35 Burst results for "Stonewall"

Statues of Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson Removed in Charlottesville

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Statues of Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson Removed in Charlottesville

"Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson gone a third on its way taken down in Charlottesville, one member of the City Council, saying No, it's back to business of running the city. I'm just glad that we are finally able to implement the decision we made four years ago. Lloyd Snook is a Charlottesville City Council member who admits several years ago He wasn't for the removal of the Confederate statues. But he says two things became Clear. One was that the statues were a magnet for people. We did not want to attract to Charlottesville, the second that deadly unite the right rally in the death of two Virginia state troopers in a helicopter accident during the 2017 rally, he says, as the city moves forward when it comes to the statues, so we have not yet decided what's going to happen with the statues. So for now, they'll remain in storage. Mike Murillo, w

Lloyd Snook Charlottesville City Council Charlottesville Stonewall Jackson Robert E. Lee City Council Virginia Mike Murillo
Charlottesville Removes Two Confederate Statues

Red Eye Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Charlottesville Removes Two Confederate Statues

"Ends in Virginia as two Confederate statues are removed in Charlottesville. The statues of generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson were removed Saturday after years of debate and just short of four years after the Unite the right white supremacist rally. Which led to injuries and the death of a counter protester Heather Higher Charlottesville Mayor Nakia Walker says the removal is a small step in helping heal Americans sin committed by those who used the slave trade for economic gain. We, the people. One step closer to form a more perfect union. The statues will be stored in a secure location until the Charlottesville City Council makes the final decision about what should be done with them. Kevin

Charlottesville Heather Higher Stonewall Jackson Mayor Nakia Walker Robert E. Lee Virginia Charlottesville City Council Kevin
Third Statue Comes Down in Charlottesville

Fork Report

00:11 sec | 2 months ago

Third Statue Comes Down in Charlottesville

"A pair of Confederate statues has been taken down in Charlottesville, Virginia Cruz, using heavy equipment removed the Robert E. Lee statue early this morning. The statue of Thomas Stonewall Jackson came down a short

Virginia Cruz Charlottesville Robert E. Lee Thomas Stonewall Jackson
Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson Statues Taken Down

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson Statues Taken Down

Charlottesville Set to Remove Lee Statue That Sparked Rally

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Charlottesville Set to Remove Lee Statue That Sparked Rally

"A statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee will be removed from a park in Charlottesville Virginia Saturday protective fencing is in place to take it down this is the same argument that set off a violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville in twenty seventeen over a push to remove it the United the right rally led to brawls in the streets and about a white supremacist and admired Adolf Hitler intentionally plowed his car into a crowd of people the woman was killed the city of Charlottesville had to wait until resolution of a lawsuit to order the statues removal also being taken down a statue of Confederate general Thomas Stonewall Jackson a city councillor in Charlottesville says there was a determination to make sure the violence of twenty seventeen was not in vain I'm a Donahue

Charlottesville Robert E. Lee Virginia Adolf Hitler Thomas Stonewall Jackson United Donahue
The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

In The Thick

02:23 min | 3 months ago

The Legacy and the Future of Pride Month

"June twenty eighth nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine fifty two years ago. Police raided the stonewall in a gay bar and the uprising. That followed was led by trans activists. Marsha p johnson and sylvia rivera and it sparked a movement that has continued for decades marsha and sylvia like the trans vibe in lower manhattan at the time. It was real. They were taking up space at the stonewall inn and other places and that's why when the police raided they were like nana. You're not gonna quietest so. The first pride march in new york city was held on the one year anniversary of that uprising at stonewall similar marches went on in chicago san francisco los angeles but the history of that is rooted in resistance towards police violence over the last few years. It's like you know. Hey everybody is celebrating pride there you see. Cvs there you see comcast there you see. At and t. Putting out statements basically professing to be lgbtq allies but still giving money to politicians who are pushing anti lgbtq legislation and this is just three out of the twenty five companies that are actually pushing anti lgbtq federal state politicians. So as june comes to an end can do a little bit of a temperature. Check kinda how are you feeling at this moment in our. I'm wondering how are you thinking about this moment in going forward in two thousand twenty one post pandemic to put it singly. I think that aside from everything i think. That pride is as much about a recommitment to the unfinished business of nineteen. Sixty-nine as it is a celebration celebration has to be a part of any type of commemoration especially for people color. It's how we retain joy in the moments of difficulty but at the same time. I think that we have to recognize that. There's a lot of unfinished business. And specifically when it comes to the intersection of gender identity and race and economic opportunity all of those things that sylvia and marsha embodied in their life of the challenges in the hope that still remains very much on the table. And so i think that's what pride is every year and that's what i look to do with a recommitment

Marsha P Johnson Sylvia Rivera Stonewall Inn Marsha Sylvia Manhattan CVS New York City Comcast San Francisco Los Angeles Chicago
"stonewall" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

09:31 min | 3 months ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"This compromise. Bill just because people like mansion make a more progressive bill impossible. Yeah it's hard sometimes to untangle the games within gains. It's really one of those complicated moments where there's as much performance going on politically as there is actual kind of genuine coalition building. I think there is. There is an argument. One could make the stacey. Abrams was making a very canny choice. To say. i'm going to embrace this thing knowing full. Well that republicans are therefore going to demonize it and that will prevent this watered down version of the bill from going ahead. I don't know if that's the case. I also think it's very possible that she said all right. We've now reached the point where we cannot achieve the the original design of the for the people act. But let's go now in the next step into a negotiation and try to get what we can and she is very pragmatic. We've had over the years totally. And i think some of this is about coming to terms with who joe manchin is and what he really believes in and i think there is a general recognition. Now they'll five or so months into this administration that they are not simply going to be able to get him to do things the way that they might have hoped by appealing to his sense of history legacy or whatever that they're going to have to try to figure out how to nod to his real belief in bipartisanship And in the end they can't control what republicans will do but what they can try to do is mount process on the left. That shows joe manchin that he is not being obstructed in his view by both sides. So much of this is about what joe manchin believes. He can tell people when he goes home to farmington west. Virginia he needs to be able to say to people. I didn't do what the left asked me to do. And i didn't do what the right asked me to do. I did my own thing so much. A part of his brand which is such a cheesy way of talking about politics. But it's just a fact that you know that's that that is what you're seeing in real time centrally democrats progressives beginning to figure out how you how do you help. Joe mention be joe mansion and still make his way to the promised land of some of these progressive reforms and of course he's a democratic senator from a conservative state trying desperately to hang onto his job. Yeah exactly and you know one of the curious things that i discovered along the way of this that i found really interesting was you might think. Gosh he must be really irritating to somebody like chuck schumer. Who is the head of the party in senate and obviously trying to get all. These things accomplished people who are close to this. We'll say no no actually schumer on some level really respects the fact that mansion is able to win in that state. Because if you're a politician that's like being the michael phelps of politics. I mean pulling off a democratic win in a state like west virginia just as a pure practitioner. They all recognize that so. That's one of the reasons why you haven't heard party. Leaders turn on him is one. They respect the fact that he's there and to let's be honest. If it was not for him they would be. No senate majority leader in the democratic party. Right now they would have. This would be a republican senate and so as dick durbin said not too long ago you know. Even though mansion is stymying so much of what the parties trying to do durbin said i say a prayer every morning and evening for joe mansion. It's interesting and some columnists including nate colin. At the times and catherine ram pell at the post have suggested that mansion is acting out of some grand strategy for his party. Do you give any credence to that argument. I really don't think i figured i knew. I mean somebody very close to mention told me with admiration that he said you all think that he's playing three dimensional chess but he's playing checkers and he said that as a complement me that when he tells you what he thinks that's basically what he thinks but i think they're the one piece of this where there is some kind of slightly over the horizon strategy to it is that i mentioned goes through this process. And we've seen over the course of his career where he will announce opposition to something then. He wants to go through this kind of slightly agonizing process of public courtship and then in the end he will probably do something that prevents the democratic party from losing a key priority. You've seen him do it on a number of different things. He never voted against the affordable. Care act even though it caused him some political trouble at home you saw him make a play for gun safety legislation back in two thousand and thirteen even though that was not particularly popular in west. Virginia so he has this way of going through this real pageant of agony and indecision and then in the end he finds a way to to at least make sure that the core necessities of the democratic party are served. And i think there are democrats who are hoping. That's the case this time but it's this is the moment when it's going to be harder for him to pull off this balancing said this gets back to some of what you were talking about earlier about the president versus congress and you write that mansion and biden have obvious points in common. They're to white older catholic joe's in their seventies Both former football players who are very proud of their working class roots even they've since become quite wealthy They they care less about ideology than about trading but biden. And we've talked about this before. He has since becoming president. He's shooed his devotion to bipartisanship in favor of a quite progressive agenda while mansion has dug in his heels and this relationship between the two joe's could be incredibly important in determining how the democratic agenda will will play out in coming months and years. Yeah it really is important. I feel like we're going to be talking years from now about these encounters between these two. Joe's the joe manses political. Put it once. I mean there is something because biden has unique leverage to be able to lean on on mansion and look mansion and obama did not have a good relationship in fact. They talked only three times in the whole time. That mentioned was in the sun. An obama was in the white house but in the first few months of biden's time he and mention of time at least half a dozen times more they've met over and over again in the white house. In fact there was one. That one point ronn claim. The white house chief of staff was having dinner on the houseboat with mansion back in march and the president called. The president said to mansion towel snapping friendship. When are you gonna get me out there and mansion says. We're trying to figure out how to get you win. Biwater these two guys and they are very much guys. Do speak the same language and one of the key. Things that you've seen is that biden has been extremely cautious about when he puts pressure. I mentioned because he sees that as a very limited tool that he has to use sparingly so mentioned at one point said to me that he's very grateful that biden has not told me ordered me. Directed me to do things. What you said is when you can help me. Please help me. I mean biden takes pride in the fact that he's he always wants to try to navigate the other person's politics in order to bring them to to where he's trying to get the meaning in this case it means trying to say to mansion. What do people in west virginia want. And how do we frame the things that they want in wiz that will satisfy the political style. So how do you present climate change as a matter of jobs. How do you present broadband. As a matter of economic development those kinds of messaging things become very important. Very alert to that stuff and he's trying to figure out how to do it. With with the peculiar circumstances of democratic senator in a very red state. Thanks so much. Evan this has been illuminating and fun as always my pleasure. Thanks to evan osnos and new yorker staff writer is the author of joe biden. The life run and what matters now. This has been the political scene. You can subscribe to this and other new yorker podcasts by searching for the new yorker and your podcast app and find more political analysis and commentary on new yorker dot com. Feel free to rate and review us on apple. Podcasts our theme music is by russell. Gillespie program was produced by barron michelle moses and kylie warner for new yorker dot com. I'm dorothy wickham. Did black swan records was america's first black owned record label. The guy who made it. Harry pace revolutionized the music industry fought for equality. Good god why. Why don't we have like three movies about his doing record owner lawyer i mean. He's like the vocational macgyver. But then all the sudden one day it's like tooth he disappeared. Listen to the vanishing of harry pace on the radio lab feed on spotify..

kylie warner Joe Evan dorothy wickham evan osnos dick durbin nate colin harry pace michael phelps congress joe manchin west virginia spotify Abrams obama Gillespie two guys republicans durbin both sides
"stonewall" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

08:29 min | 3 months ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"A weekly conversation with new yorker writers and guests about politics. It's thursday june twenty four. I'm dorothy weakened. In executive editor of the new yorker with the senate evenly split between democrats and republicans president biden's legislative agenda depends on the cooperation of every member of the democratic caucus over the first month of his presidency. Biden has consistently run into a one man. Stonewall senator joe manchin of west virginia mansion scuttled the confirmation of near tandon as budget director opposed raising the corporate tax rate and force changes to the contents of biden signature. Covert relief bills. He opposes filibuster reform. And although he joined his democratic colleagues in supporting a sweeping election reform. Bill he suggested modifications that he believed would make the bill more palatable to republicans when asked about his opposition to democratic policy priorities mansion. Sounds the same refrain. The senate was conceived as a bipartisan institution and democrats and republicans need to work together. Here he is to cnn's manu raju going to make the place. Focus on what else i can tell you and you can't make it worse. I'm at work unless the minority has input. You can't disregard person it's not in the majority. The senate was never designed that way this week. Evan osnos new yorker staff writer profile joe mansion for the magazine. He joins me to discuss. How mansion has come to wield such power. the future of the filibuster and whether bipartisan cooperation is possible. Today's washington evan. Welcome back thanks dorothy. We have to start with a story. You tell your piece this week about a dinner mansion hosted in february on the houseboat he keeps stocked on the potomac. That was news to me by the way But in any case it's the most vivid account of read of the exceedingly tenuous democratic majority in the senate. This is one of those moments that kind of crops up in an interview. And i didn't really even have any the remotest idea. I was seeking it back in february on a very rainy. Nasty night A particularly meaningful night because it was the night after which donald trump had just been acquitted by republicans in the senate for the in his second impeachment trial joe manchin as he often does invited bunch of friends over friends meeting people in the senate to his houseboat. He lives on this houseboat on the potomac and he and his wife gail were giving people spaghetti and meatballs and kind of commiserating basically and he had jon tester democrat from montana and he industrial of this thing in common. Which is they're both democrats from from red states. And then susan collins of course the republican for main and that they all are part of this very little crowd of centrists and other having a nice evening he's mixing drinks and then they finally got up to leave and jon tester told me the story about him beginning to walk down the gangplank and as he says my feet went to the ceiling he fell down and began the slide and his foot hit the water and joe manchin reaches down to grab him and then he falls down to the two of these these gushers sliding down until eventually they stop and each of them ended up hurting himself. Mentioned broke his thumb and so on and so there was a it was just a parable in there somehow that That stands i think for mansions determination his real belief. I mean this is like borders on a form of faith that if you get people in a room over dinner that you can begin to breakdown divisions in politics and then running colliding with the grim fact of early the entire nature of what his is trying to achieve hinges on this slender Arrangement that is only ever one footfall away from oblivion likes to invoke the legacy of robert byrd who rose from poverty and the coalfields of west virginia to spend over fifty one years as us senator and the unofficial historian of the senate but in the course of your piece you make it pretty clear that mansion is no robert byrd It's interesting he. He's constantly paying homage to bird bird. Was this like you know kind of iconic figure who who could give. You the encyclopedic history of the senate and in mansions telling what he will say is bird believes that you must preserve all the traditions of the senate but the truth is that's actually kind of a very narrow reading of what birds legacy tells us because one of the really interesting things is even though bird yes believed that the filibuster this sixty threshold was of course an a piece of senate history bird was in fact one of the people who believe that it had to reform in nineteen seventy four. He was one of the people who created what's known as the budget reconciliation process which allows you to escape the filibuster then. Five years later he made another change to the filibuster because as he said at the time we cannot allow our institutions to govern themselves as they would have in the nineteenth century and so i think mansions kinda draping himself in birds cape but the truth is that bird actually believed as one of his aides said to me. Recently bird's biggest fear was the paralysis of the united states senate. And if he'd been facing somebody like mitch mcconnell he would not have been interpreting tradition in the way. That mansion seems to be interpreting. It all of this talk about bipartisanship makes many democrats want to tear their hair out. Because anybody who's watched the senate over the last ten years can tell you that. Republicans have no perceivable interest in bipartisanship. So why does mansion think that is going to change. I mean this is the million dollar question. Dorothy i think it's sort of this combination. There are sort of psychoanalytic explanations and then very functional political explanations. The sentimental fact. I mean he he really does apply in some sense his own biography to understanding the senate which is to say he grew up in a very small town in which You know as people say to me in farmington west virginia population three hundred twenty five. When the creeks rise you have no choice but to work with people whether you agree with them or not. You have to find a way to work together. And then the blunt political reality is that he is the last democrat in congressional delegation. That was all democrats as recently as two thousand now twenty one years ago and so he has to be very responsive to what conservatives in west virginia believe and want but but as a result he ends up constantly invoking this image of bipartisanship which just looks like a fantasy frankly to a lot of people described him in the often. Sounds like a guy who's kind of raising his glass for a toast at the very moment that all the other guests table or lunging at each other with their statements just doesn't it doesn't match what we see in washington so let's look at one very important people of the problem. Here mansion supported the creation of a commission to look into january six capital insurrection. It would've been a bipartisan commission. Receive bipartisan support in the house it had republican supporters in the senate but then predictably senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell announced his opposition to the commission aggressively ripped as caucus into voting against it and the bill died. So how does mention. Look at that. And think that there's any hope there. He regarded the blockade by republicans against the january sixth mission. As a huge disappointment and shock. He gave a gave a statement afterwards. He taped a little video at his desk in which he said that they will have this on their conscience and that they were betraying their oath but the reality is that has no political impact. Him just declaring. That doesn't then mean that he's going to then take action to prevent them from doing it again. And that's where a lot of the frustration of his colleagues becomes vivid because they say you cannot allow them over and over them being the republicans to prevent even the most elementary act of responsible government like.

donald trump mitch mcconnell Biden robert byrd Dorothy Evan osnos jon tester february dorothy west virginia thursday june twenty four Republicans montana over fifty one years nineteenth century gail each this week collins Five years later
A Look Back at the Stonewall Riots

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:25 min | 3 months ago

A Look Back at the Stonewall Riots

"The stonewall riots are named after the stonewall bar where the riots took place back in the day in new york city before there was a gay bar on every corner from the bridge to the upper west side there were only a handful of bars where lgbtq i plus people could gather for drinks believe it or not serving alcohol in bars to quote known homosexuals had just become legal in nineteen sixty seven two years before the stonewall riots. That's another insane fascinating story. If you wanna learn about the four men who literally fought for and won the right for gays to get hammered in public. I strongly suggest you google nyc sip in nineteen sixty six. That shit is bananas and those guys are heroes anyway. Most of the gay bars at the time were owned by the mafia. It's not like the mafia was trying to do something nice for gay people. It was more. Like i don't want them in my house but i'll take their money now. It was just a business opportunity. The mafia knew they could buy basically condemned. Buildings put almost no money into fixing them up and then open them as gay bars. They charge an entry fee to get watered down the drinks and pay off the cops to look the other way. Most of the gay bars were dumps and the stonewall was no exception. There was no fire exit. No running water behind the bar to wash glasses. And the toilets in the bathroom were constantly overflowing but it had a jukebox and it was one of the few places gay people go and dance with each other without being arrested or beat up so they put up with the inconveniences. What other choice did they have. The other to know about these mafia run gay bars is that even though they had these payoff deals in place with the local precincts police raided these bars all the time like once a month for the cops and the mob bosses. It was just part of doing business however for the people caught in the middle of all of this the raids were a nightmare. Anyone without id or really anyone. The cops felt like messing with was likely to get arrested. As was anyone not dressed in. And i quote at least three items of clothing as prescribed to their gender by nature. Meaning anyone drag was getting hauled into a paddy wagon and thrown in jail for the night this law by the way apparently dates back to the eighteen hundreds and was originally put in place to keep rural farmers from dressing up to scare off tax collectors.

New York City Google
1 Dead at Florida Pride Parade After Truck Drives Through Crowd

Glenn Beck

00:14 sec | 3 months ago

1 Dead at Florida Pride Parade After Truck Drives Through Crowd

"A pickup truck drove into a crowd at an LGBTQ Pride parade in Florida, killing one person and injuring two others. Saturday, Stonewall Parade and festival was abruptly canceled following the incident. Fort Lauderdale Mayor Dean Turtle is called the event a terrorist attack on the LGBTQ plus

Florida Mayor Dean Turtle Fort Lauderdale
One Dead After Two Struck by Vehicle at Florida Pride Parade

Glenn Beck

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

One Dead After Two Struck by Vehicle at Florida Pride Parade

"Injured two people at the start of a Stonewall Pride parade in Wilton Manors, Florida near Fort Lauderdale. Dean Trantalis, mayor of Fort Lauderdale, was there and says he saw it. All of a sudden is white pickup truck dash right through the crowd, barely missing. Congressman Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz. Car by inches and just dash through, smashed through a gate smashed into a landscaping company and and and he hit two people on the ground. Truck drivers in custody. No word of the crash was intentional. Police are hunting a man they have

Stonewall Pride Parade Dean Trantalis Fort Lauderdale Wilton Manors Congressman Congresswoman Wass Florida
Throw the first Stone(wall)

Your Brain on Facts

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Throw the first Stone(wall)

"In the early hours of june twenty eighth nineteen sixty nine new york city police raided the greenwich village. Gay club called the stonewall inn. Let me set the scene for you. Gay clubs were much more than a place to get drunk or look for love in the nineteen sixties and frankly all the decades leading up to it. They were not exactly accepting of lgbt people. Being queer wasn't only societally unacceptable. It was against the law same sex relations between consenting adults or illegal in new york city in nineteen eighty and you could be arrested on the street for not wearing at least three articles of gender appropriate clothing now out on a limb here and say that men in skirts found themselves on the receiving end of that one a lot more often than women and slacks did understandably. Lgbt people flocked to gay bars and clubs refuges where they could socialize and more importantly be themselves openly. You still weren't safe there though. The new york city state liquor. Authority penalized and shutdown. Gay bars arguing. That the mir gathering of more than three homosexuals was technically disorderly. These regulations were overturned in nineteen sixty six thanks to the efforts of strident activists but things as simple as holding hands with someone of the same gender was still illegal so police harassment of gay bars continued. There was another player. In the game the mafia the mob saw profit to be had in catering to the displaced and disenfranchised gay clientele by the mid nineteen sixties. The genovese crime family controlled most of the gay bars in the village in nineteen sixty six. They purchased the stonewall inn which had been a bog standard bar and restaurant renovated it on the cheap and reopened it as a gay bar. Stonewall inn was registered as a private bottle bar which did not require a liquor licence because patrons were supposed to bring their own liquor club attendees had to sign their names in a book to maintain the club's membership facade. Police initially left the stonewall inn alone by dint of regular bribes from the jennifer easies patrons benefited by the fact that the police hassling the owners but it also meant that the owners could run the club as they saw fit which meant as cheaply as possible. The club lacked a fire exit. There was no running water behind the bar to wash the glasses. Though there was plenty of water in the drinks themselves and the less said about the bathrooms the better

Stonewall Inn New York City Gay Club
Storytelling and the Science of Love With Helen Fisher

This Anthro Life

02:18 min | 3 months ago

Storytelling and the Science of Love With Helen Fisher

"Thanks again for talking with us today. Thinking about your trajectory. Why did you decide to become an anthropologist. In the first place is so interesting. Because i grew up in a glass house was don't by one of the harvard. Five right up the road philip. Johnson's fan says. When i was six seven and eight years old i used to sneak into the woods and sit on an old stonewall and watch my neighbors eat. Dinner always watched table always. I've been fascinated with by watching people and by the continuity between men and based and identical twin and even as a small child everybody would ask the questions like. Do you like the same food. Have the same friends to get the cavities in your teeth. Do you think like which. I thought was a very strange question at the time now. I don't know as so long before. I knew there was a nature nurture issue. I knew there was biology to behavior because of my childhood because everybody asks identical twins what they have in common. And so i already had that and as i say i used to sit in the woods and watch my neighbors eat dinner. I remember in graduate school. I went to a party. Native set up a camera against some another apartment building next door. And i want to spend an hour watching a man smoke his pipe and this watching this patient motions in the ways is moved Focused was so. i'm just always been anthropologist. And then i remember. I was in college and i was in the study smoker. The basement and i had a girlfriend to walk ins at helen. You'll really like anthropology. Because you are apologised. Oh as so. She pointed out to me. And i took every single. I didn't even take the beginning course. I just took whatever they had. And one of the things about it as you don't have to start or at least i did with a big overview. I took peoples of africa. I took archaeology peoples of indonesia. Whatever it was primate behavior without ever know some of the basics. And you can pick up all that very rapidly if you registered so there's always been in anthropologist and somebody finally pointed the field out to me and i've always been interested in the nature part of nature and nurture.

Harvard Johnson Helen Indonesia Africa
What is Pride Month?

The Ten News

01:15 min | 4 months ago

What is Pride Month?

"This month you might see an extra abundance of rainbow flags and an explosion of color everywhere from commercials on tv to incredible parades in the street. Pride is here. so what is it. Pride began as a demonstration created to remember the events at the stonewall inn in nineteen sixty nine the somalian was a gay bar in new york city. And during this time gay people faced regular attacks and persecution. The police regularly raided the stonewall inn but this day. lgbtq people there had enough and fought back protests and violence continued for days afterwards capturing national attention. This event became a turning point and it's credited with launching the modern gay rights movement which still continues to this day as lgbtq fight for equality pride events like parades and street festivals are held all over the country and around the world. Many will return in person this year after being cancelled last year because of kovin and others will offer tons of virtually vents for celebration and learning

Stonewall Inn New York City
NYC Pride parade bans police; Gay officers 'disheartened'

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

NYC Pride parade bans police; Gay officers 'disheartened'

"I'm Julie Walker organizers of NYC pride or banning police and other law enforcement from marching in their parade until at least twenty twenty five NYC pride's under Thomas's people forget pride was started as a movement against police brutality and recent incidents highlight how the struggle continues last year alone on the anniversary of Stonewall introduced a wall the NYPD itself Moorestown talking people and this year the NYPD anti discrimination chief was fired over hateful online posts Thomas says the voices of black and trans gender most often targeted in the community matter and they're listening to those voices that say seeing a cop in uniform at the parade is triggering the gay officers action league along with the NYPD say they're just heartened by the decision police will still protect the parade Julie Walker New York

Julie Walker Nypd Thomas NYC Moorestown New York
Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

Humans of Hospitality

01:42 min | 5 months ago

Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

"Donald stein managing director of district farmers. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast day. Hugely appreciate you sparing the time to chat. I just asked dan. Because unfortunately despite the fact that i love the late district not face to face but where in the world are you. This morning i am on the only island this morning by the each on fairly ironic because other agents Rarely get song. We do have some nice job today. So it's beautiful. So why is that is that is that is on the coast. Is it or yes. I live in borrowing furnace case. Shipbuilding town a systems etc. Our animals assaults trout lake district so bart alec cetera. I am but i am a barrel boy on bread and only is alive in just a filing furnace. Mazen are well. I'm by the beach as well as that. I was going to be deeply envious imagined you identify sat on the top of the stonewall fouls or you know smoking a pipe looking out over the lakes but you know we're we're coastal brothers. So that's That's better on monday. So william i wanna be up there right. You represent some incredible foams in an genuinely you know. I think i think the lake district must be one of the most beautiful places on the planet let alone in england. I adore it but for those who have not heard of late district farmers. Can you just explain to people about. Yeah do as a business. I i mean basically. We represented founding cooperative. And i don't say the found his shop window for really found producing a brilliant Just create excellent products.

Donald Stein Bart Alec Cetera Mazen DAN William England
Virginia Supreme Court says Confederate statues can be removed

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Virginia Supreme Court says Confederate statues can be removed

"For the removal of a couple of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville. The state Supreme Court has ruled the two statues one of Robert E. Lee, the other of Stonewall Jackson can go the high court overturning a circuit court decision that favorite a group of residents who sued to block the city of Charlottesville from removing the monuments. After the City Council voted to take them down That's correspondent Rich Thomason

Charlottesville Robert E. Lee Stonewall Jackson Supreme Court City Council Rich Thomason
High court: Charlottesville can remove Confederate statues

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

High court: Charlottesville can remove Confederate statues

"Virginia's highest court has ruled that the city of Charlottesville can take down two statues of Confederate generals a statue of Stonewall Jackson with erected in nineteen twenty one and three years later one of Robert E. Lee Charlottesville's city council eventually voted to remove both prompting a violent white nationalist rally in the summer of twenty seventeen a group of residents also sued to block the city from taking down the statues in a lower court ruled in their favor but Virginia Supreme Court has now overturned that decision saying a state law regulating the disturbance of or interference with war memorials or monuments was created long after the statues were erected and neither gave the city authority to put them up or prohibit it from taking them down I'm Ben Thomas

Charlottesville Stonewall Jackson Robert E. Lee Virginia City Council Virginia Supreme Court Ben Thomas
3 dead, several injured in San Diego after car drives into pedestrians

The John Phillips Show

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

3 dead, several injured in San Diego after car drives into pedestrians

"After a car plowed into a group of pedestrians near San Diego City College Fire Chief Colin Stonewall. We had Three dead on scene that were triaged here way transported to immediate and another three to the hospitals. We had a total of nine patients here today. The 71 year old driver is suspected of drunk driving. Some victims appear to be homeless. The

San Diego City College Colin Stonewall
Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

The Takeaway

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

"Being leveled at an associate of Larry Ness are the former U. S gymnastics team doctor now behind bars accused of sexually molesting hundreds of young female gymnasts, most of them minors. Ah, former head coach of the U. S team, John get hurt is now under arrest in charge with 24 felony counts. Including human trafficking and sexual assault. In announcing the arrest, state Attorney General Dana Nessel also implicated Michigan State University in the crimes for failing to turn over internal documents believed to be connected to ness are There are no legal avenues remaining that would allow us to secure these documents absent MSU's decision to voluntarily produce them. I find it unconscionable. At the university would stonewall the very investigation that it requested some gym. This alleged together. It was physically and emotionally abusive and force them to be treated by NASA are Get her, maintains he had zero knowledge of Nasser's crimes. The

Larry Ness Attorney General Dana Nessel Gymnastics Michigan State University John MSU Nasa Nasser
"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Characters actually twenty real people. I'm the twenty-first characters because I'm in the play as the interviewer a, which was a freaky thing to. You playing yourself for you have other people that you get to cast as as yourself. In this production all ten actors ten actors played each two different people. And each actor played me. So tender from people played me. So I was played by an African American lesbian by a white guy by by an Asian. American. It was it was something to see. It was Was it moved me to tears? Well, Eric Thank you so much for your time to come on and chat about Stonewall I. Know I learned a ton and make sure to add a links to all of your work in the show notes for this episode as well. I just love talking about this with so much fun and I'm glad I got to see the film and I hope I never have to watch it again..

Stonewall Eric
"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"The Ed Murphy I knew was the reconstituted Ed Murphy? So the film portrayed somebody who was there were gay people who took advantage of other people. Were just we're human. We are equal opportunity opportunists. Well, like you said, like you said before they're trying to earn a living like they're trying to make their way unfortunately sometimes, that means putting other people down in order to survive. Yes. So so I learned something from the film I'm hoping that was close to accurate because Ed Murphy comes off as a terrible person I'm guessing the scene where he picks out this young Danny from the Midwest to an an older gay couple one of whom is dressed up like Ethel Merman and for your listeners who don't know who Ethel Merman is go to youtube and look Ethel Merman and that was how this older gay man was dressed up. In their fancy apartment with his husband and. And trying to rip off the clothes of young Danny who who every time. Anyone tried to do to him what they portray in the film. He gets the same expression on his face of both the horror mixture of horror and Oh my God, I can't believe this is happening to me and. We're supposed to imagine what's happening down. Then I, it was just a pathetic scene, but the ED Murphy figures into this because he's the one who's pimping out this young kid I don't doubt that there were people like Ed Murphy operating in that environment at that time. So I have to go back and read David Cars Book David. Carter recently died. His book was he spent ten years writing a book about stone definitive history of the stonewall uprising in everything that occurred around it. So for anyone who's interested in knowing more that really is the the authoritative account speaking of the uprising we're at the point in the movie where we see the uprising itself or it's been called the stonewall riots in history as well. The movie has the date as June twenty, eighth, nineteen, sixty nine. We mentioned earlier Danny's the first one to throw the brick the movie. Omega is. First of all judy. Garland who for for people? Who Don't she? She was an iconic singer who's very popular among especially game mentioned a lot of gay fans and is famous for the movie the wizard of Oz, there's been much debate about whether or not her desk which coincided with the stonewall uprising. Her body was on display the twenty seventh of June at Campbell's funeral home on the upper east side. So people went to see her body and then some of them went down to the bar. But. It's not believed that her death had anything to do with it, and if the car theorized that these street kids probably didn't even know who Judy Garland was or had no attachment to her in the way that older gay men did because the way it's portrayed in the film, it suggests that. One of the character ray goes uptown to see judy. Garland body and that they're upset about her death, it's likely that that had nothing to do with it. But as I'm watching the scene unfold outside the stonewall and you just know know Ryan that's about to occur and I know how this plays out and one of the accounts someone throws a rock breaks window and I see Danny arguing with a believe it was Congo Congo woman we that's how congresswoman woman was known by Martin Voice and she's just known as Conga in the film. Stakes brick out of her bag. And Danny suddenly has the brick and his hand and thinking Oh, please domes Jenny Danny shouldn't be the ones that throw the first brick because it's going to ruin your life screenwriter if you portray the first person who throws a brick at the stonewall and as a blond boy from the Midwest because. Even. If it was true. That shows every myth about stonewall and it wasn't true. It wasn't a blond boy from the Midwest who through the first rock or brick no one knows exactly who threw the first rock as with any riot or uprising that get started wherever you're standing. There's a different perspective on what's happening. So, as was described to me, what happened at first was people started throwing coins. At stonewall INN and that was to say to the police he came for your payoff. Here's some more. And I learned that from Sylvia. Rivera. Who is one of the people who was alleged to be a participant of the stone uprising I didn't know that detail and the police were inside right because in the movie we see the police inside. So I'm just picturing this in my head, they're throwing coins at stonewall with the police essentially barricaded inside. Before the police are barricaded. Okay. At least that's how it happened to throwing coins, and what happens is there's somebody does throw a rocket breaks a window. I was glad to see them the way the filmmaker portrayed the uprising is pretty close to how it's been described to me by people who were there, and by Lucian Truscott Fourth, who is a village voice reporter who was the scene at the time published the first one of the first articles on July third. Of, sixty nine describing what he saw because as it's often portrayed male or described is a much bigger riot than it actually was. So people talking about Molotov cocktails and firebombs and what you see in the film as the kids squirting lighter fluid on the plywood behind the glass window that has been broken and they set fire to the plywood. That's about the extent of how much flame there was. There were Molotov Co cocktails weren't firebombs. If, you compare what happened at stonewall in terms of riot ranking. Given what was going on in the nineteen sixties the late nineteen sixty with confrontations with the police and riots in the major cities it was a very small uprising. What made it different was that it was gay people fighting back against the police and instead of the police chasing gay people you have these street kids who people thought of as weak and fearful you have street kids chasing the police through. The village and nobody could believe that that was happening. So that's what made it unique, and then the the unrest went on for total of six nights it ebbs and flows, but I was impressed that they that they didn't overdo it. There's a kick wine that's portrayed in the film of the kids doing a kick line and doing a chance we are the stonewall girls we were her hair in curls. Where our genes below are these there various lyrics that I've heard but as the daily news wrote about it and this New York daily state wrote about it in sixty nine. They suggested that it was a line of drag queens in full Regalia in high heels in lafont. which actually is much better. I love that myth better than the actual reality which was restricted some moderate modify drag when I talk to Martin. Boyce was at stonewall about the high heels. He said, we did wear high heels to the stone. While you were flats you couldn't run from the police wearing high heels. So in that regard I, thought that the filmmaker did a good job. Of portraying the scene and with riot police with their shields and batons all of that described. Now we can't compare it to actual film of what happened at stonewall because there is none. You can't compare it to hundreds of photographs that were taken because as far as we know, there were a handful of photographs taken fe the most famous ones taken by Fred Madeira are a five of them that I've seen..

stonewall Ed Murphy Jenny Danny Ethel Merman Judy Garland stonewall INN brick Midwest Martin Voice youtube Lucian Truscott David Cars Carter Molotov Co Fred Madeira Campbell Boyce ray Rivera
"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Off away old line organization that there assimilation simulation combination isn't afterward coats and ties, and it's looking at that organization through the Contemporary Lens of Nineteen, sixty nine. You might think that they were old fashioned group but when frank founded the Managing Society of Washington DC in nineteen, sixty one, there were no protests out on the street. Frank is the one who initiated the first protest from the White House in Nineteen, sixty five and the reason he wanted everyone to dress appropriately at least if he considered appropriate men in suits and ties women and skirts and blouses and heels. He was arguing that gay people should not be discriminated against in employment and he said, if you WANNA be employed look employable, he also believe that your appearance shouldn't get in the way of the message and that's why he had people dressed the way they did the signs at all the protests were uniform. So. It was a very careful branding effort for a people who had been largely hidden most Americans had never seen on the sexual before. But as the sixties unfolded, the nineteen sixties and young people became radicalized young people felt that what the mashing society was doing with old fashioned they shouldn't have to dress a certain way to protest and eventually because in large part because of the stonewall uprising that earlier generation was swept away and a new group of younger radical people came into the movement and the movement exploded it went from between forty and sixty organizations to nearly fifteen hundred organizations in the first year after stonewall. If Frank Kennedy saw how he was portrayed in this film, he would be rolling over in his grave. Because he was he was a real firebrand and he's portrayed as sort of this. mousy guy in a suit talking before a group that. Politely and Trevor Who's kind of a cool version cooler version of a managing member kind of smoke in hot guy clear. You just knew Danny from the Midwest was GONNA fall for. and. He's just he's portrayed as this manipulative user buckler also an activist. I found his character particularly annoying and repellents but the guy who the the film tried to do is create a tension between. Mattachine the old line group and the younger activists, which is actually a true tension. I'd just objected to the way he did it because again, it seemed like such A. Cliche that Danny was betrayed by trevor and Trevor found a younger man you know hammock sense. Yeah? Yeah I mean the. The gears grind. So loudly in this film, you can just he'll the index cards lined up on the court or It's interesting. You mention frank getting fired from NASA and I think there was even a moment there where Danny's like work for NASA when he when you talk to him so I like that little detail there of that. It sounds like that part of it might have been you know in a mosh to frank yes. Well, Franken wants it to work for for what was. Becoming NASA, but he lost his job and that was the end of it for him because any job in the federal government for an astronomer required security clearance and no person who was known to be gay could get security clearance. They ruled career Oh. Yeah. Well, that probably goes back to the being categorized as mentally ill similar concept to you know teacher in in that aspect. That was that was. The blackmail issue less the mental illness issue. Okay going back I. Guess you mentioned to the the red scare and and tying all that into it and Stood out to me while I was watching the scene with frank campion and the mattachine society. He said something to the effect of how the American people will start to understand that firing us just for being gay is plain wrong and of course, it was this year twenty twenty. If you're listening to this in the future that the US Supreme Court ruled gay and transgender employees are protected under the civil. Rights. Act of nineteen, sixty four so that just happened. In twenty twenty, but they're talking about this sort of thing and twenty fifteen movies at back in nineteen sixty nine. So seems like as long overdue. Are there any other examples of similar decades? Long fights just to get basic rights welfare lgbtq people? Yes. Leaving aside other civil rights movements, which took much longer even than Lgbtq people the right to serve in the military the effort to remove gay people for the military began towards the end of World War Two. The first protest about gay people military was nineteen, sixty four at the Whitehall induction center in the financial district in New York City it was the from what I understand the first public protests by gay people ever in nineteen sixty four and it was over gay people being thrown out of the military and the argument was if you're gonNA throw someone in the military for being gay least give him an honorable discharge in don't ruin his life. So that was about it was fought for decades as well, and the issue of mental illness was also fought over a period of time I mean it's it's shameful that the issue about employment is this long and there's still no law protecting gay. People. Against Discrimination a national law against discrimination in a combination. So in the cities and states where you're not protected by local laws, you can be thrown out of your apartment for being here. I guess I never realized that that seems crazy. Or not served at a restaurant. Wow. So that's all up to that state levels at city level or or is that the establishment instead of state or local? It depends upon the state in which you live. Yeah. I'm no expert on it, but you can still run into problems. Wow. Is there are these cases about Baker's not wanting to bake cakes for gay wedding I think I've seen that in the news at and it's just one of the like really. Don't you have better things to do you know. What is a wedding cake? They aren't asking for a cake with their private parts reproduced on top of the cake. It's just their names to cake the cake. Cake cake. I love that about the film that was a two thousand, fifteen film in which county is talking about gay people and Employment and discrimination, and here we are all these years later and it was a decades-long battle game protections in employment. And it's not to be underestimated what a huge deal about is he I and I I appreciate your pointing out some of the fights that are still ongoing that still need to be addressed for. Sure. Going back to the movie one of the villains one of the main villains I guess I should say that we see in the movie is Ron Perlman's character a guy named Ed Murphy and as the movie explains it at takes advantage of people him some out. We see this happening with Dana Film but then at the end of the movie, there's a bit of taxed at the very end that explains Ed Murphy ended up as a gay activist and was posthumously made Grand Marshal the Newark Pride. Parade. Powell. Did the movie do showing the character arc of Murphy? Have done a better job of reading David Carter's book on Stonewall because I'm guessing he went into detail about I always heard something about it but.

frank Danny Trevor Who stonewall NASA Ed Murphy Frank Kennedy Managing Society of Washington White House frank campion US Supreme Court Ron Perlman mattachine society managing member Dana Film Franken Midwest Powell
"stonewall" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Let's talk about this this change. The splintering of gay right activism at the time of the stonewall uprising. The the existing infrastructure was there, but he was a rather conservative state approach of assimilation. Where did that change? especially in terms of racial and socioeconomic groups during the late sixties, we'll thinks it already begun changing before stonewall the first of them. The more radical organizations was founded actually nineteen, sixty, one when Frank Kenny founded, what was an independence chapter of the Mattachine Society in Washington DC where he came up with the idea of protesting in public, which was a radical move in those years I wouldn't call the early movement to simulation as they were responding to the era in which they live, they were trying to form an identity and figure out A. A way to live in the world that they were presented with and The word assimilation to me seems is is is too pejorative for what they were. They were actually they were radicals in their time, but the world was shifting quickly, and you can see the difference in just images from the annual reminder protests from nine hundred, sixty five to nineteen sixty-nine in Philadelphia Independence Hall it was held every July fourth by a group of gay and Lesbian People. You see pictures of that, and how uniformly people are dressed and for the most part. It's all white, not entirely because there's a famous person named Ernest who you can see in some of those. Those. Photographs an African American woman, wearing white framed cats, is sunglasses, but it was predominantly white movement and what you see coming happening toward the late sixties is an influx of younger people and a big mix of of identities in terms of of race and ethnicity and many more women, so if you look at the first pride, March New York. City in nineteen seventy and you look at the photographs. It is stunningly mixed stunningly diverse it fits with the era. Young people were very involved in the antiwar movement in the black. Civil Rights movement the Women's Movement. So the gay-rights movement tracked along with those movements as well and drew in large numbers of. Of People in a diverse range, but it was also nineteen, seventy, nine, hundred, sixty nine, and there was still misogyny to deal with and racism to deal with, so it was a complicated time, and very quickly after the initial organizations were formed the new organizations that were formed right after Stonewall, they started to splinter as different groups found their voice founder energy and decided they wanted to go their own way like the radical lesbians and people of Color. It was just it was a complicated. Stu that led to a lot of creativity, but also an enormous amount of conflict within the movement. Right after stonewall also right after stonewall Alfredo Diong been your. a young gay man who is grievously injured trying to escape a police station fearing he might be deported. became the center of an enormous media attention. The picture that ran in in the daily news was gruesome in an suited that tabloids salacious tastes, but I was. I was wondering if there isn't something more than just tabloid interest that drove the media. was there a sort of awakening to gay rights issues after stonewall? In the broader me, there was because suddenly there were a lot of people before the before the style uprising, the protests for small, and suddenly with the pride March itself in in June of nineteen seventy you. You had a thousands of gay people in the street, and even before that right after weeks after the storm will uprising, there was a protest march of hundreds of gay people, and no one had seen this before, so it was of interest to the media suddenly. Who are these people? And what are they doing? And then with the Diego Velez incident where he jumped out the window of a police station after a bar raid than hundred and seventy people were arrested the same exact. Inspector Pine lead that raid at a an after hours. Club in a basement called the snake bit village. The the pictures were of. Impaled on offense that is dramatic, and that led to a very quickly organized protests of hundreds of gay, people who marched to the police precinct that had led the rate of the snake. So? Yes, there was absolutely more interest by the media. Because suddenly there was this group of people and not just in New York City. who are. On the march that couldn't be ignored anymore. So looking at the change in the way the media dealt with people before, and after still.

stonewall Alfredo Diong stonewall Women's Movement Philadelphia Independence Hall Frank Kenny New York Mattachine Society Washington DC Ernest founder New York City. Diego Velez
"stonewall" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on American History Tellers

"You've heard about black power white power now get ready for St Power. Vanguard urged its members to think beyond racial divisions and focus on the community. They all shared namely the tenderloin neighborhood. They organized community cleanups of trash and use needles that littered the streets. They also helped organize the first pick it of comptons cafeteria to protest harassment and discrimination there. But. Matters came to a head in August nineteen, sixty six, when competence management called police to remove customer who wouldn't leave? An altercation erupted in the restaurant when police officer grabbed the arm of a transgender woman and trying to drag her away. To his surprise, she threw a cup of coffee in his face in the melee that followed plates cups. Silverware and saucers flew through the air at the policeman who had to dash outside for backup. Approximately fifty customers spilled out into the street, and as police attempted to make arrests, transgender women protected themselves by fighting back with their purses were kicking officers in the Groin. Violence erupted all around the intersection of Turk and Taylor streets. But. It wasn't a victory for comptons. The next night saw cross section of the Lgbtq community arrived to pick at the restaurant with the backing of the local clergy grassroots organization of their own lgbtq people in San Francisco Bowling to take a stand. For the first time there was hope that institutional oppression could be resisted on a large scale. But the movements biggest moment was yet to come. It would happen at a private bar in Greenwich Village Run by Italian mobsters. Stonewall in..

comptons St Power Vanguard Greenwich Village Stonewall Groin harassment officer Turk San Francisco Taylor
"stonewall" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

You're Wrong About...

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

"Yeah, and that's extremely important moment I mean you know. Know if you remember the obesity epidemic episode, we talked about your interview. This researcher who said the process of coming out isn't about telling other people that you're gay telling them you're not going to apologize for it. Yeah, it seems like that really wasn't an option before and I don't want slip back into the big bang thing with stonewall that like no one had ever thought of that before like the term game power had showed up in flyers in L. A. in Nineteen, sixty six. Six like these ideas had been bouncing around. Yeah, but for the people at stonewall and I think for people reading about it afterwards. It's sort of opened up. This idea like fighting back is an option. Yeah, speaks to the power of protests to the power of being uncivil right, because if you see someone who is agitating on their own behalf, for the same reasons that you have been hiding than like you can suddenly realize that like you are worth fighting for two and you're worth fighting. Fighting for yourself and you know and for your community, and we model behavior for each other were social animals like we. We learn these things by observing each other. Yeah, and there's power in a collective right like together. We have much more power than separately and doing this meek softly. Please respect me good, sir type of thing. You're not going to build power like that like that doesn't feel like power to people. It's too cerebral, whereas let's all get together and threw rocks at cops. Out of a bar feels like power like. If you treat us this way, there will be consequences. Yeah, what Mark says later on! Is it like a completely re-jigger the relationship between the cops and the gay community that the cops? It was now an option that gay people were going to fight back, and so they were actually a bunch of riots after stonewall to where they would demonstrate outside of the police precinct they would. Throw Shit other bars. There was a huge riot one year after stonewall. So it is kind of like we can do this. We can actually take power back that framing that reframing of the gay rights movement was extremely important, but of course is not only someone like you have to give all these caveats. It's like stonewalled. Inevitably lead to. Oh, no, everything's fine now, right? Yeah. Right keeps going to cops are locked inside. The crowd starts trying to light the stonewall on fire and they start. It's not clear if they molotov cocktails because I think Molotov. Cocktails are a specific thing and you need like gasoline. You need stuff..

stonewall obesity Molotov researcher L. A. Mark
"stonewall" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

You're Wrong About...

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"stonewall" Discussed on You're Wrong About...

"In the long run sort of threads that never really got pulled, and that's fine too There's the stonewall event, and then there's the gay rights movement and they overlap, but they're also distinct things, and like we're kind of finally at the point of history where we can say that's okay. Another thing Gonzaga said was that it was a turning point in the gay rights movement, but it was a turning point right like we can't talk about it as like these perfect little milestones every couple of years. It's like there were lots of turning points. Any Movement for Social Rights is going to have a lot of milestones, a lot of things that are overlooked and we're now finally looking back kind of circling back to these things and finding not only the. The interesting elements of stonewall that we haven't looked at before, but also events that aren't in the history books right like there's a lot of stuff that happened in early gay rights movement that have never gotten any attention, and so it's now sort of leading stonewall stonewall, but also adding other events to the narrative of soon all to take away from this Big Bang, nothing and then everything style narrative. Yeah, got us a really long preamble. I'm really sorry no. Don't apologize. This entire episode is going to be me feeling weird about doing it. It's a good look. I knew it's fine. I think that this is important because we're looking at the story of an event, but we're also looking at the story of how do communities got to tell their own histories? And what kind of history will be listened to? Yeah, yeah, okay? Where do we begin so I think the best way to do. This is just a walk through the event. And then we can get into all of the Hobson. Nightmarish I feel weird about it stuff afterwards. Like? Tirumala Sue debunking. That is gonNA. Come after like immediately after one of the one of the revelations of this is that people have been fighting about Stonewall, and the legacy of stonewall sends literally the day after it happened sounds about right so me..

stonewall Tirumala Sue Gonzaga
"stonewall" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

12:18 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Making Gay History

"I've had the chance to work together a lot, but I've never gone to interview. So I'm very happy to have the chance to do that, too. So you're focused is the G Q archive, which contains a lot more than just stuff about stonewall. Why do you think stone will get so much attention? And why the focus on those six nights in June of nineteen sixty nine it's kind of a victim of its own success. I think it seems activists like Michael Brown, Martha, Shelley other people helped start Galeb ration- front, Ellen Brody Craig Rodwell and others. There was a purposeful decision to make stonewall kind of line in the sand in LGBT political movement. There had been a number of riots across the nineteen sixties before it, and demonstrations before it the moment that happened after stonewall politically was so different than what had come before with the home afoul movement. And I think that. Just a totally different perspective. So how, how was it different from before? And after I think afterwards, you have this whole new generation of people, many of them, much younger, some of them already involved in the home of file movement in the sixties, but dissatisfied with it wanting to take it further. They people sort of came of age in the antiwar movement in more radical parts of the African American civil rights movement, and they wanna bring all of this energy to bear on gay and lesbian rights, activism. And so they just bring this totally different perspective that I think is also about changing society. I don't think it's unfair for home afoul year activists that there's an assimilationist tendency there and with Galeb ration- front of really trying to transform society altogether. And I think that there's this feeling of liberation that there was nothing like that before, not at that kind of level. It's not just that those six days, because if there hadn't been this activist movement to move it forward, that would just been one of these other riots. Ration- front organization formed, almost while the, the unrest was, was ongoing. What how, how would you compare organizations like the gay Liberation Front to the managing society of New York, which dick like ran, and it was an existence and they organized the first meetings with the daughters of beliefs, which was founded in nineteen fifty five managing nineteen fifty. They were Nuys right after the the the uprising. How is the managing society of New York different from, from G from gala version front? I mean, I think in a way in some ways managing was less ideological. It's really just about these certain laws that they want to change about these freedoms at that civil liberties walk Liberation Front. There's inspired by Marxism. It's very much inspired by the antiwar movement. You can even see that in some ice. It's, it's a funny kind of contrast because so much of that mashing era. Activism was about the right to serve in the military, which is key issue throughout the. Nineteen sixties because it's the right to employment generally in the society. Because if the government can discriminate against us for the right to employment that sets the tone for every other employer. But then a few years later with gay Liberation Front. There's this contingent that's in the May Day, protests, the shutdown Washington DC in nineteen seventy-one trying to make it very clear that the gay liberation is hand in hand with the antiwar movement. So it's totally different kind of perspective instead of values that come to bear. I think so. Many people think that the first time the issue of the military came up was in the nineteen seventies. When, in fact that was an issue already for the early home afoul rights groups in the nineteen in the nineteen fifties and sixties. Yeah, I always point people to this beautiful, little picture nineteen sixty four I protests that we have documented at selective service here in New York City on the Whitehall, induction center. Right. But it's like five people. Five people willing to be protests. The sexual in New York City, ninety four and I first documented public protests of homosexuals. Yeah. And then we fast forward to stonewall your hundreds of people. Well, if not self, identifying this early word challenging the police, and then a year later thousands of people in March a pride March and rallying in central park. I always point people to those two pictures like I show them the sixty four one, and then I show them the Gabi inhabiting in central park. That's the sea change that happens before. And after stonewall Agaybi in you had the gay be in happening. Can you explain what to be? So not heavily hyphen. I n right bien because there was a human being that was in sixty seven or sell to if you're before in central park, that was sort of grand hippie, counter, cultural happening, sort of gathering of people with music. And there was a fair to characterize own will, then as the I'm always saying wasn't the birth of the gay rights movement, or the movement. But it was apparently the birth of something. So say that it was the birth of gay liberation. I think it's very fair to say the perfect gay liberation, and I think people from gay Liberation Front will say that. So it was a different phase of the movement, much bigger. I the there was a national conference in nineteen sixty six in Kansas City as Frank Kennedy said, one of the early activists. They chose Kansas City because it was inconvenient for every public. And there were twenty organizations that were represented at that conference. And when I suggested to Frank that they were dozen dozen activists. However many activists, he said a few dozen there were a few, you can count them on one hand. We went from that period where there were maybe hundreds of activists to thousands of activists in the aftermath, so the riots were were explosive and messy and so some of the activism in the year, so after can you give us a laundry list of some of the organizations that that came into being? So I if managing action committee that sort of emerges, right, Atta Mattis sheen, and these younger people who join Michael Brown, and Martha Shelley and others splits off starts gay Liberation Front, quite quickly. And at a gay Liberation Front, then have gay activists alliance, which is a combination these people who come into the movement with gay Liberation Front and also older activists who had been in the home Afyon movement on my Kayla. Husson. Barbara getting's and then also Galeb ration- front. You have radical lesbians, the lavender menace, first, and then becomes Radic collisions later that year after stonewall then also you have a third world gave revolution movement. That comes out of gay Liberation Front also Celso sisters, which comes out of gay activists alliance black lesbian caucus in gay activists alliance, and SRI transvestite action revolutionaries, which really comes out of the takeover of NYU star. Yes. As I've come to understand, how things unfolded in the months after still a whole range of people work together in the meat it, aftermath, and then people sort of themselves out into different groups and then over period of months, everyone sorted themselves out again. And I wonder how we go from G L F Galeb ration- front to the gay activists alliance, and then then he'll be under stand who got left out in the sorting process. One thing is, I think we tend to think those different groups like we always think about Kayla's barbeque innings is being kicked out of gay Liberation Front in Europe bunch of dinosaurs in that kind of thing. But you look at early issues of come out in K loosen photograph forward on the masthead. So they're all these surprising moments, of overlap in those groups, and even like Sylvia Rivera. She was in all of those groups. We have the records for activists alliance at the library the minutes and you go through GAC alliances minutes in Soviets, like at all the meetings, and it's like Sylvia the minutes are like, Sylvia got arrested this week. Sylvia's. Sylvia's spots us to protest this or Soviet sister protests that so in one way they're people sorted themselves. But I think, and maybe that's our impression because I think there are so many political differences of between people who came of that movement in retrospect, right? But I think on the ground people were much more intimately connected than maybe they let on today. So we're perhaps mistaken in trying to sort things neatly that people were involved across across the spectrum. In went from one group to another. Yeah. So there are a lot of different organizations. There were also a lot of different publications. Yes. And so what were some of those publications I saw a lot of them at the exhibition at the new Republic library, which you curated, which we called a love and resistance. Stonewall fifty and I should say it wasn't. It's not passed its current. Yes. Until July thirteenth, that's the main branch of, of the public library. I what can you give us an idea of what some of those publications were. And how different were they from what had come before library has one of the greatest collections in the country of these LGBT magazines are collections. Basically from the nineteen fifties to around nineteen ninety the core of in. It's about three thousand titles from around the United States, yet and wasn't just New York City. Not just New York City in each part of the show, they're sort of before, and after stonewall. And so there's sort of selection of magazines pre. Stonewall Homa, file your magazine. So one coming out of one institute, their number of publications with one issues of the ladder also shows that are before an answer was magazine of the daughters of beliefs. Yes. And also to show before Barbara K took over as editors what looked like an after with K putting out lesbians on the cover. The magazine for the first time, also drum in terms of Janice society and activism, that's happening Philadelphia at the time before, stonewall and also even advocate comes out, and sixty seven comes out of the cat protests started out as the newsletter of the organization pride, which was founded in nineteen sixty six so sad to say pride did not begin here. It's done. Well, probably began in Los Angeles. And it morphed into they had a newsletter morph into the advocate magazine the publication that came out after stonewall, what were some of their names. And how are they different a totally different aesthetic? Right. So I think one of the first ones is a gay power, which is headed. By John Edward Hayes who still around has these amazing sort of comic book as superheroes also covering, drag scene in your, it's covering sort of Andy Warhol factory scene. Also this emerging activism with gay Liberation Front. You also then you have a gay, which is leash clarkin, Jack Nichols really that out Goldstein from screw sort of gets convinced to do this survey newspaper here in New York, favourite one that I think nobody ever talks about. But I always point people to is queen's quarterly, which is published in queens. Not published four queens, right at first at actually the first issue comes out spring. It's before stonewall inn, it has this very sort of hippie, flower gay flower child, kind of cover in the first issues queen's quarterly. And then later, it becomes q-q for gay guys with no hangups. They must've always had wanted to subscribers. Huge because it went on into the seventies. And it's almost like this kind of gay esquires at a lifestyle, magazine, with, like, decorating your house about cruising, avoiding STD's. It was like it's fun magazine. Nobody really talks about it. Then also. Favorite is drag or drag queens was Lee Brewster, who always try to bring up because I think somebody nobody remembers sleep Brewster and leave was in managing in the nineteen sixties and organized all the parties. It seems for managing and also did annual trips to New Orleans for a gay men and.

gay Liberation Front stonewall New York City stonewall Agaybi Sylvia Rivera stonewall inn Martha Shelley Stonewall Homa Michael Brown Barbara K Ellen Brody Craig Rodwell Kansas City Lee Brewster Frank Kennedy Nuys United States queens Kayla
"stonewall" Discussed on HistoryDojo

HistoryDojo

14:32 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on HistoryDojo

"We have <Speech_Music_Male> a variety of <Speech_Music_Male> history theme <Speech_Music_Male> products that <Speech_Music_Male> kind of showcase <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a different <Speech_Music_Male> quirky <Speech_Music_Male> interpretation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> history <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Male> you can use <Advertisement> as <Speech_Music_Male> a fashion <Advertisement> forward <Speech_Music_Male> sense <Advertisement> to show <Speech_Music_Male> people. You're <Advertisement> good taste <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well <Speech_Music_Male> as your knowledge <Speech_Music_Male> of district so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> let's <Speech_Music_Male> get down <Advertisement> to it <Speech_Music_Male> right now. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> So the anniversary <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> stonewall uprising <Speech_Music_Male> marks <Speech_Music_Male> the beginning of <Speech_Music_Male> the Gay Rights Revolution <Speech_Music_Male> in American <Music> history <Music> while <Speech_Music_Male> the significance significance <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> of the stonewall <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> rebellion <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> riot <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> uprising <Advertisement> what <Speech_Music_Male> have you <Advertisement> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> has <Advertisement> debated <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in terms <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of other <Speech_Music_Male> gay uprisings <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> at other <Advertisement> game rights <Speech_Music_Male> rebellions <Speech_Music_Male> stonewall <Speech_Music_Male> Bryant remained <Speech_Music_Male> significant <Speech_Music_Male> in the public <Speech_Music_Male> memory <Advertisement> as <Speech_Music_Male> the pivotal <Advertisement> moment <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the history <Speech_Music_Male> of gay liberation <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and the L._G._B._T._Q.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Plus <Advertisement> community <Speech_Male> and it's <Speech_Male> very interesting <Speech_Music_Male> history <Speech_Music_Male> so <Advertisement> by <Speech_Male> examining <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> today <Advertisement> I wanNA start <Speech_Male> us off by saying this is <Speech_Male> not necessarily <Speech_Music_Male> the only <Speech_Male> example <Speech_Music_Male> of when <Speech_Music_Male> the gay community <Speech_Music_Male> pushed <Speech_Male> back against <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> the <Advertisement> injustices <Speech_Music_Male> that <Advertisement> it was experiencing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it may <Speech_Music_Male> not even <Advertisement> be the <Speech_Music_Male> first <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> but it has <Advertisement> become <Speech_Music_Male> symbolic <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> of and <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> the <Advertisement> Gay Liberation <Speech_Music_Male> Movement <Speech_Music_Male> and <Advertisement> that's <Speech_Music_Male> symbol <Advertisement> is powerful <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> insignificant <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Male> that's we'll <Advertisement> be looking <Speech_Music_Male> at today <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> when <Advertisement> you talk <Speech_Music_Male> about <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Male> fiftieth <Advertisement> anniversary <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the stonewall <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> riots <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> in <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> the then <Speech_Music_Male> of the stonewall <Speech_Music_Male> riot <Speech_Music_Male> are fascinating <Speech_Music_Male> and to <Speech_Music_Male> read what happened <Speech_Music_Male> when N._y._p._d.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Rated <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Male> STONEWALL <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> INN <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> Greenwich Village <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> on <Advertisement> Twenty <Speech_Music_Male> Eighth <Advertisement> Nineteen <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sixty nine <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Male> at once <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> both <Advertisement> funny <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> moving <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but also <Speech_Music_Male> alarming <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and uplift <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the heroism <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and personality <Speech_Music_Male> ability <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> of the rioters <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> as <Advertisement> well as the <Speech_Male> ignorance <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the police <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Male> rather <Advertisement> iconoclastic <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> meaning <Advertisement> that <Speech_Male> it stands in contrast <Speech_Male> to the <Speech_Male> praises <Speech_Male> heaped on police <Speech_Music_Male> in the <Speech_Music_Male> second class <Speech_Music_Male> that is <Advertisement> that <Speech_Male> is assigned <Speech_Music_Male> to <Advertisement> the L._G._B._T._Q.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Plus <Speech_Music_Male> population <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Advertisement> many of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many corners <Speech_Music_Male> of this <Advertisement> nation <Speech_Male> even today <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and that <Advertisement> is itself <Speech_Music_Male> a very <Advertisement> sad <Speech_Music_Male> and <Advertisement> ironic <Speech_Music_Male> outcome <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> this event <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> which you'll see <Speech_Music_Male> I think <Advertisement> is <Speech_Music_Male> that the police <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> behaved <Advertisement> an entirely <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> inappropriate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rural <Speech_Male> manner towards <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> people <Speech_Male> who were just <Advertisement> being themselves <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and in <Advertisement> a society <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like the <Speech_Music_Male> United States <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> which <Advertisement> values <Speech_Music_Male> individual <Advertisement> freedoms <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> a <Advertisement> princess equality <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> for <Advertisement> all <Speech_Music_Male> this <Advertisement> then <Speech_Music_Male> stands <Advertisement> in <Speech_Male> stark contrast <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> the <Advertisement> promises <Speech_Music_Male> made <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> as <Advertisement> these <Speech_Music_Male> people would <Advertisement> really <Speech_Music_Male> be <Advertisement> themselves <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and wanted to <Speech_Music_Male> be treated <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> no differently <Advertisement> than <Speech_Music_Male> anyone else chiefs <Advertisement> however <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> they were of <Speech_Male> course <Advertisement> being treated <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> very very <Speech_Music_Male> different <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> so this <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> podcast <Advertisement> today <Speech_Music_Male> is <Advertisement> going to examine <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> not <Speech_Music_Male> only how the <Advertisement> events <Speech_Music_Male> as they <Advertisement>

STONEWALL Bryant
"stonewall" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Throughline

"HMO dot org. And late seventies, he recalled being a Cam going through the village day or two after the the beginning of the uprising and he said the police had a look on their faces if they'd been bitten by their favourite pets. The police were customer. Gay people running Fags didn't fight back against the police, which made it exceptional so Martin Boyce is one of the people who is at stonewall his wife. My favorite storyteller about stonewall. He's now seventy one and he said the morning after was at the riot. Who's in the papers on the radio, his father was a cab driver new, someone's game was supportive of him said, well, it's about time you facts fought back. So that was exceptional. The police weren't accustomed to being chased by by young homosexuals, so that, that made it exceptional. It was also the moment in time when when confrontations with the police were not unusual there was organizing immediate aftermath, and then there were the people who organized, the first pride March, which happened in nineteen seventy June of seventy and that branded stonewall as this event to be marked with this pride March, which was the successor to the reminder day protests, and people were told to Mark that aniversary every year there after. And over time stone will just simply came to represent people fighting back or the fight for freedom. It means lots of different things different people, many of the organizers had had years of experience in the movement. And if not in the gay rights movement, they had experienced in the black civil rights movement to the women's movement, and the antiwar movement. I like to say that the organizers will inherit the earth. So if not for the organizers who channel that rage right after stonewall and created new organizations that could address the inequities, stonewall wouldn't be remembered. Do you think that the focus on stonewall I mean as important as it is, and you laid it out, you think my focusing on it the way that we do that? We miss something important about gay civil rights history. Oh my God. Yes. I had such a contentious relationship with stone. I really had to reconcile, and of course, stonewall can't can't talk to me. But I was so pissed off at stonewall for having suck the air out of the room from the rest of the history, and that all of these people who are involved before stonewall were ignored because of this myth everything begin stonewall that in my book, I decided to play stonewall down. And I, I so played it down that I didn't give it its rightful place. I didn't recognize that I was looking at stonewall through my own lands. It's worth focusing on stonewall stonewalls a great entry point. But it's unfortunate that in the few high school textbooks history textbooks, that say anything about gay people. It mentions stonewall Harvey milk marriage, eight, and that's it. And I think that we should used on wall as an entry point to the history and put it in its rightful place in a context, the stonewall story, as much bigger story than just a couple of people who argue over who might have thrown the first rock or the first cocktail glass, we look at the very few pictures that are available. And there's no. Hm just a few pictures. We look at those pictures and their kids seventeen years old, sixteen years old, white black mixed race, Hispanic, mostly homeless, and they were the ones who challenge the police and also the ones who died the soon as they died in the seventies from drug overdoses from being murdered and then in the eighties from aids. So when people ask why they're so few people alive today to interview,.

stonewall stonewall Harvey Martin Boyce Mark seventeen years sixteen years milk
"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"I realized that's about this is about the race of the people, so the names of racially coded than not based on anything aesthetic about those, the names, all of its segregated. It's not segregated. No wanted segregating it except people that was deciding which to go into. It's not forcibly segregated but yes, the patronage is largely set great. So it's like the official policy is pressure to yeah. Yeah. I think there is pressure to say the people who hung out in the back room. Do talk about how the dance Lewis had a bit of a different vibe. So the back room, they do kind of more communal, dancing, let alone, all the weed group dances of the day, I think of an example like. All right. Covering, I'm genuinely just thinking about the Bush. Macarena from that time. Yeah. Whereas cable in the front room would be more kind of getting gathering so people come in the back room. But sometimes go to the front room for and. Or just go to the front room because it was on that one. We'll people there on. They kind of show off more. That's okay. Okay. So it's not just a racial split. They didn't have kind of different vibes. And there was movement between two years. Okay. But broadly, it was segregated as well as race. The people who gathered in the backroom, generally young, as I mentioned than the people in the front room, generally less middle class, and generally more fim. So I told him about this demographic split lays into a conversation about the demographics of who went to stonewall, which is a pretty contentious topic. And there's a lot of disagreement from people who went there as well as from later historians about who went to stonewall. And I think part of that is because it was split into two rooms, you know, if you hang yet, in one, remove the you've got a completely different image of, what kind of bio going. Okay. All right. I'm seeing sensing was. That's eight factor. So, so most people agree that stonewall was dominated by people assigned male at both ciswomen did sometimes. But once his lesbian, for example, says that while she was never made to feel unwelcome. She always felt like she was visitor in someone else's territory. I've no salsas about transmission going to we'll maybe they are some nice nobody's talked about things more complicated when we talk about trans women all transparent. And people ask so many patrons, who went to say that street queens a dominant presence at Stein will. If you listen to our website on Masha. You've heard us talk about straight queens before straight queens were a loose group of generally homeless quit teams and they will often from Rachel minorities. Almost all were assigned male at birth. Many years, female names. She pronouns and dressed in feminine clothing, at least some all of the time. So these people were quite a big presence at storm will, but on the other hand, several patrons also note that drag queens. I'm doing court Tia, too short physically that used the word drag Queen all the word transvestite, and note that these people were unlikely to be let into the. So what's happening here is that the people who assigned drag queens and transvestites went let into the us specifically talking about people assigned male at both wearing dresses. Okay. This has led people to plane that stonewall was Limbaugh, full gaining, it's pretty obvious that the absence of people assigned male at both in dresses. Does not mean it's just awful of this man on specifically in a time when for someone who was assigned male, both wearing address was very risky decision, but inside and outside the box. So in the event of a police rain or if you accord on the street on your way to from the by you could be arrested for failing to with three items of clothing that matched your sex, and obviously, traveling to and from the by could also become a victim of random queer Fertig bounds. So people such as transferring in queens, who wanted to found other ways to express feminine. Indeed. Absolutely. So I'm coming style was what was cooled skid. Right. I saw someone wearing scared right? I might be wearing a wig and makeup, type pants and amend tight around midrift. So in the event of a police raid will come..

stonewall queens Bush official Lewis Stein Limbaugh two years
"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"I will often mentioned that I specifically mentioned rally on Craig, but there were a few the men who kind of fighting this thing five of them on the east coast in the USA. I've just singled them out. We're gonna talk about Craig, if that'd be in this episode, and I've singled out Randy, because we have some points from him about people doing themselves criminals. Because he was the first gay man to appear on TV and he was just one of the more important figures in this. Yes. So those kind of Representative of a faction yeah, yeah. The Representative of a group. So in the late nineteen sixties with the influence of the antiwar movement, and the civil rights movement, and kind of similar political movements, at the time, the idea of working within the system and making yourself appear respectable to appease, the establishment to, they might grant you some of your rights started to seem outdated so nine sixty nine Craig and some friends, start anew magazine called queen's quarterly, which wrote we have earned our place in society, and it must now learn its lesson, the way he had to stay and that I've always says, loud, and strong. So that's the kind of background on the que- movement op tonight in sixty nine in very, very brief summer. Now, let's talk about stonewall. So this is on Christopher street in Greenwich Village, which is under tourist quia pot of New York it began its life in nineteen thirty as Bonnie's stonewall. That's two words as opposed to one, okay? It was a tea room. Those was the prohibition era. So it may have been a Speakeasy and And it it was. was a team or. I don't know much Bassett beyond its name. And the fact that it was a tea room so making us options here. But I think that pretty well founded assumptions and the name the stonewall came from a lesbian, novel, which was released the same year. That opened we'll say called the stonewall. Oh, okay. So we had a queer. So it was probably a lesbian so Bonnie's lesbian, the lesbian, and it probably was a lesbian Baugh, in its beginnings of cool relations after that, both que-, okay and straight. So in the early sixties it was a straight restaurant that was used for things like wedding receptions, look, it was damaged in a fire and closed in the mid sixties, and it reopened in nine hundred sixty seven as the story will in which was a mafia Ron gave up. So am I kind of hinted at before and we're talk net Craig and Randy New York state law. Prohibited licensed venues from becoming disorderly, which basically included being quick. So it wasn't technically illegal to serve a drink to aqua person. But if you did that was grounds enough to say this places, disorderly, and we're gonna find it over by. His license. What? Yes, acquitted, people drinking was disorderly. Yes. Inherently, yeah. Yeah. Exactly pay like Craig in round. He did make some progress fighting against this, some of the time line in sixty nine Tim around quit people drinking was kind of our K, but queer, people, interacting and pretty much anyways..

Craig stonewall Randy Bonnie Representative quia USA. Bassett New York Greenwich Village Randy New York Baugh Ron Tim queen
"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"Hello, and welcome to clear as fact, the cost bring you create history from around the world. Two at time. I'm alice. I'm Jason, I'm ally. And today in honor of the fiftieth anniversary, which came out the stonewall riots. Before we start, we have some content warnings from Steph site, obviously, there's absolutely is largely centered around police harassment and violence against people. It also brought a period, typical qualified yet and discrimination, including brief mentions of imprisonment and institutionalization. It also includes historical racism, sexism and causes them and Monday, transferring BIA, within and beyond the movement as well, as I mentioned of guns, sex work listless, and drug use this upside will also include swearing and the use of Quebec slows and quiets as well as out they language to describe queer identities. Both in court and when explaining the thinking and asked you at the time I also want night that using a mixture of she her, and he pronounce was very common amongst queer people in the nineteen sixties I've trained to use pronouns most commonly used for each individual cousin in primary sources that doesn't mean that the house they exclusively used. There's also means for the sake of consistency and decision that allure warfare into stormy Deloviye who I've previously referred to episode on her using. Then pronouns using share pronounce. Speaking of stormy, though, I'd also encourage you to check out, don't hurt as upside on Masha Johnson before listening to this episode of some background on these people. And also just Don quia life at the time with me, talking about, I'd also like to welcome Jason to the second ever history, episode of this podcast, gladdened back. Sometimes it's very hard to get us all in one room. And so we have Jason's that have Iranian today in terms of sources for this episode we have a wealth of ARL histories and written sources from people who were either connected with Stein, wool and eloquent of infants who actually present during the riots, I referred to plenty of days when I was researching, but it's also wasn't I knew that I realistically could not listen over eight. All of them so that they will say relied on second resources in particular historian, David Carter has a huge amount of work in terms of piecing leave accounts together and making a coherent picture. All what happened during the storm while right to our lied, quite heavily on his book, in terms of the sequence of events and stuff like that Martin Guberman has also written a book called stonewall, which does a similar thing drills unless Arnold history. So it was less rear in terms of trying to make them fit together. But similarly Britain's tomorrow histories together to explain strangle. So I'm going to stop with some background about the quia landscape and slowly queer political movements priest, I only have time for a pretty so, so explanation of this sometime. We'll do individual episodes on things like matching and the doors of us. But for now, we're going to do a brief summary of these early queer organizations in the USA. I've always said, the Mattachine society, not Madison and it's just called Madison. I've heard both okay show. I think it's officially called the medicines. But people don't necessarily things got slackened said medicine. Yeah. So he's speaking off Madison society. The medicine society was the USA's first nationwide Homa file society. That's the word that we're using the time rather than gay. So it was founded in nineteen fifty and Madison, largely catered to.

Jason Masha Johnson Madison Arnold Madison society quia Don quia BIA Steph USA harassment Mattachine society Martin Guberman stonewall David Carter Quebec ARL Britain
"stonewall" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"It wasn't just about sex although i'm sure there's plenty of hookups and apparently there is prostitution ring ryan running out of the stonewall but it was a place where you could fine i like it was there is a vibe of love there supposedly is what the guy was saying i think in there weren't very many places like that in the world at the time yes or the stoel in itself was um it was a pair brick buildings originally that were poor stables a way back in the day and then later on a bakery and then eventually opened as the stonewall inn restaurant in 1930 four and in the 1960s uh and this was a pretty fascinating part of this whole story to me because i had no idea but the mafia had a uh had a business idea were they would they saw an opportunity for gay people to meet and by boos and buy cigarettes and load money to the jukebox and so the mafia uh can of under had these underground uh gay bars oliver new york city that they ran right they be like hey we just hijacked chuck those full cigarettes in boos who we should to sell it to the gay people it illegal saloons here since nobody else will and the reason no one else would was because since it was illegal to be gay if you were a known gay person and you're at a bar that bar could be shut down so bars her like you you can't come in here we're not gay bar there's no gays allowed basically bright and not only was this you know legal it was it was encouraged by the law so the mafia was like well there's there's a huge market that's just needing to be satisfied here and will step up no problem here and you know before you go thinking the mafia was was.

prostitution stonewall inn york shut down
"stonewall" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"stonewall" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Each village in fact that's kind of where i used to go mostly because that's where my friends were back in the nineties and um i went there in it is still nice and grimy what the village the east village ed sanoh yeah i mean it's not you know it's it's been i won't modernized but it's been what's the word not gentrified maybe gentrified updated he has been updated a little bit but if their battled canada's gummy which is great anna it it definitely has the feel to still for sure in a smell okay so so chuck i think we oh you said you been to the storm before did you know much of the history yeah i mean that's why i went and oddly enough i went a just happened to be there in the days following the nightclub shooting in florida oh man so uh there were like armed guards at the stonewall n and that you know 'cause it's a national monument now though i know a lot of people flocked to stonewall stonewall inn after the pulse nightclub shootings just to show solidarity income for one another so the stonewall has become this hub the center of gay life in the united states not just in new york in the united states i would even say probably globally answer it had that much of a significance but what's interesting about the stonewall the somalian is that it also had that same significance just for much much smaller community of gays um prior to june of nineteenth sixty nine but it it it it has for decades and decades been a center of gay life is just.

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