18 Burst results for "Stones River"

Sephora Awarded NASA Contract To Give Moon Fresh, Fun Makeover

The Topical

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Sephora Awarded NASA Contract To Give Moon Fresh, Fun Makeover

"Multinational cosmetics chain Sephora has officially landed the coveted government contract to give the moon of fresh fund makeover beating out core competitor Ulta to lead the two hundred billion dollar projects over our science reporter. Rebecca Neal joins us now from the scene welcome Rebecca Good Morning Leslie Rebecca I remember the Moon from way back when I was a kid so it Has To. BE GETTING UP THEIR? Age. Wise. At least seventy if I had to guess while the Hubbub now, base XS Dragon launch NASA has been recently partnering with more companies from the private sector to tackle their large backlog of projects without the massive bill. Here's Jessica Wilbur senior beauty adviser at the stones. River. Town Centre Sephora in Murfreesboro. Tennessee who will lead the astro dermatologist mission from the ground y'all. I can't tell you how pumped on you to lead this historic mission we at Sephora at work developing personalized skin care regimen for the moon because we can't stress enough that beauty starts with healthy skin the montanes toward the dry and crack side is the spectrum. So we're start by gently exploiting the surface with a natural sponge than hydrate hydrate,

Sephora Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Neal Rebecca Good Jessica Wilbur Reporter Ulta Nasa Murfreesboro Tennessee
"stones river" Discussed on What Was That Like

What Was That Like

03:52 min | 7 months ago

"stones river" Discussed on What Was That Like

"The what do you mean by a cage? Where was this cage? I'm not exactly sure because I didn't go. There I just know that I had a couple of friends and they were evacuating all of the. Guests from the OPRY Land Hotel, they were evacuating them to megantic high school, which is on up, may GAV, Inc. which is the street in which opry land hotel is on, and the high school is much higher, and of course had multiple gymnasiums and a place for people to go, so there are a couple of subdivisions which are down the street from me, which are at a lower elevation that they were evacuating, but they weren't. Coming to make you to evacuate me or anything along that line. But you would have evacuated if there was a place that would have taken you with the dog correct. Well I'm I'm with you on that I? There's no way I could evacuate and leave my dogs behind. That's a boy. That's a tough spot to be in. Very tough spot to be in and. The little puppy kept trying to jump off of the stairs, and into the water, and I grabbed by one leg, and just so thankful ended in dislocated. That point with the with the water rising. Did you even have the option of driving away, or could you not at one point? It came too quick. What was happening was just kept raining, raining raining and across the street, or across the river from me is a place called Inglewood, and it is a gigantic huge limestone bank very very high, so when they eventually let the waters out from the dam that acted as a third dam, and that's what pushed all the water over. The whole deck and everything I had catfish that were trying to jump onto my deck as you know, we are fishermen, whatever catfish like legends they like to hide underneath ledges, and so hiding underneath my deck, and trying to get up on to the deck, and that was very odd, and at that point in time it had rained for two days as I stated, and then the third day it was beautiful blue skies. Everything was beautiful, and we thought it had stopped so at that point in time. The water was in my garage show. The damage was done in the garage and. Was it if you walked into the garage? Has Up on was over your knees, or or what was the day? Had like four or five steps that went down to be level with the ground, so at first it was. Just barely into the garage, but the third day as we had been watching the weather channel I'm watching and watching and what we didn't realize is that we had been up for forty two hours. You know just just so worried and so concerned. Were watching the same report pretty much. They did not notify any of us that they were going to let these dams out. We live in a place. That's a peninsula right there off of Megalithic and it's called Two Rivers. The reason it's called two rivers is because you have the stones river that meets the Cumberland River. The Stones River feeds Percy priest, which is a landlocked lake,.

OPRY Land Hotel stones river megantic high school Two Rivers Percy priest GAV, Inc. Cumberland River
"stones river" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:50 min | 8 months ago

"stones river" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Furred and Division one for the 2122 seasons on your own For the Bears. Jeff Joanie Actors Radio 105 points this time, try 48. Traffic and weather together. Legate is clearly I'm Kennedy, doing its best to recover here had a pretty bad crash and nickel that was walking a couple of lanes. It's been cleared, but you're still looking at 45 minutes out to the airport. It's just 16 of Montrose and the locals even better in the express of 12. Kennedy in about 34 from O'Hare, 19 off the Edens. Eden's itself just 21 either way up on eyes now or 28 minutes to Mannheim. It's still happy. 41 23 90. Inbound is busier 42 from 3 90 26 Man. I'm coming into James Burn up on Stephenson about 30 to the Tri State 42 to 3 55 About a brake. Check first to Harlem. Then you're good to go. But the five South I'm still heavy are stone River with ongoing road work up on Dan right? About 25. About is just 18. Little spotty, 57 headed out. The whole said them before 82 before Volmer, which affords about 17 in or out south on Lake Shore Drive crowded is around the Oak Street curve. North on heavy approaching the river san Going Bridge work. It was the right lane over the Chicago River till the end of the month. Subban tristate heavy Dixie Highway two whole, said improving on the rest of it always was still tied up. North Found 3 55 This veterans He passed US six debris blocking the two left lanes, and you're still pretty solid. Westbound. 80 has been the case all afternoon long, 3 55 to Chicago Street Emergency pothole repair and that patching is going on with the two left lanes, so only the right lane gets by eastbound 80 94. Busy towards to Indianapolis. Client of Broadway Next traffic aboard 5 58 news ready of 7 81 of 5.9 FM baby Evacuate her Mostly clear today I Love 58 across about lawyer is 68 at the lakefront. And a picture of clouds of sunshine of our.

Kennedy US Jeff Joanie Chicago River san Going Bridge Bears stone River Chicago Harlem Legate Indianapolis Montrose Volmer Stephenson Lake Shore Drive Eden Mannheim Dan
"stones river" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

05:07 min | 8 months ago

"stones river" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"This land is your last. Warning. We Soar above me. Can't take it. No, I can't take it either one of them like. Along means. Walking I saw. Me Shut up. We had to be in prison for the rest of your life. In one of those versions was on repeat what he got three, or would you rather saying? There's some humor with the Bernie Sanders? One right, so yeah, that would get old really fast. Really really fast. Got Some tweets here USA news tweets, so you can train to be a Marxist. Where everything is free too bad. These people didn't trained earn. Money and contribute to society. F Carol Baskin Pat. Clearly in this case F C in Tulsa stands for forever Communist. The Steve Forty to the logical conclusion of course, is that garage doors a racist? Yeah, in the whole bubble Wallace Saga. Only forty one percent of people want Karl Marx Statue removed. There's a simple reason for these bowls. They're fixed. Just joking but stupid. Jazz kidding. Yep I mean they're done enough to take down. The black lives matter group is destroyed the statue of an immigrant who died fighting slavery. I'm telling you man I mean I guess if it's a white person, they just pull it down. Right, they just white problematic. Is. They face the the regiment, the black soldiers the phone for the north. I mean they don't care. They're not taking on five seconds to black. They don't care. It's a society thing it's not. There's nothing symbolic about who they're destroying. It's just they're destroying history period. That's all they WANNA. Do first they vandalized and then toppled the statue of Hans Christian Hague an immigrant from Norway. who was against slavery and fought for the Union against the South may pulled down his statue. In Madison, Wisconsin protesters pulled down. The forward statute that normally stands outside the state capital left at lying in the middle of the road. Same Group also tore down. The Colonel Hans Christian Hegg statue for a short time later, the group then went on to throw the statue into lake. Mona yes, sure Mona. Hague for the Union as we mentioned. tweets of the destruction showed Hague's pedestal vandalized with the words. Black is beautiful scrawled across it. Okay, so he dies in battle on the side of the Union told in slavery. They also decapitated. Threw it into the lake, so he was dead when he when he hit the water, so he didn't suffer the statue. Now suffer now. He didn't drown at least. So, we got that going for us. Glad of that. On December thirtieth, eighteen, sixty, two at the battle of Stones River Hague's Regiment lost more than one hundred men. His horse was shot out from under him, and his general called him the bravest of the brave in February eighteen, sixty three was put in command of the entire brigade and pursued retreating confederate troops through Tennessee briefly into Alabama and across the State Line into chicken Maga Georgia. On the afternoon of September nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three Hague was charging forward at the front of his troops. When he was shot in the abdomen, he managed to stay in the settle for a short time, but the loss of blood compelled him to leave the field move to a hospital behind the lines. Where he died the next morning, Jesus was in the service of the country eliminating slavery, but he's He was white. He was white, so take down that statue WANNA. Hear his heroic story. I don't care what you got over there. Thank you. Thank you for putting this back into its proper perspective That's why we need that. We need that. Canceling Tearing Down Setting Fire to doing it all Mel Gibson was just asked from chicken. Run the big sequel. They're working on it. NETFLIX's chicken came out in two thousand only now. Are they doing a sequel to it? and. He was I guess. All. Set to do the movie. But then of course. Said something. Allegedly said something to with the winona Ryder Twenty four years ago. And so he's been fired now. This isn't the first time we've heard about it. She also allegation two thousand six, at which time he said it was ally, and he defended himself, said ever said that although I. Don't know how much credibility Mel Gibson has. Had some issues and if anybody remembers on. The Mel Gibson issues..

Hans Christian Hague Mel Gibson Union Stones River Hague Bernie Sanders Karl Marx Hans Christian Hegg Carol Baskin Pat Tulsa Steve Forty chicken Maga Georgia NETFLIX USA Wisconsin Madison Tennessee Alabama
"stones river" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

04:02 min | 9 months ago

"stones river" Discussed on WRVA

"Four sixteen thousand one hundred seventy on the union side battle a spot to fight this battle being a courthouse in Virginia may eighth to may twenty one one on for nearly two weeks thirty thousand casualties eighteen thousand union ended in a stalemate hi say fire got caught in the wilderness in the farce literally in many men particularly those are injured burned alive maybe five to seven eighteen sixty four the confederacy one the losses the union side seventeen thousand six hundred and sixty six the battle of Chancellorsville you can see many battles in Virginia may one of may for eighteen sixty three twenty four thousand casualties fourteen thousand were union the union had enormous casualties but that enormous casualties battle of Shiloh in Tennessee April sixty seven eighteen sixty two twenty three thousand seven hundred forty six men died thirteen thousand of which were union the battle of stones river but you never heard of that one Hey Kerr between December thirty one eighteen sixty two in January to eighteen sixty three Tennessee union victory what twenty three thousand five hundred fifteen casualties thirteen thousand two hundred forty nine union battle of Antietam in eighteen sixty two in Maryland twenty three thousand one hundred casualties the battle was inconclusive second battle of Bull Run my family night during the war Han China virus visited the battlefield of Antietam Gettysburg Inbal run between eighteen twenty eight didn't noble run was for the masses Virginia they fought over the same land that they fought the first battle the confederacy one twenty two thousand one hundred and eighty casualties thirteen thousand eight hundred thirty were union the battle of fort Donelson fought between February thirteen and sixteen eighteen sixty two again in Tennessee a victory for the union seventeen thousand three hundred sixty seven those are the top ten to keep the union and slavery those are the casualties in dealing with what Mitch McConnell says the original sin still in twenty twenty thanks for I want to tell you about what was done constitutionally legally since then up to today when we return I'll be right back ladies and gentlemen.

Virginia Chancellorsville Shiloh stones river Maryland Tennessee Mitch McConnell fort Donelson
"stones river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"stones river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Hundred and twenty four sixteen thousand one hundred seventy on the union side battle a spot to fight this battle being a courthouse in Virginia may eighth to may twenty one one on for nearly two weeks thirty thousand casualties eighteen thousand union ended in a stalemate because a fire got caught in the wilderness in the farce literally and many men particularly those are injured burned alive may five to seven eighteen sixty four the confederacy one the losses the union side seventeen thousand six hundred and sixty six the battle of Chancellorsville you can see many battles in Virginia may one of may for eighteen sixty three twenty four thousand casualties fourteen thousand were union the union had enormous casualties battles the confederacy but that enormous casualties battle of Shiloh in Tennessee April sixty seven eighteen sixty two twenty three thousand seven hundred forty six men died thirteen thousand of which were union the battle of stones river but you never heard of that one take care between December thirty one eighteen sixty two in January to eighteen sixty three Tennessee union victory what twenty three thousand five hundred fifteen casualties thirteen thousand two hundred forty nine union battle of Antietam in.

Virginia Chancellorsville Shiloh stones river Tennessee
"stones river" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"stones river" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John this is John that is the author of the new book terrible swift sword which is the life general Philip H. Sheridan but in detail you go through the battles date Sheraton is sad is glory but also you understand very clearly that the civil war was a catastrophe for both sides the not the murder the mass murder on both sides of the casualties were overwhelming and they came severely battle after battle stones river this is an effort by the southern divisions to destroy a Rosecrans's army who is Rosecrans and what does Sheridan do for in that day rose crammed was commander of the army of the Cumberland at that point and he was he was a good general overall he was in a great wall and he was very religious he's a Roman Catholic and many vent his army and the Confederate army for faced each other along stones river the end of eighteen sixty two last day of eighteen sixty two there about equivalent in size and interestingly both commanders Braxton Bragg was commander the Confederate army planned attacks at dawn on new year's eve on the right flank of the enemy yeah both of them so if the had attacked simultaneously they would have just gone and clockwise circle evidently but what happened was the Confederates attacked before Rosecrans army dead insured and was on the right flank of the the Union Army commander or division he was in the M. with cooks core and other to other divisions in the core and so during the night he and Josh would still who is one of his brigade commanders heard movement in the woods all night long like artillery moving men marching through the woods across from them and it seemed to them that the the Confederates were gathering for an attack they were alarmed so they want to cook and they reported to us who like two in the morning or so and would cook a will come up and they said as enemies massing for attack we set out don't worry about that were attacking in just a few hours and the other for well shared in hand so worried about her and so shared and got all his men up and fed and ready they were ready to go that four thirty in the morning under arms wholesale and about an hour or so later sure enough the Confederates attacked twenty thousand men cheered in at about six thousand in his division and the other two divisions had about as many but they weren't ready because the corps commander did not order those divisions to turn out so they they were just crashed they were making breakfast and coffee and everything the Confederates just rolled in there screaming you know their high pitched a fox hunters cried cheered ins division they were ready and they came in and they stop they they slaughtered them on this field one of them the aim below and the the children by the hundreds Joshua sills kill his good friend assured insuring later made the name to Ford after him in Oklahoma the way I read this Joe Sheridan's alertness with his friends as still saves Rosecrans's army he was not prepared for this attack he was not at all and so the Confederates they do stir rolled over those other two divisions Sherman's division stirred kept moving backwards but held them there number twenty thousand to sixty five hundred or something like that and for two hours they held them off while Roose Kranz was able to reorganizes army behind them and into decent defense noted here that it's just it's Sheridan's alertness but also his aggression he doesn't look for anybody else to help him he takes control of his men and they're very loyal to him at this point has he establish that rapport that we see later with the Calvary core yes I think yes he had given him the did so because of his regard for you ma'am you always see he made a point of always trying to find the best campsites for them making sure they were fed up and he took care of them he fought beside them and so they they really liked him he was very popular for his success he's now promote promoted to a Major General in the volunteers at a stones river and there are battles ahead we must mention Chickamauga because apparently it's still a controversy to this day Bragg versus Rosecrans at Chickamauga and brag brag gets the best of Rosecrans at the first and Rosecrans I don't wanna say he runs but he retreats in good time with Crittenden and McCook did you go with my cook as well but Sheridan doesn't leave the field and neither do do other parts of the Union Army and they make a stand here is Chickamauga remembered at the moment that brag exposed himself as a fool or did did people but it can still trust him after that even though they couldn't remove him from command well I think right after the battle the I mean they were related at the victory it was clearly a victory over a rose Kramden's army and the only reason it wasn't destroyed was because of general George Thomas who the rock of Chickamauga they call them right but is is brag given as victory that's no victory he loses more than than Rosecrans stuff he did but he drove from the field and what break was small line for and Jeff was that he allowed Rosecrans to retreat to Chattanooga and rather than immediately attack from there and this shattered army he decided to mount we'll we'll move on because the war and Philip Sheridan a weight as a we're on to the valley shed no valley for which shared in his remember terrible swift sword is the book just of wheeling is the author I'm John batch what do Marian Rivera and power express mortgage bankers have in common both excel under pressure our express mortgage has simplify the process of getting.

John Philip H. Sheridan
"stones river" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"stones river" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Of other major slave revolt the did not have as many participants the stone River rebellion in the state of South Carolina in seventeen thirty nine was the first mass slave revolt in America according to the Rome minute the revolt was led by a black slave named Jimmy encouraged by the Spanish crown and missionaries promises of freedom and land a group of twenty insulate persons attacked the store house in St Paul's parish to be about twenty miles from Charleston South Carolina and keeled to storekeepers armed with guns in power they set off for four or five Augustine Florida with their own bass bang as they marched through the country they captured more weapons set fire plantations of screamed liberty gathering records along the track Jerry and his band eventually consisted of more than a hundred Slade person during the ten mile March they killed more than thirty white Ford on the militia caught up with him in an open field nearly half of the rebellious slaves died in the intense fighting the heads of the did slaves were cut off and set on pole long stretch of road about one he mile the practice of posting a rebellious slaves he had on a pole or hanging his body from a tree was a popular means of warning and terrorizing of this lady however some black slaves did not get the message what did not care about the hit on the pole warnings in the very same year the stone river rebellion was followed by two more slate of rising in South Carolina with each successive revolt white ruling class instituted new one harsher laws to intimidate and control is laid person southern whites were terrified of slave revolt since their wealth and quality of life depended on insulate persons they were.

South Carolina America Jimmy St Paul Augustine Florida Jerry stone River Rome Charleston South Carolina Slade
"stones river" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"stones river" Discussed on WRVA

"If there were two things if they're two things that I could fix tomorrow that I think would would help the country survive. There's a lot of choices. There's a lot of choices but two of the easiest really is the border and the debt. Now, we got a lot of other problems Boertien is actually number one on my list. But I mean, if, if we're going to be serious about saving our nation. We have to get the debt under control. We have to get borders under control. Nobody is talking about then fact yesterday. They had a hearing that went pretty awry in the house on reparations. Now we're a society that doesn't believe in the sins of the father being paid for by the sun. But that's not even this. This is the sins of the possible. Great great, great grandfather. Being paid for by the great, great grandson, who whose great great grandfather may not have even been here at the time. Is there any example in history of this being done before we welcome back to the program? Arthur Herman, one of my favorite authors and the author of freedoms forge, which is a must read must read for everybody Arthur, I think one of the biggest mistakes, we made as a country was was not doing the forty acres and a mule. You know, we had the land back then we could have done it. We still have the land, but we could have done it probably was the right thing to do perhaps. And, you know, we just broke so many promises. However that one hundred fifty years ago. One hundred seventy years ago. Now, this idea of reparations, and the, the great great grandson paying for the crimes of a possible. Great, great grandfather had ever been done before. Well, yeah. It has. It's how the Marxist mind and also add the national socialist mind works, and that is, is that the world in which you live is based upon injustice upon you by great impersonal historical forces, which require the overthrow the entire system. Whether you're talking about the overthrow of capitalism, or in the case of the Nazis, the overthrow the World Jewish conspiracy. So that's the kind of line set that were fighting against Glenn is one that sees human beings. Not as free individuals. Not as being gifted with a sole with a with, with the independent will to make our future, a make identity as we see fit, or as we desire, but instead as pawns. Of these vast historical forces white supremacy, patriarchy, homophobia, Islamaphobia. You name it. And in those circumstances, it becomes then irrelevant. Whether in fact, for example, African Americans living in this country have a longer lifespan Africans living in, in, in their own content that the stories of people like an Oprah Winfrey stories of people like Clarence Thomas are meaningless because things are posed in terms of these huge ultimately meaningless abstractions, you know, the, the issue you just put your finger on reparations and the issue just mentioned immigration are, in fact, intimately connected, because they are both based upon Stoorikhel lie, which is, is that America is ultimately an evil place built by white supremacists. Built by Christian fundamentalists believers in the enslavement of the rest of the world patriots all those kinds of cliches. And therefore, why would you defend a country? Right. Why would you want to protect the borders country, which was born in San? Why would you want to not repay those that have suffered as a result of that of, of that original sin in the sense of, you know, those who may or may not be descendants of space that is going to be really hard issued sort out? You understand that, right? That's going to be a Super Bowl question. And then I look at my own experience, right? You mentioned great grandfather my great grandfather fought in the union army. He was wounded at the battle of stones river fighting against slavery fighting against the confederacy. In terms of who's going to be responsible for reparations, and who is who alternately needs to be called into account for, for what happened what, what was part of it in it indissoluble part of the thirteen colonies, that became an independent nation. And that was an issue that every great statesman up until eighteen six sixty wrestled with and tried to find a solution to and haunted, American politics, all those years since and ultimately required. The shedding of blood of more than six hundred thousand Americans before for it was finally sorted out. Look, you and I know we bundled the reconstruction period after the civil war there were the answers were there. And you just mentioned one of them before. Acres meal, the ways in which to go forward. Those options were there, if we really were a irredeemably, evil society, those options, we wouldn't have chosen you know, that, that we did, it would have been inevitable would have been locked in. But we didn't mistakes were were made by in those two decades that followed the civil war, but the reasons why those mistakes were made and there are there's no way you can look at the storm records sense and not see the history of the United States, as one that has promoted all of the most important human values and the most important foundations of human freedom, any society any society in the world. And that includes the civil rights movement, which is, you know, goes back much further than Martin Luther King, king culmination of. Of work of a of a title move consciousness in this country that had been set in motion before, before he arrived on the scene that he was able to that he was able to, to bring to bring to fruition, the of America of race in America is one that could be written in a very different way from the way in which the organizers of this reparations campaign have written it, and it would be much true or to these stork reality than their distortions, caricatures. All right. Arthur, I've only got a couple more minutes with you. And I, I gotta ask you this, I, I'm concerned, very concerned, and so is everyone in my industry about the silencing voices and how we how fast we can be deployed formed, and entirely erased. And that leads me to look at things, you know, like like, Huckleberry Finn and Mark Twain being remote. Moved from shelves of libraries and not not taught anymore. If. If we would enter this distortion world, that China is already in, or if we were hit by an EMP, God forbid, we had some, some sort of war with Russia, and we're trying to knock each other out, electrically all this knowledge could be lost. What if you had to save things and beyond the bible, and, and the founding documents what, what books, would you say every library should have every person should read every every school kids should read? We gotta have these books if we're going to tell the true story of America, and if we would ever want to reset it and put it right? That is really great question and have to have another hour, gland, or destroyed through what I was thinking about this. And, and it's it's an exercise conducted myself several times. But since we only have a few minutes here. What if we just limit ourselves to, to basically five books written by American presidents, as a way in which to do this, which I think many ways encapsulates so much of the American experience, that, that they really ought to be part of an understanding where we are in how we've gotten to where we are that I think that everybody should should really read it should be an every library. The first one, the first one that came to my mind was the speeches and addresses of ABRAHAM LINCOLN, you know. Right. You and I share a fascination for those, but for, for more than just the once seeded with civil war for man, who had a really deep understanding of American history of people understood. Banding of, of western history, including, including our, our Judeo Christian roots. It's an amazing amazing piece of today's Inc. Piece of work, Dan, other one that I would do is, and this is gonna shock. You surprise. You is the speeches of Franklin Roosevelt. You know, everybody discovered with a staunch -ment, right? Is his, his, his prayer before d day this last anniversary. But in fact, all his speeches whatever you say about, you know, Franklin Roosevelt, he made some huge mistakes, and in policy during the do deal, he certainly had some, some false assumptions about how the world work and his ability to, to create a postwar world in conjunction, the Soviet Union. But you know what for as presidents go? He his speeches reflected understanding of who we are of aspirations need to be that in ways that made them household. You know EV. Everybody everybody grass them what? So I would definitely put that on this. I also read then Dwight Eisenhower's crusade, in Europe, which is really understanding how that man was able to put together an hold together a multinational effort to, to, to free Nazi Germany, and why we did it to mazing book. I would also include Ronald Reagan's diaries, because those show at mind at work in the White House understanding, how it is that we are going to be able to deal with and, and ultimately emerged victorious against Soviet communism. Which everybody else assumed we would have to be lucky if we could find a way to engage in peaceful coexistence. It exposes aside, Ronald Reagan that not only enhances our understanding of his importance as an American president. But also, we, we see the way in which America in the in the Cold War era, this mind, coming to grips with what's taking. Place and understanding where it's fits in terms of where America needs to be the last one. I'll recommend Glenn John F Kennedy's profiles and courage. I think it's a wonderful book and, you know, there's a lot of standalone about who really wrote that book and so on and about his father's care being so surprise. But the biographies, first of all, the Baga fees of the man in the US, Senate who grappled with the issue of slavery. It's very well laid out in that book. He has a wonderful chapter on Robert Taft, the Republican Senator from Ohio, that we talked about before which is considering it as written for person, pretty opposite political. Party is amazing is a discussion. There about about George Norris who took a strong stand against the wheel Sonian kind of view of the world. America's involvement in World War One, it's a lot of I it's very readable. I read it, I as a as a school kid, but it's one, which I think's it's value grows. As as decades pass is a way to understand who we are in all of the really amazing things that we have accomplished, as society as a nation, and of the people who have made it possible for us to, to be to be that be that beacon in the world that we still are Glenn. It's still. It's still there. However, much try to try to try to extinguish the flame. Arthur, I love talking to you. I, I mean I used to just come in, and we should just do a whole show together because I still have about two hours left of stuff. I wanna ask you, thank you so much for your time. And we'll have you back again, Arthur Herman, you can follow him on Twitter, at Arthur, l Herman his book. That is a great entry for him is freedoms forge, which talks about how we won World War Two, it is an amazing. Being story annual all the way through it think. Gosh, I wonder if corporations would do that. Now, I wonder if we are those same people now Arthur Herman is his name any of his books. Any of them are tremendous. You can also find him at.

Arthur Herman America Glenn John F Kennedy Franklin Roosevelt United States president Ronald Reagan Boertien stones river union army ABRAHAM LINCOLN Martin Luther King Oprah Winfrey Islamaphobia White House Dwight Eisenhower
"stones river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

14:29 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Ritchie wrote a book ghost of the civil war. Let's talk about that a little bit. I know a lot of people in the paranormal community start their paranormal stories by saying I was at Gettysburg, and I had this experience. And it made me curious that is not uncommon at all Gettysburg is a hot spot of paranormal activity as are many of these civil war locations. So tell me about your book where did your stories come from? Is there a certain geography or did you just seek out the most haunted places related to the civil war and talk about them. Why definitely cover every area of the civil war as far as geography goes. But I think the interest came. Living here in Memphis and being really close to Shiloh Vicksburg and surrounded by a lot of little smaller places like fort pillow and a smaller force and little skirmish areas. And I had so much of that around me that I I started going there and doing a lot and like, you just mentioned ghost hunters already sort of made these places really popular just because you know, the public parks game that you can go there during the day carry an audio recording the camera you can walk around and Leo listen for anything by going off this one of the most common experiences of these battlefields. So you have so many different people going there for their first investigations anyway. So I thought, you know, this is a great opportunity to sort of take something I have handy here and an interest because it's also involved with history and folklore and turn it into a book. And it was a. In writing. Were you able to visit all the sites? I mean, that's that's quite an undertaking. All the sites. No what I figured out pretty quick. And this this writing these books was that getting to know a lot of the local ghost hunting groups in different areas is really was an asset. And I tried to go to as many places. I can I I went to I think. Forty something different battlefields. A couple hundred different major and minor forts and skirmish areas cemeteries, you name it and any place that I couldn't go to our just reach out to the local ghost hunting groups and say, hey, you know, I'm I'm learning about this area. What was your experience is there can you back up any of these claims of activity in that sort of thing? And this is one of the things I've found about the ghost hunting culture is that we figure out somebody else's really interested in it. We share info and trade goes places and stories, and that's been one of the coolest things about writing about this stuff. What's unique about the civil war? Why is it that so many paranormal hot spots are connected to it? Why is it that so many civil war locations have so much paranormal activity is something unique here. What's the story? I think it's a combination of. I mean, first of all we're talking about between six hundred and twenty thousand and most current estimates actually even run up as high as eight hundred fifty thousand people died during this one war and just to put this in perspective the next highest casualties for war with four hundred five thousand. I mean, so wars head and shoulders even above that by over two hundred thousand dead, and we're talking about dead in your efforts. I just wanna I just to clarify. We're talking about American casualties American because hurricane did World War. I includes also those wounded and things like that we had over six hundred and twenty thousand people killed in the civil war. We're talking soldiers. Not even we're not even including the civilian casualties and things that were secondary to the war such as starvation lack of medicine all of these types of things, you know, over six hundred twenty thousand soldiers died during the civil war. This is a crazy number. I mean, you look at like the Vietnam war. We lost fifty eight thousand in change Chirps. When you get into the individual battles of civil war Gettysburg. We lost fifty one thousand casualties. We had as many casualties in Gettysburg is almost the entire Vietnam war in three days. Yeah. Three days in one spot in one battle in that war. Yeah. Take that amount of shear dead. But also the fact that this was a, you know, were north despite the South Americans are fighting Americans families were divided the emotions were running. So high. And you know, like, I do when when you go stories a lot of times, they talk about emotions, and what they can do, you know, people lingering because these emotions. I think a combination of of emotions running hot and the sheer amount of death is why the civil war is such a ghost hunter. Yeah. A lot of people don't take into account that both sides of each of those battles were Americans. And that's why you know, those casualties are so outrageous. The other thing we have to point out is that in a in a battle against Bergen. This was true. With almost all of this of war battles is that after the army's left the dead, essentially, laid strewn across those fields for days. That's true and often the side of the dead that lay there was who won the battle because both sides for sort of notorious about. Expeditiously taking care of their own dead and just sort of leaving the other side, laying baron's appeal and oftentimes it would take the locals to come in after on the aftermath of a battle to come in and sort of sweep up to did, and then sort of depending on their dispositions because, you know, everything from a local mob who maybe hated the other side who just into a mass grave or you had people who genuinely care about all the soldiers who were there, and they would try to make efforts to bury them properly. What you know, we have this whole range of of the way the dead was treated the score. And I know like my local battlefield Shiloh, which was the six highest in casualties in civil war. There's a lot of mass graves in the area for confederates and not so much for the union soldiers. Because of course, they won the day there. The. These casualties would stay on the field. In fact, many of the photographs that you see from the civil war and you see photographs of dead soldiers. I know a lot of the ones from Gettysburg pretty specifically because I studied that battle. But you know, that's Taga for it took him days to get to the field. And when he got there, those bodies were still there, and that's why they're so disfigured in many cases. But when you talk about that amount of tragedy in that amount of motion, and then about a blood soaked into the ground. I'm assuming that that is the perfect storm if you will for paranormal activity. Absolutely. We're talking also if you are the type of person that buys into the environmental factors, a lot of the state parks too. I mean when you get into the makeup of the bed rock and whatnot. Environmental, you know, usually, you notice that a lot of these battlefields have some sort of major waterway running through them. Shiloh the Tennessee river runs right through the middle. We had the battle stones river just outside. Nashville gemstones river that's running right through there. And you know, you can into sort of environmental factors to you've got that going on. Yeah. It it does seem that. You know, the big battlefields are sort of the perfect storm for it goes to hang around. As you were writing about these stories in these places, which ones kind of made the top of the list. Man. I, you know, I love the ones that just sorta persist like, you know, if I hear a story, and your it's the same from the late eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds, but it's sort of faded away into that secondary realm of folklore. You know, I like it. But I'm not as interested in it. But you take something like green is in chicken Maga. So for a lot of people they a lot of people know about Gettysburg cousins, fifty one thousand casualties and the three days, and and honestly, it was the biggest turning point of the war pretty much selling it for the north. But the second highest casualties in the war was a chicken Maga in Georgia. And literally since the days after that battle to the present day stories of an entity called green is has been spoken about chicken Maga. And I mean, you can get on and do a quick Google. Search of green is chicken Maga pull up stories. Current is like last week about green is people who still run into this the spirit this I you know, what I'm not even sure we call it a spirit at this point. Because I know a lot of crypto people have started jumping on the green is claiming it's more of this sort of revenue otherworldly being thing that the speeding up to dead on the battlefield. But that those kinds of stories that sorta persist. Over the over the century, plus since the civil war. Those are the ones that really really get to me. When you talk to other people who've had experiences on civil war sites. Do they share those experiences their common thread from what people are seeing? What's the most common type of apparition or experience that folks experience? Well, I definitely think on the battlefields. The most common type of activities people hear the sounds of battle. I think probably ninety nine out of one hundred people who have something happen on the battlefield. They hear the sounds of cannons people, you know, the cries of battle sometimes screams of pain that sort of thing. It's usually audibles audible stuff and. But when you get into, and this is where I really had a lot of fun with the book when you get off the battlefields, and you start getting into some of the historic homes that are associated with civil war. That's when you really start getting into these interesting stories about apparitions, you hung around since the eighteen sixties and have been seen for generations and ex home and really when you start getting and also pretty interesting, how many of these places have turned into sort of be a Bs some things. So I totally and I think this is another reason why Gettysburg has become popular because you can stay, you know, at the cash town in and you can stay at places like Tillie Pierce house in and stuff like that. I think if you can get into some of these homes that are associated with civil war. That's your best shot of seeing an apparition and heavy something visual happen. Most of the experiences are auditory if they're sounds do. We have a good record or a good compilation of EDP or other type of audio recordings that that come from. Those sounds. I think there's a lot of people ghost hunters who regularly go to these sites that have done a pretty good job of getting. Sounds like cannon fire in the distance and things like that. I actually have that happen while I was writing the book my partner, and I we went to fort pillow here in Tennessee. And we were up just getting some stock photos for the book, and we heard what sounded like cannons going off. And I said was there is there a reenactment happening right now? He said, I don't think so. And then we went back down to the little park ranger office where they have a little mini museum. I brought it up with with that fellow. And he was like, no there's no reenactments nothing going on. And he kind of gave us a sideways. Look, you know, and you know, the sideways, look and. Yeah. So I mean, I think that's the most common thing. And I would be shocked if there weren't a lot of recordings of that particular type of activity for sure. When we also look at these buildings that have are located on or near civil war battlefields. Most structures of any substance were used as hospitals during and after those battles, and those places to have a lot of reports of paranormal activity, and clearly there was a lot of suffering and tragedy in those buildings. Any those stories make your book? Oh, tons of them. And I mean, and this is really one of the overlooked aspects of civil works. Everyone really wants to look at the battlefields. But the shoddy medical care that was happening during the civil war accounted for a third two thirds of the deaths. It wasn't most of them. Do not die media me on the battlefield. They either languish in died in these hospitals. And then you also have the prisons were a lot of people died, and those are really both of those are hot spots for a lot of activity. I went to a pretty famous place in Mississippi close to us called the decent house. And that's prime example. They actually wrote a a made a movie just recently called the Free State of Jones. That sort of embossed house because Amos decent was a was a big local rich man who had you know, land and win the civil war came into Mississippi. They took his house and turn it into a field hospital. And there's these diary entries. You can go and read from Amos Diesen where he talks about the stacks of just amputated limbs that were thrown out the window. Yeah. Sorry to cut you off which we didn't realize how close we were to break. But those piles would just be stacks and heaps. Okay. We're going to continue that discussion we come back. It's beyond reality.

Gettysburg chicken Maga Ritchie Leo Shiloh Vicksburg Memphis fort pillow Bergen Tennessee river Google stones river Mississippi Nashville Amos Diesen Taga baron Jones
"stones river" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Good afternoon. It is six o'clock. I'm Pamela furr. With your top stories. We got a lot of rain falling right now. And in Nashville, the mayor says his office is working with the army corps of engineers, the office of emergency management and metro water services to monitor the rain and its impact on our rivers. And I'm being told that the stones river is on the rise in Donaldson and flash flood watches do remain in effect this afternoon. Stay super talk ninety nine seven WTN for the latest President Trump says it is no surprise that. He's being sued over his declaration of a national emergency. But he remains confident. He will prevail in the end will do very well. We have absolute right to do that. I have an absolute right to call national security. We need strong borders. Sixteen states filed a lawsuit today to keep the president from taking funds congress earmarked for other areas to use and building a wall the State Department answering questions about it. American woman from Alabama turned ISIS recruit who wants to return home. Hold him. Athena. Who's currently living in a Kurdish refugee camp, Mary the nicest fighter and says she wants to come back to the US speaking to ABC news. She says we're just at the beginning of seeking always once we did come to ISIS. So we had just young people. Not knowing much about their religion thinking, they knew everything really. And we interpreted everything very well at today's State Department press briefing deputy spokesperson Robert pet palladino said he while he won't comment further on her case due to privacy, Washington's recommendation regarding ISIS fighters is clear, he treating these foreign terrorist fighters to their countries of origin ensuring that there are prosecuted and detained that's that's the best solution preventing them from returning to the battlefields in notorious RV G is back on the bench, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg, made her first appearance at his supreme court gearing following her cancer surgery in December today here at home..

Trump Robert pet palladino president State Department Pamela furr ISIS army corps of engineers stones river Nashville Alabama Donaldson ABC Bader Ginsburg US Washington Mary Ruth
"stones river" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"On February fifth and February nineteenth. You can call. The recreation department at seven to eight oh, two seven three for more information or look up on each league's Facebook page for the sign ups. So that's really important because they'll start putting teams together probably their draft will be the first part of March. I would assume and they'll start practicing and then playing so now there are they're special things that folks need to bring with them to the certificates are what you need to make sure that you can prove your age because they do classify you by your age there. It is all kinds of things did I see. See something at the rec center about pickle ball began trying to get pickle ball. Started people in neighboring communities like Shelbyville until HAMAs seemed to have more active pickle ball, but we are doing pickle ball on Tuesdays and Thursdays at ten AM. So if you're interested in that pickle ball is played in our Jim, and you have a big racket and a sort of soft kind of foamy ball says, oh, it's really good. I, you know, I've played it in it's fun, and it's an active, and especially if you're an older adult, and maybe your movement is a little bit more restricted, the smaller court pickle ball is larger racket is something that you might find fun different spongy ball opposed to like a racket ball with the racket ball court. If you're yes. It's not being played off a wall. We're back at you. So it's all about what appeals to you. Yes. And it's a smaller court. So the ball usually comes back quite a bit. Now. Like in tennis, if you're not, you know, really got the technique down for that. You can be Salem that ball over the fence and all sorts of things. All kinds of fun things happening at your Manchester. Recreation Bonnie, didn't even mention group, exercise classes and the track. The we still have our water spin classes there we've had to add another class on Saturday mornings because bites in the water. Yes. Bikes in the water said that's been very fun. People are enjoying that. And we do have a senior day at the movies that February eighteenth going to stones river mall cost us twelve dollars for the movie and transportation, and then bring some lunch money with you. And it's going to be a fun day. So we do have a lot of things going on at the recreation department gave any questions about any of the programs or how it works or what you need to do..

Facebook stones river HAMAs Shelbyville Manchester Jim tennis Bonnie Salem twelve dollars
"stones river" Discussed on AMVETS Radio

AMVETS Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on AMVETS Radio

"Also, I will get your information over to Terry. Here's your department commander. And if we could get you hooked up with the ladies auxiliary in the area, get you joined, you know, I agree effort. Effort. You still there brother? I certainly am. Who who we connect her with? You. You've been connected with me. I can fix her up wherever whatever location is close. I can pick her up. Perfect. That's. Family. Jen. Also. Also because I do we have a correspondent in Florida. It's actually I don't think you meant you Perry. I don't think we do. But you know, I'm we've got Indiana. We've got Washington DC, we've got Tennessee. But no, Florida. And and a lot of people don't understand what this means all this means is anytime you have in the, and that's related news that you wanna share you can come on the show and or post that we make you an editor on on the Facebook page. So that you can post that stuff on radio because not only do we are showing every Tuesday. But we also use the website and Facebook page to communicate and that's truth and things going on with them. So. Very we'll again tomorrow. Excellent perfect. You will have you sound? Right. Surprise. Would somebody post on the radio Facebook page that that that we have in new and that's correspondent for Florida? And I will message. The details of her name over in our little message area that we go to. Armbruster B R U S T E R right breast, her Brewster. Stay roster. The different side of the Armbruster family. We save restor Folkard. Let me go ahead and pace that there is that. And that is Lauren. Okay. Excellent. Now. Let's go right to our topic. Because I've got an article which I wanna read first. And then after I'm done reading the article, I'm gonna bring on the nessa DeLeon who is our or maybe. We still have one more now Ciment with Jen before we go forward conversation. Excellent. It's actually coming up this Saturday post forty five along with one. Oh, one in Smithville and seventeen seventy six Jerry read music city Nashville. We are going to be has fisting Jen, the good cemetery and a lot of other wonderful organizations that are gonna be coming out for one of the largest National Park Service restoration projects today. Jen, did you give us a little bit more information about that? I share can. Okay. So it's a location is the stones river national cemetery. And it's going to be called stones Bevere national cemetery. Volunteer day and we've loved to have two hundred three hundred volunteers and the stones for national cemetery is if you don't know established in eighteen sixty five and more than sixty one hundred union soldiers who Peirce during the civil. War lie in this twelve acre cemetery. It's also the final wrestler nearly one thousand gutter ins the served after the civil war and through the nineteen seventies. And it's located at the students. Remember, national battlefield, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. And that was you know, the fierce battle at stones river between December thirty first eight eighteen sixty two and in January of eighteen sixty three,.

Jen Facebook stones Bevere national cemeter stones river national cemetery Florida Tennessee stones river Armbruster family restor Folkard commander Terry Indiana Murfreesboro Perry Smithville National Park Service Brewster DeLeon Lauren
"stones river" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on American History Tellers

"The slave owners nightmare came true in seventeen thirty nine that year. The first major slave uprising took place on the stone river in South Carolina about one hundred slaves rebelled killing dozens of white and even cutting off some heads for good measure. Then they said, offer Florida toward what they hoped would be freedom. But in the end, most of the rebels ended up dead reality of an organized uprising, set terror in the hearts of slave owners that same fear was in the minds of New Yorkers two years later when a fire swept through the city, a rumor spread that slaves had started, there were seven thousand in the city and that their plan was to go on a murderous rampage. Although the cause of the fire was never determined thirty Africans were nonetheless hanged or burned the stake for the arson. This was the reality of slavery. Those who were enslaved face vicious, reprisals, and violent crackdowns at the MIR. Thought of their rebelling against their status. Once venture experienced this reality firsthand, he vowed to get out of his position. He would find a way to buy his freedom and that of his family. Shortly after their altercation. Thomas Stanton sold venture to another man. He kept Meg. The children who now included their daughter and two little boys venture and his family were separated. Once again, mentor stop back at the Stanton farm whenever he could to see his wife and children throughout the seventeen sixty s and seventeen seventies white Americans grieved over British taxes, reclaiming for freedom. But all the while venture was working himself like a dog when he wasn't doing chores for his owner, he was working nights and in the predawn hours, chopping wood growing crops to sell and fishing ails all to raise money to buy himself and his family out of slavery in this time venture sold yet again to a new owner, someone who sense of decency appeal to him Oliver Smith, a local.

Florida Stanton farm South Carolina Thomas Stanton arson Oliver Smith Meg two years
"stones river" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on KOMO

"No it's officially the best week of the year why because this week only you get twenty percents off in napa and the only thing better than quality car parts is twenty percent off quality car parts okay so we're a little biased don't waste because the twenty percent off sale will be over before you know it the quality parts helpful people that's napa know how no participating stores extant supply minimum pre items proper billable july night for july thirteenth amazon is raising its prime membership price by twenty percent ninety nine dollars to one hundred nineteen dollars just for free shipping no thank you walmart offers free two day shipping with no membership fee that's one hundred nineteen dollars back in your pocket what would you rather do one hundred nineteen bucks head to walmart free shipping dot com for the chance to instantly win a one hundred nineteen dollars walmart gift card walmart free shipping dot com for complete rules and details to business day shipping minimum thirty five dollar order restrictions apply research says to download the speed pass plus app the vast easy secure way to pay for gas and earn rewards what the tap of a button so if you're into the mobile payment method thing good times it coming exxon and mobile energy lives here visit exxon dot com or mobile dot com for details hi it's jamie progressive's employee of the month two months in a row leave a message at the hi jamie hit me jamie i just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay hey hey and the trombone goes wah wah wah and you say we'll be fine carbo jopstone to fit your budget then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes savings coming at ya savings coming at ya yes no maybe anyway see you practice tonight i got new lyrics for the rap break progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law komo aaa traffic i ninety east of the mountains in both directions just east of ellensburg is closed due to a wildfire that's is being vaunt right now and the no idea right now when they're gonna get bit roadway clear again and we do have roadwork going on all lanes of eastbound five to to paradise lake road in the stones river bridge closed overnight till five am jay phillips komo news six eighty nine.

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"stones river" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Jeez the landscape lymph lumber that i don't know how much to get or how to go about putting it up with a climber like a cla mattis or an ivy or a night blooming jasmine something that will sort of grow up and out of the pots and onto the trellis you know i did this on the side of my garage with two potted cla mattis and i have this beautiful wrought iron trellis that i found that i've put twinkling white christmas lights on and the clemenza sort of takes over it in the summer months and blooms and smells fantastic and it's just lovely to sit in front of you can do something like that very inexpensively and very easily as well now as far as the flower but on the opposite side i mean you're really not going to sacrifice that much yard space if you do dig up a portion of that lawn and that really is the best way to do it to create a flower bed and what you can do is you can use either that landscaping lumber or even stones river rock or fieldstone stacked up to create a little wall for a flower bed just removed that layer of grass filling in with potting soil and plant away and that really is a great way to create a flowerbed nikki go sort of creatively with your shape and edgy you're not giving up that much long space i think you so much.

stones river
"stones river" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The beer's family was very much part of the abolitionists mindset when major general george mcclellan led an invasion on west virginia ambrose part of that campaign the following year eighteen sixty two he was at shiloh in hardin county tennessee when it was attacked by the confederate army that battle was devastating for the union forces who were taken by surprise but beers was one of the survivors who rallied under general don carlos buell and catalyzed the confederate retreat and the shiloh battle was one of the bloodiest of the war with more than twenty three thousand casualties and it's something that came up a lot in his work two months later the newly promoted second lieutenant beers saved his commanding officer's life at the battle of stones river in murphysboro reverend county tennessee and shortly thereafter in february of eighteen sixty three he was promoted to first lieutenant in his role as first lieutenant beer served with the ninth indiana regiment and he fought it took a maga in september of eighteen sixty three meters was also part of the atlanta campaign under general sherman in this campaign was pretty rough for him personally he lost his closest friend during the fighting and he was also struck in the head by a musket shot on june twenty third eighteen sixty four during fighting at kennesaw mountain which is close to us it kind of brings this particular story very close to home the whole we're in atlanta we're in atlanta right now beers was treated for his injury he returned to the frontlines in september so just a few months later and he surfer several months before being discharged the following january chronic dizziness and fainting spells that were kind of brought on by this head injury had ended his time in the war but just a few months before the conflict officially ended it's not really surprising to say the civil war changed him because how could it not he was only eighteen when he enlisted and the horrors of battle affected him pretty deeply the idealism with which he had entered the service was replaced with this.

george mcclellan virginia shiloh tennessee confederate army officer stones river murphysboro reverend county te indiana regiment sherman kennesaw mountain atlanta hardin county don carlos buell eighteen sixty three meters two months
"stones river" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"stones river" Discussed on WJR 760

"Joint concert by the detroit symphony orchestra the jazz ambassadors of the united states army field ban and the premier touring musical representatives of the united states army my goodness gracious it's all about what's happening there in there so liu to america the twentyfifth anniversary of their quinton tense clint i'm not even gonna try to said right now it's their great they're quintessential thank you for the july celebration with the detroit symphony orchestra uh and that we're happy to have with us the deputy commander of the lummus battery fred braun fred did good morning to you got morning call w how you doing sir i'm i'm doing very well tell me as the deputy commander of the lummus battery as some of the inside and behind the scenes i said the other day when they do the eighteen twelve overture and in shooed off the cannons real cannons uh in that it makes it extra special but i didn't tell them that you guys are behind that in i certainly couldn't explain how you do that give us a little background of the loomis battery a little history if you would okay whoa was battery are for you in the civil war there was a unit called roma's battery from cold water michigan all the quaterly ah what through theater of civil war on there were named after their commanders cyrus ono much uh and uh they are in now stones river perryville and got tshikalanga andrew would art touching gay unit drugs used to work to promote the history out on and on people of the history of this on it and in particular our end of the us artillery none of civil war jewelry do you for eight years ago this are you the same a team that host a longrange artillery match in greyling the.

clint commander loomis civil war andrew us detroit united states army america fred braun stones river perryville eight years twentyfifth