21 Burst results for "Stoller"

Foreign reaction to the "disgraceful scenes" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC

Monocle 24: The Curator

05:29 min | 7 months ago

Foreign reaction to the "disgraceful scenes" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC

"In washington dc transfixed. The world prompting horror interleaved with an amount of bleak humor in countries which the us are sold to lecture on the democratic proprieties. Jonah russia and turkey were among those struggling to keep straight faces as they shoot. Solemn statements hoping that due process would be observed is might be tempting even vacantly reassuring to believe that trump's last two weeks good north. The united states image abroad any worse than the previous four years already had bus. Is this in fact. A new low four states addition of the briefing andrew miller was joined by louis lucas former. Us diplomats now senior partner with seeing global advisors to take a close. Look if you've been watching yesterday's events from one of those embassies would it have felt it would have been terribly embarrassing. You know as you said we we like to go around the world and tell countries that they should strive for a more open and free democracy and democratic system of government and to see the kind of violence and destruction that we have always condemned overseas happening in the cradle of democracy in washington dc in the capitol building itself. Egged on by the president would be incredibly embarrassing awkward for a us diplomat overseas. Do you worry that this is something that is going to. Linger pass january twentieth. Will this have a lasting impact on the united states ability to project itself as a guarantor exemplar of democracy abroad. I think it'll be a long before. The united states can issue for example. A statement of condemnation because a foreign leader doesn't accept election results. Without having that country's snicker in return. I think we like to tell the rest of the world of to abide by free and fair elections and we have a president now. Who's not doing that. And i think eventually we will regain the moral high ground. But i think donald trump and the last four years and certainly the last two weeks and still two weeks to go has caused immense damage. I mean are you able to reassure yourself. At least the world does perhaps regard president trump as an aberration. It was notable yesterday in the statements from various world leaders. That even some of those who had been broadly sympathetic. Boris johnson here in the uk. Benyamin netanyahu and israel both used the wood disgraceful right. We'll donald trump's got less than two weeks left office or whether you're boris johnson. Or benjamin netanyahu or some of these republican leaders in washington dc. They're all suddenly finding backbone and sort of moral certitude condemned donald trump when. He's basically on his way out the door. I would question for all those people including the ones in washington the politicians you know. Where was that sense of morality and two years ago three years ago when donald trump was well down this path already as we were just discussing a struggle now seems imminent full the soul of the republican party between what remains i guess of its traditional stoller decor and the sort of insurgent yahoo wing which has taken over in the last four years but is going to be a concern overseas that they might be more where this came from. I mean it is not inconceivable that a republican president could be elected for years from now it might even be donald trump again. Well on yes Let's hope not but it is certainly conceivable. The republican would be elected president for years in the skull so conceivable by the way that the republicans would retake control of the house and the senate in two years so that that's not very far away so i think if you're an oversees observer if you're a diplomat in washington and want to maintain contacts with the relevant political parties in the united states. You certainly don't discount the republicans at this point and you don't discount what you called the nut wing element of the republican party. Because i think that trump base will remain there are seventy one million. Americans voted for donald trump. You know the the notion that suddenly because of yesterday mitch. Mcconnell on the leaders of the party be rediscovered by partisanship and cooperation. I think is a bit of a fantasy. They will do everything they can for the next two years to thwart joe biden's agenda and try to set themselves up for taking control in the house and the senate two years from now just quickly. If we're trying to be optimistic about this. Is that perhaps anything to the idea that there was something usefully humbling in yesterday's nonsense in the might at laced stop. Us correspondents and commentators from referring to yesterday's events as many of them did like it was something you would expect to see. In colombia or lebanon. Mark they actually be able to understand that no. This can't happen here. Indeed is maybe i'm not. I think we have a tendency to have a bit of a short memory and a sort of lack of ability to be introspective. So i think hopefully yesterday was a one off. It won't happen again. But the fact is that donald trump has stoked this sort of fear and hatred for four years now in his. He's built up a lot of resentment amongst his base against the establishment against democrats. And i think it's not going to go away overnight. Louis lucas there in conversation with an earlier this week

Donald Trump United States Louis Lucas Benjamin Netanyahu Boris Johnson Washington Dc Andrew Miller Washington Capitol Building DC Turkey Russia Republican Party Senate Israel UK Yahoo Mcconnell Mitch
"stoller" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Pantheon

"Rocks and labor in solar here this and labor particular is not amused at first until somebody explains the math to it. You just explained it. You just said the story there apparently from what Jerry Lee recalled me Elvis was in Las Vegas in nineteen, Fifty, seven or fifty six, and there was a a just a lounge band called Freddie Bell and the bellboys played. Hound dog and he he was struck by and said I wanNA record that they had done a. bastardized version of it with the lyrics change and that's the one that. Elvis copy Jerry said he copied what they did in the lounge note for note, on the on the record. And, of course, Elvis's record went on like you say sell probably seven or eight MILLION AS OPPOSED TO R&B hit on the in the black market, which was a huge hit would be thirty thousand that would be a huge it actually that doesn't sound like bad sales to me today thirty thousand. Yes. Seven million would be typical anything Elvis. Put out every single he put out with the five million, seven, million, you know the B. Side we'd take a ride on it and whoever wrote the B side that's they would put. These clinkers on the decides of Elvis records so that Aaron Schroeder who wrote them the B side usually a good clean up didn't matter was on the B side but apparently Whatever year that was fifty? Six fifty said probably fifty six Mike stoller going on his honeymoon on the on the Italian ship, the Andrea Doria which sunk. Many miles off the coast of New York and had two people had to be rescued by boat. And as Mike Stoller was being road back to shore from is the sunken ship WHO's a famous? near tragedy I guess people were saved from the Andrea Doria. Qualify that as a full on tragedy. I think. Tragedy It was a a great ships thinking. Like the titanic except more people were rescued, I believe. around fifty six solar got back with his wife to shore. From you still wet. and Jerry came down hoping to see if he was alive survive Jerry rush down to the to the docks in in New, York to see to see to pick up my stoler and he said by the installer was alive and his wife and they were all shaking out and wet. Messed up from being on a ship that sank. And Mike's it. By the way, a hound dog is, is a hit by a by a guy named Elvis and stolen didn't even know this was at that moment. And? He said, what do you mean? He says it's all. It's all over the place. It's on the charts. It's number one. And they stole it was shock, and then of course, they found out who else was and went into. The. Music for his first or second movie a second Jailhouse Rock. And wrote the score and then produced it and everything. But that's how Mike Stoler found out about how does. And They were appreciative of Hound Dog. But when they met Elvis and worked with him, they had a very different impression. They hated the record hound dog when they heard it because it boulder is their lyrics, their intention and they didn't feel that meant any made any sense. So they hated the record, but they kept their mouth shut because it was such a monstrous success. And when they went into in La to work with L., this to the right. I think they wrote two movies for him I can they wrote to movies but jailhouse rock being the first one at least another door in creole and jailhouse rock I think. Maybe another one they did it in like a weekend they knocked out the score and they went into the studio and they produce those records jailhouse rock, which also became enormous enormous hit. it's not that great a record it's not that, but you know the considering its use in the movie and the dance that eldest does it's so iconic. but anyway, they certainly appreciated and liked Elvis when they met him and worked with them in studio and thought that he was. Gifted. To a point. They didn't think he was his great some of the artists they already worked with but they appreciated that he was talented and that he had a great voice he can only sing. Way He heard it on Jerry said, he can only say the song exactly in the key and the way he heard it on the demo. So Jerry write the song and they demo out Mike and Jerry on piano. He said that's how Elvis did it, and that's what Oh this Blackwell said to Otis Blackwell wrote don't be cruel and return to sender I believe and. Jolly and others wanted great rock and roll side. One of the really great writers and he wrote three or four of Elvis's greatest hits don't be cruel returned to sender all shook up you wrote all shook up kind of invented that kind of rock pop rock rockabilly, Song pop song. Otis Blackwell but Otis, Blackwell's demos were exactly as elvis saying to Elvis couldn't like improvised or change anything if you're saying exactly as he heard it and even in the same key you I heard you say. told. Jerry's it. I'm sorry said Mr leader that you know the In on his On the tape is the key I'm going to sing in just like the take. and. I'd heard Otis. Blackwell saying those songs in Dot Com. Is's apartment a few times. And you'd think Otis. Blackwell was imitating Elvis, but it was the other way around. We'll come back to Elvis and labor installer but I wanted to introduce our next major player in today's tale and that's not promised and here's Ray Charles doing a song dog road called Lonely Avenue. With Dr. Says I I. Wouldn't say..

Elvis Otis Blackwell Jerry Jerry Lee Jerry rush Mike stoller Andrea Doria Mike Mike Stoler Freddie Bell New York Las Vegas Ray Charles Aaron Schroeder Dot Com boulder Dr. Jolly La York
"stoller" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Song the most famous example of that would be, let's say. Right. Fools Fall in love Frankie lions hit you know Morris Levy, the mobster, the Jewish mobster who ran Ranch several record companies back in the in the fifties. Put His name on. Why Do Fools Fall in love he did not right obviously. So it took decades for them to be able to. Wrench. wrenches name off and in the same with the Lebron installed by the time Lieber installer became powerful by. Sixties and were at the top of the Brill building. They were finally able to renshaw the Johnny Otis from. Hound dog and. A claim Jerry claimed, he never received any real money for the sixties. And the Johnny Otis had been receiving all the checks including after Elvis Saturday you chit. Chat. Like you point out the scale of the difference between an rb hit like when big Mama hit with Hound dog, it's sold you know and the tens of thousands. But when Elvis with dog it sells in the millions maybe as many as eight million and that song, we're little journey I want to summarize quickly and then what you take cover but abandoned Freddie. Bell. And the bellboys started doing a totally bowdlerized version of it that loses the point lyrics of the song that were about basically a pamper Gigolo whose freeloading off his woman and turn it into this expression of. Sort of a nonsensical expression of it I mean it's just rock and roll power in a very white boy. For the Bar Way Alvis here's this in Vegas and he knew the big moment thornton song but he fell in love with the Freddie Bell bellboys version, and the rest is history cats version of Pan dog that lyrically makes no sense. But definitely, rocks and labor in solar here this and labor particular is not amused at first until somebody explains the math to it. You, just explained it. You just said the story there apparently from what Jerry Lee recalled me Elvis was in Las Vegas in nineteen, Fifty, seven or fifty six, and there was a a just a lounge band called Freddie Bell and the bellboys played. Hound dog and he he was struck by and said I wanNA record that they had done a. A bastardized version of it with the lyrics change and that's the one that Elvis copy Jerry said he copied what they did in the lounge note for note, on the on the record. And of course, Elvis's record went on like you say sell probably seven or eight million as opposed to aren hit on the in the black market, which was a huge hit would be thirty thousand that would be a huge it actually that doesn't sound like bad sales to me today thirty thousand. Yes. Seven million would be a typical anything. Elvis put out every single. He put out with the five, million, seven, million, you know the B. Side we'd take a ride on it and whoever wrote the B side that's they would put. These clinkers on the sides of Elvis records. so that Aaron Schroeder who wrote them the side usually a good clean up didn't matter on the B side but apparently Whatever year that was fifty? Six fifty said probably fifty six Mike stoller going on his honeymoon on the on the Italian ship the Andrea Doria which sunk. Many. Miles off the coast of New York and had two people had to be rescued by boat. And as Mike Stoller was being road back to shore from is the sunken ship who's a famous near tragedy I guess people were saved from the Andrea Doria. Qualify that as a full on tragedy I think. Tragedy It was a a great ships thinking. Like the titanic except more people were rescued I believe. around fifty six solar got back with his wife to shore. From you still wet and Jerry came down hoping to see if he was alive survive Jerry rush down to the to the docks in in New York to see to see to pick up my stoler and he said by the installer was alive and his wife and they were all shaking out and wet you know messed up from being on a ship that sank. And Mike's it. By the way, a hound dog is, is a hit by a by a guy named Elvis and stolen didn't even know this was at that moment. And He said, what do you mean? He says it's all. It's all over the place. It's on the charts. It's number one. And they stole it was shock, and then of course, they found out who else was and went into. The music for his first or second movie a second jailhouse rock. and. wrote the score and then then produced it and everything. But that's how Mike Stoler found out about how does And They were appreciative of Hound Dog. But when they met Elvis and worked with him, they had a very different impression. They hated the record hound dog when they heard it because it bolted is their lyrics their intention and they didn't feel that meant any made any sense. So they hated the record, but they kept their mouth shut because it was such a monstrous success. And when they went into in La to work with L. This to the right. I think they wrote two movies for him I can say wrote to movies but jailhouse rock being the first one at least another door in Creole and jailhouse rock I think. Maybe another one they did it in like a weekend they knocked out the score and they went into the studio and they produce those records jailhouse rock, which also became enormous enormous hit. it's not that great a record it's not that, but you know the considering its use in the movie and the dance that eldest does it's so iconic. But. Anyway. they certainly appreciated and liked Elvis when they met him and worked with them in the studio and thought that he was. Gifted. To a point. They didn't think he was his great as some of the artists they already worked with, but they appreciated that he was talented and that he had a great voice. He can only sing. Way He, heard it on Jerry said, he can only say the song exactly in the key and the way he heard it on the demo. So Jerry write the song and they demo out Mike and Jerry on piano. He said that's how Elvis did it and that's what Oh this Blackwell said to Otis Blackwell wrote don't be cruel and return to sender I believe and Jolly and others wanted great rock and roll side. One of the really great writers and he wrote three or four Elvis's greatest hits don't be cruel returned to sender all shook up. You wrote all shook up kind of invented that kind of rock pop rock rockabilly. Song pop song. Otis Blackwell but Otis Blackwell's demos were exactly as elvis saying to Elvis couldn't like improvised or change anything if you're saying exactly as he heard it and even in the same keys you I heard you say. Toll Jerry's it. I'm sorry. Said Mr Lebron you know the? In on his. On the tape is the key I'm going to.

Elvis Jerry Otis Blackwell Freddie Bell Johnny Otis Jerry rush Lebron Morris Levy Mike Mike stoller Andrea Doria Jerry Lee New York Mike Stoler Aaron Schroeder Lieber Ranch Mr Lebron Freddie
A look at cities seeing police budget cuts amid crime surges

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

07:28 min | 1 year ago

A look at cities seeing police budget cuts amid crime surges

"It's a turbulent time fall, the anti police protests turned violent and a wave of shootings in many big cities. It's just painful. His horrible New York City mayor Bill de Blasio, we've been put through hell in the city. Everything fell apart simultaneously because the Corona virus there's about 400 more shootings this year in New York, compared to this time last year with atleast five people killed over the weekend, A number of gun arrests have been going up steadily over the last month. The NYPD is working more deeply with community members and leaders. They will turn this time. Other cities have also seen a spike in murders and shootings, including Chicago, which also had riots and looting. Alderman Raymond Lopez told Fox the fear is spreading. The anxiety is spreading, and we're seeing individuals who used to see the downtown areas like the crown jewel of our city. Now wanting to leave. Now, all that unrest has more people arming themselves. Gun sales soared 145% in June 135% last month, the firm's small arms analytics and forecasting foot sales of two million Meaning Americans have bought more firearms so far this year than all of 2019, and that makes sense to John Lott, president of the Crime Prevention Research Center. And one night Portland had head over 69 11 calls that the police had ignored. He also has a book, gun control myths. How politicians the media and botched studies of twisted facts on gun control. You have across the country police being ordered to stand down. You have cuts and police budgets and place like New York. You've had the whole department inside the police department disbanded. You know, at the same time you look across the country and their jails and prisons, and they're releasing large number of prisoners in Los Angeles and San Francisco. You've had about 50% of inmates and jails being released. That's not uncommon. Those money Jails and prisons across country which have had between a third and half of their inmates being released. So it's not surprising that we have this concern for people's safety. We're not normal times will deal with the krone virus that you mentioned. There were already many cases where police departments were ordered not to respond to calls. And now, with riots and police being overwhelmed. That's gotten even worse. And the it's important that people do. The safest course of action is to be able to go and protect themselves and heavy a gun turns out to be the safest course of action, particularly for two groups of people, the most vulnerable people in our society. People who are relatively weaker physically women and the elderly on people who are most likely victims of violent crime. Overwhelmingly poor blacks who live in high crime, urban areas, a lot of these gun control laws, specifically poor minorities and even many times middle income minorities. From being able to go and get guns to protect themselves, And there's no reason why you should have that type of discriminatory lawn effect. When you're dealing with the rise in gun sails there. People have already said there are too many guns. I mean in Chicago. That's what has been talked about. There's too many illegal guns out on the streets, so adding more guns, which obviously are legal. How does that solve the problem, right. But the problem is that you have drug gangs and criminals with guns, not enough law abiding citizens with guns and the problem that you have to deal with with gun control laws as if they primarily disarm law abiding citizens relative to criminals. Look, the major source of illegal guns are drug dealers. Uh, drug dealers have lots of guns because they have very valuable property. It's not like a drug dealer. Khun, Go to the police and say Look, this other dealer Stoller drugs. Can you help us get them back? They have to go and set up their own little militaries in order Protect that property. You know, if you think, ah, you're going to be any more successful and getting criminals, stopping them from getting guns than you've been able to stop them from buying illegal drugs. You know good luck with that. But You know, I give you a simple example. Every place in the world that's banned either. All guns for all handguns has seen an increase in murders. But at the same time, John There are people who are from other countries because it shake their head at the number of mass shootings that we have in the United States. We have far more of these mass shooting events than another well what other mass shootings are similar to what we've had in the last 10 years in the US, I mean, France, for example, has a per capita rate of fatalities from mass public shootings. That's 50% 111% higher than the rate. States. They they have events like we had in Las Vegas or in these schools have people know about the New Zealand mosque shooting last year, But do you know that within less than 24 hours of that there was a big school shooting in Brazil, or there was a mass public shooting that occurred in the Netherlands thes things just don't get news coverage and when they do They're usually in the back of newspapers. Way recently completed a study where we looked at all the mass public shootings in the world. They using the FBI definition of mass public shootings were four more people are killed in a public place not involving some other type of crime, like robbery, or, you know a gang fight over drug turf to get it exactly the type of case that you were talking about, like the Las Vegas shooting and the Nine states made about 1% of the world's shooters. Um, even though we make up almost 5% of the world population, and many of these countries have extremely strict gun control ofthe France. ER has, um uh, you know, band semiautomatic guns here we are. Jonathan Democratic Convention this week, and gun control will certainly be an issue brought up. If Joe Biden war to win, and if Democrats were to control Congress, would you expect a renewed push for stronger gun control in 2021? I think the future of private ownership of guns is more steak now in this election that we've ever had in any past election if they get rid of the filibuster. If you have 50 votes in the Senate, a CZ well as Kamala Harris to go on, break a tie. You're going to be able to pass. You know anything they want to pass on. One can just read the Democratic platform draft to see how they're talking about everything from licensing of registration of guns to banning Large segments of semiautomatic guns to make it more costly in many other ways, for people to be alone guns to having lawsuits against gun makers and gun sellers whenever their guns are used in the commission of a crime or used improperly an accident.

New York Chicago John Lott France Nypd Las Vegas Bill De Blasio United States Joe Biden Crime Prevention Research Cent Alderman Raymond Lopez Kamala Harris Senate Portland Congress Khun President Trump FBI Los Angeles
"stoller" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back. The interactive portion of the show with Dr Kenneth Stoller will take your calls. Kenneth the Zika virus. I went on the air several years ago when the CDC was talking about this is a possible pandemic. And said with my guests, no, it's not going to be a pandemic. It's a scare tactic. It's not gonna happen. Maura people die every year from the conventional flew 36,000 Americans. Not to worry, folks. And you know what? To this day. It still hasn't happened now. They still try to create an issue every once in a while, but would you agree with me? I assume you do. Well, except for the 36,000 cases of flu that that's actually propaganda as well scare tactics by the CDC because they're seeking money in control, driving fear through mainstream media. The parents the infection's disease threat of the day so they can get money, whether it's the bird flu or Ebola or the swine flu, or Zika. So in early 2016 the World Health Organization jumped the gun by declaring that Zika virus with a global pandemic of biblical proportions. And the head of the CDC and the H begged for $2 billion in emergency funding from Congress, which they eventually really received it, Zika Zika. Nothing else could cause the microcephaly not the insecticide that Brazil is putting in the water supply and its northeastern area and certainly not the DPT vaccine. They were giving toe every pregnant woman that that had nothing to do with the microcephaly that question along with incompetent science, hijacked by political forces to extract $2 billion of funding from Americans, most of which would will goto you know, vaccine research and development for a shot that no one might need. There is no concrete evidence that Zika causes microcephaly and there is no pandemic on the horizon. So there have been three false pandemics announced by the World Health Organization. It's like crying wolf, right? Hey, it's a pattern of political abuse of public trust, reaching for massive wealth transfer from US taxpayers toe Big pharma vaccine manufacturers. And it's just one of many disturbing trends. Meanwhile, a really pandemic line disease is called a nuisance by the CDC. You know what a nuisance diseases acne that's a nuisance disease. Not line disease, but they don't have anything to sell. Yet. When they do, everything will change. Dramatically, too, won't it? Overnight. Indeed, let's take some calls share. They're lining up to talk with you, Kenneth. Dr Kenneth Stoller, our guest. He says that the way he believes it and sees it, and I find that to be refreshing. Let's go to Jerry truck driving in Oregon to get this thing started. Up. Jerry just hung up. Let's go to gym in Los Angeles. He's not ready either Areas. Go ahead, Jim. Welcome to the program. Oh, hi, George. Thank you for taking my call so much. Your guest is just excellent. Sure. I wanted to help you just a little bit on. You asked him. How did Florida ever get Assed faras. It did and I have the name of the gentleman. He was known as the PR of The father. I should say of public relations, Ed Bearnaise kosher. He started it all. Yeah. You've heard of the name before George. This guy all he did. They called him McEvilly ingenious because he also want a book by the way, called crystallizing public opinion, which George which Goebbels, Hitler's propaganda. Master of propaganda. Yeah, Yeah, exactly. And what he did is he just told the Listen to this. This is amazing. He just told the American Dental Association to start funneling millions of dollars. These corporations That, uh, that leaked this toxic by product. Into our into our water streams and into our ground water. He is absolutely correct about the development of nuclear power that that was part of it. But also the steel and aluminum industries wanted to know it would cost him billions to clean this up. So he just said, Look, just And millions of dollars to the American Dental Association and they'll get on board with you. It's all about the money all the time. George that's what it is. Follow the money. Yeah. All about the money. And this this this guy was canonised and glorify brought on the David Letterman show as some hero. He lived to be 105. Obviously, he didn't drink the fluoride, right? Probably not Kenneth want to react to that? Yes. I mean, we're getting fed literally poisons both, you know, in our minds with, you know lies about four eyed being good for yo and good for your teeth. And you know, my feeling is if there's enough money, people will sell their mothers to the glue factory. So you just apply enough money. And you, Khun by academicians. You khun by research journals. You can buy the press. You can bleed out are the f D A. From the inside. You could bleed out the CDC from the inside, and then we're stuck. Really? We're stuck for sure. But how do we pull out of this? We can't. How does Thie average person beat this system? Kenneth? They have to wake up to what is actually taking place, and it's not a comfortable situation when you realize What you believed your entire life may actually not be true and may actually be harming you. But that's how it starts. You just have to wake up and understand the rial facts. Been in these situations and and who's responsible for your health? It's not some corporation. It's not eating corporatized food. It's not brushing your teeth with corporate toothpaste that has Pleasant, innit? That's more toxic than lead. I mean, If people really understood that would they put fluoride in their mouth? If someone you know that's actually more plastic than lead, they stop brushing their teeth for toothpaste. There's no little Jiminy cricket that jumps out of your medicine cabinet and tells you that it's our responsibility. Not some corrupt corporation, not some corrupt federal agency. It's our responsibility to understand what we're putting in their bodies. What we're breathing into our lungs. And what kind of information is coming into our our minds? We have to take responsibility for that. It is so frustrating for people That get bombarded every day Kenneth with all these other situations, and now they have to worry about this losing confidence in government to protect them. When they're supposed to protect them, and it's just not happening. Is it? It's very comforting to think that some big, powerful organization has your best interests at heart. That's orbit is very anxiety provoking To think that no, they don't. And you better figure this out for yourself. It's It's not something. It's not a place where a lot of people want to go. It makes them very unhappy. Next up. We've got sherry truck driving in Oregon. Welcome to the program. Sherry on the wild card line. Hi.

Dr Kenneth Stoller CDC George microcephaly Zika Zika World Health Organization Oregon American Dental Association flu Jerry truck Zika DPT vaccine US Los Angeles David Letterman Khun
"stoller" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Go Online, and many lodge organizations and corporations to do the same so. I think there's a fascinating thing. In a one of the things that you and I talked about last time we had a conversation was the. Eighty, five percent of the jobs that the kindergarten gets kindergarten today. A central jobs that they need a will be working in. Don't exist today, so talk a little bit about about that. because. I think as leaders. We're often looking for people. Who On not, educated? In what we need, right, I mean you know. We know the a study from the Federal Reserve Bank show the. Only twenty seven percent of people today as we recall this twenty twenty twenty seven percent of college graduates were GonNA field. That, they started as a major. On A and I think for me. At least I had many conversations about this A. I don't see how it makes any sense moving forward. What are you seeing because I know this is a big our research it is, and it's it is really concerning and why to me, it's such. We need to be acting on urgency and I. You know as much as in at the situation. The Corona virus thing is is horrible. It could also be the spark for a lot of good if we can take advantage of this because. One, we've learned that we can, we can react really quickly, and my biggest concern is now that as things we try to push everything back to the way things were before because at eighty five percent of kindergartners are gonNA. Be Working in jobs that don't exist right now. That is real, so if we are GONNA spend twelve years preparing our kids to go into a college. That is now preparing them for something that jobs that do not exist. What are we doing? I mean what a what a waste of resources at. And then obviously the life that get impacted by this so fortunately there are a lot of schools that are that are researching this and following the research that are saying you know what what are the big things that we need to do if we know that these these kids are GonNa be working jobs that don't exist. What are the skills that they need to have? And they need to be able to be flexible. They need to have their empathy in their communication skills and they. They need to be looking at doing things that really only humans can do because when it comes down to his, there's going to be a lot more even more than there is right now of automation and artificial intelligence and things that is is going on and we are GonNa have to solve problems. That's the number one thing is. Can we teach our kids to solve problems and more than that I think we have to teach? Our kids is to solve human problems exactly yeah. The mechanical problems the mathematical problems. Computers allowed was there are already out doing so I. It's that human side. I'm said I believe with every fiber of my being. The new bottom line is soft skills, the very thing that we've always demeaned minimized and shoved off to HR. Who are the Education Department of whatever business we're in and we are so. It's one of the things I said about this pandemic. Leaders are being forced to lead humanly. You know you got your people working on all the technology, but now you actually have to interact with your people in a way. You didn't before because you're able to put stuff off, but now you actually have to actually give a crap and say how you doing. What's going on Bob? How's the wife? I know the kids. The kids barking in the background, and the and the dogs running around trying to steal your candy I know I rely on purpose but. It's kind of like. Di Human side is so relevant. But Let. Let's just talk about how. You know I told talked about the introduction part of the solution part of the problem right and and you and I discussed this in a previous conversation. That We. As leaders and organizations. We're part of the problem, not the solution so far. In in in what we're putting forward for applicants to apply to a little bit about that and I'm just GonNa Kinda. Get right to the point, and then I'm going to work backwards here. A little bit of just how many times us as leaders or anyone who's hiring for position? We have on our on the job description as they have to have four year degree or equivalent experience. You went through indeed or any of these almost everyone would do that, but how many actually like view that equivalent experience like like is that are those words that are on there just? Just, because or do we actually care because you and I probably had a lot of conversation that if you can hire someone who was great at a certain skill. Set that that you needed. Do you really care what college they went to or what their GPA was I. don't give a crap personally, but that's me. And me and almost everyone else because I spend half my time in the key, you know in schools the other half my time is with business, leaders and entrepreneurs, and I've never had anyone tell me like no I need to make sure. They went to an elite college and that they had a good. GPA nobody cares about that. Because when it comes down to is you want people that that can do the job well, so I think that's the first thing that if we can all take away is we need to look at our job requirements? How many people are very well qualified to do these jobs and And we are immediately not even giving them the opportunity to because of that four year degree, and if you really look at it, we're creating a whole pay to play system that literally. We're not even GONNA. Look at people unless they go through. And they spend one hundred hundred and fifty thousand dollars on education that we all we all know in our hearts, and we knew as leaders that does not matter now. Some people will challenge it a little bit well if they went through college that that shows that you know, it does show that they can do something like it shows that they can rise above. Something but I. I would challenge that that that that is almost like the false premise that we are putting right at the beginning that if we removed that and and do that now, there's a lot of factors that are working in our favor right now as we're kind of moving into or of like a Gig, economy and more freelance work. Is that we do have a really good way to judge people's work. And actually see we can. We can actually exactly so so that's that's a huge component of it that that once we start looking at inserting judge people on their work. Then we're going to be able to hire for the right things and not kind of just be worried about kind of this this whole you know hundred hundred and fifty thousand dollar gate that we're creating for that, and that that trickle effect is is what I'm excited to see what I'm just very actively talking why. Why like I wanted to be talking to you on your podcasts about this is that if we challenge at assumption and then as parents, and as well of not having to go to the educators and say hey. Give my kid into a good college or know. Make sure that they're prepared I'm only going to go to your school if you can show me, you know that that everyone's going to that. That system for a long time I used to blame the colleges for that, and now I look back at it, and I'm like no, this is not the colleges fault they they were. They created a great system for themselves. A win serving the greatest thing for for what we need for for the next generation to be prepared for, but it's not the colleges fault. It's the people that are hirings. Follow I think. Even if you go back into the fifties and early sixties. People genuinely went to university because they wanted an education in a particular area and they worked damn hard to get that because they. We we lived in a world where people had a forty year career, right? When I went to school I when I was fourteen, I was asked. What do you WANNA do? Which is a stupid question revolting your old? Because one I want to do. Is I want to be older so I can drink? Can I can potty? And so if I want to go to college, that's what I'm going to college for right so, but you know like I said back then it was you know. What is your forty year career? We know now the Krizner about four years, careers, not jobs careers jobs at one point two years, so if you get to that point of realizing the a career is years, and you just spent..

Go Online Bob Education Department Federal Reserve Bank
"stoller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coasters Lieber and Stoller well they're still searching we and you he we this is what room it what we.

Coasters Lieber Stoller
"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Short will If this were nineteen twenty seven you'd be like Oh man that's a great now anyway so it's like fascinating really dark period where we almost we pretty much almost went A fascist it was it was a corporate decade around the world. That's when Italy went fascist. It's the Beer Hall. Putsch in Germany like things were not going particularly well in terms of team democracy right and then in the thirties there was economic collapse. And that's when the second major character of my book the first one Mellon he kind of casts a shadow over the twentieth century. And and the second one is this guy named Wright Patt man who is a student at Brandeis Kind of an ally of of FDR but a populist from rural Texas and he gets into Congress in nineteen twenty nine and he. He basically organizes veterans from World War. One and there's like ten million veterans or something large veterans and he says during the In Nineteen Ninety introduced as a bill to get them an accelerated pension for their services World War One which isn't that popular then but by nineteen thirty two and everybody is poor all of a sudden. There's a giant March and protest in DC where people are literally occupy Wall Street is called the bonus army and they just camped out in DC saying give us our Our money from the first word of depression and Andrew Mellon is saying no and then patent is leading the charge and then Herbert Hoover tear tear. Gas is them all. Who in that footage from that is shown in theaters around the country? Because that's how people how people got newsreels everyone started booing and that's when FDR was like. Oh I guess I don't really have to campaign against hoover win this man. People really really hated. Hoover is incredibly such a piece of shit just to sit down for a seven course meal every night during the Depression in like tails not just seated but like tails and the reason. It's a seven seven course meal every night and the reason he did that is because he was like if people don't have confidence that things are normal and going well then the depression will continue. Oh Wow yeah Eh. He was withdrawing money like he was telling people. Don't worry the banking system is safe. And then having his assistant withdraw all his money so he would have it in cash Ashley. He was a bad guy. Wow the musical entity has thank you Mr Hoover like. That's that's that's about Herbert Hoover like he was this figure. The Democrats ran against him for twenty years right. And so what I show. Is that like basically the first thing that FDR FDR actually puts Andrew Mellon on trial for tax fraud. Is this the same Mellon whose name is on Carnegie Mellon. Is it the same guy. Yes it is so that shows you the power of wealth that even after being such a piece of shit you can still have your name on universities today. is something. I'm sorry I cut you off. Please visit store and his grandson or great grandson or whatever is a bitcoin billionaire goddamn and then it's just like it's just like it's of course it's so stupid. Like extreme wealth is so dumb. Yeah that's the other thing is these people are like that was so cool about like FDR and Pacman and prefer these guys they like today. You know I think like my problem. I'm with like some of the Obama guys is. They looked at super wealthy people and they were like. Oh you must know what you're doing you're like really smart and like these guys looked at super wealthy people and we're like your mediocre. Yeah like you're just good at grabbing things. Yeah you just have a lot so you can do a lot with stuff you have like it's I it's not a it's it's it's not because you're a genius because you have. It is just because the rich get richer is is like the reason. The reason is because the rich get richer the end. I am so annoyed. I have to pay attention to mark Zuckerberg because whenever he says anything. He's such a mediocrity like he's a good businessman but he's a plain omelette talking he gives a speech about like free speech. And it's just like it's so boring and annoying like this guy is like a sophomore in college. Read some books about free speech and like I don't yeah here like why do I have to pay attention. You nobody elected you you just monopolize to social media because we weren't enforcing the laws and now I have to pay attention to this is really fucking annoying. Yeah he bought lady just bought his competitors and now he's one of the most powerful people in the world. I'm sorry I just want to go on a on an aside. This is not about monopoly power at all but I have experienced in in my working life so many and I won't name but so many like dudes who happened to be in the right place at the right time so they made a bunch of money you you know they. They started a website got lucky etc And then as a result of that one bit of luck everybody they and everybody. Nobody else thought that they're geniuses and everything else they're going to do is going to be great and then you watch them everything. They do fails after that over and over again because they're not actually that smart. They're not actually that talented. They just got lucky. The one time it's like I had a friend who went to vegas with a friend and he was like you know what I'm GonNa do as soon as we get there. I'M GONNA put one hundred bucks. Read read on the roulette wheel and now we're like okay. Man Go ahead find. He's that's his fun game he's going to do one hundred bucks on red. He won and then for the rest of the night. He thought he was the smartest gambler in the world. He it was like all right. Here's what you should do in blackjack. He was telling everybody like he's a genius. No you got lucky. That's a bad bet. That's what you got lucky on a bad bet doesn't make if you smart doesn't mean you know Vegas inside out or anything like that right and there's so many like that's what that's what Zuckerberg is like. He happened to create. You Know He. He was the guy who Created the one side that happened to go. He bought everybody else and now he acts like he's a genius. Who should get to decide what our political discourse is? Give me a break. No that's right and I think that's like the biggest. That's that's the biggest political hurdle for That that we have right. It's it's actually it's in our own minds. It's this sense that people who are successful are successful for reason As opposed those two people who are successful are successful because they took advantage of a public policy framework that encouraged a certain kind of concentration. They're just just like us they're no they're no better or worse And there's this Guy Bernard Baru who is a an advisor to Woodrow Wilson. Key ran a lot of the operations operations have been during World War One and a general or actually the head of us. Steel came to him and said you know you can't tell us what to do. You know to make this. This is an intricate operation. And you can't just order US around and he said well you know what I can do. I can just fire you and appointed a second lieutenant to run. US steel right. I I mean he had some respect obviously for some operational competence but he knew it's this is not. This is not rocket science right you can. You can do this stuff like what they did during. The crisis was not rocket rocket science and we need to have the confidence that we can govern right. Because if we don't have the confidence that we can govern then we're going to let Bob Eiger at Disney or we're GonNa let Mark Zuckerberg or we're GonNa let warranty or anyone else we're going to say we defer to you and it is that deference he does that culture of deference. That is the reason that we are increasingly operating in servitude. We don't have to do that right. We can just be like we can recognize what we all know. which is that people are just people? We are all basically equal better worse. That's a one. That's an incredible insight and because we have this cultural cubs culture of deference towards these billionaires towards the mosques towards the Tim Cook's towards the whoever's in charge Google all right of like Oh these these people really know what they're doing and we should listen to them but it's why hi. We're so here's why okay. So I go into this. The nineteen fifties. We built a new ideology and this came from a couple of scholars on the left. And the all right. So John Kenneth Galbraith Richard hostetter and then Milton Friedman Robert Bork. A couple of others they built a sort of fake history and they said you know political economy corporations banks that stuff is not part of politics that is science. Let the economists scientists handle that politics fixes about social questions like you know conformity or flag burning or or whatever the economists. They know what they're doing the plutocrats the if if somebody uh-huh gets to the top of bank it's because he knows what he's doing and politics is not about that. Politics is about Abortion or politics is about sort of these social show questions which are important but but we shrank politics two to these questions. They don't involve our commercial sales and that's not true right because politics is is about power. It's about who exercises power. Who who controls our lives who sets the terms of our lives and defacto? Anybody who's running a company that's as large as facebook book or US steel or whatever is determining the Has Power over our lives right like mark private government. Yeah that's what it is when you have a monopoly so in Goliath I show this and I show that the new dealers they this is how they talked about the world. They said you know. US steel is more powerful in some cases than many governments. And you know Barks says he said facebook in many ways. There's a quote in many ways is more like a government than a business will really setting policies right when you talk about Amazon like they. You hire people. They hire people they say. You're going to be an Amazon marketplace policy enforcer. That's not somebody on their public policy team talks to people in DC that somebody who enforces policies policies on the Amazon marketplace. That's governing position rate so a monopoly. Dizzy is the governor increasingly of our creative Commons. They're not just a movie studio although they governed right and I mean there's it's a little bit more complicated. But they set the terms and conditions for a lot of the people in the industry and a lot of the ways that audiences can relate two movies and you either take it or leave it. So what what. I show in Goliath and this is I think something. That was kind of part of American politics from the seventeen. Ninety s until the nineteen seventies seventies. Is that how we do. Business is how we do. Justice is not about whether we're four business or against business is about how we do. Business and justice is part the business so So power is part of business. Business is part of politics and we have to recenter political economy as the core point of politics. And that means saying economists saying experts saying to plutocrats. You know you guys are. These are political questions and we all get a say in this. Even if I'm just a guy who is just like dozen have particularly nice suit and tie I get a say because I am citizen. And that's the other. That's the other pieces that in one thousand nine hundred ninety S. This philosophy that I talked about was being developed in the forties and fifties coalesced into the consumer rights movement. And so on in the well-meaning people on the left decided. Oh well I don't care about whether businesses are smaller big businesses. Just bad what we really care about his consumerism. And they transformed our conception of what our political selves is from citizen to consumer and when when that happens all of a sudden we lost our ability to see power and our antitrust laws laws in our regulatory tools all of a sudden we stopped caring about whether that concentrated power and started saying well is the stuff that we're getting cheaper right. Do People like you. No Star Wars is is is. AMC Are there theaters. They're finding whatever we don't care if they're independent theaters. Because there's no difference between Robin Independent Theater and and big chain right. Who cares right? So that's what happened to us. And we're reclaiming citizenship now and that is why it's so satisfying to now. See you know. Politicians yelling at Mark Zuckerberg Org at a hearing right and refusing to take He is bullshit lying down right. No we we desert like you have to take seriously this is is not a side show this is like the actual were you know where the actual business of figuring out what our society is going to be. Where happens as Lilly and you're you're seeing that that is a that is a symptom of the fact that we are returning political comedy to the center of our politics right? That that Mark Zuckerberg is testifying. And he's sitting there and he's acting actually like the global privacy privacy..

Mark Zuckerberg Herbert Hoover FDR Andrew Mellon Depression US In Nineteen Ninety vegas hoover DC Amazon Germany Carnegie Mellon Texas facebook Beer Hall Italy Brandeis
"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

15:30 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"They wanted him to be like a lounge singer and he said no I want to what about a little bit closer to his actual personality if he was allowed. The point is so bill cosby was able to say 'cause so it used to be that the networks just sort of put on what they put on and they controlled it and then when they were no longer allowed to just put put your own the content that they were producing for primetime all of a sudden they had to buy from studios are from independent producers and then bill cosby could say look. I want to do the show the way I wanNA WANNA do it and hey ABC. If you won't do it I'll sell it to NBC. And so it created a market and that allowed for you know some of the most kind of creative television and was in the nineteen seventies and eighties and early nineties. With you know all in the family and Sanford and sons and Seinfeld and kind of created this model because markets work right mark. If they're if if they're competitive and fair they actually work in what And when you consol it there's a couple ways till undermine markets but the but the main one is to consolidate and and we got rid of the FIN Syn San Rules and so now you see like you see this. Vertical integration which is what it's called when like the TV network produces and syndicates all their own shows. And it's like the movies you you know and the and the movie The you know the studio system which was the pre nineteen forty eight system you know the studios controlled the distribution and they control the theater chains and and so you had five guys that were controlling all of Hollywood and they controlled all the directors and they control the actors in a you know it was like massive control over Hollywood Hollywood and we're back to that now. Yeah we're back to that. Yeah it's really stunning. How if you you know people used to describe the Golden Age of TV as being in you know the mid-2000s early two thousand ten's And it felt like there was a market right there were all these different networks who suddenly making good TV And and Weird TV and interesting TV and trying new things and now just working in the industry like those mar that market has dried up. And so we're headed back to you know the old days of ABC CBS NBC. Maybe Fox right. Except now that's net flicks Disney. Hbo Amazon and Yeah Like You said those places are owning the content. They're not you're not working for a studio in the to get into a little bit of the industry You know nuts and bolts here rather than making the content for a studio which then sells it to a network and then the studio can say well if the network cancels it will take somewhere else. We'll take that show. That Fox cancelled and we'll bring it to ABC or brings an ethics or whatever. That's not even possible anymore because now Netflix is producing the show themselves so once once they cancel it while you can't you can't do shit with it. Yes and and the the it's so so and they also have combined TV and movies Lezo You know ABC NBC CBS. They were They were actually. They were not necessarily just You you know movies and TV were Sapard. And now Disney's a huge television and movie studio and so the aftermarket for movies is also getting adding undermined the residuals and all of that. So it's like what's effectively happening. Is that what this strategy of these streaming services. Mrs Right is to just cram down and destroy the power of of Labor of producers. And it's not just about wages. It's also about destroying their creative creative power to so. Yeah I mean it's just it's it's all about power and what we're seeing is the resurrection of the studio system. That is in many ways. Even more extreme than the studio system that existed before nineteen forty eight which by the way was broken up because of an antitrust suit that resulted in something called the paramount. Consent decrees So it was about a vertical integration. Problem we now have vertical integration problem on on steroids. Yeah it's It's wild I mean. Yeah that's studios isn't that you're talking about that. Was An era are aware you know. There's there's one company would own the They'd have you know Ironclad contract with the talent They paid them peanuts. And they the Made them work on the movies. Television shows And then they owned the theaters there'd be distributed and they they vertically owned the whole thing and so they were able to control the entire tire pipeline and had a men's power over what got seen walkout made And we are really really moving back to that. I mean talk about you know. I am look at this this pattern holden so many other people's industries but just because we're talking about mine. I feel it happening right now. Right like It used to be that the most valuable thing you could do as a creator in Hollywood was to create. Ip Right was to create a new series. A new movie movie Something new that people would You know that that the Studio could bring to the world and You know profit it off of and then you would receive a piece of that profit because you created the IP right like You created the thing that was being sold on lunchboxes. So you got a portion of the fucking lunchbox sales Right now These companies have moved to the strategy of purchasing the IP start hoarding the IP which turns all of the people who are working on the shows into hired hands. Hey why don't you come work on Batman for a little bit. You don't own Batman you didn't create Batman you don't really get much say over Batman Batman. You're just here for the summer. Like help it out on Batman and for that reason we're GonNa pay you peanuts for it And simultaneously It's like they own own. An asset a creative asset that. You're just helping out on. So it fundamentally not just financially but also creatively disempowers the creatives and then simultaneously. They have so much power. They're also working to end the system of basically anyone having any back end participation in there in the show or movie if you do happen happen to create it where you know it used to be You know again if you created a piece of intellectual property you got paid every time it was shown or etc you had you participate in the prophets. And now they don't they just don't do that anymore they're like no we'll buy out. Here's like a couple of grand and You know we'll never pay you again which is like oh Maybe sounds good on the day. It happens but if it's a huge hit will you don't participate in that anymore right and also if you do romancing the stone today you don't get to do the follow on which is back to the future eared fun creepy interesting stuff the stuff that teaches us about who we are the stuff that takes risks the stuff that challenges just power doesn't get made right because because nobody who can challenge power has any power any more as just an example. You know in the nineteen thirties. Thirty two Hollywood studios would not make movies that offended Nazi Germany because they weren't selling into the German market and this is funny because they were all like Jewish studio ads right. But we're not we're GONNA you know we don't want keep selling Nazi. Germany was pretty fucked up but like Charlie Chaplin had an independent Production Auction Company and actually FDR Franklin Roosevelt called him up and said hey you know I really want to encourage you to make the great dictator which was a satire of of Of Hitler and and he did and it was. You know the but the way that we learn as a culture Come in in many ways comes from movies so I started out my piece on Disney. By saying you know I used to work in Congress. In one of the you know I learned about I like learn about the US marshalls which are this branch of government. Then they basically go out and they serve serve arrest warrants and it was like sort of depressing but they had all this this fancy equipment that help them serve arrest warrants better. And I was like. When did you get funding for all of this? And they said Oh in the nineties and I was like Gwen. Why is that and they were like? Oh the movie. The fugitive came out. And that's when Congress finally understood we do. It's like it's like it's true you don't movies help contextualize our world so when you have Today you know you will never see a Chinese villain in movies right. Because there's so much control that the Chinese censors now have Hollywood and I want to contrast this to a very different market a market. That's actually functional. And that is the podcast market. I was actually saying yet. No so so so podcasting. It's this fascinating kind of almost accidental market. Where you see a separation of production and advertising and distribution Basically because apple hasn't done anything with their with their podcast APP and that's what a lot of people use right tracking and they're not automating things and so what you see is a diversity of voices in a diversity of business models because it's so easy it is that market where it's so easy to access anyone can open up their podcast APP. Hit add do a little search immediately. The podcast immediately pops up because they're using apple's database most likely which is at Apple's sort of has an open API for that. I imagine And they you you know very little of it is pay walled or anything like that and so yeah. It's a very open. You know that word of mouth process that brought people in the theater Z.. Back to the future is also why You know you can have these sort of like very middle-class podcast hits that do well for their creators have a really specific point of view in Russia. There is none of those. It's not vertically integrated either so if you can make a podcast you can distribute it through lots of different APPS and there are multiple advertising networks that you can use so the there's not like you can not only can you just like open up the APP and get a podcast but if you start a podcast you can pretty easily distributed and if you get an audience you can pretty easily get an advertising network to start off selling advertising on your podcast. Now it's hard to build a good podcast as you know. There's a lot of work but if you do it you there's a market there. There's a series of 'em because like nobody's rolled it up Trying private equities trying to destroy the podcast market right now but but they haven't been able to do it and as a result we have this immense and vibrant and really cool Kind of podcasting. Yeah for the moment. But if you imagine Agean Disney decided to move into podcasts. And they bought ear wolf and they bought Luminary and they bought maximum fun and they bought Joe Rogan and they abbad all every all these podcasts. Put them behind a paywall or even just figuring out some way to make sure that they're going to cut a deal with apple apple exactly they get they make an APP. That's the best APP there. They come up with all these various reasons that you have to use that APP. Oh you could subscribe the other way but no you're probably gonna use that APP then. Eventually The star Dr Pay walling them et Cetera et CETERA. Then you only have a couple of executives deciding what kind of podcast to play. Then they say. Hey we're going to move into the Chinese market so now the the podcast that we're going to approve have to be Not Insulting to China but also they have to really work internationally like they can't be too specific or they. I can't be like setting New York. They have to be about stuff that everybody likes like sex jokes or makeovers right you're basically describing. What's happened to TV not in the last couple of years right like you're starting to see those ways that like that? Massive amount of power really distorts. What gets made right right? And the the The other analogy would be to what's happened in newspapers so the way that they're gonNa try to podcasting is they're going to try to put a lot of tracking into the into the APPS so that the that the advertisers will no longer WanNa just by on your podcast because they trust you and they know you have a relationship with your audience. They're gonNA say oh. We know what the audience does is in. We're GONNA hit them where it's cheapest and then you lose a bunch of your advertising revenue and you kind of get starved out. And that's what happened to newspapers all over the world. Frankly is that like the local. If you WANNA hit local audiences you know in Pittsburgh you don't have to go to the Pittsburgh courier. Whatever the newspaper was which doesn't really exist anymore or you can go to facebook right? Because they know everyone in in in Pittsburgh or Google. They know everyone in Pittsburgh and so the advertising money that used to finance newsgathering ring and creative output No longer does that because you have these kind of central intermediaries that have accumulated large amounts of data and can and can put and and can like put. Advertising can match that with advertising inventories. And that's kind of how you'll see it. My guess is that's how private equity is going to try to ruin. I guarantee you. There are a bunch of annoying intact rows right now in silicon valley thinking about how to ruin podcasting. Oh Yeah they've tried. I mean luminary was an attempt to do to do that and Luckily it seems to have failed. I don't ever hear anybody talking about using Luminary I'm not You know but that's not to say it won't fail in the future And so just for the folks listening out there there when these APPs start coming. Don't use them stick with your crappy old independent podcast APP. We'll know there's a good one I use overcast. Very nice independently developed APP and do it the old fashioned way as best you can stay on the stay on the boat as long as he can before you escape as it sinks let let me let me. Let me take globeop optimistic here. Because I don't want people to think that this is all going to collapse right because it doesn't have to and that's like so. I have a book out called one hundred year with monopoly power and democracy and one the things that we you know. I I wanNA tell a historical like the the story here is about whether we have a democracy or not because we're talking about a political question right right and so it's like yeah sure US overcast..

Hollywood apple Disney Pittsburgh Batman ABC Mrs Right bill cosby Congress US NBC CBS Fox Germany Netflix Sanford WanNa Joe Rogan
"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"stoller" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Who can only whimper or tweet with our tiny voices secondly there unfettered power over entire industries can actually change the way our society functions for instance a Pew survey found that forty three percent of adults get their news from facebook. So that means that Mark Zuckerberg's unilateral decisions about what kind of information nation to spread or encourage affects. What ideas get hurt in our society in which don't the rest of us don't get saying that Zuckerberg gets to decide all by himself? This massive amount of power concentrated into the hands of just a few executives is not just bad. It's also inherently league. Undemocratic thing about our society is founded on the notion that we all collectively decide how it operates right so when power rivaling rivaling that of our own government is wielded by the CEO of just one company in ways that the rest of us can't control. Well that's the opposite of democracy that is autocracy and you know what Americans throughout history have actually known this. That's why from Teddy Roosevelt's Day through the new deal. And after American policymakers have taken steps to break up monopolies or to stop new ones from forming so that no one company holds too much power over our society fighting fighting against monopoly. Power is actually part of America's political DNA. But you know somehow. It seems that we forgot how to do that. We now live in an an age of massive consolidation in just about any industry you can imagine industries that affect our lives deeply four companies now control ninety eight percent of the cell phone provider market. Three companies control seventy five percent of the beer market airlines cable companies. Even dry cat food is now a monopolized industry and things are only getting worse if we had at one time. Such a strong anti-monopoly movement. How did we end up here? Well to answer answer this question. Our guest today is Matt Stoler. He's a fellow at the Open Markets Institute and he's the author of the Book Goliath the Hundred Year War between monopoly power and democracy. He please welcome Mat. Stolen mets dolar. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thanks for having me so I I found your work through your wonderful newsletter letter called big where you and I hope folks listening. Please go sign up to it because it's really fantastic. Really Fun readable. Look at monopoly power in America. Arca today you did a great piece a couple of months ago I when I read called The the slow death of Hollywood. I believe about Netflix X.'s happily power or near-monopoly power and what that's doing to the entertainment industry it really articulated so much of what folks in in my industry are thinking right now. People are sending it around to each other in La in you know In the entertainment industry Saying yeah this really explains what's what's going on right now It was a real talking. You know Writers Guild Union circles for example. And you just came out with a new peace as we're recording. This just came out yesterday about out. is called. It's time to break Disney. Who is just a really wonderful Wonderful Thesis Yeah. Could you talk about that a little bit. Why should we break up Disney? There's Dean why should we be worried about the power of net flix. Yeah so just to kind of give a like a a predicate for all of this so I started thinking about monopoly power during the financial crisis and which you know screwed up our economy these banks that were just basically two big manage and out of that? I developed a kind of appreciation for how problematic concentrated power can be and how destructive it is and you see concentrated power everywhere in our economy. So it's not just like Hollywood. It's you know it's search engines and airplanes in cable networks but also like peanut butter markets like coffins. It's it's just it's Kinda everywhere and it has its particularly toxic impact impact on Hollywood because what monopolization does when you concentrate power over creative fields. It tends to bottleneck creativity itself in the hands of of sort of nervous executives. And so what you're seeing is the weirder stuff. The more interesting stuff kind of doesn't get made and I kind of noticed this over the course of several several years and then it turned into those two pieces and those pieces are basically about how there was a roll up a gradual roll up of power in the industry ustry starting real in the eighties nineties when you saw theater chains kind of roll up into these megaplexes which has to do with financing and private equity but basically that's when like the theater chains exploded and started taking over all the independent theaters and then that's the with. I don't even remember you read about the the independent theaters that used to exist. I barely remember going to theaters like that when I see one. It's like old timey. I grew up with megaplexes right well back when we used to put onions on our belt going over there were independent theaters So I start with back to the future right. Which is this movie That was a great movie in one thousand nine hundred and it's like it's like a weird movie right and I didn't realize this John John Molina. has this amazing kind of stand up about how fucked up that movie as it goes back in time and and he's get hit on by his mom. It's a really really weird you. It's hard to imagine the pitch for it right in the radio. Show amazing and also he has. This is the thing that Milady do which I thought was just amazing radio and his friend inexplicably disgraced nuclear physicist. And he's a high school kid and they never explain. Why look I normally? And he's very funny okay. I know he's the funniest comic in America and everyone can stop telling me that every single day because I would love to be as funny as him and I do my best so you don't need to rub it in. How great he is? I agree let's move on. I'm just hoping that I can use this. PODCAST is a stepping stone to get on his. podcast what you know what. We're off to a rough start. Let it points. It's a weird movie. It's a hard movie to pitch right if you're just going to be like. Hey let's launch brand today right you so you would. That would be a really weird brand to launch but the reason that it got made is because the filmmaker had made romancing the stone which which did well and so the people in Hollywood were like like well as seems weird but like let's give him a shot and then they didn't. It wasn't a huge risk to make the movie and distribute it. Because you just put it in a few theaters and if it worked kind kind of word of mouth would carry it. And that's what happens so it's first weekend. It may ten million dollars and then it basically made ten million dollars throughout every weekend over the summer and ended up making three hundred eighty five million dollars which is just. This is just an incredible achievement for a film like that but also it was a market right like you didn't have to just you know do a marketing campaign pain and then week one was basically. How did once sorry? It's over you could. You could have the movie in theaters for a while. And if people liked it they would tell there could stay on the shelf for awhile and sell consistently over time but now it's like the movie doesn't do well in the first week. Do so much marketing leading up. And if it doesn't do well in the first week year sunk and you might as well not made a movie at all that's right and like that particular segment like I particularly love comedies. Right in particular like John Mullany style. Comedy is not your kind of comedy. You're in that sort of similar industry. Keep digging man you know. I love comedies. Like I grew up Mel Brooks like with my family. We bonded over that stuff. And it's just I just love comedies and and that's the particular segment that's getting hurt hurt the most because it. Yeah it's I guess it's probably the hardest stuff to pitch Because comedians are weird right and they're the weirdest people and they're also I think the smartest people in in Hollywood because they basically observe like you know tricks of language and like it's kind of hard to explain sometimes like why it's something is funny but it just is. It could just be funny. Yeah and we can't have Sort of comedies. That are made now. I agree it's it's a terrible time for comedy movies because comedy movies are basically not made now unless they are action movies in disguise like every comedy now has to have for some reason like an actual drug dealer who's who like the people are trying to stop and then they get tied up and they're in a dangerous situation like so many movies are that over and over again like if there's these very few sort of formulas that the movies have to fit into and yeah that would make sense because it is It has to be pitched people without them actually seeing what the jobs are right right without them getting a sense of the sensibility ability. You can't you can't just make like hey. How about the jerk? Where it's like a movie about a weird funny guy and you know the end right? That's not right and that can make a mess. Because is the risk of of introducing. A new product is so much more extreme today. Because you put it in a few theaters and nor could you even sell it into a few theaters you have to cut your deal with like you know is the AMC chain or or whatever just like it's just harder to introduce products in America in general because now used to be that there were locally owned stores all over the country. Now you have to go to Amazon or you have to go to Walmart and introduce your product in like you know a thousand stores or you know massive volume you can't you can't just like try out a few things here or there and that's why why and then get it right and then roll it out to more and more and that's because you've seen this concentrated roll up of power. You also have much worse bargaining terms so when you roll up the theater theater chains then all of a sudden the studios have less bargaining power so they have to combine so they can get more bargaining power. It's a kind of concentration and that's what you saw happen and And and like the law basically the laws were changed to enable this laws against merger prohibitions. And then the the ninety six telecommunications act and then in on TV it was it it was there were some rules called the financial syndication rules that prevented networks from owning the content. That they also syndicated so there were a bunch of rules and like so when Bill Cosby. He's like a bad guy. I obviously but in the he was like one of the first prominent shows with a black middle class family the cosby show. And it's like originally. I think they wanted. ABC or somebody wanted him to do. He was famous when he pitched it..

Hollywood America Mark Zuckerberg facebook Teddy Roosevelt Bill Cosby CEO Disney mets AMC Matt Stoler John Mullany Open Markets Institute Mel Brooks Writers Guild Union La John John Molina.
Mark Zuckerberg Defends Free Speech Amid Political Blowback

Leo Laporte

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Mark Zuckerberg Defends Free Speech Amid Political Blowback

"Okay meanwhile the there there is a big speech that was that was done by mark Zuckerberg yesterday at Georgetown now quick profits here there's a story that came out a little bit earlier this week in political and the story suggested that I have met with mark Zuckerberg now let me say clearly and for the record I will never tell the media when it with ever I mean I can tell them when it with and I can tell what we say the reason is because you know in my job in what I do I talk with a wide variety of extraordinarily powerful people that the left would not want me talking with less spends an enormous amount of time trying to shut down precisely those conversations by reporting that the conversations happen and then bringing outside pressure there to stop people from having those discussions in the first place I talk with lots of people they don't want me talking with because I think the conversation is important I think that persuasion is important I think it's important to talk with people you disagree with and so my answer to people were asking me about meeting with mark Zuckerberg or anybody else for that matter in a position of power is take a hike son because guess what I need lots of people it's none of your business and particularly on your business because the goal of so many people on the left as you stop exactly the sort of conversation to make the country better those conversations make the country better the gold left is to prevent those conversations which in fact is the entire issue that is happening right now with regard to Facebook south listen I understand conservative skepticism about Facebook I really can't criticize Facebook copiously in the past when Facebook is taking action to kick people I don't even like often Facebook but I think the Facebook has been too stringent in their interpretation of their own quote unquote hate speech policy which I think by the way is a stupid policy I think that the Facebook page be policy is idiotic because there is no actual definition of hate speech but let's be clear the real pressure that is being brought to bear right now on Facebook is being brought by the last and the reason left is trying to bring pressure on Facebook is because down from one in twenty sixteen it is that simple the left doesn't like the trump one blood doesn't like the you have an alternative method of getting your news because Facebook allows the free flow of information more or less no more or less is your is question a question we have to deal with but the fact is I over a daily wire can't exactly complain about Facebook's dissemination of news considering that we get an enormous amount of traffic via Facebook and so to unknown a number of other conservative publishers if it were not for social media sites like Facebook if it were not for social media sites like Instagram if it were not for social media sites like you to be very difficult for you to get information the social media sites have been very useful in ending around the media which by the way is why the media are so all fired pissed off at Facebook it's why the Democrats are still all fired pissed off at Facebook is why you're single is with Warren threatening to break up Facebook and other big tech companies not because they're worried about monopoly of information but because they want to restore the monopoly of information understand that social media platforms I may disagree with the rules I may disagree about the implementation of the rules I may be quite skeptical of the people who are in charge of actually making those rules apply but if I have a choice between a world where social media allows me to get information from a variety of sources across the political spectrum and a world where the only news papers I can buy the newsstand or The New York Times the LA times and Washington post that is not a choice for the journalists it's not a choice either which is why they hate the big tech that they hate the social media platforms you're starting to see all of these journalists journalism in all over the place what they would prefer is a an area of limited information but they would prefer limited information and that's why you see the New York times running a piece called from Matt Stoller all tech companies are destroying a democracy and freedom of the press destroying it as opposed to the New York times which just spread its own brand of news without any challengers in the space because there's no alternative means of

Mark Zuckerberg
"stoller" Discussed on Badass Agile

Badass Agile

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on Badass Agile

"Results for your customers right so it's time for us to get locked in on that bad ask essential nature and if you remember the bad ass principles from previous episodes it's all about getting visionary that means knowing where you're going with certainty every day then it's about getting focused which means shutting out distractions and noise setting a timer start driving towards your objectives envisioned break big things into small things and so on but it's also about your ability to get greedy which means leaning into the hard ugly work the tough conversations for sations the tricky bits getting out of your comfort zone stretching and growing and finally it's about getting humble which is all about remembering that you you don't know it all yet and if there's one important skill you must have as a leader. It's your ability to continuously. Look at your game and seek to improve or close any gaps that you have so allow me to inspire you this week this year to date. We've been talking a lot about the nature of resistance the nature of fear and how that creates challenges and barriers to constant forward momentum so if you wanna be able to lead teams to do things they've never been able to do before if you want to break through levels of achievement and progress if you really want up your productivity and most importantly guys if you expect to be able to innovate then you have to behave in ways that innovators and leaders behave super you my friends. This all comes back to courage courage. I don't wanna focus so much on bravery type courage but on the certainty of your convictions. I don't want you to get certainty from compliance permission or consensus sus. 'cause here's the truth and i think you know this. The rules that surround us telling us who we should be and who we shouldn't be what we shouldn't shouldn't do are are not designed to keep you safe much less to make you more successful. Those rules are designed in part to keep things controlled and predictable baloney. Let me ask you this. If you want to innovate for your clients and your customers is controlled and predictable really what you want. Is that going to work for you. I think you know the answer sir. It's not so the first thing that i want you to do is forget everything that you've been told and are being told about what a good leader a good employee or even in a good team member means the true bad ass especially the inspiring ones in my book are those with a well developed and mature sense of the right way forward forward and by right way forward. I'm talking about that vision that picture of the world and how it looks when you're done with it but that picture of the world is not based on selfish or impetuous desires but rather from a desire to serve once you have that service based vision locked in you're good to go that is your source of all future certainty that you know that no matter what your aim is true and your desire is to make the world a better place for the people that you serve and therefore for nothing and nobody is going to throw you off course now. That's a different kind of courage than the one that allows you to. Let's say jump out of an airplane. See this susan about the courage to act in the face of physical danger but the courage to speak your truth the courage to be exactly who you are to say what needs to be he said in a do it needs to be done all the time every time think about it. How many people do you meet who act that way. How many people do you meet who knows where they wanna. Go who are chasing down their future reality who were living their dreams every day most of the people that you meet think what they think or do what they do because someone else told them too because that's what's in their job description because that's what they read in some business magazine so guys if you haven't worked on that vision yet it's time to go back and harden it right now and if you have worked on it before don't be afraid to go back and revisit it could use some tweaks could use some revision asian. Is it still true for you if not that's okay because vision can evolve slowly over time but you know what there are no rules this. This is your vision. You're the one has to care for and nurture it. You're the one who has to evolve and perfect it and you're the one who has to live it and back it up every day with real action so make sure it's complete. Make sure it's up to date. Make sure it's still inspires you and make sure it's that's right and then check yourself. Make sure each and every day that you get up you speak you live and you act that truth. Ideally everything you do should be a reflection of your vision and the passion that you wanna put behind it now. Let's have a little bit more reality for a second though if you encounter people who tell you that you shouldn't say what you're saying or you shouldn't say it the way you say. It considered this truth. Most people don't want you to say what you say or be the who you are because they themselves don't have the courage to do the same. They want you to conform to their worldview. They want you to conform to their belief systems but the one thing that you can't do is that confidence and courage in your strength and in your vision demands that you accept that other people may not like you. They may not agree with you but that doesn't make you any less right and you must not change course for anybody. We'll sure you can learn lessons along the way sure you may have been less than perfect in any circumstance an should always be looking for ways to improve and grow but that's not the same thing as bending to the will of creeks and haters there might even be some places where you just don't fit in and that has to be okay. I'm gonna say this again. We have to stay focused focused on the outcome. If we truly want innovate if we wanna make change and we want to create survivability and the ability to compete in the modern marketplace marketplace we have to evolve that means we cannot accept convention and rules and old ways of thinking because those old ways of thinking and doing have brought artist to a place where we're not competitive where we want to be more productive so if the way we believed in behaved in the past was working then. Why are we in that spot. The the answer is each of us has to at some point in our lives faced the hard truths that following the herd accepting rules and norms and other people's standards birds and expectations and behaving in ways that foster comfort and consensus are not going to get you to the next level. What is required is someone who can guide guide people towards a new way of thinking in doing so this week to reclaim your inner betas. Make sure you're filtering out the negative influence of people who are asking you to change to compromise and more importantly learned to expect learn to see it at learn to accept it that simply human nature. It happens to me every time every time you meet a new group of people the hands go up and say hey slowdown. Hey wait a second. Hey hey that might work for you. I'm sure but that is never gonna work in our environment guys. It happens every single time and the sooner you learn to accept a to embrace it. The sooner we're gonna have the tools necessary to help people work through it because remember we often won't have the choice to simply move those people out of the team or to bare knuckle your way through the resistance you gotta be able to work with these people and one way to work with them is to simply shift your gaze toward your vision and mission and and your purpose and to start executing and to start delivering in ways that other people can't help but notice so that means get back to the business at hand so that means this week execute set clear goals and objectives co create those goals and objectives with your teams in your leaders but then guide hide your team's towards meeting and crushing those goals and i know some people listening to this will say you know what that stoller workings okay in some environments but it just doesn't work everywhere and it certainly won't work here. Remember guys the bad ass agile. Sts and bad ass. Leadership is simply a a tool in the toolbox. This style of leadership won't work in every situation but when it does work it's massively effective and it's exactly what people people need to break out of the box move forward so what situations are those look for people who are clamoring for change look for people who are reaching towards the alight looking for a different way of working and a better way of delivering look for people who seem tired or frustrated with convention and the old wave doing things. They're simply waiting for an experience for different way of looking at the world a different way of doing their daily work..

stoller
"stoller" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Nicholas Stoller are kind of behind this thing and they have it like they have a knowing this about what's weird about door and they address it and it makes it sort of funny it's still I mean it's still sort of very kid friendly Indiana Jones sort of adventures but I think a lot of it works and I think you know if there's there's stuff here for adults their stuff here for kids it's certainly not next level action movie or comedy or anything like that but it gets the job done and and the the lead actress Isabella mon there who has been in a run of big films like she was it needs to be older kid an instant family came in the safari sequel I think she was in the last non bumble bee transformers movie he's he's fantastic in this and and just like really knowing and and funny and high energy and endearing and she kind of captures just enough of young Doris persona to make a recognizable will feel so showing us the way the door is sort of making adjustments to this new adventure as a teenager so there's some yeah there's a few key again cameos thrown in into your favorite actor Nick you hear genial developers that as the as another explorer who sort of helps door and her friends look for this loss to the of gold where her parents are but then there's also like this the the talking fox to steal things is voiced by Benicio del Toro who sounds like he's having like a street a ridiculous time playing this insane box and yeah I mean it's it's like I said it's not it's not it's not gonna be in the seventy record is not going to Blake B. L. a benchmark in children's entertainment but it's sort of an it's a nice sort of combination of nostalgia and in a little throwback to a more innocent time and certainly doors life so and and mine too okay all right not a recommendation okay there you go all right Eric will hear what you think of it after the break okay okay all right our air children since the Procopio review in the new movies when we come back we'll hear what Eric thought of Torah and the lost city of gold right here on seven twenty to.

Nicholas Stoller Isabella mon Nick fox Benicio del Toro Blake B. L. Eric Indiana Jones Doris Procopio
"stoller" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"We're talking to Bill Stoller CEO, chairman of the board express employment professionals. Right. I see recently released a report on the state of blue collar workers in America. Can you share some insights? Of course, Sean it's good to speak with you again. By releasing this white paper focused on blue collar workers in America. We wanted to help future job seekers determine if pursuing these jobs is a smart decision in what express found is that eighty six percent of the blue collar workers surveyed said they are satisfied with their jobs. Sixty four percent said they would encourage a family member or friend to pursue a career in their field of work. All right. That's very interesting now when you say blue collar work, what exactly are you referring to? Well, these are good jobs in construction, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing and areas such as agriculture forestry and more forty nine percent of the worker surveyed were in skilled trades and eighteen percent cited technology was a significant part of their jobs alas, my former life, and these are blue collar jobs. They're in high demand right now for the first time in modern history. Blue-collar job. Openings outnumber white collar opportunities really putting job seekers in the driver's seat. When it comes to their job. Search nearly three fourths of blue collar workers in the US say there is a good career path in their line of work..

America Bill Stoller CEO US chairman Sean Sixty four percent eighty six percent forty nine percent eighteen percent
"stoller" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on KTRH

"Hey, we're talking to Bill Stoller CEO, chairman of the board express employment professionals. All right. I see recently released a report on the state of blue collar workers in America. Can you share some insights? Of course, Sean it's good to speak with you again by releasing this white paper focused on blue collar workers in America. We wanted to help future job seekers determine if pursuing these jobs is a smart decision. And what express found is that eighty six percent of a blue collar workers surveyed said they are satisfied with their jobs. Sixty four percent said they would encourage a family member or friend to pursue a career in their field of work. Right. That's very interesting now when you say blue collar work, what exactly are you referring to? Well, these are good jobs in construction manufacturing transportation, and we're housing and areas such as agriculture forestry. And more forty nine percent of the workers surveyed were in skilled trades and eighteen percent cited technology was a significant part of their jobs. That's my former life and these are blue collar jobs. They're in high demand right now for the first time in modern history. Blue collar job openings outnumber white collar opportunities really putting job seekers in the driver's seat. When it comes to their job. Search nearly three fourths of blue collar workers in the US say there is a good career path in their line of work..

America Bill Stoller CEO US chairman Sean Sixty four percent eighty six percent forty nine percent eighteen percent
"stoller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Hey, we're talking to Bill Stoller CEO, chairman of the board express employment professionals. All right. I see a recently released a report on the state of blue collar workers in America. Can you share some insights? Of course, God it's good to speak with you again by releasing this white paper focused on blue collar workers in America. We wanted to help future job seekers determine if pursuing these jobs is a smart decision. And what express found is that eighty six percent of a blue collar workers surveyed said they are satisfied with their jobs. Sixty four percent said they would encourage a family member or friend to pursue a career in. Their field of work. All right. That's very interesting now when you say blue collar work, what exactly are you referring to? Well, these are good jobs in construction, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing and areas such as agriculture forestry and more forty nine percent of the worker surveyed we're in skilled trades and eighteen percent cited technology was a significant part of their jobs. Oh, that's my former life and these are blue collar jobs. They're in high demand right now for the first time in modern history. You call her job openings outnumber white collar opportunities really putting job seekers in the driver's seat. When it comes to their job. Search nearly three fourths of blue collar workers in the US say there is a good career path in their line of work..

America Bill Stoller CEO US chairman Sixty four percent eighty six percent forty nine percent eighteen percent
"stoller" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hey, we're talking to Bill Stoller CEO, chairman of the board express employment professionals. All right. I see a recently released a report on the state of blue collar workers in America. Can you share some insights? Of course, Jon it's good to speak with you again by releasing this white paper focused on blue collar workers in America. We wanted to help future job seekers determine if pursuing these jobs is a smart decision. And what express found is that eighty six percent of the blue collar workers surveyed said they are satisfied with their jobs. Sixty four percent said they would encourage a family member or friend to pursue a career in their field of work. All right. That's very interesting now when you say blue collar work, what exactly are you referring to? Well, these are good jobs in construction, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing and areas such as agriculture, forestry and. More forty nine percent of the worker surveyed were in skilled trades and eighteen percent cited technology was a significant part of their jobs. Oh, that's my former life and these are blue collar jobs. They're in high demand right now for the first time in modern history. Blue collar job openings outnumber white collar opportunities really putting job seekers in the driver's seat. When it comes to their job. Search nearly three fourths of blue collar workers in the US say there is a good career path in their line of work..

America Bill Stoller CEO US chairman Jon Sixty four percent eighty six percent forty nine percent eighteen percent
How the killing Jamal Khashoggi impacted the world

World News Analysis

04:02 min | 2 years ago

How the killing Jamal Khashoggi impacted the world

"Those moments on October the second twenty eight dramatic shaggy went into these Saudi consulate in east timbale and disappeared after more than two weeks of Niles. Saudi Arabia eventually admitted that he had been killed within the consulate in what officials. Called a rogue operation and as out to punish those responsible. The journalist who lived in the US and wrote for the Washington Post having critical of these Saudi regime US intelligence officials determined that Saudi security officials were most likely acting orders from crown prince Mohammad bin Salman when it killed and dismembered the journalist don't own form who've used to crown prince as an I why has been reluctant to accept the findings. So don't hurt start. With many are saying that the case is like a test of some of the key values upheld by the western world. What do you make of the responses from the western countries? Yes. This case, I think can be regarded as one of the big international news in the year two thousand eighteen it has generated several impacts while as that U S image now has been a great damaged especially to the present Tump because he has been insisting like. Elias Assadi, even though the CIA has released a report saying the Saudi prince Krung now has been the the person giving the older to to kill the journalist Kazuki. So this moral the moral like for the United States is no longer there. So called democracy, like human rights like transparency or of that. Now, it seems like a very clear now that national interests now economic interests and also those minitary, you know, the weapons sale the buying things. Those things are becoming the the number one priority for the US and the secondary. I think also had impact on, you know, the international relations, particularly in the Middle East area. We all know like Turkey used to be I lied waster rusher and also the wrong, especially in the case of the Syria crisis. But now because they're some maybe those. Deals has been on the taken using this Casseus case as a backing cheap. Now, we have seen that the United States made the decision. Tom made the decision Wishaw those troops US troops from Syria. So this wish shores seem supplies Butto. Will you look the Turkish relations with the United States? Now, it's getting better than before. So and also the turkeys longer like a pushing that heart like a it's beginning about this case. So I think always readers some deals has been reached between Turkey in the US from the case of these journalists the killing and the we also see even US are now would like to sell those missile though, so anti anti those missile weapons. They used to be haunted by the congress. But Senator, but now he's saying alright continue. So those are three point five beating your Stoller are the. Peek sale to weapons to the to the Turkey. So this is another sign and the trying to even to really to send back the student grin has been regarded as the some long behind those military recoup years ago. So all of these things coming from this generous the king. So they has been using a the bagging cheese now getting the Turkey now closer now is the US. This is you know, the camp Nala longer closer with Russia. We'll Dr Joe do you feel the case could be a turning point for the relations between Saudi Arabia and the west or do you feel that the leverage the Saudi Arabia has on his in terms of oil in terms of arms

United States Saudi Arabia Turkey Saudi Consulate Syria Middle East Washington Post East Timbale Niles Camp Nala Salman Elias Assadi CIA Congress Russia Senator Dr Joe Tump Stoller
"stoller" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And that's too much of of what I've been hearing these past three days about the shooter and having a diagnosed mental health disorder that is no excuse to kill two black people at a grocery store. And that is no excuse to try to break into a black church to commit crime. And it's all connected. Whether it's the mill bombs or the murders at the synagogue or whether it's miss Jones, Mr. Stoller being killed at Kroger. Tall connected. It's all part of a system that has been created in this country over time. And it's a system that we all need to work to dismantle wanna thank you. Both for being with us. Democratic state Representative Attica Scott of Kentucky serving on the house education committee, two thousand sixteen became the first African American woman to serve in Kentucky state legislature in twenty years and Reverend Vincent James chief of community building for the city of Louisville pastor of the Baptist church, this is democracy. Now when we come back, we'll talk about far right violence connection to guns white supremacist groups in this country. Stay with us. We're climbing Jacob's ladder. Bernice Johnson Reagan here, this is democracy..

Bernice Johnson Reagan Kentucky Kroger miss Jones state Representative Jacob Attica Scott Baptist church Mr. Stoller Louisville Vincent James twenty years three days mill
"stoller" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"Lot of information. Michalis Stoller, d- dot com. In our company. We've several company websites but connection culture dot com is the place to go and task roles. Gonna put your linked in and Twitter in a show notes as well. So people can reach out to you what you're talking about, really resonates wanna, make sure that that they can reach out to you and interact with you in those spaces. We'll have all those links as well as links to your books image, show notes. You'll find that at on the schmooze dot com. Mike, thank you so much push, so great to get to know you. Yeah, did. Oh. I hope you enjoyed that infused Michael, such a pleasure to speak with him and learn about his leadership journey. What is your key takeaway Mark conversation? Something will put into action this week that you'll bend from for years to come share. It resonated with you in the show notes on the news dot com. Look for episode, one hundred eleven. That's also real fine all the links and resources from today's episode. If you enjoy this episodes, Michael, please share it with your friends and don't forget to subscribe. Sue, don't miss next week show. Remember subscribing as always free. Are you a fan? That's awesome. I'd love to read your review on apple podcasts. It's easy to find a page. I tunes dot on the schmooze dot com. Thank you in advance. And I look forward to connecting again next week when they'll be entering another town professional about the untold stories of leadership and networking will explore their career challenges work life balance and how they built a strong professional network on the way to becoming six. Cesspool leaders until then have an amazing. Thanks for listening to on the schmooze podcasts at WWW dot on the smooths dot com. That's on the schmooze s. h. m. o. e...

Michael Michalis Stoller Twitter apple Mike Sue s. h. m. o. e
"stoller" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"stoller" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"The five conservative justice on this court would you categorize them as drifting away from family values towards what identity politics well saw not a judicial stoller but i do think that it it does kind of play into the the burgling narrative that that the united states needs to be very careful about outsiders right it's sold out ruling does sort of strengthen donald trump's hand to say see the idea that america first is what we should be pursuing is not only supported by my supporters right but look at these justices have handled down a ruling that really does support what i'm trying to do and what he's gonna end up doing is complaining so the the justices are going to argue that what what they're doing is just interpreting the law donald trump will interpret that as well they're actually tacitly supporting my my policy initiatives right and so there is some those things are are subtly different but i think you're right that this does sort of play into donald trump's general rhetoric that we should be excluding these types of individuals from the united states simply by virtue of their their country of origin yes the chief justice roberts in handing down the opinion said the travel ban was squarely within the scope of presidential authority but clearly and while it's probably right for them to reject the idea that what he said on the stump isn't necessarily relevant to what he's done as president on the other hand there's no consistency in this muslim travel ban saudi arabia which is responsible for one fifteen of the nineteen hijackers in nine eleven they get a free pass right so what what's going on there and they're the ones that have been spreading out very anti western version of islam for decades now yeah well so i i think part of what's going on is that there's some indiscriminate see regarding who who this applies to and trump is not necessarily one who thinks with with a clear logic i think regarding connecting the dots on on this sort of stuff and so i frankly as as an american and it's you know my purview is mostly american democracy i'm not sure the justification for why some countries and not others but i do think it's sort of points back to a curious inconsistency but that the administration is sort of willing to to willy nilly apply these sorts of yours to countries that they just perceive to either be amenable to us interests or to be hostile based on you know things that are totally out of the control of of of folks from those countries so let's focus in on how the republican party has become the trump party that's what john bainer recently said and then it gets pretty clear and that essentially the choice between bigotry and democracy is at stake here and it seems to be that donald trump is enabling the first world abandoning the second previous guest jennifer majia who is a texas am university she's an historian of presidential rhetoric i asked her about whether or not it's a deliberate tactic on donald trump's part to further polarize an already polarized and tribal country which is what he appears to do and the extent to which is also setting a trap for democrats to reciprocate and abandoned the advice given by former first lady michelle obama when they go low we go hi do you think that's a play here yeah i think you know i think he wants to set up as many many tricky traps is as he can take to get involved in spats that have little to do with the popular issues of the day right so he's gonna he's guy to pounce on you know maxine waters her he's gonna pounds on her rhetoric he's going to ignore the substance of what she's saying and trying to portray this as see what the democrats are doing and and i think he's looking for any chance he could get to make this about kind of cheap points to to take people away from the the real difficult subject matter of children being separated from parents at the border right and so the more he can do too i mean the fact of the matter is the united states is it is it is a country that have laws right into anything that he can do to try to push democrats into a corner he's he wants to he wants to make this a very easy decision for people who are amenable to his his vision he wants to make democrats seem lawless he wants to make them.

stoller