14 Burst results for "Steward Observatory"

"steward observatory" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:34 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on Space Nuts

"You find that the completely round in our intentions okay. Now before we move onto the next question. Western said he was from the university of arizona in tucson. Now understand you bay nerine. It's a pretty special place many times. Actually it's it's part of astronomy partly because right next door is the is the national optical astronomy observatory at kitt peak. That's not very far from to some but tucson has an astronomy department is called steward observatory which which has many very fine astronomers working that including some friends of mine. One particularly good friend of mine. Who i still keep in touch with. We were students together at the university of edinburgh and he went on to become a professor of astronomy to song. He's done some great stuff actually written some fantastic books about life beyond the earth and things of that sort. Chris is his name. Hello christopher via listen to this but yes he's there and something else that's their university of arizona is the rural obara tree which is where the mirrors are being made for the giant magellan telescope. Seven eight point. Four meter diameter eras cast in the rotating often the mirror laboratory. And it's as and that's why they're being polished as well is located inside one of the buildings. It's the standard. Actually the standard people. Look i think for the baseball field of the wrong score. Wow but yeah. It's a huge concrete structure which is very stable in temperature inside an empty. Because it's all tiered staircases and ti seating so they've occupied this with this gigantic mirror laboratories well visit every. Wow how amazing. I'm glad i'm glad western got in touch with us to look at that. And thanks for your question western. Hopefully we didn't answer it for you because there isn't an answer yet but maybe one day let's continue on this This one comes from poland. Could be kentucky. Hey guys. i'm robert. Mckinley from kentucky but these days eleven poland. My questions pretty simple. But i think the answer might not be an that is what causes the spiral in a spiral galaxy Much really looking forward to the answer. You take easy to thanks for all of it. It's caused by a fairy floss. Machine candy machine is what causes the spirals. That's that's my theory. Well for a while. That was as good as any and because that because they present actually despite alums. It's one that took a law of sorting out. And it's one of those things where the silting out took place within the time spot my career so i remember when we were fooling around with all kinds of wild wonderful theories but they it's now well understood and the fact is that we we look at galaxies we see these lovely lovely swirling patterns..

Chris robert christopher tucson Four meter Mckinley kitt peak kentucky One poland Seven eight point one university of arizona university of edinburgh steward observatory earth bay nerine western eleven
"steward observatory" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:51 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"You find that the completely round in our intentions okay. Now before we move onto the next question. Western said he was from the university of arizona in tucson. Now understand you bay nerine. It's a pretty special place many times. Actually it's it's part of astronomy partly because right next door is the is the national optical astronomy observatory at kitt peak. That's not very far from to some but tucson has an astronomy department is called steward observatory which which has many very fine astronomers working that including some friends of mine. One particularly good friend of mine. Who i still keep in touch with. We were students together at the university of edinburgh and he went on to become a professor of astronomy to song. He's done some great stuff actually has written some fantastic books about life beyond the earth and things of that sort. Chris impis his name. Hello christopher via listen to this but yes he's there and something else that's their university of arizona is the arizona mural obara tree which is where the mirrors are being made for the giant magellan telescope. Seven eight point. Four meter diameter eras cast in the rotating often the mirror laboratory. And it's as and that's why they're being polished as well is located inside one of the buildings. It's the standard. Actually the standard people. Look i think for the baseball field. My of the wrong score. Wow but yeah. It's a huge concrete structure which is very stable in temperature inside an empty. Because it's all tiered staircases and ti seating so they've occupied this with this gigantic mirror laboratories well visit every. Wow how amazing. I'm glad i'm glad western got in touch with us to look at that. And thanks for your question western. Hopefully we didn't answer it for you because there isn't an answer yet but maybe one day let's continue on this This one comes from poland. Could be kentucky. Hey guys. i'm robert. Mckinley from kentucky but these days eleven poland. My questions pretty simple. But i think the answer might not be an that is what causes the spiral in a spiral galaxy Much really looking forward to the answer. You take easy to thanks for all of it. It's caused by a fairy floss. Machine candy machine is what causes the spirals. That's that's my theory. Well for a while. That was as good as any and because that because they present actually the spiral arms. It's one that took a law of sorting out. And it's one of those things where the silting out took place within the time spot my career so i remember when we were fooling around with all kinds of wild wonderful theories but they it's now well understood and the the fact is that we we look at galaxies we see these lovely lovely swirling patterns. Some of them are very symmetrical almost infacy symmetrical looking as if the been painted so the question is what are they made of and i thought he's obviously well they're just strings stars that kind of wound up by the rotation of the galaxy. But you don't have to work very hard to prove that. That can't be the case because when you think about the way galaxies turn our son takes about two hundred and forty million years to go round once that means that it's gone round.

Chris christopher robert tucson Four meter Mckinley kitt peak about two hundred and forty mi kentucky One arizona one university of arizona poland Seven eight point university of edinburgh once steward observatory earth eleven
"steward observatory" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:29 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on KPCC

"Going to improve the surface to an accuracy of 25 nana meters, So that's an improvement by a factor of 100,000, and it just takes time Tioga gradually improve the surface. I don't have a good feel for what? 25 nano meters. Our millionth of an inch is and I'm not sure anybody does. So I like to think of it as if the mirror were expanded to the size of North America. 3500 miles in diameter. In that case, the average hill would be just 17 millimeters. Two thirds of an inch tall and the average valley Two thirds of an inch deep. That's how smooth this mirror has to be unheard of form. Images that are a sharp is nature allows. And that's why it takes two years to polish it. How sharp and image is that compared to what we have available today? If you allow me, Tonto. Stick to this continental description of things. If the telescope were located in Washington, D C, which nobody would want to do, But suppose it were there. Then it could resolve a softball in San Francisco. It would see that as distinct from the arm that's holding it. Sharpness or angular resolution of a telescope skills with its diameter and that's a fundamental property of light related to the wave nature of what so that's what I mean, when I say images of sharpest nature will allow Some of the most spectacular images that any of us have seen are made with the Hubble Space Telescope which is 2.5 m in diameter. Will the GMT is 25 m in diameter? So it's images will be 10 times a shark. This does of the Hubble Space Telescope. So when I think of my mirror at home, it's got this reflective surface can tell me about how that ends up on this mirror. Most mirrors at home, say bathroom mirrors have the Reflective coating on the back of the mirror. It's protected that way. But for a telescope mirror, you can't afford to let the light go through the glass. We usually think of glasses and optical material, because light goes through glass, and we make lenses out of glass. But for a telescope mirror. We're just using glasses, a structural material that can be polished to a very precise and accurate surface. The whole purpose of this huge piece of glasses toe hold that layer of aluminum up. It's only 4,000,007 inch thick about 1000 atoms thick And the Mirror's job is to hold that reflective coating in the right shape at all times through all perturbations that occur in the telescope. This mirror is the sixth of seven. Are there five others sitting in a warehouse somewhere? They're not all in a warehouse there, two of them in a storage facility in Tucson. And we are polishing the third one now hope to be finished with that, You know, sometimes this calendar year, the 4th and 5th are in various stages of fabrication in the mirror lab, And this was the six that was cast this weekend. Since it does take us three or four years to make one of these mirrors. It's it's important that we can work on More than one mirror at a time. We're typically working on three or four mirrors simultaneously, a different stations and a different stages in the manufacturer. And when does the seventh mirror get made? I understand that it will be cast in 2023 roughly two years. Good luck with finishing Mirror Number six and best wishes for mayor Number seven. Buddy Martin is the project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona in Tucson. For science Friday. I'm Charles Burnquist. Coming up after the break. Sharks take some unusual steps in the process of becoming parents. We're gonna take a look at shark reproduction under the sea. This is science.

Charles Burnquist San Francisco Tucson Buddy Martin North America three 3500 miles two years 2023 25 nano meters 10 times sixth Washington, D C four years 25 nana meters Friday 4,000,007 inch 2.5 m 25 m two
"steward observatory" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on KPCC

"John. I know you're always up for a good game of name that sound and I have a fun one for you. Oh, name. That sound is one of my favorites. Okay, Here it comes. Any guesses. It's a beautiful sound. If you listen really closely. Now I can imagine it being part of a sound installation of an art gallery. But You know, it could also just be a vacuum cleaner. Close, but it's actually sound recorded last weekend of about 20 tons of glass, getting heated up to 1165 degrees Celsius in a giant rotating furnace located underneath the east stands of the University of Arizona football Stadium. I think if you listen very carefully, because that's exactly what it sounds like now, now that you say that This thing, it looks something like If you turn the designs of your standard fairgrounds carousel with the horses turned it over to a bunch of science fiction art designers. It's this Egg rotating red cyberpunk looking thing, and if you listen carefully to the words, you might be able to decode that it's spinning it about five revolutions per minute. It's all part of the slow process for casting a giant mirror. Wow, So there's a lot there. There's a rotating furnace and it's under a football stadium. But I guess I should ask you first. What's this mirror for? So this is one of six identical curved mirrors that will eventually get installed in the giant Magellan telescope. That's a huge optical telescope being built in Chile. It's planned to see light not till late this decade. So you say a giant Magellan telescope like how giant is it? The primary mirror is 25 M across and there's no real process for making a mirror that big, so that's why they have to do it in pieces there. These six curved mirrors arranged like flower petals around a central point, and each of those mirror segments is 8.4. M. Across that's like 27 ft. For the metric Lee challenged Wow. So they pour molten glass into a bowl shaped to cast this So that was my first guess, Or that maybe they somehow carved it out of a large chunk, and it turns out both of those ideas are completely wrong. If you got our website at science Friday that come, you'll see a video of people preparing for last weekend's melt that by stacking hundreds of these hexagonal boxes into a giant circular mold. I talked with Dr Buddy Martin, Project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona in Tucson about just how this mirror casting process works. If you imagine starting with a solid disc of glass, that's 28 ft in diameter and more than two FT. Thick. First, you would carve out the top surface to make it Con Kate. It's nine inches deep in the center. And then you want to make the mirror much lighter than it is. So you would grind out the hexagonal cavities in this disk? Well, all that grinding would be prohibitively expensive and very risky. So we Melt the glass and cast it in that structure. The boxes will form the cavities of the honeycomb and in order to get the curved top service, the optical surface we spin the furnace while the glasses molten so that the centrifugal force will push it out and up the sides of the mold. To give us that con cave surface, which is approximately the courage of this necessary for this telescope, So the key components of the glass structure here is it needs to be Strong It needs to be stiff, and it needs to be light weight. Right stiffness against the wind and stiffness against gravity or the two most important teachers in the mirror. That's what makes a good telescope mirror because if it doesn't have that it won't be able to hold its shape accurately in the telescope. You can polish it. To a very accurate shape in the lab. But in the telescope, it's gonna hit hit by a 20 mile per hour winds. It's going to be pointed in different directions of the telescope points a different objects around the sky, and so gravity is trying to bend. It also I understand you're using a kind of glass called Burroughs Silicate glass for this. That's the same material I might find in my kitchen measuring cups or a pie plate or something like that. Exactly and It's used for baking dishes for the same reason. It's used for mirrors that is that it doesn't expand.

John Chile 28 ft 25 M 8.4. M. Buddy Martin Tucson six curved mirrors Lee Steward Observatory nine inches each one First first about 20 tons late this decade more than two FT both first guess
"steward observatory" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

03:32 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Image is that compared to what we have available today? If you allow me, Tonto, stick to this continental description of things. If the telescope were located in Washington, D C, which nobody would want to do, But suppose it were there. Then it could resolve a softball in San Francisco. It would see that as distinct from the arm that's holding it. Sharpness or angular resolution of a telescope skills with its diameter and that's a fundamental property of light related to the wave nature of what so that's what I mean. When I say images as sharp as nature will allow some of the most spectacular images that any of us have Seeing are made with the Hubble Space Telescope, which is 2.5 m in diameter. Will the GMT is 25 m in diameter, so it's images will be 10 times as sharp As those of the Hubble Space Telescope. So when I think of my mirror at home, it's got this reflective surface can tell me about how that ends up on this mirror. Most mirrors at home, say bathroom mirrors have the Reflective coating on the back of the mirror. It's protected that way. But for a telescope mirror, you can't afford to let the light go through the glass. We usually think of glasses in optical material, because light goes through glass, and we make lenses out of glass. But for a telescope mirror. We're just using glad, says a structural material that can be polished to a very precise and accurate surface. The whole purpose of this huge piece of glasses toe hold that layer of aluminum up. It's only 4,000,007 inch thick about 1000 atoms thick And the Mirror's job is to hold that reflective coating in the right shape at all times through all perturbations that will occur in the telescope. This mirror is the sixth of seven. Are there five others sitting in a warehouse somewhere? They're not all in a warehouse there, two of them in a storage facility in Tucson and we are polishing the third one now hope to be finished with that. Uh, you know, sometime this calendar year, the 4th and 5th are at various stages of fabrication in the mirror lab, And this was the six that was cast this weekend. Since it does take us three or four years to make one of these mirrors. It's it's important that we can work on More than one mirror at a time. We're typically working on three or four mirrors simultaneously, a different stations and a different stages in the manufacturer. And when does the seventh mirror get made? I understand that it will be cast in 2023 roughly two years. Good luck with finishing Mirror Number six and best wishes for mayor Number seven. Buddy Martin is the project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona in Tucson. For science Friday. I'm Charles Burnquist coming up after the break. Sharks take some unusual steps. In the process of becoming parents. We're gonna take a look at Shark reproduction under the sea..

San Francisco Charles Burnquist Buddy Martin 10 times Tucson 2023 three sixth Friday Washington, D C 25 m two four years 2.5 m 4th today 4,000,007 inch third one six seventh mirror
"steward observatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Going to improve the surface to an accuracy of 25 nana meters, So that's an improvement by a factor of 100,000, and it just takes time Tioga gradually improve the surface. I don't have a good feel for what? 25 nano meters. Our millionth of an inch is and I'm not sure anybody does. So I like to think of it as if the mirror were expanded to the size of North America. 3500 miles in diameter. In that case, the average hill would be just 17 millimeters. Two thirds of an inch tall. The average valley two thirds of an inch deep. That's how smooth this mirror has to be unheard of form images that are as sharp as nature allows, and that's why it takes two years to polish it. How sharp and image is that compared to what we have available today? If you allow me to stick to this continental description of things If the telescope were located in Washington, D C, which nobody would want to do, But suppose it were there. Then it could resolve a softball in San Francisco. It would see that as distinct from the arm that's holding it. Sharpness or angular resolution of the telescope scales with its diameter and that's a fundamental property of light related to the wave nature of what so that's what I mean. When I say images as sharp as nature will allow. Some of the most spectacular images that any of us have seen or made with the Hubble Space Telescope which is 2.5 m in diameter. Will the GMT is 25 m in diameter? To its images will be 10 Times a shark. This those of the Hubble Space Telescope, So when I think of my mirror at home, it's got this reflective surface can tell me about how that ends up on this mirror. Most mirrors at home, say bathroom mirrors have the Reflective coating on the back of the mirror. It's protected that way. But for telescope mirror, you can't afford to let the light go through the glass. We usually think of glasses in optical material because, like goes through glass, and we make lenses out of glass But for a telescope mirror. We're just using glad, says a structural material that can be polished to a very precise and accurate surface. The whole purpose of this huge piece of glasses toe hold that layer of aluminum up. It's only 4,000,007 inch thick about 1000 atoms thick And the Mirror's job is to hold that reflective coating in the right shape at all times through all perturbations that will occur in the telescope. This mirror is the sixth of seven. Are there five others sitting in a warehouse somewhere? They're not all in a warehouse there, two of them in a storage facility in Tucson. And we are polishing the third one now hope to be finished with that, You know, sometimes this calendar year, the 4th and 5th are in various stages of fabrication in the mirror lab, And this was the six that was cast this weekend. Since it does take us three or four years to make one of these mirrors it Z important that we can work on. More than one mirror at a time. We're typically working on three or four mirrors simultaneously, a different stations and a different stages in the manufacturer. And when does the seventh mirror get made? I understand that it will be cast in 2023 roughly two years. Good luck with finishing Mirror Number six and best wishes for Mayor Number seven. Buddy Martin is the project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona in Tucson for science Friday. I'm Charles Burnquist coming up after the break, Sharks take some unusual steps in the process of becoming parents. Take a look at shark reproduction under the.

Charles Burnquist San Francisco Tucson Buddy Martin North America three 3500 miles two years 2023 25 nano meters 4,000,007 inch four years 25 nana meters Washington, D C Steward Observatory Friday 25 m 10 Times 100,000 2.5 m
"steward observatory" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

07:59 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on Science Friday

"Is that compared to what we have available today. You allow to stick to this Continental description of things if the telescope were located in washington. Dc which nobody would want to do but suppose it were there than it could resolve a softball in san francisco. It would see that as distinct from the arm. That's holding sharpness or angular resolution of telescopes scales with its diameter and that's a fundamental property of light related to the wave nature wide. So that's what. I mean when i say images as sharp as nature will allow some of the most spectacular images that any of us have seen or made with the hubble space telescope which is two and a half meters in diameter will the gmt is twenty five meters in diameter. So it's images will be ten times as sharp as those of the hubble space telescope. So when i think of my mirror at home. It's got this reflective surface can tell me about how that ends up on this fear most mirrors at home say bathroom mirrors have the reflective coating on the back of the mirror. It's protected that way but for telescope mirror. You can't afford to the light. Go through the glass. We usually think of glasses. An optical material because light goes through glass and we make lenses out of glass but for telescope mirror. Were just using glass. As a structural material that can be polished to a very precise accurate surface. The whole purpose of this huge piece of glass is to hold that layer of aluminum up. It's only four million of an inch thick about a thousand atoms thick and the mirrors job is to hold that reflective coating in the right shape at all times through all perturbations nations that will occur in the telescope. This mirror is the six of seven. Are there five others sitting in a warehouse somewhere. They're not gonna warehouse there. Two of them in a storage facility in tucson and we are polishing the third win. Now be finished with that. The you know sometime. This calendar year of the fourth and fifth are various stages a fabrication in the mirror. Oab and this was six that was cast this weekend since it does take us three or four years to make one of these mirrors. It's it's important that we can work on more than one mirror at a time. Were typically working on three or four years simultaneously different stations in a different stages in the manufacturer. And when does the seventh mirror get mid. I understand that it will be cast in twenty twenty three roughly two years. We're good luck with finishing mayor number six and best wishes for mayor number seven. Buddy martin is the project scientist for the mirror polishing program at the steward observatory of the university of arizona in tucson for science friday. I'm charles bergquist coming up after the break sharks take some unusual steps in the process of becoming parents going to take a look at shark reproduction. Under the see the support also comes from the amgen foundation learn more about their commitment to inspiring the scientists of tomorrow at amgen inspires dot com. This is science. friday. I'm john dan kaczynski next. We're gonna talk about baby sharks and as a bonus we're not gonna play that song for you but we are going to tell you about some things you might know about baby sharks and their relatives baby rays first of all. Did you know. they're called pups. Yeah they're born in litters just like dogs cats pretty cute right and often takes a long time to grow them. Most female sharks are pregnant for at least a year though sometimes as long as three years. And yeah that's the other thing many sharks and rays just hate mammal style with umbilical cords placentas and uteruses. And yes that's uteruses plural. We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about these and other shark reproduction wonders with my next guest. Dr katie lyons. She's a research scientist at the georgia aquarium in atlanta and lead author on new research looking at one very specific reproductive mystery which we will hear all about welcome katie decides friday. Thanks so much for being here and you were having me. It's such a pleasure so katie to get started before we get to this new research that you've just published every just talked about is pretty cool to think about but maybe you can start by telling us what else sharks rays have going on reproductively. Oh my goodness so many things. So i am going to bias conversation a little bit towards suggesting animals so moms are pregnant just like you would see somebody on. The street will be a little biased against the egg layers. But they're really cool to us. So we have a range of these reproductive characteristics so females can just stay in just basically in egg in their body and not provide any extra nutrition and we have all the way to the other end of the spectrum where females will continuously ovulate eggs and those babies can eat those eggs like you would have eggs for breakfast. Every morning all the way to enter uterine cannibalism where it is a literal hunger games inside the female's body where siblings each other and the ones who make it are the ones who make it so. Hold a talk a little bit more about that. I mean that sounds both incredibly frightening but also probably efficient right if you are eating all your brothers and sisters. You're probably coming up pretty strong. That's what we would assume would happen. Is those genes from that. Particular embryo are the ones that are going to make it out into the greater population. So it's incredibly energetic. Of course for both limits the number of offspring that she can produce so if she is not going to be able to produce any offspring that's gonna limit her overall reproductive fitness so whole goal of biology. The meeting a life isn't forty two it is to pass on your genes and so if she has less opportunities to do that that could have important consequences so she's gonna wanna make sure that those offspring are as fit end ready to go as they can be. There can be up to three hundred pups for of mature whale shark bite. You can have a single pop like an account does right. They only have one pop her litter as i mentioned early on to uteruses. Tell us more about that. Yes so it's actually fairly common across the animal world but they have to a left and a right they can have pups in both there some species that have completely of vestigial uterus so they have to but they only really us one us all kinds of cool things going on in some sharks can reproduce actually to. That's right yeah so a lot of these. Things were observed in aquaria. Actually because we're keeping animals here and often times it's more convenient to have a single. Sex group of females tend to be a little more than not as frisky as the males and what was noticed. Is that in. A lot of species lay eggs that you know. There's no mail in there. And then there'd be these little embryos developing and people like what what's happening here so it does seem that there is a whole other complex reproductive mold to where female maybe if she doesn't have access to that sperm and she's like well. I got a pass my jeans on one way or another so. We're gonna find a way to do that all right. Well let's get back to something you just said..

john dan kaczynski san francisco charles bergquist three katie lyons six Buddy martin washington katie twenty five meters two and a half meters three years four years tucson Two ten times today seventh mirror atlanta two years
"steward observatory" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Charles Berg Quest. Hi, Charles. Hey, John. I know you're always up for a good game of name that sound and I have a fun one for you. Oh, name. That sound is one of my favorites. Okay, well, here it comes. Any guesses. It's a beautiful sound if you listen really closely naked. Imagine that being part of a sound installation of an art gallery. But you know, it could also just be a vacuum cleaner close, but it's actually sound recorded last weekend of about 20 tons of glass. Getting heated up to 1165 degrees Celsius in a giant rotating furnace located underneath the east stands of the University of Arizona Football Stadium. I think if you listen very carefully, because that's exactly what it sounds like now, now, now that you say that This thing, it looks something like If you turn the designs of your standard fairgrounds carousel with the horses turned it over to a bunch of science fiction art designers. It's just Egg rotating red cyberpunk looking thing, and if you listen carefully to the words, you might be able to decode that it's spending it about five revolutions per minute. It's all part of the slow process for casting a giant mirror. Wow, So there's a lot there. There's a rotating furnace and it's under a football stadium. But I guess I should ask you first. What's this mirror for? So this is one of six identical curved mirrors that will eventually get installed in the giant Magellan telescope. That's a huge optical telescope being built in Chile. That's planned to see light not till late this decade. So you say a giant Magellan telescope like how giant is it? The primary mirror is 25 M across and there's no real process for making a mirror that big, so that's why they have to do it in pieces there. Thies six. Curved mirrors arranged like flower petals around a central point, and each of those mirror segments is 8.4. M. Across that's like 27 ft. For the metric Lee challenged Wow. So they pour molten glass into a bowl shaped to cast this So that was my first guess, Or that maybe they somehow carved it out of a large chunk, and it turns out both of those ideas are completely wrong. If you got our website at science Friday that come, you'll see a video of people preparing for last weekend's melt that by stacking hundreds of these hexagonal boxes into a giant circular mold. I talked with Dr Buddy Martin, Project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona in Tucson about just how this mirror casting process works. If you imagine starting with a solid disc of glass, that's 28 ft in diameter and more than two FT. Thick. First, you would carve out the top surface to make it Con Kate. It's nine inches deep in the center. And then you want to make the mirror much lighter than it is. So you would grind out the hexagonal cavities in this disk? Well, all that grinding would be prohibitively expensive and very risky. So we Melt the glass and cast it in that structure. The boxes will form the cavities of the honeycomb and in order to get the curved top service, the optical surface we spin the furnace while the glasses Multan so that the centrifugal force will push it out and up the sides of the mold to give us that con cave surface, which is approximately the courage of this necessary for this telescope. So the key components of the glass structure here is it needs to be strong. It needs to be stiff, and it needs to be light weight. Right stiffness against the wind and stiffness against gravity or the two most important teachers in the mirror. That's what makes a good telescope mirror because if it doesn't have that it won't be able to hold its shape accurately in the telescope. You can polish it. To a very accurate shape in the lab. But in the telescope, it's gonna hit hit by 20 mile per hour winds. It's going to be pointed in different directions, and the telescope points a different objects around the sky. And so gravity is trying to bend. It also I understand you're using a kind of glass called Burroughs Silicate glass for this. That's the same material I might find in my kitchen measuring cups or a pie plate or something like that. Exactly and It's used for baking dishes for the same reason. It's used for mirrors that is that it doesn't expand.

John 27 ft 8.4. M. Chile 25 M 28 ft Tucson Buddy Martin Lee nine inches each one First both late this decade more than two FT first first guess Steward Observatory 1165 degrees Celsius
"steward observatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:59 min | 6 months ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Turning now to a giant optical engineering project. Here's side fries, Charles Berg Quest. Hi, Charles. Hey, John. I know you're always up for a good game of name that sound and I have a fun one for you. Oh, name. That sound is one of my favorites. Okay, well, here it comes. Any guesses. It's a beautiful sound if you listen really closely next. Imagine it being part of a sound installation of an art gallery. But you know, it could also just be a vacuum cleaner. Close, but it's actually sound recorded last weekend of about 20 tons of glass getting heated up to 1165 degrees Celsius in a giant rotating furnace located underneath the East stands. Of the University of Arizona Football Stadium. I think if you listen very carefully, because that's exactly what it sounds like now, now that you say that This thing, it looks something like If you turn the designs of your standard fairgrounds carousel with the horses turned it over to a bunch of science fiction art designers. It's just Egg rotating red cyberpunk looking thing, and if you listen carefully to the words, you might be able to decode that it's spinning it about five revolutions per minute. It's all part of the slow process for casting a giant mirror. Wow, So there's a lot there. There's a rotating furnace and it's under a football stadium. But I guess I should ask you first. What's this mirror for? So this is one of six identical curved mirrors that will eventually get installed in the giant Magellan telescope. That's a huge optical telescope being built in Chile. It's planned to see light not too late this decade. So you say a giant Magellan telescope like how giant is it? The primary mirror is 25 M across and there's no real process for making a mirror that big So that's why they have to do it in pieces there, Thies six Courage mirrors arranged like flower petals around a central point, and each of those mirror segments is 8.4. M. Across that's like 27 ft. For the metric Lee challenged Wow. So they pour molten glass into a bowl shaped to cast this So that was my first guess, Or that maybe they somehow carved it out of a large chunk, and it turns out both of those ideas are completely wrong. If you got our website at science Friday that come, you'll see a video of people preparing for last weekend's melt that by stacking hundreds of these hexagonal boxes into a giant circular mold. I talked with Dr Buddy Martin, Project scientist for the Mirror Polishing program at the Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona in Tucson about just how this mirror casting process works. If you imagine starting with a solid disc of glass, that's 28 ft in diameter and more than two FT. Thick. First, you would carve out the top surface to make it Con Kate. It's nine inches deep in the center. And then you want to make the mirror much lighter than it is. So you would grind out the hexagonal cavities in this disk? Well, all that grinding would be prohibitively expensive and very risky. So we Melt the glass and cast it in that structure. The boxes were from the cavities of the honeycomb and in order to get the curved top service, the optical surface we spin the furnace while the glasses molten so that this centrifugal force were pushing out and up the sides of the mold. To give us that con cave surface, which is approximately the courage of this necessary for this telescope, So the key components of the glass structure here is it needs to be Strong. It needs to be stiff, and it needs to be lightweight right stiffness against the wind and stiffness against gravity or the two most important features of the mirror. That's what makes a good telescope mirror because if it doesn't have that it won't be able to hold its shape accurately in the telescope. You can polish it to a very accurate shape in the lab. But in the telescope, it's gonna hit hit by 20 mile per hour winds. It's going to be pointed in different directions as the telescope points of different objects around the sky. It's a gravity is trying to bend. It also I understand you're using a kind of glass called borrows silicate glass for this. That's the same material I might find in my kitchen measuring cups or a pie plate or something like that. Exactly and It's used for baking dishes for the same reason. It's used for mirrors that is that it doesn't expand.

Charles John 28 ft Chile 25 M 27 ft 8.4. M. Tucson Buddy Martin Steward Observatory Lee nine inches First more than two FT each both first about 20 tons one hundreds
"steward observatory" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"I mean I've been thinking about it. Quasars really are the Jews of the universe. Can you imagine seeing one up close? Relatively close a couple of galactic diameters right it would. It would be even better than the time we walk on that side of the bridge of the enterprise, even better than that. Looking at a Quasar, but if you WANNA even wider perspective about a Quasar, there's there's things called active galactic. Nuclei AG N that includes quasars. It also includes safer galaxies which are which are less energetic, and there's also blaze ours, which are very energetic, similar to quasars as well. But there are some people that think that all three of them are actually the same thing, but seeing a different perspectives. Isn't that cool, so it's Kinda like it made me think of Jay right when we talked to Jay face to face right, we're talking. We referred to him as J, but if he's turned around. And he's facing from behind. We refer to him as flatulent because. Different perspectives. So this discovery gets even more interesting. The closer are so far away that it existed only seven hundred million years after the Big Bang and that's like a glove, smacked across the face of our models of the growth of supermassive black black holes in the early universe like holy crap. How could something get that big that fast Dr Jinyang postdoctoral researcher? Researcher at the Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona, he said for a black hole of the size to form this early in the universe it would need to start as a ten thousand so seed black hole about one hundred million years after the Big Bang, rather than growing from a much smaller black hole formed by the collapse of a single star. The birth of galaxies and stars as we know them having happened during the epoch of reorganization, which is my third favorite epoch after the Big Bang. Just throwing that out there, so this reorganization occurred probably say everyone hundred fifty years after the Big Bang so for something as big as to exist. At this time, it's hard very hard to account for with our current models, so that leads into the future. What what what are we gonNA do in the future about this hopefully, so in order to explain the existence of quasars like Poe Nua Anna. We probably need to discover a more exotic mechanism to account for the creation of such a black hole seed in the early universe had how was that created? It's not going to be started by one star collapsing at like a few solar masses in. Increasing from there, it's going to be something much more much more exotic, so there's hope that machine learning tools of course machine learning tools are going to be important in the future kind of. But those tools in the future, going to work with advanced platforms like the James Webb Space Telescope and E- says Euclid satellite and they could potentially find imagine this a hundred quasars at this distance or even farther one hundred. We've only got wounded got one at this this well to. We've got basically two quasars at this distance. Imagine if we found one hundred more at that distance then. Then that means of course that when you have such a statistical sample, we could hopefully make some solid progress, outlining not only the boundaries of the reorganization itself, but also the black hole growth enigma as well I'll keep you apprised right, betty interesting all right, Evan, this also kind of a follow up either, but there was a new study. Tell informing US further about what killed the dinosaurs. This now. Right now we know even more like. Really really really was the asteroid. Hard? I'll t up the controversy for those who don't know you. Guys remember sixty six million years ago or so before the Internet, it was July first in the year sixty, six million BC when the greatest impact in the history of it wasn't really July. First when the greatest impact in the history of modern earth and life took place and J. It wasn't the MIC dlt sandwich with the hot site. Ha and the cool side cool. Rose. For those of you tuning into, see us on live streams on Friday. You'll know the significance of that remark. No, it was an asteroid. Earth got walloped by an asteroid. They say it's as large as fifty miles in diameter is what they estimate, but I've also read as perhaps a small is about ten miles in diameter, and that seems like a pretty significant difference or range, but in any case it's the chicks impacter. That's what it's called, and at the time of the impact and dinosaur language. It was called the Holy Shit look at that impacter How impactful was this thing? Well think about ten billion Hiroshima bombs worth of energy released with the billion ten billion with a B. Soon nominee is created hundreds of feet, tall set the planet's vegetation and forest on fire, hurled debris into outer space, right some of it, finding a resting place on the Moon, and when the asteroid impacted, it produced a Doomsday Shroud, lethal cloud of particles in Dutch, which encircled the Earth for ninety three years. It's a line from a movie by the way. About seventy five percent of all life on earth died as a result in the impact in the days, and the weeks in the months that followed including all non avian dinosaurs so therefore. That's what killed the dinosaurs. Wait wait a second. Perhaps that's not what killed. The dinosaurs was at actually volcanic eruptions or a series of them. Which began occurring about six hundred thousand years before the chicks will impact. That particular theory posits that in what is Modern Day India several volcanic seems opened up in the ground, releasing a flood of lava, which over time grew to in area, the size of the state of Texas or roughly half of what is India Today. It's called the Deccan traps. It's one of the largest volcanic features on the earth. Now what happened there. Is it sudden cooling due sulphurous volcanic gases released by the formation of the traps and the toxic gas emissions. Likely contributed to the die off of the dinosaurs. And most of the life on the planet. So, there's been evidence of this and we've known about it for quite a long time. What happens is when these sulphurous gases into the atmosphere in the short term. It will cool, but in the long-term with the carbon dioxide it will warm things up, so you'll have these wild sort of climate swings in a relatively short period of time from coal to warm. And some thought that the deacon of the Deccan traps could responsible for the warming. That happened just before the impact. So which was it? Was it? Asteroid? WAS IT Balkanisation? Combination of both the proverbial double whammy is Steve Referred to earlier in the episode. Now scientists have been back and forth on this over the decades, and so far the asteroid impact seems to have the lion's share of the scientific community is approval, but there are still clutches of scientists in the Balkan Ism camp to some degree. Today's news is more research just published the other day. The title of the paper is the title gives it away. ASTEROID IMPACT NOT VULCAN ISM caused the end Cretaceous dinosaur extinction. So this was published in the proceedings of the national. Academy of Sciences Yea Thank you care. Researchers at Imperial College London the University of Bristol and University College London claim that only a large only a large asteroid impact could have created the doomsday conditions that wiped out all dinosaurs. Across the globe. Allesandro Cheer Anza Who's with the Department of Earth, science and engineering at imperial was the lead author of the study and here's how she sums it up. We show that the asteroid caused an impact winter for decades. You know, think nuclear winter, impact winter, and that these environmental effects decimated suitable environments for dinosaurs..

Researcher Jay India Deccan Academy of Sciences Poe Nua Anna US Dr Jinyang Steward Observatory James Webb Space Telescope Department of Earth postdoctoral researcher University of Arizona Anza Who Euclid Texas Rose
"steward observatory" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Why NASA chose JETHRO credit for the Myers Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover mission and it seems belief in ufo's in alien abductions of falling because well people have more important things to worry about right now. All that and more coming up on space time WILCO. To Space Time we'd stupid. Gary astronomers have observed that expanding cloud of icy debris caused by the catastrophic collision of two asteroids in India by star system that abry cloud was originally thought to be an exoplanet orbiting the bright staff former hall located some twenty five light years away the object previously believed to be the planet former. Hobie was first announced in twenty eight based on data taken in two thousand four and two thousand six but a report in the Journal. The proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences claims new observations using the Hubble Space Telescope show that what astronomers originally thought was the planet as now seemingly vanished from side and instead replaced by cloud of very fine dust. Particles Wall has been hates have evidence of similar stored collisions in other systems. Nothing of this magnitude is ever been observed before the study's Alita with Andrea Gas spa from the University of Arizona. Steward Observatory says that makes this a big deal. It means it's really a kind of blueprint for how planets destroy each other for Hope Bay was clearly visible in several years of hobble observations. That revealed it as a moving dot but unlike other directly image exoplanets nagging puzzles with former hope arose early on for example. The object was unusually bright invisible light. But it didn't have any detectable infrared heat signature at the time. Astronomers hypothesized that this added brightness may have come from a huge shell or ring of dust circling the planet that may have been the result of some sort of collision and other problem. Was that early. Hobble observation suggested the object wasn't following a normal elliptical orbit around the Star as planets. Usually do so. The authors analyzed only available archival Hubble data from hoppy including the most recent images taken by hobble and when everything's combined it reveals several characteristics that paint a picture that this planet sized object may never have existed in the first place in fact Hubble images from two thousand fourteen showed the object vanished much to the disbelief of astronomers adding to the mystery earlier images showing the object was continuously fading over time. Gaspar says former Hall Bay was clearly doing things that a planet should not be doing so with all the evidence the authors have now included former hope was not a planet at all but rather a slowly expanding cloud blasted into space as a result of a collision between two large bodies. Research is believed the collision probably occurred not long prior to the first observations taken back in twenty. Oh four by now. The dust cloud consisting of product was around. A Micron in size is well below. Hobbles detection limit? Now the other capable of course was this object wasn't on an elliptical orbit as expected planets. But it seemed to be on an escape trajectory in other words a hyperbolic path despise says a recently created massive dust cloud experiencing considerable radi forces from the central staff. Omaha would be placed on just such a project because from hope is presently inside a vast ring of icy debris encircling the host star declining buddies. We're likely mixture of ice and dust similar to the cop about objects which orbit the sun out beyond Neptune in our own solar system. The authors estimate that each of the buddies involved in this cataclysmic collision would've been around two hundred kilometers across and they also suggested that former hot system could be experiencing similar collision events of this type every two hundred thousand or so years. A clear case of worlds colliding. This space time still to come. Why NASA CHOSE JESS row? Credit for the Myers Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover mission and it seems belief in Universe in alien abductions of falling because well people have more important things to worry about right now all that and more still to come on space time well as we mentioned last week preparations that continuing the Kennedy Space Center at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Base in Florida. Could July's planned launch of the Mars? Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover aboard an atlas five rocket to two thousand five kilograms. Six-wheeled Kasai's mobile bar tree will arrive on Mars. In February landing crater to mission will study the.

Myers Twenty Twenty Perseveran Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rov NASA Hubble Space Telescope Kennedy Space Center Hope Bay Steward Observatory National Academy of Sciences Gary India Alita Kasai University of Arizona Florida Hall Bay Gaspar Omaha Andrea Gas Cape Canaveral Air Force Base
"steward observatory" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on Space Nuts

"There are protections which are more or less effective depending on you the local circumstances just like to go back a little bit to talk about spectroscopy again and specifically ask you about your role well in developing multi object spectroscopy. I had never. I know what that is. Please explain an executive order it. Does this marvelous marvelous technique invented by William Huggins effectively the idea of using a spectroscopy for a spectrum graph which records the spectrum originally it was photographic now hold on electrically to workout. What's going on in the heavens? That became very much stock in trade astronomers during the first seventy years of the twentieth century. Words up until the nineteen eighties. It still is but the a big change happened in the early nineteen eighties. Because in the early days you had to meet your observations one star at the time. It was the only way a telescope under spectograph combination could work then in the late one thousand nine hundred seventy s a man with us absolutely delightful name Roger Angell who looked to the heavens German Brit. He works at the University of Arizona Eh. He's retired now. Still one of American astronomer astronomy very favorite strenuous Roger. Angell thought well outside outside the box in terms of how you could use technology to to you know improve astronomy and he got mixed up with fiber optics now fiber optics were until nineteen seventy. Were essentially an entertaining diversion. What what they are is stones of glass very fine strands of what we now use for fines and yes? That's right exactly. It's actually not quite a few silica which is classy. Material material drawn into these fines strands seldom more than a tenth of a millimeter diameter with the hair. It's it's yes that's about twice the width of very very fine. And they have the property that like put light in at one end and it will come out of the the other now they were known back in the nineteen fifties lava lamp lava lamp different ones. And the Yes. That's right all right. Yeah go sorry for my aside. There they were known back in the nineteen fifties these fiber optics but it was only in nineteen seventy that the corning glass works in the United States manage to draw fibers. Because that's how you make them start off with a block of glass and then you melt it and pull it out into these strengths. And they manage to draw fibers with extremely low losses by that. It means that if you put light in at one end most of it comes out the other disruption eruption. Well it's it's attenuation is. The technical is a reduction in the amount of light absorbed by the fiber before that you put light in at one into not tiny dribble came out of the but from nine hundred seventy with these what were called low loss optical fibers that's when they became a potential chill for the communications industry and so Calling it it allows sound and light to pass through it does allow any other it allows. There's light to pass through it. You Can put light in at one end and it will come out the other if you want to transmit sound through it. You've got to turn that sound signal into light clever modulating citing a light source you imprint. A sound wave on through and and that transmit through the fiber comes out the other end. You need decode and you get the sound route. So that's how communications work but astronomers and Roger Angell in particular. He thought well. These things are brilliant because astronomers are always jealously regarding the amount of light that they receive because it is so faint usually we're talking about single photons. Individual particles light so can can we use these newfangled optical fibers and in fact he's first idea was to have many many telescopes smallish telescopes all coupled together with optical fibers. So Oh you gather the light from all these telescopes and bring it back to a single place and you cannot do all the light together on one single object or one single object. That's right but then he turned the idea on its head and realized that with one big telescope which is looking at an area of sky instead of just taking one star or Galaxy Alexey from within that field of view you can actually use these optical fibers to line per fiber on many many objects simultaneously. So let me get this right. We have a field of sky. We have maybe a planet or is that too close. We don't bother with planets looking at enough galaxies and fire off stars and we could have fifteen or twenty items in sky and we could be looking at all of them and getting this barcode information from the stars Civil Tony's because you you can put a fiber on each one and in fact the first one I built actually had thirty nine optical fibers which by the standards of the day were quite quite large means thirty thirty nine objects simultaneously. So what what Roger Angell duty you got a PhD student. By the name of John Hill to work on this build something called Medusa which Medusa head thank you and that had think twenty-five fibers and they tried it out on a telescope in Arizona at the Steward Observatory and it worked. It was a technique that worked really well L. But then astronomers Australia got hold of the idea and in particular an engineer at the Angle Shirley Telescope by the name of Peter Gray. He worked out that you could engineer this thing. In a far more effective way the Medusa I worked with Peter. He was working with the anglo-australian telescope. I worked with a small telescope telescope called the United Kingdom Schmidt telescope which has a very wide field of view and together we produced a kind of workable optical tickle fiber systems for these two telescopes which kind of took the lead in the world on this science. Could you tell us the names of these. Well Peter Peterbilt you built the. What was it called fiber optic coupler psychot- remember the name but it turned into fo cap that was the acronym I built? Something called the fiber linked array imagery for matter which was flare then flare worse built in the early nineteen eighties. It was the first multi-fibre telescope spectroscopy system that coupled telescope to a spectrum graph which was actually stationary in the dome. Now that sounds weird an esoteric but what it meant was the spectrum of which is a very delicate piece of equipment was not riding around on the back of the telescope. It was fixed on the floor and was incredibly stable. And that's so we were the first to do that. So flair was the pioneer. Then I built a second version. Because flair had certain inadequacies the second one was the panoramic area coverage with higher efficiency. which was panache panache? A Well what clearly came next finesse. Until one of my colleagues said Venus stands for fails to interest nearly everyone saves spectrograph engineers engineers well. She called it flat to then evolved to a robotic system with more boring name of sixty F- with one one hundred fifty fibers that was commissioned in two thousand one and now a building an amazing machine called Taipan which uses things called starbucks so each optical fiber sixty had robot a single robot move the fibers around but with Taipan h fiber dopey. Three hundred in the end has its own micro robot round meanwhile anglo-australian telescope back in one thousand nine hundred ninety six built something called to death to the F. stands for two degree field. That's the amount of sky the thing sees in two F. Four hundred fibers but after tell you the aero which now stands for Australian astronomical optics used to be the Australian Astronomical Observatory. Hey always building. A system with more than four hundred fibers for telescope in Europe a European European telescope straight cuts way up doesn't it. It really does punch above its weight with regards to -nology develops right. That's why Australian astronomers Jonas have had such an given where small country because we have this equipment that we build it probably more effectively than anywhere else Somebody said we should call ourselves. Fibers are us. Because that's what we do. We do optical fibers the tech. The technique technique is in use around the world but many of the ones that are used elsewhere ones that have been built started struggling anticipate so just keeping bring on technology. Same here I heard Margaret Atwood before papal. She's the person that wrote. The Maidens Tail Modem Handmaiden handmaidens and. She comment was that old. Technologies have got good use a bad use and stupid. I use that we never considered and just thinking about lights and particularly with astronomy. What would you think the good the bad and the stupid well look for optical astronomy that's visible light astronomy not now talking about radio astronomers rexroad strong because these these are all different disciplines? Although we're all looking at the same things in a different way and often those results all piece together optical astronomers and and they're talking trades light so they are obsessed with light a more especially obsessed with with actually getting the very the best information from lies so the good is what we learn from from the from from the sky by Sifting light through the spectrum and other types of interest yep yep the baddies light pollution. So that's when light. which is it's been used for completely innocent purpose but gets out of hand in particularly in the light plumes of cities and and really goes back to the early twentieth century when councils putting lights with really no regard to what that was doing tonight sky because we simply simply never thought about it was becoming a problem by the time of the Second World War? It's really interesting. Is that in Los Angeles which is very next very very near the Mount Wilson Observatory in fact exceed Los Angeles from Mount Wilson. Where at the time? The biggest telescope in the world was during the second world. War centuries had had blackouts in order to to mitigate the possibility of invasion and during that time huge astronomical discoveries as were made because the the night sky koby seeing properly from moments again So it was inadvertent. So that's the bad side just on that I. I've attended some conferences in the U. K.. And one of the issues that they have when they talk about. Trying to mitigate light pollution the K.. Is that if you start talking to pay pooped in that sort of generation of about turning of streetlights and they feel like it's taking them back to that so I just like the blackout out to do that in blackout. Yes or no. I remember people saying that's true but it's not a blackout. I mean what we're talking about now is good lighting eh because this been huge progress in the last twenty years with understanding the ills of light pollution and not just for astronomers where the where the least least important in many ways of of the consequences of Bob Lighting. I again when I talk to groups about pollution. I often or haven't often and but I have been asked by people worldwide. Do we have to keep the lights down for the astronomers. When you've got a whole heaven stars you know? Why can't they study the start of the left or the brightest star or whatever and I think in some ways we lost that argument where we talked thirty years ago when when the International Dark Sky Association started and it was astronomers saying are we losing our night sky that that story was lost on the general public? I didn't understand the information that you're getting about heaven. That's probably true thing I'm most people think an astronomer is middle age bald man with a white coat. Who's got a long spindly telescope? And just spend his nights looking through uh-huh nothing could be further from the truth. It's all about you know. Well directed a scientific problems. We're trying to understand the universe because that understanding my actually actually turn out to be really useful to us one day and it's it's conducted in a very very progressive ways. Not just looking mistake. The sake of looking were studying and of course. The great thing is that it's no longer and more pulled middle aged man we we are. How far more diverse? So that's the good in a bed. Yeah stupid stupid. Use of technology that maybes. He's come through astronomy through light and and I know of things you talked about. Doppler effect isn't so I actually almost Lump the fiber optics work that I was talking about into their it certainly quirky. Because in you know I in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Nobody had thaw in this direction. It was Roger Angell towards the end of the nineteen seventies. We're thinking outside the box or this to what you could use these technologies for and I do remember number when I started working on this in one thousand..

Roger Angell United Kingdom Schmidt telesco Angle Shirley Telescope University of Arizona Eh William Huggins International Dark Sky Associa executive United States starbucks engineer Europe Margaret Atwood Steward Observatory Australian Astronomical Observ Los Angeles Galaxy Alexey Peter Peterbilt Australia Peter
"steward observatory" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

11:58 min | 3 years ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You're listening to NASA in Silicon Valley. A conversational podcast series from NASA's Ames research center where we chat with the various scientists, researchers, engineers, and all around cool people here at NASA as a special treat today, which is our eighty fifth episode raring to go back in time and do a rerun from April six, twenty seventeen, which also our thirty third episode of the podcast. Our guest for this special rerun is Kimberly Eneco Smith. We discuss her previous work, looking at Pluto on the new horizons mission and go into her current role as a project scientist for so FIA the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy per as I like to refer to it as a telescope on a plane. This weekend April seventh through eighth in two thousand eighteen NASA is going to be participating in the USA science and engineering festival in Washington DC. So NASA scientists and engineers, they're gonna be giving talks and stuff booths at this huge event and our very own Sophia, the airborne observatory is going to be represented there along with Nasr's other great observatories all. Also this weekend. If you're in the bay area, we're going to be a part of the local Silicon Valley comic con. There's going to be booths and panels featuring a lot of the topics that listeners have come to hear about on the podcast. We're talking drone traffic management research, how Earthlife fares out in space and how we're searching for life out in the cosmos. And on top of that NASA is ongoing journey to the moon and Mars. So fi is also going to be there representing a special panel about black holes featuring, Sir, Roger Penrose. You can get all of this information when you go to WWW dot NASA dot gov. Slash S V C twenty. And that's just Silicon Valley. Comecon twenty eighteen. But for today, here is Kimberly Eneco Smith. Who is starting it off, getting to know people little bit. So I would love to hear about how did you join NASA and like, how did you end up in Silicon Valley of all places? Okay. Well, it was a bit of luck. Okay. Ming? But actually was kind of hard work to always both in life to look a little bit hard. There you go. Well, how I got my job at NASA it, you know, it was a combination of just being in the right place at the right time and just doing my job. I was a post doc, sue the position you you take once you get your PHD. Okay. I was in Tucson, Arizona steward observatory, and I was just doing my job. I was working on a instrument that would fly in space someday. It was the multi ban imaging Automata for Spitzer. Okay. Spitzer would eventually launched in two thousand and three. But this was years before that and we were building the instrument at the university of ARizona. And so I was working on that just carrying out tasks, and I was also involved in designing what we might have the successor to Hubble look like called it. The next generation space tells. Go, okay, which now has been rebranded James Webb. So I was working on the earlier reincarnation of of of nexgen. And I, I liked next-gen telescope because I'm a Star Trek fan are symbol for the mission was the the Star Trek communicator pin nexgen anyway. So I was working on design study for that and we doing design study. You go through reviews? Yeah. And at the review, there were some NASA folks there, of course, because reviewing what the university. And they would be these comments about, well, who created that? Who did that study? Who did this? And they said, oh, Kim, did that give him to that. Person? So I got to meet who would then become my first boss at NASA sense. He, he basically says, you're a self starter. You seem to be working on a lot of different things. You have a lot of great ideas. How would you like to work for NASA and what was you know a little awkward at the time is that the post doc was ending and I'm like, mom, looking for a job. And of course my post doc supervisor was saying, oh, we could extend you another six months or a year, and I'm like, Nassar's offering me a job. So of course, history was made. So actually it was just be me doing my work building instruments, playing with new concepts for new space telescopes and it let landed mutual Manasseh. Yes. So like where you always like stem focused wanted to build telescopes was like a kid looking up into the sky, or how did that come about. Not really. In fact, even the term stem is actually quite new. Yeah. I mean, although I think I was at stem conference at Princeton last weekend talking to educators, and I was curious like, where does this whole thing stem come along? Because it's just, you know what? I learned how it's sort of an initiative to get us, you know, realize, well, realizing that this country faces a shortage scientists and engineers and technically minded folks going forward. And so I'm pleased that it's getting the attention that it deserves at the same time. All other subjects are are equally important, but I digress. Yes. No, I mean, I was just a self motivated student, curious about anything wanting to learn. I wasn't the type of person who took things apart and played with it. I do that from time to time. I tinker now more as an adult than I did as a kid child. It was more book smart. That was just more into learning reading about things and tried mustard how that works rather than becoming an engineer. But I won't founding myself on a series of misadventures in engineering and it's been a lot of fun when you joined into NASA, what some of the early work, what are some things where you can like you may know me by? Well, one of my tasks was I got a most playing in our detector lab, so and I was basically told, please see when our detectors fail, I was paid to destroy things. Oh, how nice so we would. So these infrared detectors would eventually fly in space. Again, for the James Webb space telescope this early in the development. We were trying to figure out what was the most robust to survive in the space radiation environment. So we will bring her devices up to UC Davis. They're particle accelerators are cyclotron and bombard the heck out of them with high-speed protons, travelling at speed of light. Okay. And we would evaluate at what point the devices would start to no longer be operable or no longer be scientifically value vibe, kind of pushing the boundaries of what can this do. And it would lead to interesting redesigns of the actual devices themselves to make sure the band gap energies were more robust. The separation between the fetes and the multiplexes had were more space, radiation hardened, because the whole point is you're going to fly these wonderful detectors to take these beautiful pictures of the deep universe. But if they can't survive a few years in space radiation, what's what's the point? And so that was a really fun project. So I was one of my early projects working at NASA, and I know now you're working on Sophia, but you'd also done some previous work on new horizons. I think. Yes, I did. Yeah. So yes. In January of this year, I started as the project scientists for Sophia the stratospheric observatory for infrastructure strana me, but. Prior to that last six years of of my series of misadventures in the space agency was a deputy project scientist on new horizons. The Pluto fly by missions back. So I was brought on due to my self starting nature, and the fact that I speak science and engineering and my job was to oversee the calibration of the instrument payload it was already on its way to Pluto. The payload was launched in two thousand six and I joined the project in twenty eleven and the fly by was in two thousand fifteen. So we had about four years to evaluate and prepare the instruments. So they were ready to go because at that time in the program to save on operations costs, but also wear and tear on the instruments. Deep-space probe went through long periods of hibernation. So most of the year, the everything would be sleeping and wake up twice a year to do some instrument checkouts. And so my work was to ensure. That we made the best use of those limited times to check out the instruments were working well, looking at stars looking at long stares at dark, partisan sky onto magin. There's a bit of anxiety of you've put this like expensive like instruments, you've put them into space. It survived a launch. It's on its way. It's been hibernating kind of a little bit of anxiety like, oh, I hope this works. Will it back God? Yes, there was a little bit of that. In fact, it was also fascinating working side by side with the scientists and engineers on the project who were still learning about the instrument, can the spacecraft as it flew through the solar system and the, you know, the the environment was changing too. We had one incident an episode, where are you alter? Vile spectrometer didn't turn on, and we're like, ooh, but it turns out it was because the spacecraft had actually gone to a much lower temperature and we needed to just up date when we did a when you have a an anomaly you fire. Donnelly report, and then you do you try to experiment with a grab a simulator, what might have happened so they didn't turn on. Turns out. It just went to safe mode, which is what it was designed to do, and it was because the look up table on board needed to have some more information on what to do at low temperatures really. So we figure that out. We then carefully went through a series of tests in which you then upload that new table, and then you would verify that the instrument turned on and worked as well. And so just a few months later, we were able to solve that issue. But that was because, oh, we are now in a new realm and then then allowed us to all take step back and look at the spacecraft again and go, okay. What other new environments is the space spacecraft behaving in or new parameters that we need to really do look at what how our instruments would behave. And so it was a wonderful lesson learned for the program as we kept on learning about how the instruments were behaving. And of course, the calibration exercises in these Bs. Yay. Years prior to the fly by were successful because we brought you those beautiful pictures. Yes, I was gonna say, imagine that's got to be the the big crescendo then when you take the pitcher and you're like, you know, happened grape now you're waiting for all that data the combat. But I'd imagine just seeing those first images just got to blow your mind. Yeah, they were. They were just phenomenal and then just met and exceeded any expectations and was mystifying on approach to Pluto. I mean, spacecraft's traveling thirty, six thousand miles per hour covering a million kilometers day. Pluto started come into focus and Sharon, and you've got a glimpse of what you might see, but not when the hi rez images came down that was just phenomenal. In an interesting connection between Sofia, you know, it's a plane with a hole in the side for a telescope between Sofia what you're working on now and then also new horizons. I understand that I believe the Sophia like actually took some observations of Pluto, even before new horizons. Got there. Yeah, it was a wonderful timing coincidence. Pluto is has has been a now. We'll have returned to being an astronomical object that distant point in the sky, that distant point of light. It moves with respect to the fixed stars, which are very, very much.

NASA Sophia Silicon Valley Kimberly Eneco Smith project scientist engineer USA Roger Penrose ARizona Washington DC James Webb space Spitzer steward observatory FIA Tucson gov. Slash S Nasr Princeton Hubble
"steward observatory" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"steward observatory" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"You're listening to NASA in Silicon Valley. A conversational podcast series from NASA's Ames research center where we chat with the various scientists, researchers, engineers, and all around cool people here at NASA as a special treat today, which is our eighty fifth episode raring to go back in time and do a rerun from April six, twenty seventeen, which also our thirty third episode of the podcast. Our guest for this special rerun is Kimberly Eneco Smith. We discuss her previous work, looking at Pluto on the new horizons mission and go into her current role as a project scientist for so FIA the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy per as I like to refer to it as a telescope on a plane. This weekend April seventh through eighth in two thousand eighteen NASA is going to be participating in the USA science and engineering festival in Washington DC. So NASA scientists and engineers, they're gonna be giving talks and stuff booths at this huge event and our very own Sophia, the airborne observatory is going to be represented there along with Nasr's other great observatories all. Also this weekend. If you're in the bay area, we're going to be a part of the local Silicon Valley comic con. There's going to be booths and panels featuring a lot of the topics that listeners have come to hear about on the podcast. We're talking drone traffic management research, how Earthlife fares out in space and how we're searching for life out in the cosmos. And on top of that NASA is ongoing journey to the moon and Mars. So fi is also going to be there representing a special panel about black holes featuring, Sir, Roger Penrose. You can get all of this information when you go to WWW dot NASA dot gov. Slash S V C twenty. And that's just Silicon Valley. Comecon twenty eighteen. But for today, here is Kimberly Eneco Smith. Who is starting it off, getting to know people little bit. So I would love to hear about how did you join NASA and like, how did you end up in Silicon Valley of all places? Okay. Well, it was a bit of luck. Okay. Ming? But actually was kind of hard work to always both in life to look a little bit hard. There you go. Well, how I got my job at NASA it, you know, it was a combination of just being in the right place at the right time and just doing my job. I was a post doc, sue the position you you take once you get your PHD. Okay. I was in Tucson, Arizona steward observatory, and I was just doing my job. I was working on a instrument that would fly in space someday. It was the multi ban imaging Automata for Spitzer. Okay. Spitzer would eventually launched in two thousand and three. But this was years before that and we were building the instrument at the university of ARizona. And so I was working on that just carrying out tasks, and I was also involved in designing what we might have the successor to Hubble look like called it. The next generation space tells. Go, okay, which now has been rebranded James Webb. So I was working on the earlier reincarnation of of of nexgen. And I, I liked next-gen telescope because I'm a Star Trek fan are symbol for the mission was the the Star Trek communicator pin nexgen anyway. So I was working on design study for that and we doing design study. You go through reviews? Yeah. And at the review, there were some NASA folks there, of course, because reviewing what the university. And they would be these comments about, well, who created that? Who did that study? Who did this? And they said, oh, Kim, did that give him to that. Person? So I got to meet who would then become my first boss at NASA sense. He, he basically says, you're a self starter. You seem to be working on a lot of different things. You have a lot of great ideas. How would you like to work for NASA and what was you know a little awkward at the time is that the post doc was ending and I'm like, mom, looking for a job. And of course my post doc supervisor was saying, oh, we could extend you another six months or a year, and I'm like, Nassar's offering me a job. So of course, history was made. So actually it was just be me doing my work building instruments, playing with new concepts for new space telescopes and it let landed mutual Manasseh. Yes. So

NASA Silicon Valley Kimberly Eneco Smith Spitzer ARizona USA Washington DC steward observatory Nassar project scientist Ames research center FIA Roger Penrose Nasr Sophia Tucson Hubble Ming supervisor