So they're going to be some big changes when i get there even though Dealing with a hostile legislature.

Gavin Newsom Larry California Pacific Ocean Legislature
Hurricane Ida Slams Louisiana, Downgraded to Tropical Storm

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Hurricane Ida Slams Louisiana, Downgraded to Tropical Storm

"IDA has been downgraded to a tropical storm with winds down to about 45 MPH this after slamming into the Gulf Coast yesterday with winds of up to 150 MPH. Selena chat Lonnie with member station W, W and over reports, the storm knocked out power to all of New Orleans and inundated coastal Louisiana communities that includes the town of Jean Lafitte, just south of New Orleans. Sergeant Jason Laura Wall with the Jean Lafitte Police Department is out currently on search and rescue missions, he says hundreds of people for financial or physical reasons. We're not able to heed the mandatory evacuation and are asking for help as they get stuck in several feet of the storm water surge that scared because they've never seen that they've never faced the storm before. So, you know, we had a mandatory evacuation has been in order for a few days now, but our resident the resilient our residents have gone through just their whole lives, and they didn't think that this would happen. Lord Wald says they are trying to rescue as many people as possible

Sergeant Jason Laura Wall Jean Lafitte Police Department New Orleans Jean Lafitte Lonnie Gulf Coast Selena Louisiana Lord Wald
One Woman Is Preparing Her Neighborhood for the Next Flood

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

One Woman Is Preparing Her Neighborhood for the Next Flood

"When heavy rainfalls in austin texas residents of the dove springs neighborhood. Brace themselves the water has nowhere to run but to us. Longtime resident francis a kunia to storm water flows down from surrounding areas into the streets in yards of her low-lying neighborhood. New development is made matters worse. Asphalt and concrete have replaced greenspaces used to soak up rainwater and as the climate warms. Extreme storms are growing more common. A kunia says several years ago. A flash flood damage many of her neighbors homes and destroyed their possessions. You don't know what to say because you see you off a disaster so the only thing that you do is just give them a hug and you try to help. The experience motivated her to advocate for solutions. A kuna now works at go. Austin vomits austin a local nonprofit as the lead organizer for climate resilience. She helps residents prepare for emergencies for example by elevating furniture to keep it dry and planning when and how to evacuate as she's pushing the city to improve its storm water systems to better protect everyone as the threat of flooding grows.

Dove Springs Kunia Austin Francis Texas
No property tax increase coming in Washington DC suburb; stormwater tax could go up

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

No property tax increase coming in Washington DC suburb; stormwater tax could go up

"There is good news and bad news this morning for the owners of real estate in Arlington County, fighting the hardship of the coronavirus Panda. American residents. The Arlington County Board voted no increase in the base real estate property text this year but then took action to advertise a different proposed tax hike for property owners. This one would raise the county stormwater tax from 1.3 cents to 1.7 cents per $100 of assessed value. Arlington officials say the money raised will be used for much needed storm water infrastructure projects to protect residents. A tax hike would fund the debt service on a bond referendum approved for stormwater improvement. Despite Arlington voters last November,

Arlington County Board Arlington County Arlington
"storm water" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"storm water" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"The Rosa Parks connector ramp to 75 Saban remain closed the construction for about another 20 minutes, and that project will run again tomorrow from ADM till six PM so watch out for that delay. Looking into forecast tonight Gonna be mostly cloudy with some light snow expected. You can expect a little around 12 degrees and tomorrow Mostly cloudy with scattered flurries throughout the day. Expect a high near 24 Right now it is actually mostly cloudy. And 23 degrees from the town hall dot com newsroom General Motors is looking to increase production of its transmissions, The automaker said Thursday will invest $100 million between two plants, one in Michigan and one in Indiana to make more 10 speed automatic transmissions that are typically found in Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra pickup trucks. The move comes after the company said they're seeing high demand for those vehicles. Recently, a worldwide semiconductor chip shortage has forced the closure of three plants temporarily. Oakland County in Detroit or working with Great Lakes Water Authority on three projects to prevent untreated storm water from flowing into the Rouge River. A $60 million project will start this summer in Detroit in the summer of 2022 in Oakland County. Three part wastewater master plan will work over 40 years to eliminate 48 million gallons of untreated storm water from entering the river each year. Glw. A will also work with the Evergreen Farmington Sanitary Drainage District, The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department for the projects as well. We have day traffic mother four times an hour. I'm Tim Cook on the Patriot. If I'm one of 1.5 and am 1400 It's six o'clock talk. With Darryl would Out fastest hour on radio. 809.

Tim Cook $100 million Indiana Michigan Great Lakes Water Authority Rouge River 23 degrees Thursday $60 million Evergreen Farmington Sanitary Oakland County six PM General Motors tomorrow two plants GMC tonight Darryl 48 million gallons Detroit
Urban prairie project kicks off in Houston's Sunnyside area

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Urban prairie project kicks off in Houston's Sunnyside area

"Learning about a major project and one houston neighborhood. That combined storm water detention with efforts to fight climate change. Bad harrop says it's going to create a unique ecosystem the project in houston's sunnyside neighborhood will turn an empty the tension area into what mayor sylvester turner calls a live habitat. It It will will create create a a park park for for children children and and community community garden garden and and allows allows space space for for recreation recreation to to the the families families reside. reside. Here Here it's it's partially partially funded funded by by four four hundred hundred thousand dollar grant from the national fish and wildlife foundation local leaders. Say it's part of a broader effort to build green infrastructure that strengthens native ecosystems and vulnerable communities. The city will host public workshops about the urban prairie resiliency project before construction begins. Its estimated to be complete in two

Mayor Sylvester Turner Houston Harrop Sunnyside National Fish And Wildlife Fou
"storm water" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"storm water" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Quarterback to Shawn Watson makes it official he wants out of Houston. Brian D. Has some thoughts at 7 15. Another round of heavy snow expected across southeast Wisconsin. This weekend Storm team for meteorologist Ryan is, Nancy says the white stuff will likely move in tomorrow evening. Most of the area is going to probably end up with 67, maybe even as much as eight inches of snow when things are all said and done. By Sunday night, but look for the snow to move in Saturday evening. Until then, things are looking quite Winter Storm Watch kicks in tomorrow at 6 P.m. your full five day forecast coming up in just a couple minutes storm drenching Southern California's increasing the chances of mudslides in that area. Now it's area that is scarred by wildfires. Now thousands have been ordered to evacuate. Reporter Nicole Comstock spoke to people fleeing their homes and Riverside County by one daughters in San Diego. And she said, Mom, it's too far for us to get you to the last minute. Get out. So that's what Brendan Elden are doing. Leading the Cherry Mobile Home Park, which is now under a mandatory evacuation orders as the storm approaches. Sheriff's deputies went door to door to clear everyone out here in in parts of mountain Home Village and the north bench of Yucaipa to explain the danger with them. Living right next to flood channels just downhill from the San Bernadino mountains or rain is soon melt the snow pack and send a lot of storm water down through two different burn areas. Specialized response strike teams have now been implemented and also some task forces in several counties. In Southern California coming up right after traffic and weather here in a minute. GM makes a bold move. This report sponsored by Murphy and product Hauser, good lawyers who help people no one expects an auto accident to happen. But last year over 100,000 people were injured in auto crashes in the state of Wisconsin, people lose wages and incur extensive medical costs. If you've been in an auto accident,.

Wisconsin Southern California Nicole Comstock Shawn Watson San Bernadino mountains Brendan Elden Cherry Mobile Brian D. San Diego mountain Home Village Yucaipa GM Riverside County Houston Hauser Murphy Ryan official Reporter Nancy
Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

Short Wave

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

"Okay sue. you said that the lawsuit that went before the supreme court this week was brought by city of baltimore. Yep and there are more than twenty of these lawsuits. They're all alleging various versions of the same thing that climate change is causing damage in the city or the state or the county and that oil and gas companies are partially responsible. And the baltimore case just happens to be the one that made it the supreme court. So we'll focus on that one also very convenient because you live in baltimore. Indeed i do definitely makes it easier for this reporting so what specifically does the baltimore lawsuit allege so this lawsuit alleges that a long list of big fossil company isn't that includes exxon mobil shell. Bp chevron misled the public about the dangers of burning fossil fuels and that those companies have to help the city pay for the cost of climate change so the lawsuit lays out how global warming is causing damage in the city. And how that's expensive for the city. Government like heat waves for example. They're expensive or flooding like the flooding from climate driven extreme. Yeah and flooding from ceelo arise. So let's start there because that's actually the simpler one sea levels on the east coast of the us arising more quickly than the global average streets sometimes flood during high tide. When there's a storm water ends up in buildings which is obviously not good And when you look to the future. The city estimates that the amount of baltimore's port area that will flood frequently will increase by almost one hundred fifty percent in the next thirty years. Well a hundred fifty percent becky. that is intense. That is a lot of flooding. Yeah it's super serious. And i have to imagine that it's going to be really expensive to retrofit baltimore to be able to deal with what's coming. Yeah totally and you know. Climate change isn't just a future cost right. Cds are already racking up millions of dollars in infrastructure costs and understand why you have to remember that. A lot of cities were built a long time ago and they weren't designed for

Baltimore Supreme Court Exxon Mobil Shell Chevron BP Becky United States
Washington DC Water: Ongoing project could’ve prevented Northeast sewage flooding

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Washington DC Water: Ongoing project could’ve prevented Northeast sewage flooding

"Customers clean up after the September 10th historic rainfall that heavy rain overwhelmed some parts of the sewer system, filling some people's homes in northeast D. C with the disgusting substance. CEO and general manager David Gattis says up to $5000 will be paid to homeowners for the cost of drying their basements, including removing moldy drywall and sanitizing in an online flooding. Town hall get US also announced a major expansion of the agency's backflow Water valve reimbursement program. That expansion will cover every home within the most seriously impacted DC neighborhoods. The agency says it will reimburse up to $6000 to homeowners for the installation of the device, which is designed to stop sewage flow from coming back into the basement by ensuring the flow goes on Ly one way What other hopes are there to prevent flooding? W T O peace Neal Augenstein reports the flooding that happened in the Edgewood community. We believe the Northeast boundary eternal would mitigate that flooding. DC water Ceelo Tish Powell says That project is already underway and should be done by 2023. The water authority already built the first street in Anacostia Tunnel Systems. To carry storm water and sewage directly to the blue planes. Treatment plan well completely eliminates flooding, But it will greatly mitigate storm such as this Your log unstained W Tio Pino

Town Hall Tio Pino David Gattis Anacostia Tunnel Systems Tish Powell Neal Augenstein CEO LY Edgewood Community General Manager
Nuns agree to turn former convent into flood-prevention project

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Nuns agree to turn former convent into flood-prevention project

"When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in two thousand, five the Convent of the Sisters of Saint. With severely damaged by flooding. The nuns moved elsewhere while repairs began. The following year lightning struck the roof and started a fire. The convent could not be saved. We began to pray for some kind of insight that would enable us to use the property in a way that would minister to the people of New Orleans sister Pat Bergen architect came to the nuns with an idea converting the twenty five acres into a wetland that helps prevent flooding in nearby areas they're calling the project. The mirabeau water garden plans for the site include recreational areas, meadows that absorb storm water and retention ponds. When the city's drainage system is overwhelmed, water will be diverted to the property and held there until it can be safely released. Healing, strengthening restoring earth was a major part of our decision making and that's why this design resonated with our hearts right away. So, when the city breaks ground, it will turn what was once a major loss into a gain for the flood prone city of New

New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Convent Of The Sisters Of Sain Pat Bergen
A Georgia clam farmer worries about the climate

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

A Georgia clam farmer worries about the climate

"Charlie Phillips on Pelosi Farms the oldest clam farm in Georgia. He's been raising and harvesting shellfish for more than forty years and he worries about how climate change will affect is industry as carbon dioxide levels rise ocean waters become more acidic education will definitely affect shellfish of the water gives more acidic than shellfish can't form their shelves especially the very small shellfish he says that increasingly extreme weather could also take a toll because storm water runoff can contaminate coastal waters. So when there's a hurricane or a bad storm state agencies may temporarily closed areas to shellfishing when they closed the waters on generally going to be closed for close to three weeks which means there's no income three weeks as a rule of thumb. So Philip says it's important to protect the ocean from pollution and acidification. I just can't emphasize enough how important it is to take care of our war quality. You can't overstate how important that is for. Not only fisherman's quality of life but everybody's quality of life.

Charlie Phillips Pelosi Farms Georgia Philip
Oregons coastal high marshes likely to shrink as sea levels rise

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Oregons coastal high marshes likely to shrink as sea levels rise

"Where the land meets the sea. You'll often find. Coastal wetlands called salt marshes during high tide. Salt water floods the low lying part of the marsh the tidal flats the high marsh a drier sandy area floods frequently. When there's a storm. The high marsh provides an important buffer helping protect inland areas from waves and flooding but as the climate changes rising seas could put high marshes in jeopardy. We've been doing is trying to figure out how. We'll salt marshes respond to sea level rise. That's Martin Luther. Friends a geographer at Portland State University. He and his colleagues have been studying salt marshes along the Oregon coast. He says by twenty fifty the high marsh will begin to shrink and then by twenty one hundred Very large decrease in the amount of high marsh and a very large extension of the tide flats. He says roads dikes prevent the high marsh from expanding inland. So the marsh can't migrate anywhere. It's SORTA stuck in place as what that means. As we lose that high marsh all the coastal communities will be losing that protection from storm water from storm surges. So he says in many cases they need to consider moving vulnerable resources. Inland

Martin Luther Portland State University Oregon
How cities are preparing their water infrastructure for bigger storms

Climate Cast

04:03 min | 3 years ago

How cities are preparing their water infrastructure for bigger storms

"The cost of heavier rainfall. I'M NPR CHIEF. Meteorologist Paul Hutton. Or this is climate. Cats governor. Tim Wall says Minnesota Needs Two hundred ninety three million dollars to retrofit. Its water infrastructure to keep up with climate change last year more than twenty Minnesota location set annual precipitation records that includes the twin cities and Rochester. Were more than fifty. Five inches fell last year. Minnesota is now about five inches wetter on average than in nineteen eighty and these heavier twenty-first-century rains are overwhelming. Our Twentieth Century Stormwater Infrastructure Randy Nip rash is a storm water regulatory specialist with Stanford Consulting and the Minnesota cities stormwater coalition. Hi Randy Paul. So we see the data right. Minnesota's getting wetter. What are the impacts of this climate shift on Cities? Not only are we getting wetter in general but more of our rainfall is coming in more intense. Storms everybody has seen what a really intense storm does to an urban storm water system. But you can Get those sort of impacts at scales where you have real problems where you can jeopardize property where people can get injured or even killed and those impacts are real inconsequential for our cities. We have rain bursts last summer in South. Minneapolis in a neighborhood that overwhelmed the storm systems and there was water up to the top of the tires and cars parked on the street. How does that four cities to to those heavier bursts of rain? One of the things that we try to do is figure out where the problems are going to be an advance so instead of just responding to problems after they happen we can use computer models to look at our urban stormwater systems we can we refer to it as dropping designed storm onto our urban landscape using these computer models. Watch how all the water moves through the storm water system and see where the problems are going to be. So for instance the hundred year storm nowadays For the twin cities area is thought to be about seven and a half inches which is up from six inches from earlier precipitation frequencies that change in rainfall can cause impacts that we can Analyzing advance anticipate and perhaps address before they happen instead of after it happened. Okay so let's say we do that. And we address them. I assume we're building bigger storm water projects and how much can a big storm? Water project cost a city a million multiple millions of dollars. Sometimes sometimes it's a fixes though can be quite simple. You can provide a path for water to pass under an emergency situation. Could be a road. Could be a parking lot of places where you can move water or store. Water even temporarily. Sometimes you can do it pretty cheaply randy and you're dealing with cities. What's your assessment of where they are with this process? Are they on the right track? With upgrading. Stormwater infrastructure cities are as usual trying their best They also have multiple water issues to deal with so for instance they have state permitting. Requirements for water quality whereas flooding questions are related to water quantity. There isn't the same regulatory pressure on the water quantity side but the cities are always and and for a very long time have been deeply concerned about flooding potential randy crash with stand tech consulting and the Minnesota City stormwater coalition thanks for being on climate cast today always a pleasure. Paul keep up the good

Minnesota Randy Paul Paul Hutton Minnesota City NPR Tim Wall Stanford Consulting Minneapolis Rochester
Connecticut town sets up a climate fund

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Connecticut town sets up a climate fund

"Saving for retirement. Pays off if you deposit posit money into an IRA. Its earnings can grow over time. And so can your nest egg. James Finch the director of finance for Branford Connecticut. He says the cities and towns focused on the cost of rising seas and more extreme weather. They can take a similar approach. What we started saving money? We'll start with a million dollars. And and what are we started adding to that every year and then what if we were able to invest it at a rate that could compound so that it grows faster his town is doing in just that through its new coastal resiliency fund. FINCH says Branford. Put a million dollars into start with more to be added each year over time. The invested funds winds are expected to grow. Then when it comes time to repair a flooded bridge elevate houses were improved. Storm water drainage the town can tap into those funds this this provides a vehicle for a community to put money aside and so can grow for the long term just like any family would for funding their kid's college or finding their retirement accounts finch says that for towns and cities that can afford to it makes sense to start saving now for the future costs of climate

James Finch Branford Connecticut Branford Director Of Finance Million Dollars
City uses abandoned industrial sites to capture floodwater

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 years ago

City uses abandoned industrial sites to capture floodwater

"In Camden New Jersey storm water. Her and sewage wanted the same pipe so when heavy rain hits the system can overflow storm water mix sewage and during storm events the MIC sewage will go into the river and we'll go into neighborhoods homes parks schools and who's the most destructive environmental issue in the city of Camden Frame McLaughlin Clinton's with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. He says one solution is to create green spaces that absorb rain and flood water. He says abandoned industrial areas as can be ideal sites in Camden many are located along rivers so cleaning them up and planting vegetation can create valuable waterfront buffers for example example and the Cramer Hill neighborhood and Old City is now home to a community center and the adjacent sixty plus acres will soon be a waterfront park with restored wetlands and and lots of trees all the onsite stormwater is sustainably managed on that site and not connected to the combined sewer issue that we have have the rest of the approach helped the city prepare for more extreme rate and it will provide a park for residents who have long endured industrial blight

Camden Mclaughlin Clinton Old City New Jersey Department Of Envir New Jersey Cramer Hill
Dorian's floodwaters trap people in attics in North Carolina

Rush Limbaugh

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Dorian's floodwaters trap people in attics in North Carolina

"Hurricanes Dorian remains a danger still in North Carolina North Carolina governor really Cooper that danger right now is the rising storm surge of four to seven feet and officials are telling people to get to the highest point in their houses several hundred thousand power outages have been reported in North Carolina Bob Costantini Wilmington North Carolina hundreds are trapped on Ocracoke island and many have had to move into their attics to get above the rising storm waters in Beaufort North Carolina there is damage but correspondent Ryan young reports people know it could have been much worse some turned over boats in the harbor but outside of that and we toured the city we haven't seen major damage at all but the wind and the rain deathly created submissions around here because we have over two hundred thousand people in the state without power Dorian still has hurricane force winds of ninety miles per hour the next landfall could be in New

North Carolina Cooper Ocracoke Island Dorian Bob Costantini Beaufort North Carolina Ryan Young Seven Feet
Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

"Coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR

Florida Keys Brian Florida Professor Florida Atlantic University Marine Biology James Porter NPR Pink Wong Michael Fox Woods Hole University Of Georgia Co Thirty Years Twenty Years
$2.5 million reportedly diverted from Park Service for Trump's Fourth of July celebration

All Things Considered

03:48 min | 3 years ago

$2.5 million reportedly diverted from Park Service for Trump's Fourth of July celebration

"President trump's July fourth celebration is taking place on the national mall which is part of the national park system The Washington Post is reporting the National Park Service is re directing about two and a half million dollars to help pay for the festivities at the same time the entire national park system which includes four hundred and eighteen national park sites has been struggling with chronic underfunding for years deferred maintenance is in the neighborhood of twelve billion dollars in the parks rely on more than two hundred thousand volunteers to Reese appear now is the president and CEO of the national parks conservation association they're an independent group that advocates on behalf of the national park system welcome to all things considered thank you it's a pleasure to be here first can you tell us what we mean when we say deferred maintenance what does that look like across you know four hundred plus park sites well all the twelve billion dollars half of that is roads and bridges and major on construction projects that are really important for transportation within the national parks and then the other half account for everything from all the important storm water management systems septic systems bathrooms trails any of the buildings we have within the national park system there are more structures than all the other departments accepted the defense department so you're talking about seventy five thousand structures that they have to maintain so this this backlog is very significant and it has a tremendous impact on whether we're going to be able to protect and continue to restore and see these parks for the future with that number we said in the introduction twelve billion is huge right so the two and a half million that might be re directed for the celebration is not that big a deal it is because you know that comes on top of if you recall in in December the federal government shut down and so there was a loss of about six million dollars in revenue during that time and these fees I remind you are used for general kind of projects and maintenance with in the national parks and some of those projects a very small it might be you know ten thousand dollars or five thousand dollars but it's very important to that individual park and so when you take away see revenue you really take their ability to just take care of general maintenance keeping the bathrooms open or or taking care of a specific trailer project that is critical to the visitors of that national park what is the long term implications of so much deferred maintenance how much longer can the national park system go on like this well that's a great question and I think that for for most people what happens is they get chipped away at so the experience the park may still be there but the problem is you might not be able to go into a store structures or you might start to see a reduction in the ability to camp in parks because the campsites in such disrepair so it's a constant chipping away at something that is a treasure people come from all over the world to see our national parks in the end is there something that strikes you about the idea that this money would be diverted to help pay for the presidential life for deliberation well it's a it shows tremendous disrespect which is been continual with this administration to our national parks with recommendations for enormous budget cuts they continue to not filled the position of the director of the National Park Service which is a critical leadership position so in so many ways the parks are threatened and then to see more money diverted away from national parks for parade I'm shocked and I think that the public will

Donald Trump President Trump Twelve Billion Dollars Five Thousand Dollars Ten Thousand Dollars Six Million Dollars Million Dollars