33 Burst results for "Stony Brook"

"stony brook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"stony brook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So much really appreciate that We just went through some of the big headlines including that CDC panel that is meeting today to talk about the vaccine for kids made by Pfizer and BioNTech So we're watching for some news out of that Let's get to it One of the voices that we've turned to a lot during the health crisis is doctor Harold Paul he is the executive vice president for health sciences at stony brook university former Chancellor for health affairs at the Ohio State university and CEO of wexner medical center also former chief medical officer at etna So he really understands so many different aspects of our healthcare and medical world and has been really like I said a great voice to us during the pandemic He joins us on the phone from stony brook New York first of all congratulations You're in a new position Yes thank you very much Carol I appreciate it Hey we were thinking you know on our planning call we're just thinking about you going from your position before and being in Ohio to now being in New York What are I don't know the differences in terms of what you're seeing about communication the handling and just the processes involving the pandemic What's the same What's different Yeah Yeah yeah So I'm originally from New York and it's great to be back I would say there are a lot of similarities many many more similarities in terms of how the pandemic has been handled by the healthcare workforce both both here and in Ohio In terms of the number of individuals that have been tested the number of vaccinations that have been offered here at stony brook medicine we've vaccinated over half a million individuals to date and this week we're very very busy with the boosters for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson in addition to Pfizer So a lot of similarities in terms of vaccination and testing and certainly in terms of treatment stony brook medicine has cared for hundreds and thousands of patients with COVID at the peak there were over 400 patients in the hospital with COVID and thousands have been cared for across Long Island So a great deal of similarities I think the other big similarity is that as part of this research university stony brook university a lot of research work has been going on testing the vaccines including you mentioned children of the Moderna vaccine has been tested here on children ages 5 to 11 and just a lot of research work over 230 research studies in clinical trials across stony brook medicine and stony brook university Hey doctors I want to go back to boosters before we talk about vaccines for kids Who should get boosters right now In which booster should they get Well that's a great question and there's CDC has been very clear about boosters particularly those who are 65 and older without a doubt those that have certain types of medical conditions The whole question of mixing and matching boosters with the original vaccine is an open question And I can tell you that I received my booster today as a matter of fact And my thinking is is that if I received a vaccine and it worked well for me originally the first and second shot if it was either Moderna or Pfizer I made the decision to go ahead and get Moderna for the booster as well If someone had some reaction to a vaccine and certainly it would make sense to think about a booster different booster than they originally received But we're still waiting for the research to indicate if there is any advantage to mixing the booster later on from what they originally received And we're going to need some research studies to show that makes any sense or not But I would just underscore one thing Most importantly get the booster if you fit one of the categories that require you were suggest that you get the booster because frankly that's the most important thing And worry less about trying to tailor it to the specific situation unless you are in the circumstances I described before So do you not if you don't meet those circumstances because we Tim and I have talked about we know individuals where you can basically walk into a pharmacy and get a shot and it's pretty easy to get Should you hold off And I've practiced this myself because I waited until this week to get the booster and I had advised everyone in my family and I've been asked many many times Follow the CDC recommendations That's how I've worked all through this pandemic It makes a lot of sense to me because there are so many people looking at the data at the FCA and the CDC in real time and are being guided by the science And I think for all of us dealing with so much information so many reports that they hear in the media what they hear from neighbors even I think the one thing that is consistent is is that we should try to depend as much as we can on the information that's available from our physicians from our local healthcare workers that care for us and from organizations that have access to huge amounts of data All right that's a good final thought And an important one Hey thank you so much and congratulations again doctor Harold pause He is the executive vice president for health sciences It's stony brook university joining us on the phone from stony brook Some really clear thinking on that I have to tell you I have a friend who yesterday they're both vaccinated his wife has a breakthrough case and she's symptomatic You got a PCR test He's negative And he's not finding a lot of answers for what should he do right now Should he where should he be where she be How does he stay negative How long is she in How long does she have this for There's still so many wearing masks Like what are they doing He's texting me all these questions and I say check the CDC Talk to your doctor All right We've got a lot more to come including taking a look at Avis soaring in today's trade This is a Bloomberg and now it's Geico's motorcycle rules of the.

stony brook university Moderna Pfizer Harold Paul CDC wexner medical center stony brook medicine New York COVID stony brook medicine and stony Ohio stony brook Ohio State university Johnson & Johnson Carol Long Island Harold pause FCA Tim
A Conversation with Michigan State Representative Padma Kuppa

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:46 min | 6 months ago

A Conversation with Michigan State Representative Padma Kuppa

"Pomme welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me again. Sonya it is an honor to be here with you and your listeners. At the dc woman podcast. I'll we are so excited to have you here. And i wanted to start with a bit about your journey to this country. We have a large number of listeners from indiana in particular and i know you came to this country for graduate school. I know that you came here briefly as a child and then again for graduate school and so would really enjoy your end where you are from an indian a bit about your journey to this country becoming a mechanical engineer a business analyst experience executive in early the manufacturing finance and now elected official for second term and the first indian and hindu to be elected to the michigan state legislature and spiring journey. That began began in india. That'd be here for me about much. So i actually was born not in where my parents are from. My mom is from regimen dri. My father is from ten ali and then whatever reason you know mothers women go home to their parents or their family to deliver a child so my mom went to. Her eldest brother was working in a city called lie. It was in madhya pradesh. Today it is in check. These cut so is born in july and then my dad had come to the united states in the wave of immigrants that came to study here in the late sixties early seventies and my mother and i followed him. My mom also did postgraduate work here. She's a biologist. She did her phd at the state university of new york at stony brook. And so after living here for so many years in northeastern part of the united states my parents decided. My brother was one year old. I was fifteen and we moved back to india so that they could take the education that they had acquired here and then helped their country. Now i spent eleven years here growing up when i landed in india. I do feel at home. I had an american accent had an american attitude. And so i think that it wasn't just the best age to move to shift cultures in this was pre internet so really had no idea what i was getting into and i would be very outspoken. I come from a traditional seth indian family and you know as the girl amongst many boy cousins. I would always end up arguing with them and associated a lot of the patriarchy that i experienced and that i confronted with

Michigan State Legislature Sonya State University Of New York India Indiana Madhya Pradesh ALI United States Stony Brook
Boston Man Convicted Of Killing Amy Lord Seeks New Trial

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Boston Man Convicted Of Killing Amy Lord Seeks New Trial

"News radio and attorney for the man convicted of kidnapping and murdering a Mi lord in 2013, once the state's highest court to grant him a new trial. Edward Alamein ease appellate attorney Andrew Crouch told the state Supreme Court that alimony deserves a new trial because his trial attorney ignored his pleas not to use the insanity defense. Roach said. That's why Alamein e acted so strange in court in 2015 because he was so mad at his attorney. He is rocking back and forth at counsel table for the majority of the trial because he says he's trying to calm himself down because he's so angry, elemental was convicted of kidnapping 24 year old Amy Lord Outsider South Boston apartment, forcing her to withdraw money. From a T. M's and then stabbing her to death, leaving her body and Stony Brook

Edward Alamein Andrew Crouch Alamein Roach Supreme Court Amy Lord South Boston Stony Brook
Trump's new PAC raises over $30 million

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:16 min | 9 months ago

Trump's new PAC raises over $30 million

"At the conservative. Political action conference in orlando over the weekend. Former president trump was clear. He will not start a new political party to make an end run around the grand old party. He drops strong hints. Though that he might like to run for president again there was interest. Also in rhonda. Santa's the governor of florida and the governor of south dakota kristi noem and trump is still very good at raising money. Marketplace's kimberly adams has that former. President trump never stopped raising money. I he pulled in cash from donors to fight his election loss and since then trump launched a leadership pac that raised over thirty million dollars in just a matter of months. Carl evers hellstrom monitors money in politics for open secrets dot org and he says politicians and groups who align themselves with trump are benefiting as well. The republican party is increasingly. Reliant on trump. actually raise money. so we've seen some. Corporate interests are not as interested in donating to them after the capital riot. Trump's supporters on the other hand still seem game to donate to the president and his allies. There were even rumors after the election. He might start a third political party and what he's done is actually a lot more interesting. Jennifer here. wig political sociologist at suny stony brook. He said okay. I have this kind of asset which is my a fundraising prowess and my donor or less than the ability to connect with people who maybe ordinarily wouldn't donate and so i'm going to use that and turn it into a formal organisation that the gop has to pay attention to and the republican party. Is we know that. President trump is still someone who was wildly popular and someone who was and is an effective fundraiser. Paris denard is a spokesperson for the republican national committee. We are optimistic. That he will continue to be the type of former president that engages in wants to help the rmc. A fundraise denied says trump has agreed to attend an r. n. c. donors event this spring in florida where republican leaders will be encouraging donors and the former president to support their efforts heading into the midterm elections in washington. I'm kimberly adams for marketplace

President Trump Donald Trump Kristi Noem Kimberly Adams Carl Evers Hellstrom Republican Party Rhonda Suny Stony Brook Orlando South Dakota Santa Florida Paris Denard Jennifer Republican National Committee Washington
"stony brook" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:01 min | 11 months ago

"stony brook" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"This is intelligence banners with former acting director of the CIA. Michael Morrell. Broken back to intelligence matters. I'm Michael morale. We're talking with Dr Ken with Kaiser, the associate dean for research and a biochemist at the United States Military Academy. At West Point, so can in the paper. You and your co authors give some examples of where this has already been done. And let me ask you just to describe very briefly. For our listeners a couple of those because I think they're instructive. The first was work. Done in 2000 and two I believe by scientists at the State University of New York at Stony Brook on the polio virus. Talk about that. So it's always been a goal for someone to build a genome from scratch. And so then the question is, you know, using state of the art Chemical synthesis tools. Can you construct something that is functional and s O? That is really where that effort was born out of s O, You know that in and of itself spawned several other efforts that eventually led up to kind of The idea that could you actually create a living cell, you know, from scratch, and that in and of itself goes hand in hand with what do you actually need? Because what we really need to understand this is what is actually needed for a living system. What can you throw away? Take Out of this car every little bit that you don't actually need to make that car run. So if you don't decide the mirrors to get it out of there, if you don't need this, the seat warmers get it out of there and whatnot. Just give me the very minimal system that I need for that car to actually function. And that's what has been a major goal in in synthetic biology efforts. You know, across the globe because once you have that kind of minimal structure that minimal scaffold that biological scaffold You can then add in. Ah, very, you know, whatever you want, And it's less of a load s O. You and I were going out for a run. If you if you add a large backpack onto your self, you're gonna slow yourself down. It's gonna be much more exerting. Well, the same thing happens when you engineer a a small micro, But you know this, you increase the metabolic load and you slow it down and you make it struggle. But if you can get rid of all the non essential requirements, then when you actually loaded up with that new system, whatever again for good or for bad Even have a chassis, a biological system that that's not gonna be loaded down as much as a natural one s so so that that's been kind of the progression is going from construct construct of the virus to construct of an actual living system of living cell. Another piece that we really wanted to bring up here is again on the good part. We have these amazing contests like the international genetically engineered machine contest Born out of M I T Um and and you have this incredibly rich international group of young men and women? Primarily, it was it was college students. That's how they kind of envision this. And so there was some undergraduates in some graduates that kind of got into it. But recently they've kind of lowered the bar of of entry because so many young high school students are really interested in this kind of work, and I'm just taking a look right now at the eye Jim team list in 2019. There was 360 teams from across the world about pushing 50% of them came from Asia. About 20% were from North America. But I'm just taking a look at the high school here. There was about Looks like about one third. One quarter to one third of the teams were at the high school level. So these air, young men and women in in high school who are who are engaging in synthetic biology projects. And about 60 65% of them are are from Asia and predominately there from China. So again, you know, the great thing about synthetic biology is that they're no borders. But then again, you know that then that apply that today to the context of threat and apply that to the context of force protection amongst the American population and the D O D and there might be something here of concern. Yeah, And and And then no borders become a bad thing. Right? So it Zzyzx. Interesting dichotomy. So can you just raised an issue that really caught my attention when I read it, because when people used to ask me about this threat I would say yes. Terrorist groups have shown interest. But doing this is very, very difficult and the one of the things that really jumped out to me and you're in your article. Is that your point that this is getting easier and easier and let me read? Maybe a couple of sentences that I highlighted when I read it the first time on, then get you to react to them. The first is today, the sophistication of high school and undergraduate student research projects. Has matched that of many highly trained personnel who were working in advanced laboratories less than a decade ago. That's the first and this And then the second is these synthetic bio tools are lowering the education training, cost time and equipment threshold required to modify and employ pathogenic organisms as biological weapons. Talk about the extent to which this is getting easier. And obviously why that's important. Sure, I mean, so let's take a look at the eye Jim organization and once again, you know, I'm a huge fan of participated my gym for many years, and you know they have a bio safety and about a security committee on their very much attuned to the potential. I'm issues but for us, say outside of the context of a competition and just going into the general population and then going into perhaps non state actors. Who have you no ill intent toward the United States. You think about this and you say if high school students could do this across Asia across Europe across United States, even if they have An adviser. That then take that threat kind of scenario and apply that to something chemical. Apply that to something, say nuclear and and it just doesn't match up. You're not gonna have high school students, you know, making the next generation a nuclear weapon. That's that's that's not going to happen. But here with the most amazing things about science, and you know, we're all about sharing information while about publishing were all about, you know, planting your flag and generating bragging rights about these great advances that we make and in both basic science and and the and applied science. But that also then provides Ah great recipe a great set of instructions for that next person and that next person can certainly be a young individual that does not have decades of experience in laboratories and and he or she can essentially do garage level science that in the past, I would have taken a lot of very Talented people. Ah, long time and in sophisticated labs going back to our polio example, you know, and talking about. You know how long did that take these experts in the Stony Brook lab. You know how many years was that? How many million American dollars was spent on that? Whereas when you talk about say something like a A young team of students in one of these one of these, I Jim teams whether this is on the thousands of dollars,.

Asia Jim polio United States United States Military Academy Michael Morrell Dr Ken Michael morale CIA acting director associate dean for research Stony Brook Stony Brook lab State University of New York D O D North America engineer China Europe
"stony brook" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"stony brook" Discussed on WTOP

"Plan or area limitations and exclusions apply Good Sunday evening, It's 10, 18 and Crawford in the W T O be Traffic center and around the capital Beltway. No reported delays Maryland or Virginia inner and outer loop running at a good pace. We may have some work on the Virginia Beltway near Alexandria, Watch that in local and said to be blocking a right lane haven't seen any evidence of slowing, however, on the Virginia side. 66 eastbound hung up badly trying to get toward the capital Beltway from Nutley Street, a single left lane Getting by. It is a very slow right onto and across the capital Beltway on 66 eastbound 66 westbound. There's still some lingering work from the weekend festivities left lane blocked your 29 Centerville beneath that they're still working on that 29 getting to and from the battlefield. Battlefield beneath I 66 a single ingots by in each direction 3, 95 and 95 So far so good in Maryland on the 95 on the BW Parkway. No reported delays on the Columbia Pike 29 Sound Pound from 2 16 heading toward the Protective River Bridge. They are supposed to be working out there, blocking a right lane once again. Also watch for some work for the long distance. Voyager's 70 westbound near Boonsboro. Next 35 with the right lane scheduled to to be blocked for work. We're working again on Intra levity westbound after the Beltway heading toward bright seat road with the work again over on the right side, you'll get by in single file to the left lingering delays on Klopfer Road between the teeny road and Watkinsville wrote each direction for the Winter Lights festival, actually emptying out Stony Brook Road and capital Stony Brook Drive, I should say in Capitol View Drive should be emptying out here very shortly after the lights at the D, C LDS Temple in the District, the freeway and the 2 95 Quiet Watch for work on Suitland Parkway both directions. Mean for Sterling Avenue in Sound Capitol Street. Also on the Douglas Bridge outbound across the Anacostia River. The right lane gets by the work multiplied the cheer when you give or play Maryland Lottery holiday multiplier scratch offs and your winnings could be instantly multiplied after $100,000 or enter second chance drawings, too. In cash or a warehouse shopping spree. He and Crawford w T O P. Traffic. Thank you. Now, let's get your storm team for four day forecast from NBC Force. Tamara Theodore. Good evening. Good evening. All right, so let's get into it. Your Monday Monday's temperatures are going to be in the low.

Virginia Maryland Crawford Tamara Theodore Protective River Bridge Traffic center Anacostia River Maryland Lottery Boonsboro Intra Alexandria Douglas Bridge Voyager Winter Lights NBC Watkinsville C LDS Temple
Exit polls show economy, racial inequality, coronavirus are top concerns of voters

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Exit polls show economy, racial inequality, coronavirus are top concerns of voters

"One of the voters been thinking about as they cast ballots. Stony Brook professor Leonie Huddy he's been looking at exit polls, Biden voters were much more likely to mention racial inequality in the van. Iris. Where is Trump? Voters were noting the economy and crime and safety is some of their top issues.

Leonie Huddy Biden
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"CBS News is Anthony Mason took a look back recently at the way masks were handled more than a century ago. That, of course, during the 2018 flu pandemic, also in the fall and found many similarities to today. Fascinating look from Anthony. In the fall of 1918. As Americans across the country were celebrating victory in World War, One of the masks on returning troops showed we were losing another war against the so called Spanish flu even a century ago, masks were controversial. Yes, And for so many of the same reasons they are today. Nancy Toms is a history professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook at its worst in 1918. How bad did the pandemic get really, really bad? He referred to it as the Big one among historians of medicine. 675,000 Americans would die nearly a third of them in a single month. The Red Cross spread the slogan Where a mask Save your Life. And nurses began to make them for the public way. We're looking at two masks God's masks that were used in the 1918 pandemic. Here in California, there in the collection of the Oakland Museum, Erin Dina Delgaudio is associate curator. That pretty transparent, right? It wasn't an ideal material, but it was definitely better than not wearing anything. Back in 1918. This was one of the centers in the fight against the pandemic. Yes, indeed. This is Henry Street settlement and its founder, Lillian Walk, played a critical role in organizing the pandemic response in New York City masks were never officially mandated on the East Coast, Nancy Tom says. But other health rules were often aggressively enforced. There were spitting raids, even though by Pelo Yes, there was a definite effort to up the ante in prosecuting. They called them sanitary infractions. The US outbreak had started on a Kansas Army base on the campaign to stop it. Was tied to the war effort. So wearing a mask became a patriotic just Yes. If you refused to wear a mask, you could be called a slacker. What did that mean? A slacker was not quite like a traitor. But it was someone who was dragging their patriotic feet. San Francisco was the first city to actually mandate masks. Yes. 10% of the population was infected between 1918 and 1919. In just a day, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. 100 people were charged with disturbing the peace or failing toe wear masks. Their sentence. 10 days in prison or a $5 fine about $80 today, and then here in San Francisco, there was an anti mask league that farmed in early January. So the chairman was this woman named Mrs Harrington. She was a suffragist. She was a lawyer. He put out a call in the the San San Francisco Francisco Chronicle Chronicle asking asking for for her her fellow fellow citizens citizens who who objected objected to to this this mass mass mandate mandate as as Really Really similar similar to to the the arguments arguments now. now. Actually, Actually, they they argue the ordinance was unconstitutional and that masks had not been proven effective. Some 2000 people turned out for a rally at the Dreamland skate rink. Other cities would mandate masks, including Denver, Seattle, Oakland, Sacramento and Phoenix. They were met with resistance to one major difference. It wasn't political. Then they're wass disagreement between the various politicians about which businesses should get closed down. But The decision to mask or not to mass never became identified with a specific political party.

Francisco Chronicle Chronicle San Francisco Anthony Mason Mrs Harrington Cbs News San San Francisco Dreamland Skate Rink Nancy Toms Oakland Museum United States California State University Of New York Erin Dina Delgaudio Stony Brook New York City Associate Curator Nancy Tom Lillian Walk Chairman
James Montgomery Boice

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 1 year ago

James Montgomery Boice

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode we will be in the twentieth century visiting with James Montgomery Boyce. Doctor Boyce was born on July seven, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, eight. He lived in a bedroom community of Pittsburgh. was quite a high school athlete. His Dad was a doctor and position voice for a fine education as a high school student voice was sent to the Stony Brook School and New York. He was mentored by Frank E. Gabe line, Biblical, scholar and theologian in his own right. Well after Stony Brook Voice went to Harvard for his undergraduate, and then he went to Princeton for his give. After that he was on his way to Basel for a PhD in theology while he was in Basel all there were a group of people who pressured him to start a Bible study, and he started a Bible study that became a church and to this day there is an evangelical church there in Basel that great, reformation city. And there's a church there founded by doctor. Boyce well. He graduated from Basel and Nineteen. Sixty six and two years later in nineteen, sixty eight, he was installed as the Minister of Philadelphia's Tenth Presbyterian Church near Rittenhouse Square on Spruce Street and Philadelphia Historic Church its. Spire went way into the sky, and its organ and its pipes could be heard throughout the city on a Sunday morning. Well in the nineteen seventies and nineteen, seventy, four to be exact Boyce started the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology. And in those early years people would gather there and intense church to hear John, Gersh ner and a young RC sprawl and J I packer and others, this constellation of reformed theologians in Nineteen, seventy, eight, a number of them joined together informed. The International Council for Biblical and A boy served as the chairman Dr. Scroll served as the President and see put out the Chicago statement on an errand see. They established themselves for a ten year run, and that was the life they had a voice also helped establish the Alliance for confessing evangelicals and nineteen ninety-four. That group stood strong against the evangelicals and Catholics together document, and took a stand for justification by faith alone well, in addition to those organizations. We have the books that doctor. Boyce wrote one of them. Foundations of the Christian faith is his systematic theology. It's billed as a comprehensive and readable theology. He also wrote renewing your mind in a mindless age, and another one of his books to cities to loves is subtitled Christian responsibility and a crumbling culture in addition to those books. He was known for his. Commentaries these of course grew out of his many sermons preached from Nineteen Sixty eight to the year two thousand from the pulpit of Tenth Presbyterian Church. She did a five volume series on John that was published a four volume series on Romans, two volumes on the minor prophets, three volumes on genesis and three volumes on the psalms. They're also commentaries on acts flippy in Nehemiah, Joshua Equations and Philippians and a few more books well Dr Voice was married to Linda. They had three daughters, nineteen, eighty, eighty-two Linda and Dr, Boyce. The city. Centre Academy School there in Philadelphia. On the morning of Good Friday, April twenty, one, two thousand Doctor Boyce was diagnosed with cancer. He died eight weeks later on June fifteen, two thousand. During those eight weeks he had one more thing to write in. There were hymns. He wrote thirteen in all. One of them is entitled Hallelujah. The other come to the waters, an invitation for all who have no money, but are thirsty, and those who have no funds about are hungry to come to the waters to come to the fountain to drink freely of Christ.

James Montgomery Boyce Tenth Presbyterian Church Philadelphia Stony Brook School Basel Stony Brook Voice Philadelphia Historic Church John Frank E. Gabe Line New York Harvard Spire Pittsburgh. Dr Voice International Council Rittenhouse Square Centre Academy School Princeton Gersh Ner Joshua Equations
"stony brook" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"stony brook" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Inventors and many American workers who continue to do an incredible job during these difficult and challenging times Big win for the president, at least before the election. The Democrats petition the Supreme Court for documents looking into testimony against Mr Trump, despite Moore's team, not finding any collusion or conspiracy after three years and $40 million investigations, Supreme Court said. We're going to block the access to the Mueller secret grand jury material. That means it will not be able to be used in the Joe Biden campaign ads of this November so at least till after the election will Knows where it goes from there. The man who correctly predicted President Trump's 2016 win Professor Helmer nor path from Stony Brook told Lou Dobbs back in August 2016 that Donald Trump had an 87% chance of winning the president's election. He was right. Now he's predicting 91% chance. The president will be re elected. In 2020 The president personally picked up a phone and call the father. Of a 19 year old son, who was gunned down in Seattle's lawless chop zone or Auntie for stand as we call the horrors, Lorenzo Anderson senior got a personal call from President Trump, who have been moved by his heart wrenching experience the night before. With Sean Hannity doesn't have to do it, but he wanted to do it on explain, comprise, actually express his condolences. Finally hear a lot about polls, but Joe Biden being up by 12 14 points, whatever the case may be, But the one thing that President Trump is absolutely dominating in. Scoring the bread par scale. President Trump's campaign manager is dominating the former vice president. Quote when it comes To the most important factor enthusiasm. Our scale said in the Washington compost yesterday. The unprecedented enthusiasm behind the president's reelection effort stands in stark contrast to the flat, almost Non existent enthusiasm for Biden. And watching his campaign in the basement, I think explains why winning Starting at the concept now. I pretty much have it by the way talking about Joe Biden's campaign campaign. One of the new bike campaign ads out running primarily online. He is this a business owner who trashes the president's covert response. Here is part of this. Add her name. Last name is easily check this out uneasily, and I'm a small business owner. Thiss president seemed to make everything else works in his administration that the American people behind the people that he is supposed to protect and Yes, she's coming out all in favor of Joe Biden. What now turns out that she did actually participating the PPP. So she was behind. She got 27,000 plus dollars for her in her business of P P. P. So the assistant spokesperson, deputy communications director for the campaign rally, Pardo said. The fact is President Trump is restoring the historically strong economy he built before and there's nothing Joe Biden can do to stop it. That is the truth when he stopped it. If he gets elected, God will not hopefully happened. All right. It's coming up with 7 20 year calls and comments coming up. A lot of people are talking about the NFL, the dual anthem Proposal on Tele Jeffrey Upstate If you want to join us.

President Trump president business owner Joe Biden vice president Supreme Court Sean Hannity Mueller Lou Dobbs Stony Brook Washington Seattle Jeffrey Upstate Lorenzo Anderson NFL Moore Thiss Professor Helmer Pardo
Man, 33, dressed in tactical gear 'walks into Long Island hospital with three bombs in his backpack'

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Man, 33, dressed in tactical gear 'walks into Long Island hospital with three bombs in his backpack'

"The F. B. I. has now joined into the investigation after a man walked into Stony Brook university hospital last night with the back pot pack which contained three explosives thirty three year old Robert Rhoden was taken into custody he faces numerous charges nobody

Stony Brook University Hospita Robert Rhoden
"stony brook" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"stony brook" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"The most drastic action we can take and he took it that's the governor of New York earlier today basically quarantining the entire state of New York except for essential services things like pharmacies and grocery stores gas stations I'm assuming will all remain open but other than that you got to be home you got to be working from home you got to be in your home that's the new statement standard for New York state which has by the way about fifty percent of all the cases in the U. S. about seven thousand of them of the fourteen thousand are in New York state and the majority of those are in New York City but we will break all this down as we continue to to roll through this afternoon chemical about have you with us lease Eldon is the proud representative of a good chunk of Long Island in Washington DC and he was someone that had a lot of opportunity to fight for what was right earlier in the the year and in the last over the last a couple of years with the Russia investigation and so forth but I wanted to get him back with this in congressman I'm I'm always grateful for your time how are people in your district holding up under the current circumstances of what we're seeing with covert nineteen what the hell side in the economic side there's a disruption to the quality of life that certainly impacts everybody for those individuals who have come down with a cold nineteen or people in their family were to deal with the health component that has been an issue Yadav as personal as it possibly gas gets get access to the testing and to ensure that yeah their loved one is able to recover that's that that is as personal as as it gets nearly this week we open up our first drive through free corona virus testing site at Stony Brook university the open from seven AM to seven PM seven days a week there's a phone number for the state anyone in your state can call the number eight eight eight three six four three zero six five make a reservation for the multiple drive thru sites that are now open up in many different counties including as I mentioned here in Suffolk then you have the the economic peace you're the small business owner seeing eighty five to ninety plus percent drop or a hundred percent drop depending on what type of a small business you have if you have a pizzeria at least you're still able to sell some food out of your front door maybe some people are willing to purchase a gift cards.

New York New York City Eldon representative Long Island congressman Yadav Stony Brook university Suffolk business owner Washington Russia
Stores reserve hours for seniors during outbreak

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Stores reserve hours for seniors during outbreak

"Some stores are trying to make it easier for seniors by designating certain hours of operation for them to shop before the general public comes in but that decision is stirring up some debate whole foods and target are among the stores implementing the policy early morning hours reserved for seniors and other at risk customers many stores are also closing early in an effort to spend more time restocking in sanitizing at a whole foods in Riverdale Maryland offices were seen checking ID's as people went in and waving down cars but the move is raising questions from some health care providers about whether it will help prevent the spread of coronavirus Bettina fries chief of the division of infectious disease at Stony Brook medicine tells The Washington Post her main concern is for the at risk population and the size of

Stony Brook Medicine The Washington Post Riverdale Maryland Bettina Fries
Schumer Calls For Faster Funding To CDC As 5th U.S. Coronavirus Case Confirmed

Brian Lehrer

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Schumer Calls For Faster Funding To CDC As 5th U.S. Coronavirus Case Confirmed

"Morning New York senator Chuck Schumer wants the centers for disease control and prevention to use funding allocated to fake fight the spread of the deadly coronavirus speaking at a press conference yesterday Schumer called for eighty five million dollars in a special C. D. C. fun to be unlocked and the department of health and Human Services to declare a public health emergency should the outbreak get worse they're going to need immediate access to critical federal funds that at present they can't access because an emergency has not yet been declared Schumer says the CDC would have full discretion over how to use the funds including for contact tracing in monitoring and hand screening at airports and direct support for state and local health departments sure also said that a SUNY Stony Brook professor visiting family in Wuhan China has been unable to return to the U. S. as a result of China's lockdown he says there's no indication that he has the virus and is working with officials to arrange a flight

Chuck Schumer CDC Professor Wuhan China New York Senator Department Of Health And Human Stony Brook

How I Built This

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
"stony brook" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"You know he's been running real hard two hundred twenty pound backing grace people down and later in the game you kind of see if some of those run start the pop a little more your decision making is it in your check down you know being able to see a play as it develops and know where to go when you get rid of it you know and not throw it into coverage do you feel as though you've improved in that area what does it take to be successful doing that yeah definitely improved in that area I think last year sometimes I would maybe even rely on the town the wires here's a little too much and this year kind of just knowing that if it's if it clears out down field and they drop out and try and take away that I can take a check down there's a guy who's gonna catch that can probably go get a first down for me the coach talking about the the tight ends both of them both for catches a piece we catch his other tight ends in a lot of it's complete it seems like as the weeks go on there more more involved in that and that type of part of the offense yeah yeah we got you know Caleb Warren and Joe. candy Joe's doing most of the block and we know the time but when he gets on the fly to mean the TV's don't want to see him out there yes that's a that's a big man rumbling down the field and then Caleb's really good route runner just because of the hands yeah you really good hands and he can you can get it done absolutely this team I mean I know you're only three and a half to heartbreaking losses yeah but you got to stand back a look as a. you guys this is a talented football team that can do a lot of damage yeah we got a lot of town you know those two ones those are tough we gotta find a way to pull those out but you know we gotta find a way to pull out Stony Brook yeah that's the lower folks do you think coach and talking about last year briefly he is he is think about that a little bit the the hurt and they put on in there and say okay are turned on a little bit now you don't you don't forget losing like that too soon but you can focus on last year too much but from my perspective I definitely am pants for gotta go get one vida thanks so much really done a great we room for you on Saturday okay ****. this year in the gym Fleming coaches show just what you said July coach coming up in just a bit in the gym will be back to talk about espy you that game is Saturday night seven o'clock at the abbey stadium under the lights.

two hundred twenty pound
This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:30 min | 2 years ago

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

"This message comes from N._P._R.. Sponsor get around with get around your idol car can actually earn you money. Just share it on the APP and Rinse it out when you're not using it visit get around dot com slash share now to start sharing get around. It's go time New York. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez wants a green new deal clean energy guaranteed jobs when she announced this everyone asked how are you gonNa pay for it. Here's what she told morning edition earlier this year I the first thing that we need to do is kind of break. The mistaken idea that taxes pay for one hundred percent of government expenditure. She says ambitious government programs can be financed through deficit spending and in saying that she has spotlighted in an obscure brand of economics known as Modern Monetary Theory N._p._R.'s Scott horsely has a beginner's guide modern monetary theory's been around for years but it's only recently stepped out of the shadows economist Stephanie Kelsen Stony Brook. Doc University says that's partly thanks to Cossio Cortes. The Social Media Darling embraced the theory while making an unapologetic case for costly new government programs there was something of an oprah effect wrench she did that. People immediately probably started readied googling modern monetary theory to find out what she was referring to run that Google search and you'll quickly find Kelton herself. The Economist who advised Bernie Sanders Twenty sixteen campaign is one of the best known evangelist for 'EM MT Kelton says paying for big government programs is the easy part. If Congress has the will she argues the Federal Reserve can effectively print the money if Congress authorizes a few billion dollars of additional spending or a few hundred billion dollars then the feds job is to make sure that those checks don't bounce a central element of empty is that governments that control their own currency like the United States don't have to worry about spending more than they collect in taxes. This they can always create more money but Kelton says that's not a blank check for unlimited government spending too often people get a whiff of mt they don't read the literature and they somehow arrive at the takeaway that M._t._a.. is about printing prosperity and of course when people hear printing money they go straight to Zimbabwe Weimar Germany those are notorious cases of runaway price hikes but Kelton says inflation is only Nia danger when demand outstripped the real capacity of the economy the people machines and raw materials last week under questioning from Cossio Cortez Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell acknowledged the U._S.. Job Market has shown more capacity. Did you grow without triggering inflation. He and his colleagues had expected still vows no fan of MT as he told the Senate hearing back in February the idea that deficits don't matter for countries that can borrow in their own currency. I think is just wrong. We're. We're going to have to either spend less or raise more revenue taxes story and Bruce Bartlett also blast. 'EM MT as little more than a fig leaf giving license for big spending in the same way art laugher gave Republicans covered a cut taxes with the dubious claim. They'd pay for themselves. M. T. is sort of laugh recur for the Left. Some of them tease biggest supporters however are not liberal politicians but bond traders but firms like Pimco and Goldman Sachs James Montier. WHO's with the investment firm G._M._O.? Says he turned him Mt. After more conventional economics. Let him astray in the nineteen nineties. Monty and many others were convinced. Japan's rising government debt would drive up borrowing costs. It didn't across both Mike Lines or anyone who stupid enough to follow me money. It was one of the worst trait positions I've ever suggested in my entire life. Monte says M. T. offers better financial forecast and helped him understand why interest rates in the U._S. asks have stayed low. Despite growing government deficits persistently low interest rates have also prompted some mainstream economists like Larry Summers and Jason Ferment to rethink their attitudes and be less concerned about federal deficits but they haven't.

Mt Kelton M. T. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasi Cossio Cortes Cossio Cortez Federal Reserve New York Bernie Sanders Congress Federal Reserve Mike Lines Bruce Bartlett Stephanie Kelsen Stony Brook Doc University Job Market Senate Google Larry Summers Pimco
"stony brook" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"From the offer. Lifelong learning institute at Stony Brook university all under the direction of miles mascot. All right. The national anthem here at Citi field in New York. Where does look like and we see this a lot in the summertime with a game played at this time of day. I think there are going to be a lot of kids here today. So we could hear some shrieks and screams even for Papa game today always sort of make some interesting background music giants. That's wrapping up this series giants finishing up their road trip and then heading home to welcome in the dodgers tomorrow night. Our starting lineups sponsored by Comcast. Learn how to take your business beyond fast at Comcast business dot com. Giant twenty five thirty five the fifth place team in the National League West giants hem lineup that looks like this, the New York native Joe panic hitting leadoff and starting at second base again. Mike history is in left field that second of all that. They're they spend hitting third. Granted belted vesey's Jane's cleanup hitter. Stephen vote doing the catching batting in number five spot in the order. Brenna Crawford is at shortstop proper bet six Kevin pillar in right field, it seven Stephen Duggar the center fielder. Bads eight and the starting pitcher for the giants is the young right editor twenty four years old. Sean Anderson Anderson, who is coming off his best big league outing his first big league when he went seven strong innings against the Orioles. Anderson pitches today here in New York against the mess. So that's the giants lineup. Meanwhile, the bachelor twenty nine thirty two after their win to even the series year last night. I'm at Resor yo is shortstop. He'll bat in the leadoff spot today for the first time in this series Dominic Smith. He's out a really good year. Just unplayable whole lot. He is there. Leftfielder seven batting second. The first baseman Pete Alonzo hits third. Michael conforto. Right. Fielder and cleanup hitter today. Todd frazier. Is at third base Frazier, bats fifth identity rea- at second base Robbie canot had to lead last night's game with the some version of recurrence of his quad injury. He is not on the injured list as of today, but he's not starting lineup either Etcheverry second basic six one. The Gars center fielder, bad seven to Nido doing the catching. It's eight and a starting pitcher for the Mets is the right hander Zack Wheeler one time at giants minor leaguer traded a long time ago now was eight years ago when he was traded from the giants to the Mets in exchange for Carlos BELTRAN and BELTRAN traumas with the giants down the home stretch in twenty eleven wheelers Ben with the Mets sense, has not been fully healthy that whole time it has turned into a very solid starting pitcher. He's five and three with a four six eight earned run average. The number's probably don't tell the full story. He has been better than that. In terms of the strikeouts how hard he is to hit. He's one of the hardest throwers all. Major league baseball Wheeler today against his old organization. Not the first time he's face the giants. But he's on out today for the Mets a message sponsored by Hanson, Bridget lawyers, you'll like. This copyrighted broadcast is presented by authority of the San Francisco. Giants may not be reproduced retransmitted in any form the accounts and descriptions of this game. Not be disseminated without the express written consent of the San Francisco. Giants umpires hunter Wendell staff who does tend to have a big on. I think if you're a pitcher you like having hundred vine the plate. He is gonna call strikes this afternoon. Angel Hernandez, who came in, in the middle of this series. Tom Hallion, and hopefully Tom's doing. Okay. Took foul ball is nasty other night had to leave again. And as he's the first base on fire today, Vic care, pots at second Jordan, Baker is the fire along third base line. Well, right. As we get ready to start this game. It had been overcast and not dark. But I think.

giants Mets Zack Wheeler Dominic Smith New York Citi field Stephen Duggar Sean Anderson Anderson Comcast dodgers San Francisco Stony Brook university Todd frazier Brenna Crawford Michael conforto Tom Hallion Robbie canot Mike history
Survey finds teens unaware they are vaping nicotine

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Survey finds teens unaware they are vaping nicotine

"As e cigarette you sewers in high schools. New research from Stony Brook university shows many people don't understand the amount of addictive nicotine there inhaling with every puff in the new survey. Many teen said they regularly used e cigarettes but swore they only vape nicotine free products. But urine test very marker of nicotine use came up positive forty percent of the time in the same group of vapor. We don't have the treatments for teenagers now for nicotine results. But we don't have it for teens. That's really scary. This

Nicotine Stony Brook University Forty Percent
"stony brook" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of educate- of higher education of college university education in this country is out of control. I mean, you know in my son's looking at colleges, right? Where where's he looked like he wants to go to stoney Brooks? He wants to be a doctor, and they were very good medical program. May I ask what Stony Brook cost these days? It's pretty cheap. It's about let's see if you live there probably fourteen year that that is we live kind of near there. So he may not have to live there, which would be only like seven. Okay. Well that that's that's terrific. But the only thing about Stony Brook is you have to have a fourteen hundred on your SAT. So he's he's got a little bit ways to go. Okay. He has near twelve hundred. So that's but that's good. I mean, but but my point being so if he if he's got twelve hundred I'm that tells me he's a good student. So it's going to cost let's say you wanted to go to another school. So he could get into a lot of schools, but it's going to cost an arm and a leg. Both my daughters did the three years apart both married with kids both my daughters ended up going to northeastern not because expensive well one year, they overlapped they. They overlapped. Atlanta was a senior essay was a freshman. At that time. What the hell was it? I might have been like two thousand in two thousand and three two thousand and four that might have been it was like forty three five times to what that was. Then you let them go. Okay. No, no. That was then. And I remember saying to my wife, I don't know how now that's so figuring. It's two girls extras innocent that you're talking about ninety five one hundred now that's cash so to get that you gotta be earning two hundred thousand and I remember saying to my wife. I don't know how the average person does it. And I said what the hell am I talking about average? Thank God, we're above average. And you know, one of the proudest things I can say that my kids went to school, and they don't have any debt. Right. Okay. But that's the problem. Now, do you know what that school costs? Now. Now, it's closer to sixty five a year sixty five year. That's not northeastern is a good school. But it's not an either. V league school kids have to try to do today is get some kind of scholarships. Whether it's academic or athletic. Well, yeah. And my son's also probably going to do is eat athlete. He's a very good track athlete. Oh, terrific. What's he run? He runs like best stuff. I don't know what it's called. But he's speed racer. Does he run long distances are short stores? Sure in a very little amount of time. I to remember that Jill forever. What does he run fast? That that is priceless. What does he run that has to be put on in the future? When we do a best of Bernie and said, I want that on Matt. Fast fast. Yeah. No. But but really Email so I get I do believe the price of higher education. You know, another country is a major major prowler option, which my husband is kind of China if he doesn't get into Stony Brook instead of going to the university of buffalo upstate already accepted him. So if he wants to go there, but my husband says have you ever heard of Farmingdale, it's a local used to be just yes to your school? But now, it's a four years people have this notion of Farmingdale being that's that's for stupid people. I I always said the wrong thing. That's bull. My husband doesn't as an SAT business. And he actually tells his students for your first year try to go local, and it's okay to go to community or like Farmingdale state university for your first year, then you could transfer. Your husband has an SAT. What's real? Yeah. So he's a tutor SAT. Very interesting. Yeah. So, but he tells the students go go local don't 'cause most students party the first year, and they waste all their parents or their own money and stuff some of them flunk out. Well, I know I listen, I listen all week. And I was here in Bernie and said they've had a few debates, and and I I happen to agree with Bernie techs that that well, you know, what college is not for everybody. But here's here's the other thing you graduate from college, especially now because now four years of college for a good school is two hundred thousand. Yeah. That's I mean, I mean how many kids in interns over the years at channel five and channel nine that. I run into that. They would tell me they they have in excess of a hundred thousand dollars in debt. So there is nothing wrong with I listen and go to if you're from New York SUNY school, why do you have to go to? You know, USC or UCLA, you know, all those. Well, they will also be burning say we also talked about the draft a bit. I can't tell you people talk about the military. You know, how many people I know? And I know a lot. They went to the military for the purpose of being able to leave the military and pay for an education, and they're all doing well that all had good educations. And they would not have had those had they not join the military. My brother is a perfect example. Is that right? He was a horrible student in high school, isn't he a doctor as well. He was a horrible horrible. And you got him with the wrong crowd doing very bad. Thanks probably was about to flunk out. So joined the marines right after high school. We went to Paris island whose graduates really a different person they paid for a lot of his Stony Brook college experience. And then he went on to NYU medical school. Now, he's a very rich anesthesiologist. But, but but you wanna know what? But that's the truth. Correct me if I'm wrong being a wise ass here, you and your brother you don't come from a lot of money migrating them on. Okay. That's right. Single mom. So there you go. So, you know, it's not I mean, the cost of this. I'm not against it. All. Like like being knocked down. But when we say, it's all free. That's unrealistic. You know, don't give me this socialist crap. I'm not gonna pay for your kid. I paid for my own kids. Exactly. And then everyone goes to college for free. And now everyone needs a job when they get out. So the job pools going to be less because there's not enough. You know, there's too many kids get jobs. That's but that's also what might complain. Is you go to college, and what you spent on your education, then you come out and get a job. It's not commensurate with what you paid to go to college. Right. Exactly. So I mean, there is a legitimate beef. Like, I don't just say screw it will what this person says what that person says. And that's why I say we all gotta listen to one another. But to say, it's free to me. That's just that's just silly. Any we go. We got time for Tony. Okay. Well, Tony will take you on what coming back eight hundred eight four eight nine. Two two two is the number. That's eight hundred eight four eight W A B C. Insidious? All right, folks. You've heard me say it before that's just me..

Stony Brook Bernie Farmingdale Stony Brook college Tony Farmingdale state university stoney Brooks New York SUNY school NYU university of buffalo Atlanta Jill USC China Matt Paris island UCLA four years eight hundred eight four eight hundred thousand dollars
"stony brook" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Scientists improve their communicating skills who it really came out of Allen's experience in both those every day. And acting and also in hosting the show which was called scientific American from peers on PBS, and he really found that in working with folks who were working on really complicated scientific issues that having conversations with them where he was using improvisational exercises to help them get more clear and vivid in our communication it worked. And so that was the Genesis of the center, and he found that it improved. Not just verbal communication. Also, non verbal communication, and now we've trained, you know, I think it's up to fourteen thousand folks in this method the way that it works is we use improvisational facilitators. Many folks over theater background to provide the training and then the season journalists that are involved scientists medical. Professionals on the team they really helped develop the way that these offering there are together. And then also on evaluation side to see is what we're doing working. So it's very much a team approach, and we're really proud of what we have to offer. Well, Dr potty that is so interesting and erase thinking as you were speaking, we think a lot about translational science or really talking about getting people to understand here. The consequences of not communicating effectively are pretty extreme. And the ability to communicate effectively has been focused on in the education and training of scientists and shins in a clinical sense, perhaps. But not in this larger scale, tell me a little bit about what you've seen in terms of transformation as the scientists learned to communicate more effectively, maybe share a story, and I'm happy to share some stories. I've been with the center now since January eighteenth and. We started actually prior to that having trainings at Stony Brook medicine. We'd groups of healthcare professionals, it was nurses, attending physicians trainees dietary aides respiratory therapists. And they were led by again, an improv facilitator from the center and a healthcare professional often myself, and we ran through these trainings over the course of about a year with about one hundred seventy folks and afterward, we heard from the nursing leadership about how folks on the floors in the hospital when they made a mistake in communication. Maybe they were a little too abrupt. They would do thing that we talk about which we call Tada and today is that that thing that you see clowns, do, you know, or when they, you know, after they if they make a mistake than they do at Sadda, and they it's a way to quickly acknowledged that you. Made a mistake and move on. And so the nurses and the staff were to dying with each other. When they made those mistakes, and it really has led to a positive change in the culture in the way, we communicate it certainly has helped build the team communication as well. So that's just one story from Stony Brook Matterson about some of what we've done well just trying to think about my own kids. I've got four of them, and they are very much into instant communications. And I think they're expecting their healthcare providers to respond like their dad. Does it their mom does in terms of being there right at the moment? I'm wondering if you could walk us through issues that today's providers are going to face with a whole new generation of people who are expecting to be able to access healthcare information in a totally different way. And I'm wondering how the all the method helps providers address this seat changed. I am happy to talk about that. You know, I think our approach at the center has really to be thinking about what in folks really want and need from their healthcare team. And it really boils down to a lot of what folks want as you mentioned as a parent. But what folks want from leaders in general, and that's trust compassion stability. Hope all those things are things that people are looking for from their healthcare provider. Quality care doing the right thing the right treatment. But to do those other things that's what really matters to folks when it comes to health care to feel that there'd be listening to and so our trainings really focused on that. Because we're aiming to train the team to communicate better. So that they can offer all of that to the patient, and I think that is really analogous to what's happened in other industries. So I don't know if you're familiar with the story of the janitor who was questioned at NASA, and they asked the janitor, what do you do here? And the janitor said I put people on the moon and same way in health care. We want folks to be able to answer that no matter what role they play on the team that when they're asked. What do they do? They take care of patients Dr party. I know in addition to. To your incredible work in communications. You're also a thought leader in care transformation in particularly improving health outcomes for pediatric patients and their families. And I know you've congratulations for this. You earned the academic pediatric associations healthcare delivery award..

Stony Brook Matterson Stony Brook medicine PBS Allen Tada Sadda NASA
"stony brook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Professor at Stony Brook university knows there's a problem e in the US is increasingly dominated by a single platform Amazon Amazon is making its own private label products that compete with the offerings of independent merchants. A pair of accountability thing shoe in queens. Lou observed Amazon's behavior over time and found that it tends to introduce proprietary products in issues were smaller merchants did the work. Of finding out what consumers like Amazon they concluded then piggybacked on their efforts. Smith says this was a classic tactic used by supermarkets observe which products sell. Well, then introduce private label brands to try and grab some of those markets. And that's today's Bloomberg small business report. This is a Bloomberg market minute. Stocks fell in thin trading. As investors grappled with concerns about economic growth and the latest twists in trade talks between the US and China, the S and P five hundred dropped for the first time in four sessions after economic reports in both Europe and the US came in below forecasts. Raising new worries about global economic growth for the day. The Dow Jones industrials fell one hundred three points four tenths of a percent to twenty five thousand eight fifty s and p five hundred down just over a third of a percent. The NASDAQ dropping four tenths of a percent. President Trump plans to meet with China's top trade negotiators tomorrow afternoon as the US tries to forge a preliminary deal with its biggest economic rival before. Tariffs on some Chinese imports more than double next month. According to people familiar with the matter, apple, and Goldman Sachs will begin testing jointly developed credit card with employees in the next few weeks. According to people with knowledge of the matter, the Wall Street Journal reports a wider rollout to consumers will come later. This year Mark mills Bloomberg radio. Join Bloomberg.

Amazon Bloomberg US Stony Brook university Wall Street Journal queens China Professor Lou President Trump Mark mills Goldman Sachs Smith Europe apple
"stony brook" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Broadcast journalism, she roomed with Chinese friends and adopted a western name like a lot of Chinese students. Accent was okay. My problem with that would Americans talk to me, they would think that I would have no problem understanding eighty that. They would say when in reality. She didn't understand much. Should stuck with her Chinese friends and that didn't help her English? Whether we want to admit it or not a lot of us definitely have problems with keeping it up act Damocles because of the language barrier whenever lodged by authority, you tend to cluster among yourselves, create Sutton dynamics that people elsewhere on campus might react to Linda limbs university of Michigan International business, professor. She says some people may feel like Chinese students are kinda show offi because they're the biggest international group on many campuses. And also because some of them are wealthy, you know, rich kids of any nationality, including foot civil of Ericsoon's, wait around, you know, they drive fancy caused at parka here in bed and limb says seeing Chinese people like that can be surprising for some Americans, perhaps not just Americans with a lot of westerners might have had a very recent. View of China being a poor country. And therefore, it's kind of jarring to them to see Chinese whom they think are should be the richer than them Americans already have a bad rap when it comes to tolerating languages other than English. Susan blooms and ather polity professor at the university of Notre Dame, the US tends to celebrate mono-lingualism in mid nineteenth century, for example. Many American leaders expressed concern that German immigrants and their children weren't speaking English. Same thing with talion in the early twentieth century and Spanish speakers in recent decades, if the US gets a reputation for discouraging people from speaking Chinese they could be a big problem for American higher Ed because American colleges and universities are in global race to attract Chinese students. This is one of many promotional videos on the web from Stony Brook university in New York. John how for many years now the graduate school at Stony Brook has sent a team of faculty and staff to various parts of China in the hope of recruiting many schools. My own included have developed sophisticated administrators who go actively to these countries to China to spread the word about our institutions and try to get highly paying, but also qualified students to apply to our.

China Stony Brook university professor Stony Brook US Linda limbs university of Mich university of Notre Dame Sutton dynamics New York John Ericsoon Susan
"stony brook" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Sixty one and Stony Brook lost UNBC fifty seven forty nine. The Dow Jones industrial average in your businesses closed above the twenty five thousand Mark on Wall Street after news. The Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates unchanged. The Dow's wrote down. Rose up to twenty five zero one five NASDAQ gained one hundred fifty five points to seventy one eighty three the S and P five hundred rose forty one points to twenty six eighty one and bear mayor de Blasio says he's backing the notion that Amazon should allow its employees to unionize as the tech giant's second headquarters project faces criticism. A rally was held at city hall yesterday decrying Amazon's business practices anti-labour in union later. There was a city council hearing in which the company offered solution toward helping the community mayor de Blasio noted that the agreement between the city state and Amazon assured union labor would be involved in construction of the Long Island city facility. He adds that distribution warehouse in -ployees should definitely be unionized. And for those of you who love watching the Super Bowl and are going to plan on doing that this weekend, the stress of your favorite football team losing the Super Bowl could send you are. You ready for this to the emergency room? Let's hear more from Mark Mayfield. Doctor Victoria, shin- Torrance Memorial Hospital. Cites a study in L A county. They chose an increase in heart attacks following the LA Rams nineteen eighty Super Bowl loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers, ER physicians and cardiologists have noticed during events such as this. We have an increased incidence of patients coming in either burying our after the the game complaining of chest pain or shortness of breath, or some sort of symptom that is related to cardiovascular stress. Meanwhile, there was a decrease in the number of heart attacks in nineteen Eighty-four when the then LA raiders beat the Washington Redskins. Dr Shan says the evidence is anecdotal. However, it's possible that stress and binge eating bad day contributed to the increase of heart related incidents at the ER. Mark mayfield. NBC News Radio. Five forty nine. How's that drive in going in the call? Let's find out from Verdy vita burning good morning. Some issues on the bridges right now. Verizon bridge heading.

Amazon Mark Mayfield de Blasio Federal Reserve city hall LA Rams Verizon shin- Torrance Memorial Hospit Long Island Pittsburgh Steelers NBC Washington Redskins Dr Shan Doctor Victoria Verdy
"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That state funding declined when the recession hit and it hasn't come back that's made Stony Brook more reliant on tuition dollars to meet its budget since it can't raise tuition without legislative approval. Stony Brook has turned to international and out of state students who pay tuition that's four times higher than what New Yorkers pay. The recession. Also brought more applicants for middle and upper middle class families, recognize Stony Brook was a good value, and who might have gone private before starting to work has increased enrollment to bring in more revenue but Stony Brook president Samuel Stanley says he's not sure how long Stony Brook can sustain that balancing act. We want to remain committed to the social mobility. We're doing, but we're really getting squeezed the incentives that have been created for us to accept more students who pay full tuition in pay for out of state tuition, or international tuition, a fifth of Stony Brook students. Now, come from out of state and this fall because it's at capacity there will be fewer slots for entering students in that P program. We told you about Stanley says before it took the job at Stony Brook he read about the program, and he was drawn to the idea of working for public university. That's part of its core mission is giving lots of people the opportunity to rise out of poverty. It's hard for him to understand why. The state is an investing more in Ethiopia. We struggle every year. It's remarkable to me for a program that so successful that every year there's an attempt to reduce its budget at the state level, usually some of that money gets restored. But it keeps the program captain. And rather than having fight about restoring money to it. I would rather have a fight about adding money to it every year. But every year we seem to be stuck in this cycle. This fall one hundred and fifty new students will enter Stony Brook COP program. Remember three thousand people applied Patrick Hughes. The student from queens who got the job at Google wonders, what could be accomplished if more people got a chance like he did need to open up the admissions two maybe two hundred three hundred students because no matter what we're going to graduate. And we're gonna get some really good jobs. We're gonna change our communities, and we're going to make this change. But if you're only a leading a few of us in that change going to happen, very slow. Stony Brook is dealing with a financial squeeze that's affecting a lot of other public institutions to a report by the state higher education executive officers association found more than half of all states now rely more on tuition than in state and local government funding to finance higher.

Stony Brook Samuel Stanley Ethiopia Google Patrick Hughes president executive
"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:12 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Off student loans ten years after he graduated Adam was determined not to end up in that kind of debt. So he went to state schools. He started for junior Commonwealth university. Then he transferred to Virginia Tech. It's one of the top public universities in the state. But even though Virginia Tech was public school. Adam says there were plenty of rich kids there. I remember hanging out with a guy who lived in my dorm, and he got drunk one night, and then ordered a thousand dollars with a raving gear on Amazon, raving gear. Oh going to raves glow. Sticks light up torches. The light just dropped like a full thousand dollars on this. And then told the story about the next day, and it blew my mind how anyone could possibly have the resources and poor judgment to to make a decision like that. According to all that data analyzed by the economists at the equality of opportunity project. There are indeed a lot of rich students at Virginia Tech students. There have the second highest family income among highly selective public colleges in the United States. The university of Michigan is number one. These public colleges aren't doing much better than a private school like wash you when it comes to promoting social mobility students from poor families like Adam or Lesko are an exception at many of the nation's top public universities. So what colleges are doing a good job? Who are the mobility makers in America? Our correspondent Sasha as lenient takes us to Long Island New York to show us what a mobility maker looks like the campus of Stony Brook university is much plainer than the wash u campus. It started as a teacher's college in nineteen fifty seven it has a lot of blocking brick buildings from the seventies. And some newer ones with more glass. Like this wasn't here. When I was here. The walk this way to go to lecture hall Derrick Peterson graduated from Stony Brook in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight he grew up on Long Island. Stony Brook was a half hour from home and a place where he could work with big computers. But then the goal is just very simply can't go to school and get a job. My parents weren't necessary. Desk to we didn't have a lot. And so I had a way get out and be in do something now, and then make my parents and my community proud of what I've done Derek was admitted to Stony Brook as part of a special program for low income students who show potential, but aren't fully prepared for college. Their high school grades and test scores are lower than what Stony Brook typically looks for this. It was able to do it schools, really tough. But with a lot of support he did do it. Derek graduated with a degree in computer science and applied mathematics. Now. Here's a wealthy tech entrepreneur his setting up a scholarship to honor his father who never finished college. What I've gained is being able to help a lot of people. Stony Brook has been making bets on people like Derek Peterson. For decades the school produces a remarkable number bottom to top success stories. The quality of opportunity project found half the students from poor families with ten Stony Brook, go on to become top earners. That's an Ivy league success rate, but Stony Brook takes a lot more low income students than an Ivy league school does turns out Stony Brook is the third. Best college America when it comes to promoting social mobility, the top two are Cal State LA and pace university in New York John Friedman of the equality of opportunity project refers to these schools as America's engines of mobility, these are not fancy schools. So if you look at the schools with the very highest mobility rates, there are primarily schools that are in the middle of the American public higher education system. And what exactly are these schools doing freedom's? Not quite sure I like to say that colleges with a with a very high mobility rate. They must be doing something. Right. They are either providing. Great education and a great boost to students that are on campus. Or they're doing a great job. Finding talented low income students in the first place Friedman. Thanks, it's probably both. It's not entirely clear what the secret sauce is at Stony Brook. But administrators say these are some of the ingredients the school is a short train ride away from a ton of talented, low income kids growing up on Long Island in New York City. These students are hungry to succeed and Stony Brook sees helping them do that as part of its mission. It recruits them it gives them a chance. Even if they may not be quite ready for college and it supports them along the way, remember how most high achieving low income kids. Don't apply to any selective. Colleges. Stony Brook tries to go. Find them crooked. Some of the outreach the school does is to pretty young kids. These long island's sixth graders are on a day-long field trip to an engineering lab at Stony Brook, they're learning how to build little motion detectors out of circuit boards. I folk, Emma. Samantha get some help with their soldering irons from David westerfield who usually teaches college students about semiconductor lasers. Teams on Stony Brook has a grant from the National Science Foundation to get kids from underrepresented groups excited about careers in science technology, engineering and math known as stem fields starting Brooke has cooked up math camps and opportunities for high schoolers to shadow doctors in its teaching hospital to learn about careers in healthcare starting to work specifically targets children from low income school districts, these programs get kids onto campus, and may spark the idea I could come here. The woman who's picked a lot of those students who became bottom to top success stories is Judith for Hanan the dean of admissions. She's worked in admissions at Stony Brook for thirty four years more than half the schools history. She knows how many more students want the chance to be here. I work with applications. I see family income levels. So I see the level of need. And in my opinion, it's grown over the years. It's. Very in your face that there's still this very strong need for more thirty two percent of Stony Brook undergraduates receive Pell grants, remember wash U was trying to get up to thirteen percent, and because of federal state and institutional financial aid forty four percent of Stony Brook students pay no tuition, but it can still be a stretch to afford things like housing and folks Brennan says there's a culture at Stony Brook of trying to make college possible for these students. I can remember picking up the phone and talking to our associate director for campus residences in saying on many occasions. This student does not have money for the housing deposit. Can we wave it no problem, waive the deposit? This student doesn't have the housing deposit. And Furthermore, they don't have a place to stay for the last two weeks of the summer. No problem will give them a job on campus. Will let them stay in the building. And then we'll figure it out social mobility doesn't just happen because the school takes in a lot of students from poor families, plenty of schools are willing to take their money, but many of those schools don't catapult their students to higher incomes, for example for profit schools. Take a lot of low income students and have some of the worst success rates. There's something that Stony Brook's doing for its low income students. That's really working. Centre. Here's one of the things starting Brooke is doing having students from low income backgrounds mentor. Each other Patrick Hughes is a senior from Queens, New York. Patrick has a huge smile with dimples close cropped hair. And the slender billed of the soccer player. He is. Patrick's men T Elvis Peres is from the Bronx Elvis is a math major, but a calculus test didn't go. So well, did you try go into the math learning center? No, not really, Patrick, advises Elvis. There's a ninety percent chance. Those problems will shop on the final exam. So it's worth getting help. Then he asks about Elvis's new job in the student center. Patrick put him in touch with his boss there and Elvis got hired this spend the rest of the session editing Elvis's resume, so they they see that year and active participant and job seekers. They want those kind of people Patrick Elvis are both part of Stony Brook's educational opportunity program. Or yo p that's the same program Derrick Peterson was in the Stony Brook grad. Who's now a wealthy tech entrepreneur Patrick's the son of Jamaican immigrants. He says ever since he can remember his mom has been insisting that he was going to go to college. I am the first child of four and the first to go to college out of my mom's family, my dad's will be as well. But I'm having instilled into me that education is the path to break this cycle that my parents were fighting so hard to break. Three thousand people apply for these coveted spots in the program at Stony Brook every year and about two hundred get them, it's a state funded program. So there's only so much money. First year students arrive five weeks early for an intensive summer school session, and they're matched with counselors who will work with them from the beginning to the end of their college careers. Patrick takes me to visit his counselor. Throughout the school year. UP students get academic and social support from counselors and peer mentors. The support seems to be paying off the graduation rates for students are even a little higher than the regular student body. Remember, these were students whose academic profiles, put them a little below the Mark when they were admitted and at Stony Brook, they're more likely to graduate just to give you a sense of how remarkable that is nationally Pellston have a graduation rate the eighteen percent lower than students who don't get Pell grants. But graduation isn't the ultimate goal social mobility doesn't happen without the next step getting a job when more affluent kids need a job. They might have a connection through a relative or neighbor who can offer an informational interview or an internship. Stony Brook is calling him this favour from alumni. On this spring evening. Stony Brook has invited. One hundred alumni to join students at a networking mixer students crowd around alums who work in IT, healthcare and business. These tend to beat feels that pay well and Stony Brook strengthen these areas probably helps explain some of those bottom to top success stories students who look dress for job interviews. Gather up free orders and work the room. The force behind. These efforts is Mariana voca who directs the career center I follow her to a quieter room. And she lays out how crucial these connections are especially to first generation college students, these students don't have exposure to professionals in the way that continuing generation students. Have I think for myself? I didn't know anybody with a college degree growing up after graduation a lot of Stony Brook grads. Pour into the New York City job market. So voca says they're up against candidates whose alumni networks are much more extensive. We're working on it. We're building it right now. And we're starting when they're students. But if we don't tell them, right when you think about social capital, they don't know the expectations. Right. So in a very practical way, not in a snowy way, we say, okay? We're gonna help you bring these alumni to help you. They want to help you. And when you're in a position you're going to help to she tells the story of an alum and banking whose company recruited one hundred new college grads, forty one of them were from Stony Brook. It wasn't loyalty to his alma mater. He told Subotica it was a good business decision. Starring Brooke rats were hungry..

Stony Brook Stony Brook grad Stony Brook university Long Island New York City Patrick Elvis Brooke rats Patrick Virginia Tech Adam America Amazon Derrick Peterson John Friedman Mariana voca United States Derek Peterson
"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:10 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Off student loans. Ten years after he graduated Adam was determined not to end up in that kind of debt. So he went to state schools. He started Virginia Commonwealth university. Then he transferred to Virginia Tech. It's one of the top public universities in the state. But even though Virginia Tech was a public school. Adam says there were plenty of rich kids there. I remember hanging out with a guy who lived in my dorm, and he got drunk one night, and then ordered two thousand dollars with a raving gear on Amazon, raving gear. Oh going to raves glow. Sticks light up torches. The light just dropped like a full thousand dollars on this. And then told the story about the next day. And it blew my mind how anyone could possibly have the resources and poor judgment to to make a decision like that. According to all that data analyzed by the economists at the equality of opportunity project. There are indeed a lot of rich students at Virginia Tech students. There have the second highest family income. Among highly selective public colleges in the United States. The university of Michigan is number one. These public colleges aren't doing much better than a private school like wash you when it comes to promoting social mobility students from poor families like Adam Curle Lesko are an exception at many of the nation's top public universities. So what colleges are doing a good job? Who are the mobility makers in America? Our correspondent Sasha as lenient takes us to Long Island New York to show us what a mobility maker looks like the campus of Stony Brook university is much plainer than the wash u campus. It started as teachers college in nineteen fifty seven it has a lot of Blackie brick buildings from the seventies. And some newer ones with more glass. Like this wasn't here. When I was here. Walk this way to go to a little less Shahal Derrick Peterson graduated from Stony Brook in nineteen eighty eight. He grew up on Long Island Stony Brook was a half hour from home and a place where he could work with big computers back then the goals. Just very simply can't go to school and get a job. My parents desk to we didn't have a lot had a way get out and be in do something. And then make my parents and my community proud of what I've done Dirk was admitted to Stony Brook as part of a special program for low income students who show potential, but aren't fully prepared for college. Their high school grades and test scores are lower than what Stony Brook typically looks for. Was a lot of people. School is really tough. But with a lot of support he did do it. Derek graduated with a degree in computer science and applied mathematics. Now. Here's a wealthy tech entrepreneur, he's setting up a scholarship to honor his father who never finished college. What I've gained is being able to help a lot of people. Stony Brook has been making bets on people like Derek Peterson. For decades the school produces a remarkable number of bottom to top success stories. The equality of opportunity project found half the students from poor families with ten Stony Brook, go on to become top earners. That's an Ivy league success rate, but the Stony Brook takes in a lot more low income students than an Ivy league school does turns out Stony Brook is the third best college in America when it comes to promoting social mobility, the top two are Cal State LA and pace university in New York John Friedman of the equality of opportunity project refers to these schools as America's engines of mobility, these are not fancy schools. So if you look at the schools with the very highest mobility rates, there are primarily schools that are in the middle of the American public higher education system. And what exactly are these schools doing Friedman's? Not quite sure I like to say that colleges with a very high mobility rate. They must be doing something. Right. They are either providing. Great education and a great boost to students that are on campus. Or they're doing a great job. Finding talented low income students in the first place Friedman. Thanks, it's probably both. It's not entirely clear what the secret sauce is at Stony Brook, but administered or say, these are some of the ingredients the school is a short train ride away from a ton of talented, low income kids growing up on Long Island in New York City. These turns are hungry to succeed and Stony Brook sees helping them do that as part of its mission. It recruits them it gives them a chance. Even if there may not be quite ready for college and it supports them along the way, remember how most high achieving low income kids. Don't apply to any selective. Colleges. Stony Brook tries to go. Find them cricket. But some of the outreach the school does is to pretty young kids. These long island's sixth graders are on a day-long field trip to an engineering lab at Stony Brook, they're learning how to build little motion detectors out of circuit boards. I. Emma and Samantha get some help with their soldering irons from David westerfield who usually teaches college students about semiconductor lasers. Teams on Stony Brook has a grant from the National Science Foundation to get kids from underrepresented groups excited about careers in science technology, engineering and math known as stem fields starting Brooke has cooked up math camps and opportunities for high schoolers to shadow doctors in its teaching hospital to learn about careers in healthcare Stony Brook, specifically targets children from low income school districts, these programs get kids onto campus, and may spark the idea I could come here. The woman who's picked a lot of those students who became bottom to top success stories is Judith for Hanan the dean of admissions. She's worked in admissions at Stony Brook for thirty four years more than half the schools history. She knows how many more students want the chance to be here. I work with applications. I see family income levels. So I see the level of need. And in my opinion. It's Rhone over the years. It's. Very in your face that there's still this very strong need for more thirty two percent of Stony Brook undergraduates receive Pell grants, remember wash U was trying to get up to thirteen percent, and because of federal state and institutional financial aid forty four percent of Stony Brook students pay no tuition, but it can still be a stretch to afford things like housing and books for Henan says there's a culture at Stony Brook trying to make college possible for these students. I can remember picking up the phone and talking to our associate director for campus residences in saying on many occasions. This student does not have money for the housing deposit. Can we wave it no problem, waive the deposit? This student doesn't have the housing deposit. And Furthermore, they don't have a place to stay for the last two weeks of the summer. No problem will give them jab on campus. We'll let them stay in the building. And then we'll figure it out social mobility doesn't just happen because the school takes in a lot of students from poor families, plenty of schools are willing to take their money, but many of those schools don't catapult their students to higher incomes, for example for profit schools. Take a lot of low income students and have some of the worst success rates. There's something that Stony Brook's doing for its low income students. That's really working. Five-person centre. Here's one of the things starting broke his doing having students from low income backgrounds mentor. Each other Patrick Hughes is a senior from Queens, New York. Patrick has a huge smile with dimples close cropped hair. And the slender billed of the soccer player. He is weak. Okay. Patrick's men T Elvis Peres is from the Bronx Elvis is a math major, but a calculus test didn't go. So well, did you try go into the math learning center? No, not really, Patrick, advises Elvis. There's a ninety percent chance. Those problems will show up on the final exam. So it's worth getting help Vinny asks about Elvis's new job in the student center. Patrick put him in touch with his boss there and Elvis got hired. They spend the rest of the session editing Elvis's resume, so they they see that year, an active participant, and you as seekers they want those kind of people, Patrick and Elvis are both part of Stony Brook's educational opportunity program. Or yo p that's the same program Derrick Peterson was in the Stony Brook grad. Who's now a wealthy tech entrepreneur Patrick's the son of Jamaican immigrants. He says ever since he can remember his mom has been insisting that he was going to go to college. I am the first child of four and the first to go to college out of my mom's family, my dad's family as well. But I'm having instilled into me that and the path to break the cycle that my parents were fighting so hard to break. Three thousand people apply for these coveted spots in the program at Stony Brook every year and about two hundred get them, it's a state funded program. So there's only so much money. First year students arrive five weeks early for an intensive summer school session, and they're matched with counselors will work with them from the beginning to the end of their college careers. Patrick takes me to visit his counselor. Throughout the school year. UP students get academic and social support from counselors and peer mentors. The support seems to be paying off the graduation rates for students are even a little higher than the regular student body. Remember, these were students whose academic profiles, put them a little below the Mark when they were admitted, and it Stony Brook, they're more likely to graduate just to give you a sense of how remarkable that is nationally Pell students have a graduation rate. That's eighteen percent lower than students who don't get Pell grants. But graduation isn't the ultimate goal social mobility doesn't happen without the next step getting a job when more affluent kids need a job. They might have a connection through a relative or neighbor who can offer an informational interview or an internship. Stony Brook is calling him this favour from. I the energy on this spring evening. Stony Brook has invited. One hundred alumni to join students at a networking mixer students crowd around alums who work in IT, healthcare and business. These tend to be fields that pay well and Stony Brook strengthen these areas probably helps explain some of those bottom to top success stories students who looked dress for job interviews. Gather up free orders and work the room. Everybody. Look, right. The force behind. These efforts is Mariana voca who directs the career center I follow her to a quieter room. And she lays out how crucial these connections are especially to first generation college students, these students don't have exposure to professionals in the way that continuing generation students. Have I think for myself? I didn't know anybody with a college degree growing up after graduation a lot of Stony Brook grads. Pour into the New York City job market. So voca says they're up against candidates whose alumni networks are much more extensive. We're working on it. We're building it right now. And we're starting when they're students. But if we don't tell them, right when you think about social capital, they don't know the expectations. Right. So in a very practical way, not necess- nudie way, we say, okay. We're gonna help you bring these alumni to help you. They want to help you. And when you're in a position you're going to help to she tells the story of an alum in banking, whose company recruited one hundred new college grads, forty one of them were from Stony Brook. It wasn't loyalty to his alma mater. He told Subotica it was a good business decision. Starring Brooke crowds.

Stony Brook Stony Brook grad Long Island Stony Brook Stony Brook university Virginia Tech Adam Curle Lesko Patrick Hughes Elvis Peres New York City Long Island Amazon Virginia Commonwealth universi Derrick Peterson America Brooke university of Michigan
"stony brook" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on This Week in Science

"This is the study from WCS the wildlife Conservation Society who's been studying whale song for probably twenty years at this point university of Saint Andrews Stony Brook, university Madagascar, national parks, all these people work together to look at the whale songs at really synthesize them and figure out what was going on a transcribed more than fifteen hundred individuals sounds recorded between two thousand one and two thousand five they compared similar songs similarity using statistical methods. So somehow, you can boil music down to make sense you have the frequent. Yeah. No, it it does make sense. Yeah. They the wave form that you have there are you can note certain syllables in free end frequencies and birdsong they use statistics to analyze the song. All the time. I love that. So so they'll they'll boil the song down to. Song units made of moans cries or other vocalisations, and then the song units are put back together into larger phrases, which are called themes different themes are produced in sequence to make a song that is then repeated for hours to days and for the most part all males within the same population. Sing the same song. Type. There's a very strong similarity between a population of Wales, and this population wide, similarity is maintained despite the fact that members die new members are born there's kind of evolution and change in the song. It it moves with the group. So that they kind of considered hit songs. It's like the top ten right for the group. It's like having the same accent? Right. We're having that is. Yeah. Birds are or what have you is? Absolutely. And so we know that some song learning can occur between populations that are in close proximity. But this was interesting because these two animals are in completely different basins, and they're not in the same space for very long. Usually they when two sets to populations of whales will converge in their song type. It's when they share a meeting ground. So they're together for a while. But these guys they're pretty separate in. So in two thousand three they saw that the songs sung by one set of Wales in Gabon was more elaborate than those in Madagascar in two thousand and four they shared the same themes and then. Both whale groups in two thousand four head drop the same themes from their previous your song types that was like they were out of out of fashion. Like, oh, nobody's listening to that anymore. And then five songs being sung on both sides of Africa were very similar. They are individuals in both locations singing songs with the same themes and order. Well that case Israel. I will say that right? Don't complain. Yes, you're being. Fierce..

Wales Saint Andrews Stony Brook university Madagascar wildlife Conservation Society Madagascar Israel Gabon Africa twenty years
"stony brook" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"stony brook" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Kornheiser show dot com. Baby boy, boots is here and was quiet for about fifteen minutes. And now, it's go time. Yeah. I made the mistake of running through banana and his early in the so he's no food. Granola bar, but I'm holding onto sky filled with protein now he is ready to go. I apologize. I probably shouldn't have given him that coffee, but seemed like. Jeff some news Nigel. I do. Indeed, Mr Tony. And I believe today's the eighth, right? Correct. Yes. You know, who you play tonight. Right binghamton. No. I don't know. Who are we on? Are we Homer on the road? And I'll have to check this Doni, Brooke. Yes. Stony brook. I hate Stony this, and then we will hate them. They're good. They arrive. Very good eleven three. So good year. Yeah. I don't. Well. We can we can hope we have hope where is that. Oh, it's at Stony Brook. Yes. Oh, no. It's it's morning. I'm sorry tonight. We have we have time to poison. We have. That's good. To know. We've been talking about college football with championship game last night. Should something about college football. Yeah. There is this notion and people people go on television, and they write essays about how great Clemson is about. How tragic this is for Alabama down for a sec soda things change things change Nebraska was a great great team. They went to a couple of coaches couldn't win. They reached out the Scott frost. He won four games at the end of the season. But they're nothing like they were Florida state right now Florida's stain under Bobby Bowden and JIMBO Fisher to a degree dominating teams. Florida state. Anybody can beat them right now. That's one of the reasons for Clemson caught them and pass them Clemson established itself as the best team in the the fifteen year period for Alabama way win anything they went to four or five. Different coaches. They didn't win anything. Oh, ala Bama, but ala Bama under saving not Alabama, not Alabama more this guy that had some off the field issues as we like to say remember the coach I do and I don't remember his name. I don't remember his Notre Dame. They went through fifteen years before Brian Kelly and after Lou Holtz where they weren't sure. What they were doing. They won seven or eight. They didn't want to let you know. So these income football in all sports in all sports, less. So in the pros because you can draft somebody who's meaningful for ten to twelve year run. But in college football, they're gone. And you gotta keep replacing and things things change at Clemson looks great now Clemson is greatness. Doesn't mean it lasts forever? Doesn't mean. You gotta have the right? It's the right guy. If you look back at Duke, you'd say might you chefs. He's the right guy. Of course, he's the right guy. Mine she shefty had a back problem. One year Pete. Herman Cain her. They want six game. And. Yeah. Him five years to get going. All right. Go ahead. Dallas news via VO state university is the gain of quarterback. They've lost a quarterback took one of the Clemson quarterbacks. Georgia kid just fields transferred last weeks. And he was like the top prospect but wasn't going to get on the field. On the field. So I said, and we said, well, he's not gonna stay. He's got one more year. Yeah. He's not gonna go state. If Dwayne Haskins is still playing and so he transferred last week and everybody thought. Well. Okay. Well, this means it has is gonna go exactly what it me. And. Yes. And he is in fact gonna go pro full go his final year. He had a fantastic finish third in the Heisman boasting voting. Rather? Fifty touchdowns. Fifty. Yes. Vicky five deceptions fifty touchdowns. I'm local for us. He went to bullets. I was were you aware of him. I was unaware of him. I was unaware of apparently was all met. Didn't. I didn't know that got to be all medals alive state's not gonna look right? But this kid, this is a burst on the scene doubt..

Clemson Florida state Dwayne Haskins football Stony brook Alabama Herman Cain Lou Holtz Scott frost Mr Tony Nigel binghamton Brooke Brian Kelly Vicky Florida Bobby Bowden Bama VO state university Pete
Dictionary.com chooses 'misinformation' as word of the year

Rush Limbaugh

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Dictionary.com chooses 'misinformation' as word of the year

"Of the year, Jane Salomon linguist and residents at dictionary dot com says the rampant spread of misinformation is really providing new challenges for navigating life in two thousand eighteen she adds that understanding the concept of misinformation is vital to identifying misinformation as we encounter it in the wild. And that she says could ultimately help curb its impact misinformation is defined as false information. That is spread regardless of whether there is intent to mislead elisa's Z for the human brain death may not be as immediate as it seems researchers from the Stony Brook university of medicine found it may take hours for the brain shut down after death as the blood slowly stops pumping to it by looking at patients with cardiac arrest, they found that the individuals. Could remember many details about their surroundings? Once they've been revived some say, this could mean that people stay conscious. Inside their body for a while after death the team hopes their findings may help prevent brain damage during the resuscitation of patients. That's NBC's. Lisa carter. KTAR news time is twelve. Oh, four on Wall Street are now the Dow is up one hundred ninety seven to twenty four thousand four eighty four. The NASDAQ is up eighty three to seventy or seven thousand twenty two and five hundred up twenty four to twenty six fifty seven oil at fifty one seventy three and now max gains in esta wealth management gives us the

Jane Salomon Stony Brook University Of Medi Lisa Carter NBC
Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

The Great Outdoors

01:51 min | 3 years ago

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

"This morning we do have long term construction though moving north or southbound on four ten Marbot the turnaround lanes are blocked off you have. Construction southbound. Sixteen oh four from military. All the way down to highway ninety and thirty-five access road north and. Southbound at eleven oh three alternating lanes blocked until October I'm Steven FOSS NewsRadio, twelve hundred w away from. The roofing dot com weather center dry started the. Weekend on this Saturday with a few clouds initially then some afternoon signed China's the high approaches ninety four clear to. The evening the low tonight will drop to seventy five and partly cloudy and slightly. Warmer tomorrow the hype to ninety five degrees I'm meteorologist Jeff marr from the Weather Channel on San. Antonio's official weather, station, NewsRadio twelve hundred w.. O. AI morning clouds seventy four degrees Six oh one at, NewsRadio twelve hundred w flames lit up the skies overnight on. The city's far west side is a two alarm apartment fire tore through, one building and threatened several others nearby thirty. Five fire units responding to that call at the Stony Brook apartments on border brick drive off timber hill no one reported injured it took. An hour. To contain the blaze no. Word yet on its cause a federal judge has ordered the Trump administration. To fully restore the deferred action for childhood arrivals or DACA program United States, District Judge John debates issued. The ruling Friday saying the White House failed to. Provide justification for ending the program President Obama started DACA to provide work permits and deferrals from deportation to eight hundred. Thousand dreamers the judge is delaying implementation for twenty days to give the Trump. Administration. Time to decide if it wants to appeal his decision White nationalists are. Expected to converge on the nation's capital for a unite the right rally August twelfth and. The city's metro transit systems considering giving them a private train to get there to prevent violence but the idea is causing controversy.

Daca Judge John Debates Steven Foss Stony Brook Jeff Marr China White House SAN Barack Obama Antonio United States President Trump Official Twelve Hundred W Seventy Four Degrees Ninety Five Degrees Twenty Days
Health officials warn of new species of tick found in NY state

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

01:48 min | 3 years ago

Health officials warn of new species of tick found in NY state

"Affected James flippin for, seven ten w. o. ARA. Number of legionnaires cases in upper Manhattan is now up to eighteen and that includes one fatality according to the New York City health department. And deputy Commissioner Dimitri discus the cooling tower suspected in the outbreak heaven clean and now I now believe that that cluster has been contained So that we do have bad news of a mortality we have the good news that the environmental. Exposure we believe is over some now people he can contract legionnaires disease. By breathing and water. Vapor that contains bacteria and if you are experiencing flu like symptoms you should contact your doctor immediately there's a new type of tick finding a home in Westchester county New York state officials say the long horned take has been found in several locations it's native to, Australia New Zealand and eastern Asia and the, health department says they don't know, what specific threat the. Tick now poses to. Humans in the state they are urging people to be cautious as usual when hiking working or even spending time in wooded areas a man is. Under arrest after being seen on a cell phone video menacing a subway riders Sunday on the video the suspect pulled a knife on a father and his family after they intervene. When they said the man hit his own child, said the. Man also threatened to kill the father the incident started on On each train canal street about three thirty pm and ended. With the suspect pulling out a knife at the west fourth street stop stop. And, Long Island students are mourning the death of a seventeen year old Farmingdale student. She collapsed last night after suffering some sort, of medical episode at a school. Function at Salem high high school east and she was pronounced dead, at Stony Brook university, hospital we'll have sports and your Weather Channel forecast up next. Wwl news time eleven, oh four balance of nature's, fruits and.

Dimitri New York City James Flippin Salem High High School Deputy Commissioner Manhattan Stony Brook University Westchester County Long Island Australia New Zealand New York Asia Farmingdale Seventeen Year Seven Ten W
NBC Sports presents IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama Sunday live at 3:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN – MotorSportsTalk

Indy's Morning News with Tony Katz

01:05 min | 3 years ago

NBC Sports presents IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama Sunday live at 3:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN – MotorSportsTalk

"Actually backing him police are checking surveillance video this morning hopeful to find out who released pepper spray at a warren township school yesterday fifteen students in two teachers were affected by it at stony brook middle school the school says no one was seriously hurt the district is unsure if a student released the spray on accident it is five oh six talks are underway about closing or redistricting carmel clay elementary schools the district is holding its first meeting with parents last night to answer questions about possible change changes the next meeting is less than a week away next wednesday evening at carmel elementary that starts at six thirty indy five hundred fans get excited today we are going to get to see the car that will lead the field of thirty three drivers to the green flag on race day the pace car being unveiled on the yard of bricks a chevy has been pez pace the race every year since two thousand two it's been a corvette or camaros the last fourteen years last year stunner which you can see here was a 2017 chevrolet corvette grand sport without with the old in with the noon time to get.

Warren Township School Stony Brook Middle School Carmel Elementary Corvette Fourteen Years