36 Burst results for "Store Store Store"

Fresh update on "store " discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

00:43 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "store " discussed on Myths and Legends

"We'll see the second phase of Victor's plan, but that will be right after this. What if, what if what if? What if hiring didn't have to be so hard? What if finding someone great could be as easy as asking them to apply? What if your dream hiring platform already exists? Surprise, it does, and you need indeed. Indeed, as the hiring platform where you can attract interview and hire all in one place doesn't get more unified or simple than that. Plus, you have tools like indeed instant match, assessments, and virtual interviews, again, all right there. I'm a huge fan of indeeds, assessments. Your star applicants get to shine with over 135 assessment tests. For things like cooking, coding, and everything in between. That definitely saves time. And it takes the stress out of the interview process. On both ends. That's true. Your candidates can prove themselves before the interview, so you can dive deeper when you do meet them. It's so helpful. And you only pay for applications that meet your must have requirements. Start hiring now with a $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at indeed dot com slash legends. Offer good for a limited time. Claim your $75 credit now, and indeed dot com slash legends. Indeed, dot com slash legends, terms and conditions apply. You need to hire, you need, indeed. We're all for try try again and building perseverance, but sometimes you just need a win. And what's better than making it to level 1000 best fiends? I'd take that win. Me too. But I'm just on level 360 seven, although I did come in second in the most recent challenge. Oh, you placed? I did got 50 gold bars and added Zaha to my collection of feet. That's amazing. If you can't tell, we are super into best fiends in a big way. The seasonal challenges, collecting keys, opening crates, solving puzzles and upgrading your fiends, I feel like accomplished when I play. I play every spare moment I get. It's on my iPad, it's on my phone. No matter where we are, we can play even offline. It makes you feel so energized to get to that next level. And we're always looking for other people that play. So check it out. Add me as a friend. I'm right or mom with friend code two 8 two 9 8 four one, which we'll put in the show notes too. Play anywhere, collect fiends, and never run out of things you can do with best fiends. Download best fiends for free from the App Store or Google Play. Plus, earn even more with $5 worth of in game rewards when you reach level 5. That's Friends without the R, best

Victor Zaha App Store Google
Todd Starnes Gets in Trouble at Whole Foods

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:53 min | 12 hrs ago

Todd Starnes Gets in Trouble at Whole Foods

"I haven't been I'm trying to eat a little healthier and I wasn't really happy with the produce at the regular supermarket. Fair enough. So I thought, you know what, I gotta go to the whole foods. I mean, that's what they're known for. You know, the high dollar lettuce and vegetables and all that kind of whatnot. It's a very nice store though. It's a great store, so I'm driving, I'm driving there in the Cadillac, and I realize, oh wow, there is a parking spot up front. Oh. And I thought that. I was very excited. I mean, it's a busy supermarket. A lot of, you know, a lot of people are shopping. And so I realized I thought, well, maybe it's handicapped parking. A lot of these stories have like 75 parking spots for the handicap. I've noticed that. And nobody's nobody's ever parked there, so the rest of us have to walk a couple of a quarter of a mile to the store. Dare they make us walk. So anyway, there wasn't a handicapped sign. So I thought, oh, great. Well, I pull right in and to go about my business. And anyone when I get out, some guy is just kind of giving me the evil eye. And he said, your parking, your parking in a place reserved for electric cars. Sir. Was there a charging port? Because I realize, you know, I'm turning around and looking, and I realized, holy crap, everybody's shopping here has a Biden bumper sticker, and I like the only person without one. Oh. Did you still left out? No, no, I just felt like the I felt like it wasn't the odd man out. I was the right man out. Sir, that no, you need to park somewhere else. Did he talk with me? Yeah, I don't know, maybe he had the flu. I don't know, he was and he was. He did have a mask on. There you go. So that could have been it.

SIR Biden FLU
Best Buy cuts jobs after it cuts sales and profit outlook

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 d ago

Best Buy cuts jobs after it cuts sales and profit outlook

"Best Buy the nation's largest consumer electronics chain is trimming jobs in an effort to adjust to new changes in consumer behavior Best Buy declined to say how many jobs it was cutting but The Wall Street Journal which was first to report the news estimated it involved hundreds of jobs at the store level The cuts come after Best Buy reduced its annual sales and profit forecast late last month citing surging inflation that is dampened consumer spending on gadgets The Minneapolis based company echoed Walmart which a few days before said higher prices on basic needs are forcing shoppers to cut back on discretionary spending I'm Shelley Adler

Best Buy The Wall Street Journal Minneapolis Walmart Shelley Adler
The Documents Into the Raid at Mar-A-Lago Have Been Unsealed.

The Officer Tatum Show

00:55 sec | 4 d ago

The Documents Into the Raid at Mar-A-Lago Have Been Unsealed.

"When I'm reading the things that in the documentation. We could go down to the items, the property to be seized. It says all physical documents and records, constituting evidence, contraband, a fruit of a crime or other items illegally possessed in violation of this particular code, including the following, any physical documents with classification, markings, along with any other container boxes, including any of any other contents in which such documents are located, as well as any other container boxes that are collectively stored or found together with the aforementioned documents in the box. Information including communication and any form regarding the retrieval storage, a transmission of any national defense information or classified material.

The FBI Previously Plotted Which Areas to Map for Search

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 4 d ago

The FBI Previously Plotted Which Areas to Map for Search

"Warrant itself And I'm turning the page it's just bare with me Search warrant is a form it was signed by Bruce Reinhart Turn the page attachment a the premises to be searched They get the location of the Mar-a-Lago Location just to be searched include the 45 office meaning president's office all storage rooms All other rooms are areas within the premises used are available to be used by the former president his staff and in which boxes are documents could be stored including all structures or buildings on the estate It does not include areas currently being occupied rented or used by third parties And not otherwise used to available to be used by the former president as they have such as private guest suites So in June they had the benefit of scouring the place Almost like a recon effort So they had a good view They could map out put the building looks like They knew where the boxes were They told to put another lock on the basement storage area And what they did on in August is simply unjustifiable In every respect

Bruce Reinhart Lago Location
FBI Searched for Nuclear Documents at Mar-a-Lago

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | 4 d ago

FBI Searched for Nuclear Documents at Mar-a-Lago

"Merrick Garland? Confirmed that he personally approved the decision. To raid Trump's home, president Trump overnight said release all the documents, so people can see what they were looking for, the mainstream media is reporting they were looking for nuclear documents? Impacting obviously national security? This stuff is right out of a Tom Clancy novel. You can not make this up. And now, of course, Trump is officially denying there were any nuclear documents being stored at Mar-a-Lago. Well, they're either are or there aren't. This to me is pretty simple. If there aren't, Merrick Garland and Christopher wray and the rest of them need to resign in disgrace. If there are, that's bad for president Trump. There's no way around that.

Merrick Garland President Trump Donald Trump Tom Clancy Christopher Wray
A Look at the Suspects in the Christa Helm Murder

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:59 min | 4 d ago

A Look at the Suspects in the Christa Helm Murder

"Let's look at the suspects for the police. Sandy Smith, Chris agent, and the person whose house she was murdered in front of. Definitely in the Hollywood party scene, potentially had mob ties and definitely was a shady character. The next suspects a guy named Rudy mosel. A drug dealer who was roommates with Blair aronson, the keyboardist who worked on Christa's disco album. And so I was to say that crystal was storing large amounts of Coke from azela and during that time she stole some drugs from him and he found out and got a bit violent toward her. Another crazy thing Rudy sprag that he was the one who committed the murder. Now we all know that there are false confessions that happen. They happen pretty regularly in murder cases, but this is one that I would take a little seriously. He wasn't looked at deeply at the time of Christ as murder, but when the case was opened back up in the mid 2000s, cold cased investigators found that Rudy had been dead for years so there's nothing they could do with that. I think he's the general favorite of whoever killed Chris to helm. But with investigators unable to interview him, there was no direct evidence linking him to the death. So the case is still unsolved to this day. What I would do is I'd like to know what sandy Smith saw. And why did he lie to the police? What's also interesting about this case is investigative found tapes among her possessions and audio recordings of her sexual encounters. I love to hear those tapes. Another fascinating possible suspect is Tony sirico. Pauly walnuts himself. The roommate Stephanie said that he showed up at their apartment right after the party to check on Chris as well fair, but that ended up not happening. And what ended up happening was he went to their apartment to steal fur coats and personal items of Kristin's. So Stephanie have always believed that it was Tony who initially stole Christa's tape recordings from her room after the murder. Why he did that? I don't know.

Sandy Smith Rudy Mosel Blair Aronson Rudy Sprag Chris Christa Coke Hollywood Rudy Tony Sirico Pauly Stephanie Kristin Tony
Child Star Jennette McCurdy Spills the Beans on Creepy Dan Schneider

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:23 min | 6 d ago

Child Star Jennette McCurdy Spills the Beans on Creepy Dan Schneider

"We haven't talked about genetic mccurdy yet, have we? Oh, wow, this is quite a story. Jennette McCurdy has written a book about all the shit she went through as a child star and the excerpts are pretty wild, but I do recall me giving you some of this crazy story on this podcast some years ago, so I was on this before she wrote the book, so Jennette McCurdy, who used to be on the children's show I Carly. She wrote this memoir, wonderfully titled, I'm glad my mom died. And horrible. And in this book, she details her life as a child star her relationship with her mom and her experiences with Nickelodeon. That's a network that many actors and actresses can't rub the stink off them. In the book, she really goes crazy. The book hit stores yesterday. So in this book, mccurdy details the humiliations and the mistreatment she endured while growing up in the public eye. She writes about being photographed in a bikini at a wardrobe fitting and then being encouraged to drink alcohol by a person she simply refers to as the creator. Now, even though she doesn't reveal the creator's identity, she is without doubt referring to one of my favorite subjects on fame as a bitch during my pedophile hunting days, will be smoked him out of every corner in Hollywood, and we name names, that would be the iCarly creator Dan getting the van Schneider. Who left the network back in 2018 amid rumors that he was verbally abusive and difficult to work with now some who work with him also said they felt uncomfortable when he frequently asked an employee from the costume department for shoulder and neck massages or he used to text child actors outside of work hours. That's fucking creepy than anything. Mccurdy also said it's important to talk about. It was so commonplace. His behavior and it was all accepted because everybody was scared of losing their job. I don't blame any of them. I get it. But it was really unfortunate. Everything that happened in the children's television series environment it really seems like there's not much of a moral compass there. I'm so glad finally, after all these years and she used to get a lot of shit for not wanting to work on that show anymore. After all these years, somebody speaks out against this horrible person.

Jennette Mccurdy Mccurdy Van Schneider Carly Nickelodeon Hollywood DAN
Demand for grocery delivery cools as food costs rise

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Demand for grocery delivery cools as food costs rise

"Demand for grocery delivery cools as food costs rise Just like everything else the cost to have groceries delivered has gone up Consulting firm chase design says it's hard to get the delivery premium below $10 due to fuel and labor costs as the pandemic eased some shoppers turned to less expensive grocery pickup while others returned to the store Experts say grocery delivery saw 5 years of growth in the first three months of the pandemic In fact in June of 2020 grocery delivery was a $3.4 billion business but by June of this year that was down 26% I'm Shelley Adler

Chase Design Shelley Adler
Mall of America Locked Down After Shooting

The Officer Tatum Show

01:10 min | Last week

Mall of America Locked Down After Shooting

"Breaking news developing right now in the mall of America is on lockdown due to a shooting. Now, I know some people would like to imagine that this is another active shooter situation with rifles so they can ban guns, but it seems like it's an isolated situation to be confirmed as an isolated situation according to the mall. There's a short video that they posted on Twitter that shows a man walking into the Nike store while shouting and a sound of three apparent gunshots can be heard. Danny, I don't know how this is probably not the person here. Danny raining 22 Minneapolis student was at the mall with friends when announcer came out. Okay, so I don't think that that was him. This probably was a witness. This person said that about 75 people were at the small room, they did not hear any gunshots fired, but saw people running away, the mall marked the 30th anniversary of his opening on August the 11th. And was placed on lockdown New Year's Eve last year when two people were shot during a fight. One man suffered a gunshot wound to the leg and another was grazed. So right now it's developing, but it appears to be a isolated situation.

Nike Store Danny America Minneapolis Twitter
Danielle D'Souza Gill and Dinesh Discuss the Cancelled 'Batgirl' Movie

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:19 min | Last week

Danielle D'Souza Gill and Dinesh Discuss the Cancelled 'Batgirl' Movie

"I'm back with my daughter Danielle de Souza gill author of the book the choice and also a merchandise store and we were talking about abortion we want to now talk about Hollywood and I was kind of chuckling because I'm reading in the rap, which is a website that covers entertainment. It says batgirl won't fly. Warner Brothers discovery has no plans to release a nearly finished $90 million film. So evidently, they thought we have Batman. We gotta do bat girl. And so they commissioned this filmmaking duo, a guy, one guy named RB, and another guy named fala to make this bat girl. And these guys seem to be like your classic woke producers. And so they make this bad girl evidently they look at it and they just go, this is super boring. Not only can we not put this in the theater, but they're saying we can't even put it on HBO Max. So they were initially thinking if we don't do a theatrical we can at least do home box office, they've decided to just basically throw the movie into the trash. Now, some leftists are little up in arms because I think they see this as like it's sending a negative message to marginalized groups that batgirl is being taken off the shelf. What's your reading on this as a kind of both in and of itself, but as a metaphor for wool Hollywood? I don't know what marginalized groups would be offended other than bats because I mean, I don't know who else this would possibly offend. But I would just say that I think the movie I haven't seen it because they're not releasing it, but it's probably much worse than we've been thinking. It's probably not just boring because then yeah, why wouldn't you sell it and put it on a streaming platform if it's just a boring movie? Maybe you can make something, but it probably they're worried about lawsuits or that it's going to offend people or even cause a bigger uproar than they would have thought maybe cost them more money because they've had other films come out that they've been sued over and I have issues like that and so they're probably saying this is just a loss for us because it's just not even worth it even if the movie doesn't have much popularity. It's just not worth it because of some kind of maybe pushback there worried about. I don't know what else is that they could possibly leave it to throw away the $90 million film.

Danielle De Souza Gill Fala Batgirl Hollywood Warner Brothers Batman HBO
Dr. Ashley Lucas Describes the Success of the PHD Weight Loss System

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:04 min | Last week

Dr. Ashley Lucas Describes the Success of the PHD Weight Loss System

"The system just seems to be so obvious. Instead of locking yourself into a system that you can't maintain properly after you've lost the weight in which of course results in the spring back of all those pounds, as you explained it to me as Rachel is your team explained it to me. It's very simple. It's about chemistry. If you have weight you want to burn. You need to burn it. And if you're eating stuff that your body will burn instead of burning the fat, you never gonna burn the fat. So this is why cutting sugars minimizing carbs in the beginning is how you, in my words, you reset the body chemistry. It worked for me, tell me what I'm getting wrong. What I'm oversimplifying, but explain how the PhD system gets these incredible results. It really is doctor gorka that some have to teach the body how to burn fat for fuel. And nearly every cell in the body prefers to work this way metabolically, but we don't let it by the way that we've been told to eat. And so what we need to do is find that unique place that unique carbohydrate tolerance level where we can get the body into burning fat. For the majority of us, I want you to think that this excess fat weight is locked away in a freezer store that you can't access. So you're hungry all the time. You've got cravings. It doesn't feel good. There's inflammation as a result. And that can come out like knee pain, joint pain, poor sleep, that poor mood, but when we can unlock these freezer stores when we can teach the body how to burn fat for fuel, then this is when you can see this much more effortless pain weight loss. And by finding your unique carbohydrate tolerance level, it doesn't mean that you've got to be keto or very low carb or follow the Atkins diet, but it's going to be unique to you. And that's what we do is we create this customized meal plan to get each person in their unique state of fat burn.

Gorka Rachel
George Soros Defends Spending Millions to Elect “Reform” Prosecutors

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:54 sec | Last week

George Soros Defends Spending Millions to Elect “Reform” Prosecutors

"Let's go through this. We need to invest more in preventing crime. But the end of the sentence two sentences later, this is reduces the likelihood that those prisoners will commit new crimes. What is it? Wait a minute. We're not talking about prisoners committing new crimes. We're talking about people committing crimes and not being jailed. The subject is different. And anyway, let's go through the what he thinks is more important than police. Deploying mental health professionals in crisis situations. What does that mean? People go into stores and steal the store's def dumb and blind. Every individual $950 and it's not a felony. What will a mental health professional do?

80-Year-Old Norco Store Owner Shoots off Armed Robber

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

80-Year-Old Norco Store Owner Shoots off Armed Robber

"There is a story up on dot com from Norco, California. This is your feel good story of the day. So a bad guy armed with an AR-15 tried to rob an 80 year old man in the store that he owned the Norco market. What the bad guy didn't realize at the time is that the owner was watching a security camp video and he saw the car pull up, there were four people in this car and he saw one of the bad guys getting out and putting on a ski mask and the owner of the store knew what was about to happen, so when the band guy came in and said, put your hands in the air, the owner of the store took out his shotgun and literally blew the bad guys arm off and the whole thing was captured on surveillance video. You gotta listen to this. I wanna hear it again. I love that. Now, now, so by the way, the riverside county sheriff's department, they say that the clerk or the owner of the store did the right thing, he was a legally. He was a legal gun owner. He was allowed by law to own that gun and he defended himself. He did nothing wrong. I will say this, that the owner suffered a heart attack after all of this, but he's okay, he's going to make a full recovery. The bad guys and critical condition at the local hospital and they've arrested others. What I

Norco Riverside County Sheriff's Dep ROB California Heart Attack
First ship carrying Ukrainian grain since Russia invaded leaves Odesa

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

First ship carrying Ukrainian grain since Russia invaded leaves Odesa

"The first ship carrying Ukrainian grain has set off from the port of Odessa The departure of the Sierra Leone flagged cargo ship the rizzoni laden with corn is expected to finally allow large stores of Ukrainian crops to reach foreign markets and ease a growing hunger crisis Russia and Ukraine have signed separate agreements with turkey and the UN clearing the way for Ukraine one of the world's key bread baskets to

Odessa Sierra Leone Ukraine Turkey UN
Poll: Democrats Lead by 4% in Midterm Races

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Poll: Democrats Lead by 4% in Midterm Races

"Democrats are leading in the midterm race with a 4% edge over the GOP on the generic congressional ballot. This is a Suffolk university USA Today poll. 44% should if the election were held today, they would vote for a Democrat, only 40% said they'd vote for a Republican a 16% remain undecided. So maybe that's the key if you believe this poll. But I just want to ask you, simple question. Do you honestly believe that more Americans are upset about roe V wade? Being overturned? Then being able to pay the bills, you know, we fall into a trap with polls. And the trap is this. If a poll confirms what we hope for or what we think, we like the poll. If it doesn't, we don't like the poll. And I don't want to fall into that trap. I'm just going to ask you the smartest audience in America. Here in the relief factor dot com studios as we kick things off for a Friday, July 29th. Do you honestly think that this poll is correct that more Americans are concerned about abortion? Than they are, the economy, their bank account, their 401k, filling up the gas tank, going to the grocery store. Being able to buy a house pay rent?

Suffolk University Usa Roe V Wade GOP America
The Biden Administration Has a Lot of Problems...

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

The Biden Administration Has a Lot of Problems...

"Biden administration has a lot of problems. This is a lot of issues that just keep compounding. And it started basically from day one when they decided to make their attack on the energy independence of our country. They shut down the Keystone pipeline. They made the new green deal, the background feature and everything that they do so that they made it all and gas leases are harder to use and even if they have them. They're almost unmanageable. There's no working with our energy producers, so they feel under attack. So again, they're not going to make it major investments into things if they don't think that the government or if they feel the government is going to be taking those away or legislating them out of existence in some ways over the next ten to 15 years. This is a long-term game that the Democrats seem to be playing, but I'm not sure they understand what they're playing with because you also then turn around and they want to put a mandate on energy cars and electric cars and energy efficiency and these all are going to take power off of our electrical grid, which right now in very honest format is not capable of handling that kind of pull on our grid. So we've got a problem with this administration not understanding the basics. Then you go into the fact of inflation and the fact that they sort of lit the fuse on inflation last year with the American rescue plan, even when they were told by others that this is not a good idea to continue to dump this much money into the economy at a time in which you had supply chain issues. You had supply. Not being able to be delivered to stores, you had things being waited on, and you had a higher demand because people had access income. So instead of trying to put off the car purchase or they put off the remodeling purchase, they were out there trying to buy these things when, again, supply was low. What's going to happen? The man's high supply is low, prices go up.

Biden Administration
Why George Soros Is the Puppeteer of Crime

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Why George Soros Is the Puppeteer of Crime

"As crime rates soar around the country, I'm happy to report that there is a powerful counter movement developing against the George Soros backed district attorneys who have enabled this crime wave to grow and gather momentum and cause havoc. Make life really miserable if not unlivable for many people in democratic cities. Now, Soros here is the puppeteer. I mean, this guy is, I don't know if I'd call him evil and carnet. But he's pretty close to it. I mean, there are very few people who could be called a spawn of Satan, but this guy comes fairly close. He's a malevolent figure. And as Debbie has mentioned on this podcast, he's a malevolent figure worldwide. He's causing harm, many places. I mean, think about a guy who puts tens of millions of dollars into district attorney races. Why? Basically, so you can get district attorneys who are on the side of the criminals. You have district attorneys who say things like let's abolish bail. Put the criminals right back on the street, defund the police. Decriminalize a whole bunch of offenses, so if you go into a store and loot the place, well, that's just going to be classified as a property crime, and therefore, quote, not serious, and therefore we're not going to really take much action. We're not even going to investigate, and if we do investigate, we're not going to, we're not going to go for serious penalties at all.

George Soros Soros Debbie
Some Things You Probably Didn't Know About Harry Truman

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Some Things You Probably Didn't Know About Harry Truman

"In this speech, I want to talk about it was given on January 15th, 1953, a lot to see, but it also goes into a lot of what basically service is, is from the people like Harry Truman, who believed that their service in life was from a calling of their upbringing. He was the 33rd president who was born in 1884 and lived most of his life as I said outside independence, Missouri. Most people don't realize that he actually early in his life as he was trying to win best, his eventual wife, that he wanted to make something himself. He actually was a farmer, worked on a farm, got jobs, but he opened a haberdashery in Kansas City. So he did men's clothing. The store went okay. It didn't completely pan out. But it was a story of someone who tried in life and succeeded to appoint in business. But that was Harry Truman. This was somebody who was always trying to do more. He also served in World War I, which made a great impact on his thinking, especially as it came later. He also met the pendergrass family during his time in the army which later led him to his public life as a judge and then also which a judge in that time was more of like a county administrator. And ruler, but also he led him then to what became the United States Senate and how he got to Washington D.C.. So a lot just going on there. An interesting couple of side notes not only he had trouble getting into the army. In fact, he couldn't see. He had a very bad eyesight. Outside of his glasses. And the way he got in there is, again, a lot of great individuals in the world adapt and overcome and Harry Truman adapted and overcome. He actually memorized the eye chart. That's how he actually got past his eye exam. So a lot of stuff that went into Harry Truman's life that a lot of people may not know, he was also very accomplished piano player, played piano in The White House, played piano. A lot of places. It was a very much of an icebreaker, a lot of times for Truman. He was also one last thing before we get into this speech itself. He is the last president that we have had that did not have a college degree. And he

Harry Truman Washington D.C. Pendergrass Missouri Kansas City Army Senate United States White House Truman
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

05:09 min | 11 months ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"So once somebody goes into your funnel, then what they see what they hear, all the connection points, all of that can be automated, and then you can just add in your own personal touch in certain places like at the point of purchase, et cetera. So that's kind of what we're looking at automatic. How can we remove humans from as much of this as possible? Ultimately, people can't write copy. I was going to say it, but they're also AI copyright and software right now. I don't know how good it is. But that's the next level. Even with our ad creation, right? We the way that we create ads is so templated out that we can create hundreds of ads in the afternoon. And then once you've created all those ads, we have AI software. There are AI software out there, you know, magic is good riding. There's a couple of others as well. That you can plug in all of your iterations into your ads. And as long as you plan properly, as soon as an ad stops working, you can automatically load up another one. So now, as a business owner, I've removed a lot of that heavy lifting. And I can focus on the offer. I can focus on the strategy of the business. I can focus on coming up with a creative angle creative idea. There may not have tried before. And so in terms of automation, we really try to automate all the processes that take us time that you don't really need a human to do. And then, you know, a lot of that is ad creation admirers, when you add optimization, email sequences, all those can be complete automated. Once acquisition system is working, whether you're using ads or even if you're using organic, once somebody gets into your ecosystem, if that whole messaging is, if that message is all automated and it's kind of behavioral, I could get really deep on this. But it's kind of it triggers based on their behavior, which we can do with software. If someone goes to a certain part of your site, they'll see a certain email. Someone responds to a certain email. They'll see another offer will they go back to your website. All that stuff can be automated. And so now we take our you know about our customers, we know about our business. We put it into the automated systems and I watch it watch it work and we just look at the data we optimize it.

"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

03:35 min | 11 months ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"So if you were to start today and you're not going to run and you're not the marketing agency, you're just yourself with your knowledge. How would you take a clothing brand or a pale brand or anything like that to how would you scale to 7 figures if it's chin's company and you started a T-shirt line or you started on clothing line, how would you take it to 7 figures? Sure. So I'd actually take it even one step back. So that in two ways. So if I was going to start a DTC brand from scratch, I would find the hungry audience first. Because from what we've seen audience can make or break a brand. So I would actually find an audience and see if there's a nexus between a hungry audience that has a need and something that I enjoy doing. If I can make those two things haven't fantastic and I know that I will have fun running this brand long-term. Life gets so much easier when the audience is starting. Look for starving audience. It's so much easy to do. We've had clients we've worked with. And it's like, it's hard because the audience doesn't have that desire. There's a great advertising book by a guy called yuji Schwartz. And it's called breakthrough advertising. But there's a quote that is great. And the quote is you can not I'm going to paraphrase. You basically can not manufacture desire. It's a marketer's job to harness existing desire and put it to your products. So we always want to look, I want to look for the desire first. With that being said, let's identify that desire. Let's say it's a T-shirt rhino, the power run. I would start first because the first thing we want to validate the products. I want to make sure that we've got a market for the price. So I actually start with either affiliates or influences. Because you don't really want to stop pumping money into it to acquire customers unless you are really upset..

yuji Schwartz
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"To some of those Facebook, Instagram ads, and getting them to be profitable, what are some elements that you're testing or maybe there's maybe you guys have some sort of order of importance, right? Of things that you test first to see if it's actually going to work. Sure. Yeah. So this question would have been also differently before iOS 14s because I assumed he has kind of changed and I don't know if we're going to go into that depending on how crude up your listeners might be on there. Absolutely, we've talked about it. So yeah, you can speak directly to it if you'd like. Okay, so yeah, so I was 14 has kind of changed things in terms of how we approach testing. The interesting thing about iOS 14, it hasn't affected every brand of every account the same. It had different impacts on different types of businesses. We've been seeing across the price of we look after the niche brands have been affected a lot more than the mass market brands. And so that kind of leads us to our testing testing hypothesis. We typically like to test created first because grave is going to have the biggest impact. For the longest time, Facebook's algorithm was pretty good at being able to work with very, very large audiences. You load up the creative. And it did its own thing by being able to find where the best customers were. That's not we have to now test that idea before we can just run with it. Before we can get good creative, and we knew the algorithm would do its thing. Now we have to make sure it's doing the same because iOS 14 is kind of made some accounts have weird random results. So we got to do a little bit more testing to make sure that we're validating our ideas before we move forward. So creative is always the very first thing that we test. You know, we want to figure out which audience is going to have the best potential for scale and the best potential for profits. And so that typically comes out from crave. So you can use targets into an extent. We found creative has the biggest lever. A risk that one of the quickest ways you can do it is with UGC creative because UGC's typically the brands and a good job of gathering customer testimonials and UGC. That's a quick way of getting instant feedback on whether that angle works because if you go through customer testimonials and you go through the UGC, they typically hit a lot of the objections that customers might have. And they typically fit themselves nicely into the avatars. So we'll get like three or four different types of UGC and then we'll test those because they usually fit into different avatars..

Instagram Facebook UGC
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

03:09 min | 11 months ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"From wherever you're at right now to 7 figures. This is an amazing episode. I learned a ton out of this one. I know you guys are as well. Like I mentioned earlier, go grab your notebook, your iPad, whatever it is, put in your headphones, whatever you're doing right now, stop, go grab those and really take notes. You're going to get a lot of nuggets out of this episode, guys, so enjoy it. And if you know a another clothing boutique or brand, make sure you share this episode if you found value in it for them. They're going to enjoy it as well. So sit back, relax, and enjoy this one, guys. Awesome chin. Welcome to the podcast. I hope you're doing well over there. What time is it, by the way? I'm just curious. I'm doing great man. Thanks for having me. Just gone ten past 8 p.m. on UK time. Okay. So we're going to be packed full of really good information and also let you get back to it because we're a little bit different time zone right now, so I want to make sure we're courteous of your time as well. All right, and we're going to do an intro for you because I think there's a lot to add, but I really want to get into some parts that you can speak to because we can always introduce you and talk more in depth. But I want to hear from you. You work a lot with ecommerce brains. And so I know everybody listening is going to get a ton of value. But what would you say is the biggest problem that most brands most direct to consumer brands that come to you, what are they trying to what problem do they have and how are you helping them solve it? Sure. Without question, it's profitable, customer acquisition at scale. That is easily the number one issue that virtually every direct to consumer ecommerce owner, I talk about. I meet and there's also this three parts of that equation. So it's either they can't acquire any new customers at all. They can acquire new customers, but they can't do profitably. They can acquire customers profitably and they can't do it at scale. It's always one of those three things. And that really just has a knock on effect on everything else. So if they're not profitable or if they can't hide the right team members, almost every time we unpack that situation, it goes back to not being able to profitably acquire new customers at scale. And so that's almost always when we have to be kind of dig deep and trying to find what's going on in the business. It is in that area. And for most of the price that we speak to who are in that half a million to one, 2 million range. That's their number one issue. And once you kind of fix that, a lot of the other things start to fall in place. What would you say is the first thing that you're gonna fix, right? I guess it's not, it's not a one size fits all for everybody, but what's your first thing that you are going to try to fix when they're doing when they're not finding it profitably? Where do you go to to see where there's opportunities before? Sometimes you can't even take people on because there's not opportunity there, but where do you see the opportunity to help them become profitable? Yeah, so the very first thing we always look at is the underlying fundamentals of the business from a unit economic standpoint..

nuggets UK
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"That just added so much more value to the episode too that we didn't mention. So yeah, definitely go follow them on TikTok too. I haven't saved up here to go see some of these videos that are doing crazy good. But yeah, what is the best way for somebody to support the boutique? How can they shop with you guys? What's the best way? So our website is Jackson grace boutique dot com, but then of course we have our app, which most people prefer. It's super easy. You can just go to your Apple or Android store or Google Play Store. I think it's called and you just search jacks. And then the plus sign, grace boutique and it's jexi. I know I have kind of a crazy name. Nobody half the time couldn't figure it out and understand it, but it's named after my kids and then my face. So it works out, but yeah, just searches Jack's plus 9 grace boutique, and then you'll be able to find us..

Android store grace boutique Jackson Apple Google Jack
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"On Instagram story, kind of asking like, yay or nay, then we'll put the little votes up. And if there's enough nose, we don't touch it. If there's a ton of yeses, like extremely a time, then I'll know to get more than one pack of that item. But if it's kind of hit or miss, and there's like at least ten, 12 people that maybe want or don't on the other side or whatever, I'll still get it, but maybe only one pack. So I try to listen to the customers and sometimes you just see something as a, I guess experience knowing buying for 5 years now, you kind of know what stuff might not sell so well, but you're like this thing is I can tell this pattern these people are going to love this. I'm going to get two, three, four, how are my packs this one? So. That's a good point. I want to clarify maybe a little bit more detail to what you just said there. Two, three, four, more packs. So yeah, if you do find something that you like no matter who it is for how many of how deep are you buying? So how many for each size are you buying how deep are those? So it depends on the season. It depends on what the item is. If it's a shirt that I'm like, hey, I know this is gonna sell really, really well. I'll maybe do I'm trying to think of how you would type the Paxton or tell them at Mark because they usually come in two two two packs. So a two pack is one. I might do anywhere from four to 8 packs if it's something I know is gonna do super duper well and it's the beginning of the season. So I'll have the whole season to sell it. Now if I find something awesome for summer, but I don't find it till the end of July, beginning of August, I may do two or three packs, knowing they'll sell well, but they won't sell past August because people September they're one sweaters, even though it's a 100° in Orchard. But that's good. Yeah, I was going to say we're in Texas and it's crazy how hot it is for how long. But it's like so hot. It's crazy hot. Okay, I think that gives it I think I give some really good insight because I would say that more I think it's something that nobody really talks about. I mean, I don't know if you're part of the boutique hub or not. But they may talk about it inside of there. But I know that it's a common question, which is, hey, I'm just starting out or have been doing it for a while, but I still haven't figured out my inventory. So this gives good insight into that. Yeah, when I started, I definitely did one pack of stuff because I was too scared. I didn't know what would do well or not and I was scared to hold on to it. So at the beginning, I definitely told my customers like, hey, if you like it by it now, you might not get it again because I'm only getting one pack or something like that. Yeah, and I think it's a little scary too, because it's a financial commitment. You're just kind of sitting on it at that point. Yes. So speaking of along that lines of getting rid of things, especially for inventory and for seasons. And we're about to transition if you have an already transition. I'm sure most people are transitioning to fall whenever depending on what this episode comes out. But how do you manage getting rid of or making a transition happen, getting rid of the old stock and bring in a new stock? Do you have a strategy for that? Yeah, so we have a very, very successful event that we do twice a year at the end of each season. So coming up, I think, at very end of August, very beginning of September, is usually when we do this one. We do a fill the bag sale. And I have seen a lot of boutiques try the fill the bags though, but they do the bags so cheap that they're losing so much money. We try to still do our bags because we are boutique we're not Walmart. We don't want people to get that Walmart vibe when they're shopping. But we do fill the back cell at the end of each season and we do depending on the season we'll do two or three big bags, Brown bags. We have a very large bag that we usually do anywhere from one 80 to two 60 to 80 it just depends on the season because you know in the summer you can fit more in a bag than you came in the winner. And then the lowest bag I think we offer is either 80 or a hundred or a 120, something like that. It differs. We tested each bag. But I basically price those to make sure that I am either breaking even with wholesale, you know, obviously, you might have one customer who gets really clever and stuffed way more sneaks in a boot, which is we allow that. But you might lose a little bit on some bags, but you might gain a little bit on some bags and it really is an event our customers look forward to. Aside from Black Friday, there are two busiest days of the year. We do the best sales on those days. And it's really awesome because leading up to them, I try to do a couple of weeks of sale normal sale on those items just to kind of tease people a little bit like if they can buy it for X amount versus the fill the back rather than before they fill the back sale, but we still we cram our racks full. We do have some that are marked off, but we balloon the racks that are included. And we have a line that wraps around our building. People wait an hour to two to check out. Sometimes there's so many people it is insane. And it really really has blown up and been super successful and the customers love it. They have fun. We have customers that come from two, three hours away just to come for the fill the bag sale with that will bring their whole family and they'd be like, yeah, this is our annual. We do this every year. Together as a family. So it's been really awesome because it's fun for the community. We're exhausted by the end of that day and week. But it's so worth it and it really helps clear inventory out that maybe has sat towards the end of the summer or maybe it shipped to me too late and I didn't get it till the end of summer and it won't make it into fall. We don't want to hold on to it until the next season. If it's something super nice, sometimes it will hold on to it if it was really expensive. But yeah, that's what we do. And it's been really successful. That's awesome. I do want to touch a little bit on what you said earlier with listening to customers. And making sure that you're just in tune with what the customers want. And even this event that you're talking about that you do twice a year, it's again going back to that. It does, this is one O one to fundamentals, right? Listen to your customers, know your audience. And even the other events, it's something that you've seen us super successful and you sort of double down on the and I think it's working amazingly for you. So kudos on that, that's great really, really good. Hey so owners are you ready to grow and scale your online business predictably and profitably? We've created a free 15 minute training that will walk you through the 5 key areas every online store needs to achieve financial success. You can grab the free training by going to optimize store owner dot com slice E comm training or clicking the link below in the DuPont's description. Again, that is optimized, store owner dot com slash E comm training. I just want to go a little bit deeper into that because I know that brick and mortar. So in most of the people that we do work with, do we talk to, do you have an element of the brick and mortar? But maybe how exactly do you only do it for the brick and mortar or is there an idea or strategy maybe you can think of for those who are doing an online R two? Because that's an amazing idea. But maybe you can talk to specifically.

Walmart Mark Texas Brown DuPont
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"That's truly incredible. I think that the first question that I pop into my head when you mentioned the pandemic and how the community helped you through that process was the pandemic that forced you to do the website or did you have the website and Shopify all along from the beginning? When did that come into play? Yeah, so we had the website at the beginning, but like I said, I never paid for marketing. I had just had a baby when we moved into the second location, plus my other kid, plus one thing you might not know, Marine Corps recruiting, they work 90 to a hundred hours a week. So I did not really have any help. I did not have the time or the resources to grow. So I knew that I could probably do better if I would pay for marketing. I just couldn't do it yet. I wasn't ready. I didn't have the team available just lots of factors of why I couldn't, I was too scared to pay for the marketing because I knew it would probably help a lot and I wasn't there yet even though obviously the money would have been awesome. And this year is the first year we finally started paying for marketing for the online store and the online start of it. And we started in March or April, I think and it definitely, we started growing a little bit more online for sure with that. So that's helped, but still, I mean, even the in store stuff, I've blown away with the growth and the support. So whenever you're speaking of, you mentioned 80% was in store and then 20% online, which is awesome. Great position to be in because most people that I talk to that is the position, whether your personages are a little bit different numbers. But it's still like the 80 20 and usually within a year or so, it can flip where it's 80% online, 20% in store. But yeah, it's definitely possible. But I'm curious what has been your organic strategy. If you didn't ever do anything for marketing, how did people was it just word of mouth? How exactly did you post it on social media? How exactly did you continue to grow organically without ever having to pay with anything or pay for anything? So I would say we made sure to post consistently to Instagram, Facebook. We scheduled our post, one of the biggest factors that I hear a lot from our customers and the community and people that have stayed with us from the beginning is that we are relatable. So there's some boutique owners out there that I just look at and I'm like, oh my gosh, they're perfect. They have the perfect everything. They're gorgeous. They're nice, they're cute. They can try on every piece of clothing and make it look great. But our staff, I just try to be more relatable and down to earth, not that it's a bad thing to be ordered. So we've definitely had some gorgeous models here and stuff to help us out. But we have some curvier models that we make sure to show all the time that look like real people. So that's what we get feedback on a lot is that they feel like when they come into the store, they are judged. They can come in in their pajamas and we're going to treat them the same as if they were coming in in a Rolls Royce with Louis Vuitton Oliver. We don't treat anybody any different here, whether we know that customers only going to spend $5 or where we know that for customers are going to be our $500 spender. We want everybody to be the same and we try to show that on social media so that people feel comfortable and want to come and be with us and shop with us. Just because I think, you know, it's great to have the perfect looking model for your clothing sometimes, but sometimes the average person might get turned off to it, so we try to do a little bit of both to make sure that everybody feels comfortable and it's all inclusive place here for everybody no matter who you are. Absolutely. And I was going to say I think I could see that from one the quality of the photography is obviously you probably have and maybe you have a pulse on that a little bit more. Now and knowing the edit photography background. One of the questions I would really want to ask is, and we get this a lot from boutique owners who are really just trying to grow and scale is how do you project sales, but more so importantly, I think it's the inventory side. So in the early days, maybe we could talk about, okay, well, I had to sell 8 shirts, so it's pretty easy to keep track of inventory. But how is it now that you're boutique is doing what it is now? How are you trying to buy either at market or other places? How are you managing that inventory so that if something is going to sell well, you get enough of it or something isn't going to sell well, you don't buy it more of it. Right. So at the beginning, it was definitely full blown wing in it just based off of what I would see online with anything that was popular. I know when I first started, I think a company called LuLaRoe or something was popular because I was the name of it was really popular with a pattern ligands, women's women were going crazy for them. So I made sure to keep those in stock just based off that. Plus, I would ask some of my other younger girls that are in college. What are you guys wearing the game days? You know, help me pick this stuff out. And we would kind of browse together. And now it's got to the point where I think one of my biggest things that I noticed sometimes when I go to other boutiques, a lot of the style is everything is the same. There's all the neutral tones or maybe they're all a bright storm. Maybe they're all a western store. And I think this might go against the rules of the boutique world that you want to kind of find your brand and everybody wants to know what it looks like when they come in. I might go against that rule, but I think it's worked for us because I don't stick to one look or one brand. So when I'm looking for inventory, I'm going to make sure, okay, I need to buy for my teachers. My mother's who want to cover up and wear baggier stuff or still look classy when they go to school and teach or work at the bank or their mom and they've got a bend over a hundred times. They want to look cute, but be comfortable. But I also need to look for the college student, who wants to be a little bit more showy and trendy. But then I often need to look for my mom's age in her 60s and find a couple little things that she might not want to shop at belt. She wants to look trendy, but be modest and not look like she's trying to be 20 again. And so I try to keep that in mind when I'm shopping, it would be awesome to order everything that I liked, but I would say a huge percentage of the stuff might not be something I would even look at. But I think that's where a lot of people fail as I think a lot of people might get into the boutique owning world. Thinking, oh my gosh, I love clothes. I love style. I'm gonna buy everything that I like because then I can steal a piece and then I can wear it and, you know, I'll sell it to all my Friends, but they're missing that huge market of people who might not like that. And so a lot of these boutiques in our town, which I like I said, they're great for what they are, but you might go in. And if I'm a mom, I'm not gonna be able to find one piece of clothing for me. Or if there's an older woman store a college girl might come in and she's not gonna be able to find anything for her, we're here. If you don't browse, you might think, I don't know what this is for me because I have something for everybody. You just have to kind of walk in and look a little bit harder. So your college girl's gonna come in and she might see her first top that she looks at is like a more work appropriate teacher. Mom type of top and she's gonna be like, wow, but wait, oh, wait, there? That's my kind of shirt over there. I like that. It's more distressed, vintage, look or whatever. You know, we have had a couple of even older women that have come in and be like, oh, is this the college shore? I don't need another boutique. You know, we have enough those in this town where my stuff and I'm like, hold on, hold on. You just looked at the front table. There's everywhere. So I think that's really important when gauging for inventory is to look for everybody not just what you like, but what you know is popular based on trends based on what you've seen people wearing or asking for. I do ask my customers a lot. As well, we have a VIP group and I try to ask them, which I was opinions, you know, yes or no on this when we go to Mark, we try to ask, we'll do like a yay or nay and we'll do.

Louis Vuitton Oliver Marine Corps Instagram Facebook Mark
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"All right y'all, that's all I have right now, but enjoy this episode and let me know what you think. Rachel, thanks so much for joining us on the show. Thanks for having me. Absolutely. I wanted to give a little context, but maybe from your perspective of how we met, because I think it's important because we're going to talk about that a little bit, but maybe you can give a background how our conversation started how we met each other. Okay, I know it was, I think, on the comment sold Facebook VIP. I think and I don't remember what I posted to be honest. I remember maybe in a comment, asking you, I'm assuming you work for a comments hold or you just really know a heck of a lot about it. But I was something to do with maybe the app or improving our social media. I had noticed that you seemed like your comments. You had some skills and I wanted to reach out and kind of ask how we could improve from an outsider's perspective. We can criticize ourselves all day long, but it's great to seem like an outsider perspective it was something with experience to see what we need to change. And then our discussion just kind of went on from there about the details and now this. Yes. And I think the main thing that I wanted to summarize from that is that your boutique was after working with several boutiques and clothing brands, you're at a different level. And we're going to talk about that here in a second. I think you can help a lot of people which is why I actually come on the podcast because you achieved a certain level of success that I think a lot of people strive to get to and you did it without a key ingredient, which I think is super crucial. And I'm curious and I have Christian as two to hear some insight into that. So maybe you can give us a little bit of background about your boutique, what it looks like whenever it was starting out in the beginning. And then maybe how it started and then where you're at now. So beginning to now okay, so I honestly to be quite, I came in with zero experience with boutique stuff. I'm also not a super pressy girl. You know, I'm most of the time, making sure we have t-shirts available for Jackson gray so that I can wear comfortable big baggy clothes because I'm a mom and that's kind of what I was going for and we moved we actually got moved to the area where I now Georgia from North Carolina. My husband was in the Marine Corps and we were only supposed to be here for three years. And prior to that, I had done photography for ten years. And if anybody's listening from Georgia, it is hot as Haiti's down here. It is humid. You basically live in a sauna and you're swamped with gnats, nonstop. So photography was just I was over the nap. I was over the sweat during every wedding. I was shooting. I just God called me away from it, and I wanted to meet more people in the community beyond just taking their pictures. And I noticed when I was shopping in town, there's a lot of great boutiques. We have probably 20 plus boutiques in this town, it's insane, because we're our college town. And Georgia southern is here. So there's lots of young, beautiful girls who aren't moms yet, and they've maybe got the great figure to go out and show, you know, a crop tops or they're haven't had a baby yet, so they may be the helmet gained that little mom pooch that some of us have. And I just was not able to find any clothes that fit me the way I liked comfortably that were good quality, where I could go in and feel like the employees weren't judging me for being an older mom with a little bit of curves. And I was like, you know what? That would be awesome. I've always loved business. My dad is a huge businessman and it's just rubbed off on me, my whole life. And I was like, you know, even though I'm not huge on clothes, I love to make women feel beautiful and confident. And so that's kind of initially what started it. And I started in the back of a, I mean, literally the office I'm sitting in right now is probably the same size as my first store. It was very tiny. It was like a giant closet and a walk in closet size store. And I remember when I started it, I was like, all right, my rent is $200 just for this back room. That's nothing, but at least if I sell like, what is that? 8 shirts at $25. I'll least make my rent. That'll be I can handle it, and then we'll grow from there. It took off. We had moms coming in on stop we had college girls who maybe wanted to be a little bit more modest or curvy, college girls who weren't finding stuff in town either. And it just continued to grow from there. And within a few months, I had to move. I think it was only two or three doors down from our store that we started at to a bigger location. We stayed there, maybe not even a year, maybe a little bit over around a year. And we continue to grow and I was like, oh, man, this is an awkward time. My husband was getting medically retired at the time. We actually had got orders to 29 palms, California, and we're supposed to be moving. And I got really scared and was like, oh, I'm not going to be able to make it in California with the clothing differences, the cost, everything we were going to be like an hour away from your closest Walmart. So nothing was going to be biased. I knew it wouldn't work. It was kind of great about it and it was like, God, if you want me to keep the store, you got to show me a sign like do I sell it? Do I manage it from afar for a while? We're about to have to renew our lease, but I don't like this building. We've got to find something else. If we do stay, left the store right after I thought all that and praying and down the street was the store that I was like, man, I wish I could get that store one day. It's gorgeous with lots of Windows. They were putting up for rent signs on the front. And I was like, oh, that is actually that might be my turn, so I called and I was like, you know what? We don't even know what's going to happen with my husband. We knew he was getting medically retired, but we knew he would have to find a job. We didn't know if we'd have to be here or in another state we didn't know. But I just decided to take a leap of faith, rent it out. And after he got medically retired, he found a job here. We were able to stay. And we just continue to blossom where we're at, and this location. And the community here has supported us like crazy. And I think I may have told you this. I think about 75 to 80% of our sales are in store because one of the things you mentioned that I forgot to say, I guess is we had never paid for marketing at all. So we really relied on the community and they showed up, especially when the pandemic happened and we closed for a couple of months. They supported us even our local customers supported us by shopping online. We offered free delivery. So I mean, that's kind of the growth story, and I've just been surprised by the growth every time we grow. I kind of, when shocking when you told me that I was in the successful range, I was like, man, I really didn't even realize because I don't think my focus has stayed on the numbers because that's not what it's about to me. I know numbers are important. Sales are obviously huge and important. But I tried to keep my focus more on the customers. And making them happy, then maybe that's just one of the big steps that's taken off. So I don't know, hopefully that's that's a good story..

Georgia Rachel Marine Corps Facebook Haiti North Carolina Jackson California Walmart
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"6 of them to kind of mold your strategy to help take your brick and mortar business online. All right, thank you guys so much for listening to this. If you are a brick and mortar business, and you're like, how the heck do I get this to go online? Please go over to bit Brandon ICO. Shoot us an email. Do you want to start a new project? We'll at least give you some more information about it. And if you're super serious, you would like a 45 minute strategy session about how to take this online. It's completely free. Go to applied up, bit branding dot CEO. You'll pick a time that works for you and then fill out a questionnaire that just answers some few things to help us learn more about your business. And then we'll sit down with you and for virtually more than likely, do something like maybe zoom, and we will cover how.

"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"You're like, oh, I've got it to this point. You're like, yes, but eventually online should be able to if I do believe that it could surpass what you're doing in the retail location. It's just going to take time. You got to put in that effort to do it. Yeah, certainly. And I think I would say my number one tip for trying to create as much success overnight would be to mimic what the big store retailers are doing and even Amazon. Because people have been not brainwashed, but educated into free shipping into free returns into knowing your packing, tracking number. So all these little things that you kind of take for granted from the big stores and Amazon are little things that you should also incorporate within your store. Because it will make the user experience and your customer experience just that much better. Looking professional too. Yeah, exactly. They're going to look at you like, okay, you know exactly what you're doing. You actually have all these details packed down and I know where my package is. I know the communication is there. And I think that's key in order to do that. I feel like a lot of stores early on, maybe they don't have the money to spend on adding these things, but I think in the long run, especially starting out, it helps you stand out from everyone else in smaller stores who may not have the infrastructure or the knowledge of doing something like that. But I think mimicking the bigger stores and some of the things that they're doing, it's definitely going to help you bring in more success or more rapidly. Yeah, absolutely. You got to adapt to the people who have already been accustomed to the way they shop online. You try to make them do something different. It's like that friction. And they're like, oh, I don't like this. Just even the tracking number. That's something that we take for granted, but a lot of smaller shops online, they don't offer that, right? They don't offer for you to track your package.

Amazon
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"Got Paramount plus now at this point. I was just looking at that last night. What show are you currently watching right now or what are you guys bingeing through anything? We used to say Netflix, but I think that's now irrelevant, right? Because we all have everything. So what are you currently binging? I have a month subscription to Disney+ because WandaVision intrigued me, so I binge to that. And then I'm going to try to get through as much of falcon and Winter Soldier as I can before my month expires. So far, it's been pretty good. Oh, I see what they're doing. They're just going to IV drip the marvel content so that just as one series ends. I might glam onto another. So to answer your question, that's what I'm doing. But I myself, one of my favorite things to do is I don't know if it's like an active protest, but sometimes I will watch YouTube on my TV. As opposed to watch TV on my TV. And there's one YouTuber who I personally think is like one of the most compelling storytellers across any platform. He's called the empa lemon it's short for emperor lemon, EMP LE MO N and he does a number of it is a series called never ever. Where he talks about either like a show or a person or a moment in history that under no circumstances could ever be repeated. So I don't know if you guys are big Simpsons fans, but his most recent episode was about how there will never ever be another episode like Homer's enemy, which is like the pivotal episode of Simpsons with Homer clashing heads with Frank Grimes. I love that series. And I know that doesn't sound like a streaming service thing, but you know, that kind of content is in competition with Disney. And I just wanted to get that content shout out because some of those episodes I rewatched like three or four times because the storytelling is so compelling. Yeah, I think you're on to something there in general, right? Which is that the more that we find community or niches like with what we like. So you and Christian could definitely watch WandaVision and stuff like there's that community of people there, right? So they're good at Disney+. Then there's another group of people who are community. They just love maybe they're old TV shows, so they found them on Netflix and they're gonna watch just that. So everybody now has the choice. It's not just like cable where we had this is what was available to us..

Disney Netflix Paramount Frank Grimes Homer YouTube Simpsons
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"I mean, not the beautified theme is for drop shippers, exclusively or will this theme work for other customers? I mean, luckily, because there's a Shopify template you can go different routes if you want to. It was designed with drop shipping in mind because the I guess the thesis of drop shipping is that it is the lowest cost. Entry level method for people to start doing their own ecommerce business. That's also scalable too. Not to dissuade anybody who makes I guess more boutique or small batch product. It could be for them if they have Jews to scale. Somebody that I had spoken to just last week, her name is freya James, her episode would be out in a couple of months. But I'll tell you her story real quick, because I think this is a good example of how small batch can scale. Now I don't she's not using a shop or theme yet, but just to give you guys an example of this particular strategy before we get back to dropshipping is that there was demand because her audience were following her on YouTube. And she had to make a Shea butter cream that was not a good for her, but good for her infant daughter. And she devoured it herself. And then the audience said, can we have that too? And so demand just started increasing naturally. So there is a way for small batch to end up scaling. And so it can certainly work out for them too. But yes, it is it was made for drop shipping of mine because that's where Ricky, the one who had as a marketing side of it, that's where he came from. And the reason why he is as prominent as he is is because drop shipping was there for him to do that. Myself and participating in dropshipping now, too. I've got my own store going up. I'm learning just how many things can be obstruction or how many instructions there can be. So there's definitely a lot that can go awry. But it takes the weight off my shoulders that I don't have hundreds of them sitting in my apartment waiting to ship. I haven't wrote the money down on that yet. Quick question on that. Would you argue that majority of employees at the beautify have their own ecomm businesses? Drop shipping? You know, I haven't asked. So I don't have a survey result for it. I think the pressure changes from person to person. I think myself and my YouTube counterpart. I think the pressure on us is a lot more to do this because I mean, really what excuse do I have not to? Like, I get to talk to people every week who are sharing actionable tips on how to make it work. I get the theme. I get that the image. So I do get that. And also, I mean, there is money to be made. So I do like making money. So that definitely factored into the motivation and just going back to the point that I made earlier is that I can't not..

freya James YouTube Ricky
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"Coming up, there are different things like 4th of July, right? There's different product launches. There's different other holidays. In the past, there were things like Father's Day, Mother's Day, right? There's a bunch of different things, whether they're national holidays, they're made up holidays where I like national dog day or national pizza day. There's always typically something that gives you the reason. A new blog post, a new collection, new social proof, right? So the campaigns are something that you're going to be working on. Typically day in and day out, and you're going to be sending at least a couple of those per week. You mentioned there is something that I think is probably the hardest for us. And I think for most brands, which is how do you effectively do the testing with its a headline, whether it's the content, how are you effectively ongoing the testing? And is it a constant thing? Yeah, look, the more data that you have are the more subscribers and more traffic, the more tests that you can run because you do need some form of statistical significance. But yeah, I mean on every single email that we send there's some kind of test. The low hanging fruit is a subject line test or a preview text or a from name text. That's like the low hanging fruit at minimum. You should be running at least one of those. You know, the ones that takes a little bit more work is testing like a plain text version versus a beautifully designed email. Which one works? Other low hanging fruit is things like testing offers, 10% versus $10 versus for shipping offer. There's a bunch of different things. Obviously, you want to only test variable a versus variable. You don't want to mix variables or you won't understand which is going to be the one that actually moves the needle. But yeah, every chance that we get on almost every single email, we are testing something. What are your thoughts on putting RE colon on a subject line? What are my thoughts on putting on the same line? Yeah. Not normally something I'd roll with. Again, I'm trying to be kind of like mysterious and kind of like an interesting without being super clickbaity. Again, I've tried to read stuff in the past, you know, and some people get pissed. But I also work. So it's like you have to balance that. I don't do that as much anymore, but I definitely see companies doing that and I'm sure it still works. So I think it goes down to like your brand's philosophy. If you're kind of a witty prankster jokester or a brand like, for example, maybe chubby's that makes a short and a swimmer..

"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"Ready? Let's go. Hey, a hook today is treating you well today is an episode that is absolutely packed with value. I'm gonna be re listening to this one over and over again myself. Our guest is Chase diamond the go to guru when it comes to email marketing. I've been following him for a very long time and his knowledge is just through the roof when it comes to email marketing. In this episode, you're going to learn these three things and more. Number one, how many emails you should be sending to your list every single week? Two. How to increase your email opt in rate. This is something that was super mind boggling for me. It's super helpful for our business, so I know you're gonna get a ton of value out of that one. And one automation that I almost guarantee you haven't heard of, I know it was new for us. Like I said, this episode is going to be packed full of value for you, email marketing is not dead. There is so much money left on the table with email marketing. Use this episode as a guide to help you grow your business to that next level. All right y'all I know you're gonna love this episode, let's get into it. All right guys, thank you for tuning into another episode. We have chase here, chasing so much for jumping on the optimized store in our podcast. Yeah, dude, thanks for having me. Pumped to be here. Awesome. So I want to dive, this is your forte here, and there's just a lot of things I want to get to on the email marketing side. But tell me a little bit about how you got into it and what you're doing email marketing wise for yourself because I get your emails, which is what prompted me to reach out 'cause these are so good and I know our clients will love them too. So maybe give a little insight into how you started and how are you using email marketing for your own business right now and we can go deeper? Yeah, dude, I started with email on a very different form than it uses today a long time ago. So I'm 28 at the age of 13 to about 15 years ago. I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease and after being sick for about a year. I took it upon myself to raise awareness and fundraising. So I literally had an address book of Friends, phone numbers, like a house lines, and their emails or their parents emails or their AIM, their messengers, right?.

Chase diamond Crohn's disease
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"It's nearly a service as much as it is a product company, I get this kind of sometimes how I think of it. To me, everything they just talked about were some of the key characteristics that made me buy. One of those key components that made me buy the actual coffee wasn't just because you were on our show. I mean, yes, that could play a part, but at the same time, I think it was the article on Instagram from the river journal where you kind of compare the complexity of the different flavors of coffee to wine, I drink wine, so that resonated with me. And then you also talked about how people should buy coffee as a produce on a grocery store. And then yeah, when you were talking about the freshness and then when I found out that, yeah, it's also like, I'm not just buying it, and, you know, it's been on a pouch or whatever, I don't know. It's something that's fresh. It could be sometimes where I don't know maybe you're waiting a couple, a little bit longer, but you know that you're just waiting for that bats that it's getting a small batch. That also cut my attention. So there was definitely a lot of little things subtle things here and there. That made me like, huh, I actually do want to try this. And when we talked about the Newton's flavors and the fruitiness and less of that burnt tasting. I was like, okay, I feel like most of my life, the coffee that I have tried, it's always just that burnt flavor of coffee or overly crane with a lot of creamers and milk and sugars and all that kind of stuff. And I would say the last thing and I think this is where your photographer background comes in is I don't think I've ever seen cold brew coffee on a delicate wine type glass looking thing with ice in it. That was like, this looks like wine to me. I don't know. I'm very excited to try it. Yeah, well, thank you for touching on all those things. They're all, yeah, that's definitely like I just kind of do things differently when it comes to this, you know, the cold brew space. I genuinely think that there's that there's not a place for a serious coffee drinker to be to be participating in the productized version of cold brew right now. You either make it at home or you go buy something at the grocery store and find out that it's underwhelming, and you're like, oh, well, I guess I can't buy these bottled products or these canned products because I don't think they're very good. And I think that there's just like I honestly think that in a few years, everyone will be doing what I'm doing because you can and these products shouldn't be sitting around on shelves for a long time. There is an actual legitimate all business aside and I'm a purist in this regard. Either it should be fresh and great or it just shouldn't happen at all. Or you can make it yourself. Don't buy a product. Don't interact with any business, just like buy.

river journal
"store  " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

The Optimized Store Owner Show

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"store " Discussed on The Optimized Store Owner Show

"How you kind of mentioned word of mouth and different things and how it have you been able to get to that 600 odor mark on the website? Has it everything been word of mouth or have you done any sort of marketing through social or anything like that? It's mostly it's mostly word of mouth. But I've done, I mean, other than organic marketing by just posting and trying to put out stuff that I think is cool in my customers. I do very I've done very little paid advertising. I've probably spent nothing I've spent a couple $100 in the last two years, I'm just a couple one off little ads that I might have that I might have ran on Facebook or just like a boosted post, for example, I did some of that. But most of it's probably not attributable to that. It's largely attributable to the fact that I have an interesting network. I have decent amount of friends who are supporting me and then you know, and then word of mouth largely. Is I think the main thing that that's making it work for now. I was going to say that's insanely impressive because for so many reasons, I'm actually curious if you're able to necessarily share dollar amounts, but I am curious about if you know your repeat customer rate or roughly that stuff. But we can get into that. I'd be curious to hear and I know that people who listen to be interested on that ecommerce side of things because you say it kind of nonchalantly about the 600 orders, but I will tell you that you're focusing on probably the most important thing, which is that brand building. And because of that, people are like, hey, where'd you get that bougie coffee? Okay, I'm gonna tell a friend about this or whatever else. So I think that's very impressive and worth a kudos, especially if you haven't spent very much in advertising to get it out there..

Facebook
"store  " Discussed on All Things Retail: The Store WPP

All Things Retail: The Store WPP

08:43 min | 3 years ago

"store " Discussed on All Things Retail: The Store WPP

"I'm not really going to shops tool might doing airports running through, and I might do some milk. But this rarely just like the music industry. I am not going to physical spaces. And that's a reality the different series with the music world is the I do actually go to physical spaces and spend money, and that's because of live performance. Yeah. So let's get into that. My passion is seeing live bands in gangs and backs of pubs bars where it may cost five dollars to get in spending thirty bucks and going to really good concept. This is Brixton academy in London. Mazey experience. Maybe once a year go too crazy hedonistic festivals. Like Glastonbury aura or a burning man. Spend three five hundred dollars and have the most set -rageous experience. But it's all about spending time enjoying the music in the sociology of that. And I'm not alone toll can just see how on my only chart here. How the music industry is really picking up with regard revenues from live spaces revenue from sales of music Spotify Accenture drops so people really do want to spend time and money with it. And that really gets to my main point here is that maybe we as retailers could learn a lot from from the music industry, and maybe we should just be a little bit more rock and roll. So sort of three quick thoughts on that. The first one is around we need to stir the emotions better too easy to shop on the Sofer. And just you know, why would I if someone's going to go to physical space, we need to create a much e- promotional connection we need to create memories in some sort of emotional connection to there, and there's an algorithm for everything. But I don't believe yet. There is an algorithm to stir emotions I'm sure that will come along in the near future. I love the great, Freddie, late and great, Freddie. Mercury. He said a concert is not a live rendition of our album the attribute event and for me. That's really the parallel to if I've got a genius friction Louis e comm system while they want exactly that physical environment. There's no reason to go. So I'm going to get to this point around positive friction the space. It's about more friction, but it's about positive friction. So live gigs. We've all been there. Some of his getting on maybe less now but gets hot and sweaty. And you can feel your chess vibrating by the base ounds and every starting to sing and jump and bounce. And then suddenly, you can have three hundred strangers or singing, and jumping and bouncing harmony. Just amazing how individuals that are collectively come together and I flipped that back into retail. And this is actually the only time that strangest me, isn't it when we're all pissed off. And we're just grumbling and just, you know, not not happy. But there are some there are some positive signs. We've all we've always said nyc in very high regard how they brought people have their passions together to create run clubs around the stores. Somebody earlier talks about Lululemon. We started the day with sort of the yoga culture, and how they're actually in the physical spaces to the music land a big fan of Sonos disturbed what nearly two years ago. Not my designed in SoHo Manhattan are still think is brilliant has these little music rooms a lot of people to come and enjoy music make music. Listen music argued that music ineffectual space in places that brought people together. So referenced seaside about stirring, emotions eight human emotions that we need to stir since there are lots of secondary tertiary sets. That's all around the world, we have those and I challenge every brand to kind of find what is their emotion they want to stir with customer. And my point here that they should all just be the happy happy. Nice ones. Some brands some campaigns can actually stir quite. Faithful almost scary emotions the second insight. Here is around think venues, not formats really school struggle with this word of like shops and stalls. Now, think of Spacey's maybe performance spaces where people can connect with the brands, and it's quite an old example now but Burberry in London reach street. They created this absolutely gorgeous store wherever through is picture perfect gorgeous mirrors. However, it could absolutely transform into catwalk show or a live music space who Jake blogger think it was all this all all mirrors start to become digital screens. And love the idea of thinking of Spacey's venues now music festivals. Have extremely different personalities from southbound southwest to Coachella two a burning man festival and walk through so many department stores and shopping malls. And they just so banal. So bland kind of my challenge one. We're working on projects sees Coachella was to art. Recht shopping mall or new development for new store. I'm absolutely sure it would be something dramatically different to what's been done previously. And I love to conversations off if you've got Jamba juice, plus a hospital, what would that new mall be? So I'm all about thinking about the art direction, the cultural Kareishe ine of experiences. Third in final real learning music industry. So the big shift from transactional to service and a couple of photographs here one both taking quite recently one is in a marketplace where very much the commodity of someone choosing with their fingers running through albums down the left hand side into this green pop up canopy and on the right hand side took a few six weeks ago in in Manhattan, midtown these FedEx and not just throwing boxes out the back of the van onto the onto the sidewalk. Now, they're actually got pop-up. Little canopies aren't just there's a beautiful sort of full circle era of how retail started in the marketplace. And now the service industries they're actually starting to build stores in our streets. Both with green canopy, I think something quite interesting. But my my my badly point now is this real shift of service very much needs to be the after sort in fiscal Rita commodity. I and now massively believed that services one of the key reasons, why people would go to physical space beyond just experiencing entertained, so slightly bold statement to go into lunch with I believe the future of shopping is not retail. It's actually service and just just kind of unpack that slightly. Shopping is very much about the destination. This community one of two talk. Earlier speakers earlier talked about the social dimension. Absolutely. The entertainment is stirring, the emotions creating memories over the service. The people in the store, the employee's. They can create deliver empathy connection enjoy and retail as we see today is kind of being solved. It's very much about the transaction the purchase and removing pain points. It's the start to think about shopping as about service as opposed to retail. So somebody thoughts here service should now be central to the experience so service and the key word. The human. Another speaker tomorrow is gonna talk about the staff. It's not about more star is expense. It's really about reface reframing the roles they do give them different purposes. Technology. Not service has now resolved the pain points, therefore service can now add the emotion and the stickiness this positive friction. So what's our roles to the brand owners and the retailers in the room to be a little bit of poetic, bricks and mortar retail needs to be more alive. Kick-ass sweaty messy and highly commercial shopkeepers need to become more thrill seekers and brands ACTA like more like rock bands. I think that's what get people in there. And what's my responsibilities designer is to not be an interior designer architect? Creating the stage our roles to be the conductor the av the pyrotechnic choreographer. The filmmaker the whole thing to create these super rich powerful experiences that people can be bothered to get off the sofa and come to. So with that. Thank you very much joy lunch.

London Manhattan Freddie Spacey Jamba juice Spotify Mercury Burberry Accenture nyc FedEx Recht Jake SoHo three five hundred dollars five dollars six weeks two years milk