35 Burst results for "Stevenson"

COVID-19 cases break new records in the US

Sean Hannity

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

COVID-19 cases break new records in the US

"Stevenson doing the extreme opposite of fading away Cove it in the U. S. U. S cases since the pandemic start now more than eight million. About a dozen states have new records in cases and people in the hospital and two states hit a record number of new deaths. Presidential candidates talking about the pandemic in battleground states, the president promising Florida's seniors that the pandemic will end soon with drugs and a vaccine. I'm working as hard as I can see you can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honest with funny. In fact, the pandemic has not restricted the president's travel or interacting with his own family, which doctors say led to him and others at the White House getting the virus and he failed ABC News

President Trump Stevenson Abc News White House S. U. S Florida
Trump to travel to military hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis

Big Al and JoJo

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump to travel to military hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis

"Won't read Military Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, the White House says. I'll be there a few days working while docks keep an eye on him. Sources close to the president say he's tested positive for Cove it and as symptoms, including a low grade fever, chills, congestion and a cough. Before I left the White House. The president recorded a short message. Thank everybody for the tremendous support. I'm going to Walter Reed Hospital. I think I'm doing very well. President Stocks is Mr Trump is being treated with an antibody cocktail, aspirin, vitamin D and other meds. Mrs Trump tested positive but has no symptoms. Joe Biden, Democratic presidential challenger at a campaign stop in Grand Rapids, Michigan, says that he's praying for the recovery of the president and first lady urging people to wear masks. Chuck Stevenson ABC News So

President Trump Mrs Trump White House Walter Reed Hospital Military Hospital Chuck Stevenson Joe Biden Cough Grand Rapids Bethesda Maryland Aspirin Michigan
Spider-Man PS5: They Recast Peter Parker

Kinda Funny Games Daily

04:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Spider-Man PS5: They Recast Peter Parker

"Number one, this I want you to know has bumped the original number. One story broke just a little while ago from the playstation blog James Stevenson community director over, and it's SOM- Nick Games put up a thing called included with Marvel's Spiderman Miles Morales ultimated on an ESA summit Marvel Spiderman. remastered details is what the blog post is talking about and it's talking about, of course, the whole voucher code fiasco that's been going on of Marvel's spider man remastered being included with Marvel's Spider Man Miles Morales alternate edition coming on November twelve. The Post. Reads as you would expect, it talks about of course Oh. Hey, we're very excited for this voucher code you're going to get hey, let's talk about the graphical updates they've gone above and beyond on the city environments it looks beautiful. It's always different things cabinet you scroll down comes gotTa pulled up here I go down like Here's what it looks like in four crazy. Okay. Here's the retracing. They see Spiderman in a reflection, but then you scroll a little bit further in read some tax in what do we find Gary? What a look at this a brand new face for Spiderman They've recast Peter Parker, I'm reading from the playstation blog. This does bring us to one of the bigger changes in order to bring the best performances to players with our next generation Marvel Spiderman Games we have recast the face of Peter Parker we loved working with John Bobby. Neck. buback on the original game however, to get a better match for Peter Parker, Slash Spiderman actor Yuri Lowenthal facial capture we have cast Ben Jordan to be the face model for Peter Parker on the playstation five council, he looks incredible in game in years moving performances take on a new life right now, if you're a video watcher, you see the doc spoilers Peter Parker scene were docked puts on the arms for the first time. They posted this full here with the new Ben. Jordan model, and of course, jury's still dialogue talking through going through it. Can you full screen? Kevin. Can we see that full screen just to get a little bit more intensity to what we're seeing here? I don't even know where to begin because if you want to talk about the amount of things I did not see happening with Spiderman remastered recasting. Peter Parker was definitely high on something. I hadn't even considered now granted I'm not inside INSOMNIAC, getting updates on what they're doing why they're doing it but. I I am shook Gary I. AM Shuki. Cabinet. If you click on the second link there the second one that will show you a side by side comparison with that on a different one. Side by side comparison, you can full screen that tweet with the original face of course was John buback, and now we're talking about Jordan of. You're alone fall. Famed voice actor Principia a million other things is still the voice both times around first reaction. Gary, widow, what do you think of this new Peter Parker? My immediate first reaction is watching those watching that clip again makes does want to go back and replay the whole gang because it really what a fantastic game that was. Almost forgotten how good it was. I would definitely go back and play the remastered. Strikes me is kind of strange change when I it's funny when I I play the playstation for. Spiderman game. One of the things that wasn't at the top of my list of things I liked was was the cafe seed strategy. I thought it was a little bit old. It wasn't a hundred percent like everyone has their own imaging had of like what pita pocket doesn't look like Tom Holland for me really nails it and obviously does for a lot of people Andrew, golf field for example, didn't you know it's like everyone's got their own Carrots should look like and over time that face model for Peter Parker especially with the voice because year he does a tremendous job as his voice. Grooming and by the end yeah. That's pita pocket. So for them to change it again now feels like a bit of a Curve Ball I. Guess Mostly Greg, the question is why why did they? Why did they feel they needed to change the face where they not happy with it? Like what why did they explain the why of all the all we have so far as his blog post we loved working with John The original game however to get a better match to Peter Parker Slash Spiderman actor Yuri alone falls facial capture capture. We have cast Ben Jordan as to be the face model for Peter Parker on the playstation console.

Peter Parker Spiderman Ben Jordan Gary Yuri Lowenthal Cabinet Miles Morales James Stevenson Community Director Nick Games John Buback ESA John Bobby Kevin Principia John TA Tom Holland
Chicago - Kyle Rittenhouse, Charged With Killing Two In Kenosha, Will Fight Extradition To Wisconsin

Michael Brown

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chicago - Kyle Rittenhouse, Charged With Killing Two In Kenosha, Will Fight Extradition To Wisconsin

"Illinois, charged in connection with debts of protesters remains in his home state's Kyle Rittenhouse is charged with fatally shooting two men and injuring another during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, related to the Jacob Blake shooting at a hearing via zoom. Friday, his attorneys announced they plan to fight extradition. Wisconsin So we have no extradition papers from Wisconsin. We have no extradition papers from Illinois. Obviously, we need to review those that were in title is a Matter of a lot of challenge those by right of habeas corpus, which we intend to do and happy to do it. Written house was on the video call he was masked from the detention center is only words were good morning, your honor. His next court appearance will be in two weeks. Ryan Burrow, ABC News Chicago Chuck Stevenson,

Wisconsin Kyle Rittenhouse Illinois Ryan Burrow Chuck Stevenson Jacob Blake Kenosha ABC
Arrest made after suspicious letter sent to the White House in Washington, D.C.

Jim Bohannon

00:30 sec | Last month

Arrest made after suspicious letter sent to the White House in Washington, D.C.

"The FBI reports the arrest of a woman in the suspicious letter sent to the president. The FBI announces its arrested a woman with a gun at the New York Canadian border in connection with a suspicious letter that was sent to President Trump that the White House. The letter was intercepted before it got to the President Associated Press reporting that the letter contained the poison rice in three law enforcement officials telling the AP that Customs and border protection officers at the Peace Bridge crossing near Buffalo took the woman into custody. ABC is Chuck Stevenson.

FBI President Trump President Associated Press Chuck Stevenson Donald Trump Peace Bridge AP White House ABC New York
Donald Trump to host indoor Nevada campaign rally, despite COVID concerns

The Leo LaPorte Show

00:27 sec | Last month

Donald Trump to host indoor Nevada campaign rally, despite COVID concerns

"I'm Chuck Stevenson. President Trump's first indoor campaign rally since June is getting underway. Ignoring a warning from its host city Henderson. Nevada City says the rallies in violation of state emergency rules to stop the spread of coded the Trump campaign official says if people can gather to protest gamble in casinos and riot they can assemble to hear the president. The last indoor rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, led to a surge in covert cases, say health officials. Not long

President Trump Chuck Stevenson Nevada City Tulsa Oklahoma Official
Nintendo marks the 35th anniversary of Super Mario Bros. with games, products and in-game events

Game Scoop!

05:00 min | Last month

Nintendo marks the 35th anniversary of Super Mario Bros. with games, products and in-game events

"Finally after many months of rumors the Mario Three. D. Packages collection officially announced surprise announced by Nintendo. This morning along with a bunch of other Mario announcements to coincide with his thirty fifth anniversary so. Super Mario Three D all-stars collection announcer switch mireles sixty four miles sunshine. Mario Galaxy out very soon. September eighteenth lots of people are. Apparently excited for it. pre ordering the game right now as we speak But there are also some reasons to maybe be a little bit irked. About the whole situation here some people are wondering why there's no more got institute in the collection. Some people were hoping for a little bit more Polish they're not remakes their ports of his games and also apparently they're only going to be available until March thirty first of next year package deal. Package and then what? Nobody knows what the future holds. Okay. The sunshine is in wide screen. It's and sixteen by nine and I think that's the only change like otherwise supporting the game's over Is Sixty four, sixty, four in screen. Also right now, I don't think so. Weird. Really In the trailer, they filled it into end with their. Is. Showing it they zoomed then yeah. They must have because I I i. think they explicitly said that only sunshine has been made wide-screen man that's so strange. They did that with band Kazoo just fine on the on the xbox a once and that was an Stevenson. I don't so much mind playing the original sixty four. My my only concern is, what have they done anything with the camera like the actually given it a camera that you can control. I'm sure the. It's like that will make that game. That's that's what makes that game hard to play for me the Federal Ian Control the camera I don't think it's that bad I. Don't think it's a it's a showstopper but I do know that the C- stick version of stuff was Kinda strange lot of the time to cameras a lot of work for you. It's definitely definitely feels like a different era of game, but it's nothing like playing rugby but one now or something like that. Yeah. I replayed my sixty four recently and That's one of my favorite games of all time. So I know inside now but yeah, you definitely spend a lot of time fighting the camera and. Many companies including Nintendo figured out how to do three camera in in the years after my sixty four, it came out. Yeah. Ahead. Okay. I I'm I'm a little bit down on this news. My Galaxy to is incredibly underrated and I think incredibly underplayed. Absence kind of baffling and inexplicable I understand why three world is not included because. They Nintendo does have sort of cottage industry of porting over we you games onto the switch and it's coming. You know what? You're probably GONNA get to it's coming as its own you know sort of full-fledged for. You know no three d land from the three s in no especially no Mario Galaxy to. Is a big bummer for me Instead of these three games, sixty bucks, you know some of which are over twenty years old in the case of Mario Sixty four it's a new bums me out like I I I'm I'm a little underwhelmed to. Sam How you feeling about. I it's amazing. I don't really like Meyer. Galaxy. Mario OCCC two. So I don't really care about those games but I really really really WANNA play sixty four on the go always, and then sunshine is ordering my favorite Games ever I. think it's so great. I'm worried about like I'll try galaxy again, but it's a little bit too acrobatic. Kind of run to the end of the level based for me and I think it's really cool. For what it is, but I like the more explorer type stuff goes no I think that I'm really confused about what they'll do because a lot of things just requires you to point at something and like shake we remote to just a lot of that in that game and so I guess we'll just change with button prompts where you'll dislike head you'll jump from planet to planet to planet the planet. Because there, there's a lot of like Gimmickry in that game for the we remote, they clearly will have to take out the the the two players stuff, and I'm saying that fully knowing that the switches capable of point controls, just half of the switches out there don't have those the system they address that you actually they re say you will have to buy a set of joy cons if you want to go. On and you can sink joy cons to your this which led yeah. Don't get. So maybe they'll have those options and then they'll also have the ability to change. Turn them off which be cool Yeah like I. This collection is just one of the things today and everything that that was announced. It was just like the coolest. coolest. That I wish was at an e three so I can walk around and see that booth.

Nintendo Mario Mario Three Mario Occc Stevenson Rugby Gimmickry Meyer
Atlanta Hawks Head Coach Addresses NBA Strikes For Racial Justice

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:44 min | Last month

Atlanta Hawks Head Coach Addresses NBA Strikes For Racial Justice

"The National Basketball Association put the world on notice this week playoff games came to a halt when the Milwaukee Bucks refused to play on Wednesday in protest of the latest police shooting of Jacob Blake. A black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Protest in other leagues followed suit The W N B a major league baseball, hockey and football college athletes marched on campus in solidarity with players trying to raise awareness on racism and police brutality. To talk about what's next. We're joined by the head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. Lloyd Pierce. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for having me so, Coach. I understand you have been in touch with Jacob Blakes. Father. Why was it important for you to reach out to him? The level of influence and access that we have as an association is really, really high and and so just the opportunity that was presented to us as coaches Our coaches association to connect with the family, I thought would be It's really impactful trying to figure out one out. They're all doing and to what we can do from a humanity standpoint, too. Really be there in support of the family. I have to ask emotionally. Did this shooting bring up feelings that you had back in June when the during the killing of Rashard Brooks in Atlanta? Every shooting as an emotional attachment, and I think every time you see another one, you know it brings you back. They just all add on and for people that are dealing with anxiety deep people are dealing with depression, people that are feeling like There's so much stress that's occurring. You can see how that comes about, you know, n Ba players sent a clear message this week that reverberated throughout the sports world. Beyond that the protests led to some concrete commitments for change. For instance, the Wisconsin Legislature committed to going into special session on police reform. What kinds of things were achieved through this action? Well, I think the biggest thing that the players were able to do was was expressed that they want to be hurt. They wanted our league toe put racial discrimination, racial profiling, racial injustice, police brutality. They wanted to put that at the forefront. Obviously, there are some tangible items that came about, you know, with with emphasis on voting, with the emphasis on forming a coalition to address these issues moving forward with the emphasis on the policing bill. Writes and addressing that from a legislative standpoint, you've been a prominent voice in Atlanta for racial justice and a protest this summer. I'm going to quote you now, you said. I was born a black man. I'm going to die a black man, But I do not want to die because I'm a black man. Why is sharing your experience with the community there in Atlanta? Important to you? I'm sharing it with anyone that'll listen. And I think it's important to note that you know, prior to June are really, really Phil. That a lot of people in our country both black and white, and any other ethnicity. We're pretty ignorant, Teo the fact that there are a lot of people that feel and think that I in the way that I do in terms of the fear of being black, the fear of living in America and being a black man. I wonder what you say to people who And we've heard this time and time again who think that athletes should be athletes and stay away from the politics? Well, I wasn't and I'm not a person who grew up interested in politics. But what I really don't see is someone that looks like me. That's our fight. Our fight is we need to address areas of legislation. We need to address areas of representation and in order to do so. It's going to require other individuals to fight for those people to be in that position, And so if it requires us athletes on us in sports to push for new representation, and that starts with the vote, then that's what that's what we're going to be committed to. You know, you're the chair of AA Committee of the Coaches Association. That's focused on racial injustice. What what do you see? Coming next from the N B A on this subject? You know, hopefully a lot of hope. There are a lot of angles that come out of this. This isn't us saying we had the answers and we're going to. We're going to tell our players. We have the answers, and this is what we're going to do know this is a different This is a different world for all of us, and so we have committed Ourselves, too. Working with Bryan Stevenson from Unequal Justice Initiative, working with the Obama Foundation in my brother's keeper on mentoring and community initiatives for low income areas, working with various individuals who Are focused in our communities on racial justice, education, access, health care, access, police reform legislative items We want to hear from them. We want to be educated, and we want to be able to amplify the work that they're doing, and that's that's been our focus from day one. That was the head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. Lloyd Pierce. Thank you so much for being on our programme.

Atlanta Hawks Atlanta Lloyd Pierce Wisconsin Coaches Association National Basketball Associatio Kenosha Milwaukee Bucks Jacob Blakes Jacob Blake Baseball Ourselves Bryan Stevenson Unequal Justice Initiative Rashard Brooks Depression Hockey Aa Committee TEO Phil
MTA offers reward for info leading to arrest of New York subway vandal

BBC Newshour

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

MTA offers reward for info leading to arrest of New York subway vandal

"Subway car windows is costing the transit system money It doesn't have. W. Stevenson says the empty is offering a reward to stop the vandalism before it gets worse. Each window on a recent seven train looks like a baseball landed right in the middle with a unique spiderweb of cracks, fanning out the M T. A is offering more than $12,000 for information about who is doing this. It's a small sum compared to the cost of the damage. The empty says There have been 70 incidents of smashed windows since May. It's cost $300,000 to repair an NYPD inspector Jason Savino is in charge of the investigation and is asking the public to film and the Vandals put on your little detective Shields. And if you see something, say something, certainly make us aware of it. The police have video of one suspect. But if not made any arrests.

Jason Savino Vandalism Nypd W. Stevenson Baseball
Biden: 'No new taxes' for anyone making under $400K

News, Traffic and Weather

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Biden: 'No new taxes' for anyone making under $400K

"No new taxes for people making less than $400,000 a year, says Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential contender. His proposal in an ABC News interview. Very wealthy Should Fe Fair share corporations should pay a fair share. The fact is, they're corporations making close $2 Trillion to pay no tax at all. Chuck Stevenson ABC News

Abc News Joe Biden Chuck Stevenson
Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:07 min | 2 months ago

Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan and this is intelligence squared US part of our discourse disruptor series and what we're going to be focusing on. Our the coming presidential debates they are coming sort of starting September twenty-ninth, the first of three. And of course, because everything's different this year, the debates are going to feel different almost certainly going to be. In some fashion remote, maybe the debaters, the candidates won't even be in the same place. There's only going to be one moderator. We're not gonNA live audience because you can't have that many people in one space in this dangerous time. Also what we have going on as a conversation simultaneously with which is focused on, maybe we shouldn't have debates maybe it's time to wrap up that whole institution and go back to a time of no debates. And when I say go back did you know that for most of American history this institution that we know is the debates did not exist that for most of our history, there were no debates and did you know that once we started having debates that in the first series, there was a remote debate the candidates were not in the same place and there was no live audience. And there was only one moderator. So maybe things are circling back. There's a lot of history here and we are interested in that because. At intelligence squared, we are very interested in history and we are also very very interested in debates. So that's what we want to focus on and we want to focus. In this case of discourse disrupters with an excellent source of information about the past and the present and potentially the future, and that is a gentleman named Newton Minot and Newton Minnow is an old friend of intelligence squared us and he's also known as the father of American presidential debates and we'll talk a little bit about why that is. But first, let's bring Newt Minnow into the conversation newt. Thank you so much for for joining us. It's really a pleasure to be back in communication with you. John I. LOOK FORWARD TO I. Admire your work or the intelligence squared very very much. Well, thank you. Can I ask before we start everything else I find it interesting that for folks who don't know you have lived through some very, very disruptive times and this one in your nineties a comes at the after a long series of other adventures. I mean, you have lived through I, think twenty three presidential elections. At this point, you have seen twelve cycles of the debates that we're GONNA be talking about. You lived through the major disruption called World War to. Use served overseas you went into politics You're an aide to ally Stevenson who ran for president does the Democratic nominee twice in the nineteen fifties. So you saw two elections then you joined John Kennedy's administration and you saw the trauma of his assassination and then you were very close friends with Robert Kennedy and you saw his assassination and lived through that and and now this. Just just to take a moment is, is this disruption different in dramatically in kind from all of the others you've seen so far? Well, I lived through all that, but then I had another. Exposure to politics with Obama, the because Michelle worked for our firm and and Barack came to be a summer associate and they fell in love and so we got. So we had another round politics with with with the OBAMAS. About that but all throughout, I would say the last fifty years of this you have been intersecting with this institution that we call the presidential debates take us back to nineteen, fifty, nine, nineteen, sixty, where as an aide to at least Stevenson. You actually were involved in the idea of pushing forward the idea that there there. He did not get to take part in that kind of debate but was interested in enemies interested because you are suggesting it. You have a very strong faith in the idea of technology. To be a force for good and for communication and you saw television as this, you're right as this big thing happening in the sixties. Well, it actually was in the fifties in when. In in the fifty six. Presidential, election. The incumbent President President Eisenhower. Having a heart attack. And there was a big question whether he would be able to run again. And I suggested to adly that instead of the candidates. Rushing. All over the country and speaking crowds that that. Now, we have television which reached every home. And that instead of traditional debate that. There'd be a series of joint appearances or debates between the presidential candidates. As they considered that his advisors thought it was a gimmick and it was he never suggested it. The Federal Communications Act when it was originally passed during the new deal. Required equal time for political candidates. The law said section three fifteen FA broadcaster gives or sells time to one candidate. At must give ourselves time to the opponent on the same basis. As a result that was interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission to mean any use of the air by a candidate including being in a news program. So the broadcasters were pressing to get news programs exempt. From the equal time requirement and they finally succeeded in the late fifties. But debates were not regarded as a news program.

Stevenson President President Eisenhower John Donvan Barack Obama Newton Minnow Federal Communications Commiss John Kennedy United States Newton Minot Robert Kennedy John President Trump FA Summer Associate Michelle
Train Your Brain To Find Opportunities During A Crisis

The Model Health Show

04:54 min | 3 months ago

Train Your Brain To Find Opportunities During A Crisis

"Welcome to the Mater Hell, show this fitness nutrition expert, Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to you today. We've got a very popular episode nine up today with him. Talking about how we can make the most of the situation that we find our society and right now you know with twenty twenty. It seems like twenty twenty came along and through our lives into a blender, but today we're GonNa talk about how we can make it into a delicious smoothie. You know what I mean and right now here in the state of California that just moved to. We haven't even been here full year yet. Society is re shut down there and just shut it down, opened it little bit open the crack and they shut it back down and right now for the upcoming semester children are you back to school we've got millions of people who are unemployed. Countless businesses are closed and this is a very trying time and I truly want everybody to understand that we have not seen the fallout. Fallout yet. The true fallout and I WANNA help to make sure that as many people as possible are in a position to overcome this, because our mental health is going to be stressed, our financial health physical health are relationships, but we can come out better Albert Einstein said that in the middle of every difficulty lies opportunity, and we have to shift our mindset to that, though because when things are going bad, we're faced with. especially uncertainty, we tend to go to the dark side. Are This is how? An CONSI- Walker you know went down the wrong path it was it was presented with You know those those trying times and trying opportunities you know so shout out to Darth vader shadow to space balls IRA out. They get credit. one of the greatest movie parodies of all time all right instead of Chewbacca, the wookey. They had BARF play by John. Candy. Alright a big shot to them. But again in the middle of every difficulty lies opportunity. We have to shift our mindset there and this has been a trying time for many. But I believe that we are strong I believe that we are capable and I believe that this is a time in history that is offering a great reset. It's offering an opportunity for humanity elevate. It makes me think of you know the original Nintendo the original Nintendo. The game console itself had two buttons. One was a power button in one was a reset button. First of all, why don't if I want to reset? Push the power button often. Turn it back on again. They're like no. You're going to need this reset button. The reset says. I'm playing the game. Maybe I made a mistake maybe i. was exposed to clinch. May. Be I WANNA do something different, but the reset says I'm going to keep playing. is going to tap this real. Quick I'm GONNA keep playing. And I think their life right now is a big reset button that is getting pushed whether we like it or not, and so we need to embrace it because it's happening, you know fighting against what is is what leads to allow to suffering. But the thing is we don't have to. We don't have to be content about it. We need to accept it realize what's happening. Realize what is and then put in place an intelligent. Plan of action which starts from the inside. Truly, all changes in inside game and really getting our mindset right and taking control of our own personal. Economy inside of our minds are personal health and wellness inside of our minds, so we can take that and spread that out to our family and our communities so very excited about this episode in as I mentioned. This is my first full summer here in California I grew up the Mid West S. T.. L.! Right in here in California is, it's amazing. The consistency in the weather, but something that I've noticed is very different from the Midwest Summers. Is that here in California you got the heat he might be to say is nine hundred ninety five outside. And If, there's a piece of shea going. Get into the shade in this cooler cycle is nice shadier. In Saint, Louis, it doesn't work that way. Would you say if it's ninety ninety five and Saint Louis? And you see a little piece of shade going. Get some of their shade, but. He's like what do you think you're going? We have this little extended arm, cold humidity, and it'll grab your by your collar. I make your holiday dollar humidity. It doesn't feel good. You know so. It's like I've got a true experience now of going into the shade and me like Oh. This is nice, nice shade. But Saint Louis doesn't work that way shot to all my friends and family in Saint Louis, everybody listening in Saint Louis I love you guys so much.

Saint Louis California Twenty Twenty Shawn Stevenson Albert Einstein Nintendo Darth Vader IRA Midwest Summers John Shea
"stevenson" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

05:52 min | 3 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"Monday. August thirteenth the Democratic National Convention opened in Chicago, the. Democratic frontrunner former Illinois Governor Adler Stevenson had fared well and Democratic primaries Stevenson who had competed against Ike in the nineteen fifty, two presidential race had consistently attack Eisenhower's foreign policy decisions especially in Egypt. These attacks have moved the former governor to the front of the pack, forcing other contenders to drop out of the race before the convention. So My August of Nineteen fifty-six, Stevenson stood poised to secure the Democratic nomination for a second time, but he would need a strong running mate someone to stand behind his anti Cold War platform and help him take on the five star general turn commander-in-chief out of a crowded field of potential VP candidates, one man with a famous last name stood out a name that would become synonymous with three letters that represented a new era of American politics. JFK..

Governor Adler Stevenson Illinois Chicago Eisenhower Ike commander-in-chief JFK Egypt VP
The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

The Model Health Show

05:41 min | 3 months ago

The Fat burn Fix And Our Growing Susceptibility To Viral Infections - With Dr. Cate Shanahan

"Welcome to the model. Show this fitness and nutrition expert Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to be tuning today. This episode here I am so pumped about. This is one of my favorite physicians. One of my favorite scientists and she's got a new project is really helping shed some light on a very very misunderstood topic in this the topic of body, fat. Sustain that we tend to see is a very cosmetic target is a very cosmetic issue for hundreds of millions of people right now, but in truth, our body fat is a major player in so many different dynamic ways as far as our health as far as our ability to fight infections, viral infections, even and I think that this is going to be incredibly enlightening and something that you're going to walk away with having a better understanding of this. Incredible tissue that we're all carrying around in what's led to the surplus that were carrying around for many of us, and also some more intelligent ways that we can address this in not just for cosmetic issues, but to truly get our society healthier. And hope that you've been employing different strategies to get yourself healthy right now, and also your loved ones. It's more important than ever to reach out. Make sure that our friends and family are doing some of the basic necessities of just getting some fresh air, going out and walk move their bodies, engaging in some stress management practices, and we've done episodes dedicated to these things, and also making sure that they're getting in some high-quality foods as well as supersport right now, but we just recently went on our first outing since the corn team began first outing to a restaurant with our FRIZZ nextdoor, nextdoor, neighbours, families both wint. And it was very a felt like I was visiting another planet, I definitely felt a little bit like that scene and back to the future when Michael J. Fox goes back to pass, and he's got like a has met suit on, and he winds up in a barn, and these folks happened upon him in his hands. Matsue with this delorean in the sign has his comic book. which is like the cover? The Comic Book Kinda shows what the future looks like are. These alien invaders look like. So just to get into the restaurant you walk through. The. Lobby is about five feet of lobby, and you have to wear masks. Go through the five feet, but then there people already there sitting at tables there socially distance. Of course you know one table apart, but they've got. You know they don't have mask on because you can eat with a mask on yet. Until maybe we get permanent mass installed on her face faces in little openings, but the science there. Wasn't really accurate. You know like that five feet, but then once you go pacify feet. Take your mask off, and you can each her. You know whatever your therefore, but he's a very strange experience. Because the waitress had on, the has metsu she had on the face shield. She had on the mask at that point I was like why be here in like there's so much that goes into it, and it's so abnormal. We should just go ahead and you know. Make dinner ourselves have family. Get together something like that. It's just an added. stressor is so much uncertainty in all. The tables had to be labeled that this table has been sanitized in, you know. We've hit it with the flame thrower all these different stuff just to feel comfortable going outside, and it was like this was like a you know there's a strip mall and everybody is just a very dystopia and situation, and this is the situation that we're facing right now. There is a very infectious. Virus that is that we're dealing with as a society and at its core. We Really WanNA. Look at this what we've been dedicated to. How do we get our citizens healthier? so that were not as susceptible to this virus in the mini viruses that are to come because this is right now. This is just the first of many that we're going to be faced with as humanity you know, and the thing that is overlooked in that I've really been working to up level the conversation is. As a species? What are the things that make us more susceptible to viral infections? What are the things that we can do to help? Improve our bodies response because in truth we've had such a relationship with viruses throughout human evolution that we are in fact, the human genome is eight percent over eight percent in dodge in his viruses that we are. Our genome is made of. We've had such interaction with viruses. We are made viruses on that level talking about our human genome, what our jeans are made of the human genes with the things that make us human. We're part virus. And even more tangible aspect because I think there's really a hard pill for us to swallow as society right now that we are virus ourselves. But you know this is something that we can test track now. We have some affirmation to the fact that we all are carrying upwards of three hundred trillion virus particles in and on our bodies all the time. We are. We're like a playground for viruses and. Pathogenic! Many of them Symbiotic. But this equation really plays into. How healthy are we interact with other people's virus load? How healthy are we or what can happen to damage our health immune system health that even the pathogenic viruses that were carrying right now can become opportunistic and take advantage of our system and make us sick.

Shawn Stevenson Nextdoor Michael J. Fox
Chicago - 2 Injured  In Crash Involving Semi-Trailer I-294; Lanes Blocked Near Golf Road

WBBM Late Morning News

01:49 min | 4 months ago

Chicago - 2 Injured In Crash Involving Semi-Trailer I-294; Lanes Blocked Near Golf Road

"Tarsem issues on the south side of I 65 in northwest Indiana. This is all because of an earlier crash involving a some other ended up in the ditch. The good news is Cruz with heavy equipment. Got the somebody out of the digits now kind of sitting there. Between the first and second lanes. You still have the two right lanes blocked south found 65 before 61st Avenue traffic just getting by in the left lane. South bound and it is jammed up from 80 94 all the way down to the scene here because of just a single in getting bias here really backed up on the South bound side of I 65. The delay actually starts on 80 94 eastbound. Starting all the way back and burn overnight 65 because the extra into south and 65 is jammed as well. So expect some extra travel time. If you're heading south on I 65 trying to get into Merrillville and points south on the Edens Expressway were looking good on the in bound side. Outbound 22 from Montrose DeLay, cook, Moving roadwork and Lane from Foster out to Peterson is the culprit here. Kennedy and about 26 from O'Hare, 16 from the junction. Outbound. No problems. The Eisenhower no delays in around the Stevenson looking good between 3 55 and Lakeshore drive on the Dan Ryan in about 20 minutes from 95th. 20 on the outbound trip 57 year. Okay? The Bishop Ford Inbound is in pretty good shape. But the up outside of the Ford slow fromthe Ryan out to 115th because of moving roadwork in the left lane, 22 minutes from the dam right now to 80 94. Lakeshore drive north down slow approaching the Chicago River, but no south bound issues on the tri state Tollway south bound. We still have a exit ramp at golf roadblock because of an earlier pen and crash involving a semi Injuries were involved in this crash too much earlier. State police remain on the scene investigating and doing clean up so the exit ramp to golf is block from the south and Tri State. Your best option. It's not clothes, but your best option is to excellent Willow road instead. Elsewhere on the tollway's eastbound Jane Adams just passed around 47 we had earlier crash. Everything is on the shoulder. Now. Reagan 3 55 53 All clear. No. I 80 issues to report at the moment Westbound 80 94. Slow from Ripley to Central in

Dan Ryan Tri State Tollway Cruz Indiana Bishop Ford Inbound Tri State Edens Expressway Merrillville Ford Chicago River Reagan Montrose Kennedy Jane Adams Eisenhower Peterson Stevenson
Chicago's CTA Red, Purple Line Service Temporarily Suspended Due To Mechanical Problems

Steve Cochran

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Chicago's CTA Red, Purple Line Service Temporarily Suspended Due To Mechanical Problems

"Merry am still have some problems on the CTA red line and the purple line no service on the red line between Howard and Belmont this is due to earlier mechanical problems shuttle buses are available so why the trains the red line trains only operating between ninety fifth and Belmont's purple line is not operating between Howard and the loop also due to those mechanical problems in Waukegan an accident Green Bay road at Washington and some slight delays on the inbound Stevenson this morning from into

Howard Waukegan Washington Stevenson Belmont
U.S. plans massive coronavirus vaccine testing effort to meet year-end deadline

Science Vs

11:15 min | 4 months ago

U.S. plans massive coronavirus vaccine testing effort to meet year-end deadline

"Tastes have been on the hunt for something that could shut this virus down and give us our lives back. A vaccine. A few months ago, there was a lot of excitement. As the very first clinical trials for the coronavirus began, it was in time. The search for coronavirus vaccine has become one of the fastest moving in history. That scenes usually take years not months to produce. This is happening warp speed. Never before hundreds of scientists are over the world and focused on the same thing at the same time creating a vaccine for covid nineteen. And more and more vaccine candidates are entering the fray. Were at the point, where around a dozen clinical trials are on the go. Hundreds of people volunteered for jab in the arm to test old kinds of different vaccines. As part of this scientists are taking some be gambles. The vaccine were looking at is incredibly modern type vaccine. It's not the traditional way building a vaccine, so we're going as fast as humanly possible. Many of them are not traditionally vaccine companies. They are using novel ideas from oncology things. They've learned treating cancer. It's never been used in a vaccine before. And if one of these gambles payoff, it could be huge, we could get a vaccine soon. The US government says that the goal is to get a vaccine to Americans by January twenty twenty one. They're calling this nation warp speed. And if it could be done, this would be unprecedented. So could we really be celebrating twenty one with Champagne and shot in the arm to fight the coronavirus? And? What would it take to make that happen? That's Today on the show. Because when it comes to getting a vaccine, it feels like this is happening at warp speed, but then there's. Science. Scientist is when on Earth Are we getting? This vaccine is coming up to stop to the break. This episode of science versus is sponsored by Phillips Sonacare the electric toothbrush that combines decades of science and engineering to master the art of brushing with sixty two thousand brushstrokes minute you've got a month's worth of brushing in just two minutes for better checkups, guaranteed or your money back visit Phillips. Dot Com slash sonacare. This episode of science versus is brought to you by AFLAC. That lovable duct does more than just say. AFLAC access a safety net when the unexpected happens by helping with the expenses. That health insurance doesn't cover. Get to know them at half dot com. Welcome back. So back in January. We had from people like Anthony Fauci that we could get a vaccine in twelve to eighteen months. That could mean early next year. And in the land of vaccines, these would be record breaking. It often takes something like ten years for a vaccine to from the lab to the doctor's office. So can we really do it? Get Out of this pandemic by January, before Santa even catches these brands. Well to get them labs. All around the world s around experimenting with different kinds of vaccines. But they all have the same goal to train our immune system to recognize and killed this coronavirus. And to do that, many vaccine developers have homed in on one thing. Progress. And northwestern told us all about it. If you think about the picture that you've seen corona virus like everywhere, and it looks like a ball with little points coming out. Those points the spike. Spike protein you know it, I, know it. It's the most famous spikes in Spike Lee and the most famous protein since. College Eddie right. This spike is so important because it's a major thing that tells our body weight this virus. It doesn't belong here. That actually is what argue system fees most readily. It sees the spike. After our meeting system sees the spike. It lends to recognize quickly. Respond to it by creating things like antibodies to fight it, and then some of those antibodies hang around so that if the virus shows up, then the virus will just be cleared away by our immune system. So that the next time we see that disease, we don't get sick in the first place, so if you making Exane, how do you get your immune system to quickly recognized this spike? Well, one way is that scientists can take rhinovirus and then make less dangerous. Say They Kill the virus most comedy vaccines are made by growing up the virus. And inactivating that virus sometimes with the chemical, sometimes the heat, and then that is then injected. An otherwise scientists can do this version of the virus. That's too weak to make you sick. And this is how we make a lot of vaccines familiar with things like the measles and chickenpox and flu vaccines. It's tried and tested. We know it can work and some companies are going this way to try to make Alka, rhinovirus vaccine. But other groups at. This meat and potatoes vaccine method they using new attack more experimental ways of building vaccine. And these experimental methods getting a ton of attention and funding right now, because governments and big. Pharma hoping they'll deliver the goods pasta. So for they use instead of giving you a whole coronavirus, these vaccines, basically using genetic material from the coronavirus, and then they're plopping that into your body. And scientists have chosen a very particular piece of genetic material spike. It's the recipe for the spike, protein. And this can come in a couple of forms. One is called. Our body will see that as a normal M Arnie and just translate into a pro team. Wow, so this. If this vaccine works, it would encourage your body to make little corona virus proteins. Yes that's that's the idea. Wow, that seems so futuristic. As as is, that's really cool right, so you're getting the body degenerate that protein for you yet, so these spike proteins that your body has made will then be floating around and the idea. Is that your immune system? We'll see it. Make antibodies send Ta. You'll have immunity. And many of the vaccines in this race, delivering this genetic material to us in different ways, so some shopping Marin into a ball of fat, so that your cells will slip up while other groups trying to smuggle in that code using get this a totally different virus one. That weren't hurt you. Is it fantasy that they've taken a different virus? And then they're like like Halloween the dressing at all like the corona virus, yes. Say. So this all sounds a little bunk is mad. The question is will it really work that is. Will these vaccines protectiveness if we get exposed to the coronavirus? Because if they don't. Like on a useless. My boss is to stay if it's just dishwater that you're not gonNA get anywhere. This is Katie Stevenson. She's a doctor working on vaccine development at Harvard and she says that one of the key ways will know if a vaccine is working is if it makes you produce antibodies. And she's looking for not just any antibodies. But neutralizing antibodies, what what is a neutralizing antibodies? So a neutralizing antibody is an antibody that binds to virus and neutralizes it. This is the dream right? Yeah, exactly right inches binds to the virus and prevent it from entering a cell. So the body sees that and just thrown in the garbage to this is what Katie is going to be looking for. In the results of all these clinical trials, and if she doesn't see these neutralizing antibodies, shelby thinking well, that was kind of done. And Katie says I dealing see a lot of these. So! What's a lot? Well you measure milk leases. Okay so I've measure milk. And you can measure antibodies titus. So one study, which looked at people who had been infected with this virus, and then recovered found the antibody. Titus tended to be at least one hundred. And when Katie's colleague vaccinated monkeys with an experimental vaccine, they found that having similar antibody Tom of one hundred protected them from getting infected. So while we're still learning a lot, he all I have been kind of looking for one one hundred. Okay, that's it's nice, poetic, great one hundred yeah! We have a handful of results that companies have released from different clinical trials, but just one paper that's published in a peer review gentle. It was from a Chinese local company who injected more than one hundred people with one of those new fandango vaccines and it was back in March. They tested three different doses. And Katie says they didn't get. This antibody tighter. Like at the highest dose averaged around Bootie for you know I was a little bit disappointed, so a little bit reserved I'm happy that it elicited an immune response because that's not a given. Sometimes, it's just zero zero zero but I would've liked to see something closer to like one hundred another company. Medina injected forty five people back in March with the vaccine, and they said that eight people had good levels of neutralizing antibodies. But they didn't tell us about the opposite in the trial. When we asked dinner about this, we didn't hear back to Katie is holding out for more info. Yeah, I just wanted to see the rest because it is immune. A- promising I'd put promising right on there. But I do not know which one of these is GonNa work if any, and that that is the actual fact truth so I try not to stray from that, and there are other FAC truths to nail down him. Even if these vaccines do make you produce produces, antibodies will still have to make absolutely short that you'll protected from the corona virus. If you do get exposed, and then if you protected, we'll have to work out how long four so you might need. More than one shot of the vaccine say a booster shot in a or so.

Katie Stevenson Scientist Spike Lee Aflac United States Anthony Fauci Phillips Sonacare Marin Champagne Chickenpox Santa Alka Medina Phillips Exane Arnie
Chicago Stevenson Expressway Reopens After Shooting Investigation Closes Southbound Lanes

WBBM Morning News

01:34 min | 4 months ago

Chicago Stevenson Expressway Reopens After Shooting Investigation Closes Southbound Lanes

"Company good morning both Iran well good morning Pat we went from one mass on an expressway to now a mass on the tollway we will start on the tri state tollway were on the northbound side we have some really heavy traffic over the mile long bridge approaching the Stevenson this is because of a fully engulfed vehicle fire that is blocking the exit ramp to the inbound Stevenson expressway once you get past this we're jammed up from North Avenue to the Bensenville bridges a crash in the left lane there and in the middle of all that we had a report of a crash your Ogden's well with the crews heading out to check on it so kind of a very messy northbound tri state tollway trip today the southbound side of tri state is moving at the speed limit the rest the Illinois tollway staff a few spots of road work here and there but no major delays because of them on the expressways Eaton's looking good the Kennedy about twenty six minutes from o'hare sixteen from the junction outbound delays eyes now are about thirty three minutes from route three ninety twenty from Mannheim in about thirty two minutes out to route three ninety the Stevenson found out thirty seven minutes three fifty five the lake shore drive police from central Pulaski and Damon to the Dan Ryan outbound Stevenson's all clear traffic is using it once again after early morning shut down for an investigation the Dan Ryan invest a heavy past Garfield into the burning or change its twenty seven minutes from ninety fifth in downtown but the up outside of right is now delayed three fifty seven and the bishop Porter both in great shape lake shore drive north down so from Roosevelt to Monroe and then as you approach the Chicago River because the two right lanes remain closed over the Chicago River through the end of this month no southbound delays on lake shore drive I. eighty is all clear eighty ninety four looking good I sixty five the Indiana toll road in pretty good shape as well do you still have a closure in the loop State Street remains blocked from Randolph to lake because of ongoing police activity is it's an investigation into a shooting there she's Michigan

Bishop Porter Shape Lake Illinois Iran Michigan Randolph Chicago River Monroe Roosevelt PAT Dan Ryan Damon Pulaski Mannheim Kennedy Eaton Ogden Bensenville Stevenson
Report documents nearly 2,000 Reconstruction-era lynchings

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Report documents nearly 2,000 Reconstruction-era lynchings

"I might cross your reporting a legal advocacy group that has been documenting lynchings in America has released a new report in releasing a new report on an additional two thousand lynchings of black people in post civil war America Bryan Stevenson the founder of the equal justice initiative says in a statement we cannot understand our present moment without recognizing the lasting damage caused by allowing white supremacy and racial hierarchy to prevail during reconstruction the equal justice initiative has now documented nearly sixty five hundred lynchings of black people between eighteen sixty five and nineteen fifty lynchings came as mobs attacked black people attempting to participate in the political process or merely live freely a memorial to lynching victims the national memorial for peace and justice opened in Montgomery Alabama in twenty eighteen hi Mike Crossey up

America Bryan Stevenson Founder Montgomery Alabama Mike Crossey
"stevenson" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

05:20 min | 5 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"You went to Alabama. To establish a center, a Death Penalty Defense Yeah center that evolved into the equal justice. Initiative, but you tell a story about the first execution. Witness I. Mean You know I was in Alabama, because Alabama didn't instill doesn't have a public defender system. There's no statewide public defender system. There were no resources allocated for people on death row. there are a lot of people getting execution dates, and so We open up this office with the hope that we could recruit some people to help us meet the needs of the legal, poor and. As soon as I got there, call from a man who was scheduled to be executed in thirty days, and he begged me to take his case, and I said look I'm sorry. I can't take cases yet. We don't have books. We don't have staff. We don't have computers and I. Never will forget him just. Stay on the line, and not saying a word, and then he hung up. And I was so unnerved by that that I didn't sleep much the next day he called me back. He said Mr Stevenson Annoy. You don't have your books in your computers, I. You don't have tell you can stop the execution. You don't have to tell me you can keep them from executing me. He's a please. Tell me you'll represent me so i. don't think I can make it these next twenty nine days. There's no hope at all. And when you put it like that, it became impossible to say no so I, said yes. We worked really hard. But couldn't stop that execution, and it became a defining moment for me because being with him on the night of the execution when he told me about how all day long people were saying. What can we do to help? You can get stamps to mail. Your letters can get you the phone. Do you want water? Do you want coffee and him? Finally? Saying Brian it's been so strange. More people have asked me what they can do to help me in the last fourteen hours of my life than they ever did in the first nineteen years of my life. It became really clear to me that we were not. We were failing people in some pretty profound ways, and I didn't want US continue failing, and that was kind of really important, because you can't do the kind of work that I do representing people were condemn without being prepared for some setbacks and some heartbreak. The central story in your book is about a case involving a man named Walter mcmillen. who was? Convicted and sentenced to death in. In a shocking way, yeah! overtly. Unjust. talk talk a little bit about that well, it was you know in some ways. I focused on that case because it's sort of a microcosm of all wrong. With our criminal justice system, including our collective indifference. Because water, McMillan was actually accused of a crime that took place in Monroeville Alabama. And MONROEVILLE. Alabama is of course where the famous Knob Hill Mockingbird Harper. Lee grew up, and that's where she said her novel to kill a Mockingbird and that community. has this just romantic relationship to that story? They've renamed streets after characters in the book. They closed the old courthouse. In Gregory Peck came to mobile to shoot one of the scenes for the movie. They've turned it into a museum. It is the thing about which the community is proudest of. And yet there was complete. Hostility to the idea of providing a fair trial to this black man accused of killing a young white woman. And, it was one of these outrageous cases where the crime takes place in downtown Monrovia. The police can't solve the crime months go by. and there's a lot of pressure on law enforcement which we frequently see. And, so they arrest Walter mcmillen, I think most of the new then that he wasn't guilty, and there were witnesses who had him in a completely different play. That's the really painful part on the day of the crime. He was actually with his family, raising money for his church. There were dozens of black people who were with him eleven miles from the crime scene and so. So when he was arrested, they all went to the sheriff. In the Popkin said look you've got the wrong person and they were ignored. They actually put Mr Macmillan on death row pretrial so for fifteen months before the trial, he was on death row until the the press would say deathrow defense. Walter mcmillen will be arraigned deathrow defendant Waldwick McMillan and you create this environment. and. Black folks would say to me. They'd say Mr. Stevenson it would have been so much better if he'd been out in the woods, hunting by himself in this crime took place. Because, at least then we could entertain the possibility that he might be guilty, but because we were there with him, because we know he's innocent. We feel like we've been convicted to yeah, and that sense that it's a that a community accusation that it's a community conviction community sentence was very palpable, and notwithstanding the romance of Tequila mockingbird. MOCKINGBIRD was just complete hostility to confronting the overwhelming evidence of his innocence. We found kind of evidence. The man who they got testify against him, admitted that his trial testimony was false. We tapes of him acknowledging that we had other witnesses, a police officer had been to his house on the day of the crime buying from the fish fry where he was selling money. Who could confirm is innocent, and still everybody just resisted in fought. I got more death rats working on that case, an.

Alabama Walter mcmillen Waldwick McMillan Mr Stevenson MONROEVILLE Gregory Peck Walter mcmillen. Monrovia Mr Macmillan officer Brian Mr. Stevenson Popkin Lee
"stevenson" Discussed on Because You Watched

Because You Watched

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Because You Watched

"Okay so. Those are our three ideas for an exciting spy movie. Let's just recap the more real quick before we decide what best it's the category I stopped. We have Jones idea which is keeping it in the family very much like spy kids but with adults. The central couple is mark and Sara Petersen. They think that they're the ones in the family. But little do they know that their children Tom and sally which attains and their parents Diana and Richard I actually awesome super spies. They find this going on a holiday to Florida where they uncover that. Ivana shrugs about some of the grandparents running a big hole for some talking only give those chips in Luby's purposes. We don't quite know it could be drugs. It could be money. It could be anything but all we know is that. There's GONNA be some spy escapades as mark and Sarah dragged into the family business and all hell breaks loose next. We HAVE TIPS IDEA. Sassy squash which is a normal about a normal suburban Sasquatch who works undercover at the FBI and must go undercover as a teen girl to investigate an admission scandal. I'd say prestigious school. No Sony. Is She the only woman on the team? She's also a sasquatch and she must appease her boss Renegade Raina played by Rob Schneider who's always raining renegades and he bloody loves it eventually? Everything gets out lease mansion. He's judy very importantly Jordi ask. We're getting a bit of that diversity. In there everything gets out of hand eventually. Someone shot into space. It's unclear however what it does. Guest channing tatum that happens in the first one which sets up for the Sequel Space Scotch. That's the idea Sassy spot. And finally we have Mark Idea Ping which is about a character who is a paranoid conspiracy theorists and also a game receives a game in the Post and decides that it's his job to review it. The game is set in a realistic London near where he lives this ping pong balls everywhere which starts to show up in life. But what do they mean literally? Nobody knows government conspiracy or not. We don't know but most importantly tip is in the movie. Maybe the government agent maybe is a double agent. Maybe it's a triple agent. But she's playing a post herself. Who's observing the experiment in some way? This and all the ideas featured in today's episode are part of the SEC. You the soccer but thankfully because paying is a psychological thriller we're free to detach reattach it however you want. It's really all up to interpretation so those are our three ideas. But which do we think? Best fits the category of an exciting spy. Movie Best Fits. The category is John's idea. But I feel that I'm depriving the world of Sasquatch if one counts can I can I go with my heart and ignore an ignore what was supposed to be doing and sausage my support. That's built on love mark. You can whatever your heart tells. Then yes Sir Jonah really like your idea and I think I wanNA Shag. Salat is already in a multiple character. But I've only about you need to make sure character grabs catchphrase. That's a catchphrase. Yeah which idea do you think? Best fits the category of exciting spy. Movie I mean like again. The family one fits the category by you know. I just feel like if I vote for Sassy. Scorch we can then put that within the universe. Hey tiff just quick spoiled. Yeah I'm definitely possesses. Well the great thing is is that as Sussex scorched sets up the U. There's potential that all the rest of the ideas can shoot me honestly. We're just opening the door for all these great ideas coaches which is the case is not as about it. Well then it sounds like it's a runaway success. Sassy scorch is our winner. The second so welcome protesting this episode of because he watched featured John Gracie tiff Stevenson mark. Davidson and me rory banks. It was produced by Joe Grace and mottes intricate..

Rob Schneider John Gracie Sara Petersen channing tatum soccer Jones mark FBI Joe Grace Tom Sony Ivana Renegade Raina Diana Florida Davidson London Sir Jonah Sussex SEC
"stevenson" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Stevenson in Fremont and we're getting first report of a motorcycle down north won a one year Third Avenue in San Matteo looks like they're clearing this quickly though to the right shoulder next update A. thirty eight on the traffic leader KCBS forecast for the bay area road there right right back to that warming weather maybe not as warm as yesterday but still comfortably in the seventies across the board traffic and weather together on the eight so it only was one of six nine A. M. seven forty KCBS it's a good time to be a doer and that's a good time to join the home depot now hiring no home improvement experience no problem they'll train you apply at home depot dot com slash careers or text jobs to five two two seven zero message and data rates apply the home depot is an equal opportunity employer hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvements of five thousand dollars or more will pay for those renovations with a high interest credit card that may not be a great idea a better idea may be to take cash out of your home with a quicken loans thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point two three percent call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com rates of exchange two percent B. as he the subscriber ID call for confirmation conditions equal housing lender lessons off the state's analyst over thirty thirty news that matters to you around the bay around the world around the clock all news one oh six nine and A. M. seven forty KCBS is Wednesday February twenty six twenty twenty coming up on KCBS president trump in CDC officials will hold a news conference this afternoon to discuss the latest on the corona virus good morning on stand by I'm Susan Lee Taylor eight thirty one CBS news update preparing for a corona virus outbreak we fully expect we will see more cases here in the United States with more this morning from health secretary Alex ETS are who told Congress he backs the White House is two point five billion dollar spending package Senate Democrats are calling for nearly four times that in Boston WBZ radio's Laurie Kirby says there's concern for American students in Italy where cases have increased Stonehill college is asking students studying and interning in Florence and Rome to return.

Laurie Kirby Boston secretary CBS CDC president KCBS quicken Jay Farner A. M. Rome Florence Italy Stevenson White House Congress Alex ETS United States
"stevenson" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Probably Science

"Of one of those actors that was part of not like a rat pack but almost like a British tisch version of around the time of Sinatra. and Peter O'Toole and Oliver Reed on. Oh heavy drink hard-drinking kind of actors if the time is Montgomery clift in that group Not In the rat packer. Don't think it was who was the TV host he used to host it. Peter rat pack was rat. Pack was Sinatra Dean Martin Lawford. Joe Bishop this June so in the UK one. I think it was read. O'Toole Richard Burton But they were connected because obviously Elizabeth Taylor is sort of the glue between all of that. And then you know Elizabeth Taylor. They're married Eddie. Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Donald. So there's all that kind of weird incestuous kind of was Hollywood religions Elizabeth Taylor married w sheet she elizabeth Taylor and Debbie Reynolds finals. were sort of like enemies because Eddie Fisher cheat on Debbie Reynolds with Elizabeth Taylor. Okay I think she might. I think Elizabeth Taylor married. which about in twice? That sounds right. Yeah I think I assumed that clift was part of that because he had a car accident that I thought was drinking related but I guess he fell asleep just enor- fall just a classic fooling the knoll sober falling asleep. The victim believed to be a man in his mid twinsies which is tragically young story ruined right now crystallized into those Bear he was found lying on a wooden bed. Barry by volcanic ash at Huck huck uranium. He was probably killed instantly by the eruptions. Dr Paternity analysis of charred wood. Found near the body showed a maximum temperature of five. Five hundred and twenty degrees. C was reached. Is this the same recent study where they found that someone was masturbating POMPEII. Because there was. It's definitely a story recently K.. No but I feel like that would have found this way to this show. Yeah oh no I I remember but possibly not masturbating. He's like protecting his package from oncoming. He couldn't he. Couldn't it just being like yelling. Noah his penis Lovera. Why why did you get ten times? I didn't I ice days decided. These Alex awed an Italian enough name to give.

Elizabeth Taylor Montgomery clift Debbie Reynolds Eddie Fisher Debbie Reynolds Donald Pack Peter O'Toole Sinatra Dean Martin Lawford Joe Bishop Richard Burton Oliver Reed UK Dr Paternity POMPEII Noah Alex Barry Sinatra.
"stevenson" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

13:24 min | 9 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Probably Science

"Could you show. That's a that site but once again just so she's getting pregnant bowling just to be clear. This is well reporting on devastating bushfires if nothing else sums up the Australia's that you've got the international press reporting these fires that have devastated communities houses and fatalities and people just like we still as bad as serious as this is and as much as we need to get the message out for international aid. We want to make this Kush do still need to prank. The foreign it is still a moral imperative on Ola straightens that any foreigners visiting the country will schema school. She's she's got paint bullet that's crazy but also those little cooper's like run up to people bikes for water because they're so desperate thirsty she'll see any of that. What does she think he's GonNa do? I mean she looks dead when told this is a drop their Roche's what does this assigned this story. Does it say she in the video she calling it a drop bear in the video. The Guy who's saying this is a deadly drop air. We need you to wear all these things. Yeah it's just this countrywide prank. They do have ruining anybody who goes over that. You're not though because everyone because we three. repoed costs in a row. We opened by talking about how you will not stop insisting on this bullshit thing and they would still then go after the dangerous interesting. Is this strategy of trying to get everyone back for saying that the country is a hoax. Maybe this is that you know that that's a well known like conspiracy. He's eerie conspiracy as you get on a plane and you get off somewhere in somewhere in North America. Okay whether I've got trained actors talking with strangers accent. Is it genuine conspiracy theory more than flutter. Actually that's that's a pretty great If you're going to come up with just make a hole exists but is trump may one is also remarkable because it is as you just pointed out an entire classic country conspiring practical elegance American thing at all. We don't have anything unifies US like that. No I can't think of anything like it went ever. Anyone visits America for just vote. Connie pancakes it makes. It's It's really really sad. I want to be the down a person but I saw a video of a quality the other day and it was being given like a bowl of water and I've never seen an animal look dejected. And this Koala bears head is like like it's like my life is I've been destroyed like everything new new. Obviously it lost like benefits pack. It's a pack of the collective term is a cuddle it should be a couple of fallers an S. T. D. of coral. is they like but this is also not bears. They also get. Yeah all misconception but yes or otherwise the head down kind of like and it took a moment to realize that someone was just sort of drunk from the bulb. Look it lost the will to live that. was you know animals normally have high survival liberal instincts right so you know this dejected and say and that little bird that a little bit but they say Koala Bear Right. Why do they say call? I think people people do but I think it is wrong. Okay Yeah Yeah Yeah So. It's not any it's not in the US group of equivalent level of Tomato Meja. Right I saw. I saw a twitter video of like six or seven qualities in someone's car I didn't hear it with sound on presumably. He was driving the way from a fire or something. Yeah just on a road trip to get them drunk. You don't want them on the halt Seltzer. What well we all talking about disasters this a cool story from a much much older disaster? Yeah this is crazy this is I just in broad and pull where the both sent us in. Maybe some other people The SUV IUS. They have just what what mount and Mount Vesuvius they discovered extreme heat tons at least one man's brain took loss the heat Kristie Mount Vesuvius eruption in Italy which was volcano the weight off in seventeen ninety the ad in pompeii killing thousands destroying room settlements nimble day Naples and the heat was so immense it tone one victims break it into gloss suggests to study the town of Hook uranium was buried by volcanic matter entombing. Some of its residents was pumping wasn't it I just said POMPEII I believe Schaal. POMPEII was involved. I'm not making that up. No herculaneum was a nearby. POMPEII think they're okay. So these are pretty sure I visited POMPEII. They want since over the ruins I believe if you can crystallize a spine which you with alcohol. That's what happened to Richard Burton. Three yes is that gout identifies. I'm actually it's probably uric acid but it was from heavy boozing the operation because he'd crystallized yeah is it coming up Richard Burton Crystal Spine operated on for SCIATICA and Oth- right only anyway let me see. This is an article in the Telegraph entitled to Theoretic Vagrancy Everett trip birth. Wow imagine agent magic coming out of the headline that today I wanna be an erotic vagrant fun. His spinal column was co two with crystallized alcohol crystal alcohol. His kidneys were shot. His lips are they'll else's and he couldn't remember his lines when he was operated on growth. rightous he died aged fifty eight. I didn't know I thought he went longer than that. Yeah this is the one who married Elizabeth Taylor yet did Elizabeth Taylor drink as hard as him. I had A. I just found out the other day from a friend he met. Ah She was drinking. A what was it called a bullet bourbon bullet. But it was a a bloody Mary with a short of beef billion in it. Is it quarterback shop. Savory Bloody Mary Yeah but with beef a WH- woah a bull shop. So I imagine that she I think. Elizabeth Taylor drunk quite low short it was maybe enough to crystallize spine spine. But that's pretty wild. This is this is this is that that is the spine being coated with a crystalline form of the thing heathen by whereas this is actually the the cells themselves loss effectively Optimistic about brain a glass so a team research. Has it been studying. The remains of one victim in Hook. Uranium at the town in the sixties this study published in the Doing Magenta medicine said the fragments of glossy black material were extracted from the victim's skull. Research is behind. The study. Believes that black material is the vitrified remains of the. The man's brains vitrification is the process by which material is burned high heat and cool rapidly into loss or glaze vitrified. Yep You fit me the The President Preservation of an ancient brain remains is extremely ratifying says to Pierre Powell Petrolia trone forensic anthropologists. The University of Naples Federico the second is that the university named the whole thing. The University of Naples Federico the second. It's like I didn't know that anything. I thought it was just like saddened by going to display my ignorance. Any kind kind of matter could be he it enough to tend to glow. I didn't know that either will sanders. Silicon and carbon and silicon are in the same group in the periodic table so they probably have have relatively similar behaviors so maybe good chemistry know-how there thank you. You had me here. We oughta table is where it tends how that I'm wrong when when listener's previous Roy Moore right in a greg. I would love to know though because it's yeah I assumed he needed sand for some reason it was. This can't phrase good question from like crystals -ation aren't related really. But how could it be solids. We have what is what. What is it a crystal of because it wouldn't just be ethanol crystals I mean that's called Cam freeze by the way but freezes uses at a much lower temperature the mortar but like what would it actually mean to have Chris. I'm trying to think of other things that are liquid at room temperature. But can it's. It's not just that alcohol is a solution where something is dissolved numbers thinking of like You Know Elementary School Science when you make rock candy by just having sugar water. Yeah Yeah I don't know Chris could form. Are you looking at up. I'm trying to look back. Yeah because also I didn't now I don't know if this is real or just a plot of Rome come but saga of my science knowledge because it was in sweet Home Alabama that if lightning hits a beach you get these kinds of glass formations in the sand. Yeah I've heard of that. Yeah so that's a real thing so you can have a piece of beach glass that is formed from lightning. Okay okay so I'm looking up. Well there's there's an article in powdered alcohol the whole which you can now buy them people sailing but uses some kind of encapsulation technique where the alcohol is trapped inside little gelatin in all some other protein. It's also super deadly right. I believe that like all snow all sprinkle into drinks. Yeah have I'll colonise just because it's too tricky sometimes Oklahoma and your drink DOPP a bit. I'm just GonNa talk to very much the word crystallized being thing that I read and going ooh because that's quite vivid image but maybe that was a a more descriptive word rather than a with. Didn't you read this thing and Richard Burton article met are you. Are you currently research. Yeah yeah or should we move to the crystallize alcohol alcohol crystal trying to work out with Someone will be a vision of Gal has actually what they had so it's a uranus that they actually had up and down his spine rather than alcohol. I think NCUA right. She can be induced by alcoholic consumption. Yeah think isn't that one of the causes of Gout Dot Kau. We used to call him uric grown. He really appreciate Jason. I think I drew a picture of my dad. And then were uric run underneath it and stuck in the kitchen for about three years Yes yes oh here we go someone else. Yeah this. This is completely unsubstantiated but someone who's saying physically impossible to ask the claim that crystallized alcohol was found button spinal column during operation. That's absurd alcohol does not crystallize either bones or anything else. Doubtless Burton himself told the town and the author did not by the CHEKA. catalysed is well. Someone saying they're going to just completely just just get a load of a crystallized spy in withdrew. Nobody sounded like I don't know Richard Burton the Welsh. Okay what's he most known for besides being married to Liz Taylor. He was an actor in his biggest roles. Like what. What are the things? Can You name Richard Burton movie right now. Cleopatra he's okay. That was a WHO's afraid. Virginia Woolf haven't seen it another name my my like Hollywood this place while knowledge is not is it Edward Albee Eh. Yeah Yeah Zoo story. Also Edward Hourly I mean this is just my IMDB Deby brain out all got the same IMDB Ara- he got Golden Globe for my cousin. Rachel he was nominated for an Oscar. Ska full the robe and look back in anger on. He was just he was nominated for a Golden Globe for that He wanted Tony Fa- camelot and He was in. The spy. Came from the colts who's afraid of Virginia Woolf the timing of the shrew and of the thousand days equis Nice Ooh.

Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor POMPEII US Richard Burton Crystal Spine Chris University of Naples Australia Virginia Woolf Ola Edward Albee Roche cooper gout Mount Vesuvius twitter You Know Elementary School Sci Cleopatra North America America
"stevenson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Here & Now

"Think they're GONNA set my execution soon. Last lawyer said nothing left to do. There's there's always something that we can do whatever you did. Your life is still meaningful and I'm GONNA do everything possible to keep them from taking Brian. You represented countless less people who are guilty of their crimes but you ask for mercy fresh to respect the value of their lives. Can you share more on this idea. Yeah I've just learned. I've come to believe that each of us is more than the worst thing we've ever done. I don't think that if someone tells a lie there just the liar. I don't think if you take something you're just a thief. I think even if you kill someone you're not just a killer and justice requires that we understand the other things you you are believe in holding people accountable. It's not that I'm opposed to punishment but I don't think we can reduce people To one act because I think you you know ultimately issues like the death penalty can't be resolved by asking to people deserve to die for the crimes they've committed. I think the threshold question is do. We deserve to kill kill. Is that what you want folks to take away from just mercy. Well I want them to take away a new understanding about these issues. I've just always believed that if people saw what I see on a regular basis. They'd want the same things I want. I don't think I have some bizarre perspective. Many people most people in this country don't want there to be inequality and injustice. They don't want people to treated unfairly or cruelly. When I just think if you get closer to it you'll be motivated to say more to do more than I do? Hope people that see this film will walk away with a greater consciousness about why we need to do better in this country when it comes to creating a justice system that is fair reliable. That's Bryan Stevenson lawyer. Social Justice activist founder and executive producer of the equal justice justice initiative his life and works portrayed in the film just mercy.

Bryan Stevenson Brian executive producer founder
"stevenson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:53 min | 10 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Here & Now

"Listen and subscribe to life gave the film. Just mercy is out today in theaters across the country and it tells the true story of lawyer Bryan Stevenson and his efforts to exonerate a man on death. Yeah throw why are you doing this. Why am I know you lower down in Alabama taking these cases that ain't nobody GonNa pay for when I was a teenager? My grandfather was murdered over a black and white TV. We kept waiting for someone to show up to help. And that's when I realized last that outside my community. Nobody care to sit him. He's just another black man killed in a projects. I know what it's like to be an shadows house while I'm doing this in the film. Jamie Fox portrays the role of Walter. mcmillen a black man from Alabama. Who was wrongly accused and convicted of murder and sat on death row for six years? Michael Jordan plays the role of Stevenson. This film comes at a pivotal time. As states throughout the country are reexamining the use of the death penalty joining us now for more on. Just mercy is the inspiration behind the movie and Executive Producer Bryan Stevenson. Welcome to here now. Now and congrats on the film. Thank you it's great to be with you. Yes we'll Brian. Just mercy is based on your memoir of the same name and I hear you were a big part of producing this film contributing to the writing of the script. How does it feel to have your story on the big screen like this? Was it something you always wanted to do. Well not really. It's kind of surreal to be in this place. I mean I think you know after thirty five years of going into jails and prisons and standing next to condemned people facing execution. It never crossed my mind that You know that would turn into an experience like this. When I wrote the book I I was just trying to get people? Closer to the reality of over incarceration in America To the problems that we have in this system that I continue to creep treats you better if you're rich and guilty than if you're pouring innocent and even after the book was finished I'd I'd really didn't have any clue or idea that someone would want to make a film so it's been really surreal but it's been pretty exciting You know the the people involved have been so committed and so Dedicated to getting this right That I feel really good about the film and I'm excited that the people will have a chance to see. This movie offers a small L.. Slice of your life and work. You're the founder of the Equal Justice Initiative which represents people on death row and you've also been instrumental in pretty significant reform Twenty twelve US Supreme Court decision to ban mandatory life parole for minors convicted of murder. This story in this film focuses on one of your earliest cases. Says Walter mcmillen. How are you able to narrow your work to this story? Why was this one specifically an important one to tell? Yeah when I was writing the book it was just going going to be one of maybe twenty or so cases that I talked about at length but there was so much richness in the Walter mcmillen case I mean first first of all the crime took place in Monroeville Alabama Which is where Harper Lee grew up? Is the setting of the fictional novel Tequila mockingbird in that community so embrace this romanticized that story it was surreal when I began working on this case to have a whole community. Indeed directing me to the Tequila Mockingbird bird museum talking proudly about their relationship to that story While I was trying to get them to pay attention to the plight up an innocent black man who had been wrongly accused of killing a young white woman and I just thought there was a lot to exploring the case Mr Macmillan was poor he was a person. It's not color The people who convicted him I think had every reason to know that he was not guilty and yet he was convicted and sentenced wants to death. Anyway they put him on death row before he would actually been tried or convicted of any crime and too many elements that exposed the way fear. Your anger has shaped our criminal justice policy making in this country and it just was a really powerful medium through which to talk about these issues. MHM I watched this film with my twelve year old daughter and I thought to myself as we watched it was a difficult but really important introduction for her to some of the major major flaws in the criminal justice system and twenty fourteen forty two percent of those on death row were black. It's a big question I'm about to ask you. But how do we begin to grapple grapple with the racist legacy that is really led to these disparities. I think we do have to begin talking more honestly about our history of racial injustice. I don't think in our country has ever engaged in any meaningful process of knowledge The injustice inequality. I think we're a post genocide society what we did to native people was a genocide and we haven't acknowledged that and we've allowed You know systems to continue that have been compromised by these narratives racial difference I think the great evil of slavery was an involuntary servitude. It was this idea that black people aren't as good as white people and that continues after the thirteenth amendment. And it's why argued slightly doesn't end it just evolves and we had one hundred years of terrorism and lynching and violence were black. People were pulled out of their homes and beaten and murdered and drowned tortured and lynched. And we've never really talked about that and even though we pay more attention to did the civil rights era. We haven't confronted the fact that this presumption of dangerousness guilt that gets assigned to black and Brown people is still with us. It's why I. These police encounters with young black people that end up with lethal violence or so disruptive and so painful. So I think we're going to have have to commit to a process of truth injustice in America you go to places like South Africa and Germany and you see evidence of nations that have grappled with their history of apartheid And the Holocaust. But we haven't really done that in Germany. You can't go two hundred meters without seeing markers or stones or symbols that have been placed next to the homes homes of Jewish families that reducted during the Holocaust but in this country we haven't created that kind of architecture created that kind of landscape to cause people to remember and reflect on the challenges created by slavery and lynching and segregation. And I think that leaves us vulnerable to content to new manifestations of that AH legacy which is what causes people like Walter mcmillen to be wrongly convicted sentenced to death and almost executed in our contemporary system. I WanNa talk with you about your depiction in the movie. After you graduated from Harvard University he decided to move to Alabama. And there's a scene Where are your mother clearly worried about your well being says goodbye to you and essentially tells you you're exceptionalism won't save you and it's something the thing in the film that McMillan says well let's take a listen Rizwan from harvey you'll know what it is? Here you get from the moment you bowl you can buddy over these white folks and make them laugh and try to make him like it. Whatever that is and you say yes or no man but when it showed earning got ahead no fingerprints Brian? Did that really happen. And how do you negotiate your identity and safety with your work. Yeah I I always tell people that you can't do this kind of work but just ideas in your mind to make a difference in this space. You've got to have the ideas in your mind. Fueled by conviction in your heart and the great gift I have have is that I am the grandson of people who were enslaved. And they believe in freedom when it wasn't rational too and I'm the grandchild of people who were terrorized by lynching and they believed in a better future even though that didn't seem a logical the child of people humiliated by segregation and Jim Crow and yet they believed. I could be anything I want. And it's that orientation of hopefulness Sustained me You know we say in the film and I say when I give talks I believe that hopelessness is the enemy of justice. If you WANNA do justice work you have to be prepared to believe things you have in seen in. And it's what continues continues to to define work tried to do today. This film is called just mercy and it it really. Is this idea. That mercy appeals your work the the film primarily follows a story of Macmillan who is innocent but we also see the story of Herbert Richardson. WHO's homemade bomb killed a young girl? Let's take a listen. I.

Walter. mcmillen Bryan Stevenson Alabama murder Mr Macmillan America Walter mcmillen Germany Tequila Mockingbird bird museu Jamie Fox Michael Jordan Executive Producer Equal Justice Initiative Harper Lee Harvard University Supreme Court US Rizwan
"stevenson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

08:14 min | 10 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I'm podcast and you wrote this book. That's great influence. So I guess my question to you is. Do you use a different method of persuasion persuasion or think about persuasion differently. When you're in a courtroom and arguing emotion or arguing that appeal then you do when you're talking to people outside the courtroom room is something different where there's is there something the same about those things? Yeah well I think you have to talk to the audience that you're in front of right and I mean as a lawyer I I I WANNA know. WHO's on the jury I wanNA know who's on the bench and I wanna find out as much about them as I can because I need to go where they are and get get them to follow me someplace where they can in my judgment? Make the right decision. Make the decision if I pretend like it doesn't matter who they are and where they they are with their presumptions are and just insist that they come where I am not going to be very effective and I think that's true whether you're in the court or out of the court so I speak in faith spaces and I. I WanNa talk about my faith in those spaces. I speak in other places where people don't respond as well to the faith tradition and that's not going to be a priority for me. I think the goal is to reach people where they are. I don't think we should imagine if we change laws that things will change. Its that hearts and minds. The thing I think narrative is really powerful in both places and both inside and outside absolutely to shoe lawyers appreciate the power of narrative they rely rely on facts and law and they are disappointed by the outcome. Because you haven't given people of having given people a a path to travel to follow you to that right place and it's really powerful and I think outside of courts We have to use narrative more effectively. And that's why we want to tell the stories of people who were enslaved in who were lynched and who had to overcome segregation so that we can appreciate the power of that struggle. But Yeah I think you have to for me at least I I wanna go where people are if I'm talking abroad and their set of issues that are distracting people in a particular country that I want to know what those issues are So I can be responsive to that even as advocating for something broader. You said once in your household gifts were microscopes not football absolutely. That's exactly right now. My mother my family. We didn't have a lot. There were times when you know The water wasn't working the way it's supposed to be couldn't do this. You couldn't take shower. You couldn't think about but my mother went into debt by us. The World Book Encyclopedia. We didn't have a lot of things we didn't have. We didn't have a TV but we had that World Book Encyclopedia and if my family was upset if my parents were upset I knew that if I went over and got one of those books and started reading it would change the dynamic in the space because in our family there was something hopeful about this ability to explore new worlds through books two words and that's a gift that and my grandmother gave my mother. My mother gave to me. And you know if I've had any success in these professions that require study and application of reason and all of that is because I you know I was loved by these people who thought it not wasteful to push themselves to create opportunities for their children to read. You said something else about reading which I totally agree with the number quite thought of it this way that by giving people who might not otherwise have opportunities to read you were giving them a gateway to something that they wouldn't otherwise have and that's imagination absolutely which is not just about creative imaginations not just about you know understanding you know the Harry Potter world but in the real world and they get older they can look at something and see it for what it is and how it could be different because they have learned the power of imagination from books. Absolutely no you you become someone who believes things you haven't seen which you have to if you're going to change the world if you're going to create more justice. I never met a lawyer here until I got to law school i. I'd never met a lawyer. I had to believe I could be something I'd never seen. You beat the first one but it's just that kind of relationship you develop with the world around you and right weeding will allow you to imagine things to think. Think about things to believe things that can be created. Even if they haven't yet been realized in science science it's amazing to me how scientists absolutely except except that they innovate they discover things. They believe that. Just because we haven't seen that planet yet that it that it could still exist and we think of science being the opposite of that but it's actually a fulfillment of that hope and that's you know if anything been what's defined by my career. I just believe you have to stay hopeful. I actually actually think that hopelessness is the enemy of justice. Injustice prevails were hopelessness persists. I think hope is our superpower if I've had any ability to do anything thing is because I've been willing to hope for things that haven't been seen yet. I'm GonNa continue with that because I almost persuade myself. The hat persuaded myself that. You're either hopeful where you're the problem. There's no real middle ground and we have to keep pushing keep wanting more more Dr mercy more compassion justice more opportunity. That's what animates by work. Why don't you think that a lot of politicians don't practice the politics of hope When all the evidence shows it's very powerful is it because they don't know how to do it? And the second best way to motivate people through fear so you have the runner up to I. Hope is fear and so a lot of people don't know how to practice hope so they do fear. Well I do think that I think that what we've seen succeed in too. Many situations are the politics of fear and anger. And I think it's easier frankly to try to govern through fear and anger then to inspire people through hope open aspiration and commitment to caring about one another. It's harder to be hopeful when we're dealing with very real problems you also have thank you feel an absolute. Everyone feels presumably some amount of anger and frustration. And it's about conquering that and appealing to your better l.. Absolute some people can't do that absolutely. And what's bizarre is that we know in our personal relationships. You know that that we shouldn't make judgments about our children when we're angry with them or we shouldn't make judgments about other people when we're fearful about them that really get a to a good judgment. We have to kind of push those things aside which can distract us from really seeing people. Clearly we see this obviously in courtrooms and and yet you see so many elected officials so many politicians reaching for those very powerful I think fear anger the essential ingredients of oppression of treating people. Because you accept things you wouldn't otherwise except you tolerate things you wouldn't otherwise tolerate and that's why I think rejecting the politics of fear and anger is so important and you don't have to do it. In the abstract it can be replaced with something hopeful. We have the highest rate of incarceration in the world. I I hope that that changes. I don't think our country can be a great country if we have one in three black male babies born in this country expected good to go to jail or prison if we put six million people on probation and parole. I think we should hope for something better than to be the world leader in incarceration and their whole host of things. I think we should hope for something better for our planet in terms of climate change in the kind of spaces that we create for our children. I think we should hope for something better than the kind of income inequality the quality that we see all around us. We hope for something better than seeing struggling families trying to cross borders because they're so desperate and traumatize in their home spaces that they would do anything going to get into this country. We should hope for something better than what we're seeing and I think that's the only way we progress. That's the only way we evolved. That's only way become a truly the great society and that hopeful note right Stevenson. Thank thank you.

World Book Encyclopedia Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"I am so excited to get this particular episode out to you unexcited because the person's will not about to make you listen to is someone who is so so charismatic on sage in fact. She is the guy who got me excited about. Solving the mind valley podcast in the first place backstory in shawn stevenson is an incredible author and broadcaster islam casts immortal held show which you should be subscribed to is one of my favorite podcast out there by far in this one of the trump podcast in the world right now is focused on how but it's also also focused on a remarkable story my favorite episode of the model podcasts episode where he goes through the history of this cola he goes through the history of coca cola sprite and all of these other drinks that billions of people put into their bodies and when you understand that his is a fascinating but you understand the manipulation that goes on behind the scenes to make you put so much hyper sponsor deal and that is what i love about sean style style. He is just so brilliant at getting these messages out now in this episode of the mind body or cast brought on sean to discuss something something that he knows best which is how to stop your own podcast and the same ideas here apply. If you want to stop a youtube chat so listen to this talk. This talk was delivered at nine bally's eighth incorrigible the particular theme of this as as was growing your influence. It was for anyone out there who wanted to grow the audience size our reach for themselves for the of this and sean across was the number one name on myanmar hi my when i asked myself who can i put on stage that did teach us all how to build a world-class forecasts so again if you are thinking about growing growing you instagram following or building podcasts or starting a youtube channel the idea you're going to hear here will apply to you. This is not just for podcasting stick shawn's method of thinking this philosophy here applies to matter what type of audience you're trying to build and in today's world but they said body insists assist matter in a way all of us get to be a media company what and whether you're trying to get out or service or even just grand yourself the next job interview being able to have an audience truly matters so listen to this podcast. Take a lot of notes and i wanna give you one tip. If you're driving i mean obviously listened to the podcast and trump remember as much as you can put it in action..

shawn stevenson sean youtube bally
"stevenson" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

They Walk Among Us

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

"Stevenson and the daily brothers run sacked the house looking for what they came for money but they culprits.

Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Backlisted

"Available Ayaan on the web so that is village green by the kinks and we're excited about talking about Miss Broncos Book. Ah some for several reasons one of which is that it is a classic of English village life and we all thought it would be fun to have a little village theme today's episode so the wake is indeed a village of hands where it would is a village go onto the bad potent. What was the link with Sam Riviera's pawn. I think there's a couple of links there and I think one is that that Miss broncos book is very very much self-consciously book. You are sitting there reading roads and the other thing is just this little thing. He was talking about money and for me. One of them is moving. Parts of the book is actually actually when the market gets paid. No actually it is genuine lead tearjerking because who ever thinks about that who ever writes about whoever writes about it and actually she is just two hundred pounds. It's life changing it changes. It does because she bloody. He needs money 'cause she's. She works. It's not fair easing fairies giving you stories. I'm going to give some topics. I think this book is about village life. It's a book about books as a book about the mechanics of writing and publishing which is of course very atlas station and it's also a brilliant example example of the sort of novel republished but in the last twenty years which is we would call Middle Brow Middle middle-brow as we talked about this on the cross before is a legitimate term adopted by academia rather than I'm not being snitty by using the word Middle Brow Shelley. When did you first read this book or come across this book so I have to soften one is a direct onsite question which she's actually that I was in hotshots bookshop and I really really really wants to come to read and honestly. I wish I could remember what had happened in my life that we we all have everything happening. Our lives now that means we need to comfort read and of course you know. Booksellers are gods and this particular books that are just look. This is the key you need never ever have picked up ever and I actually loved it. Can I tell you another story can I can. I tell you how Sarah waters waters heard about Miss Bengals book she had about me sparkles book because I'm a real dickhead so basically I am really really bad around people whose work I hugely hugely admire and I'm just awful and I have just learned the I literally physically need to staying away from people because of a really bad thing I did to offer. Miller wants and I'm not kidding. I'm not kidding so I'm all I was the thing that she was at and I can't tell you how much I love her work. I mean words don't express and she was in the room and I said to the person that was wave shit. Okay don't worry I'm going to press my back against this wall and not go near her. Things will happen and after a while the person always I said I think it needs to be a bit braver and pulled me towards her and I- involuntarily curtsied bobbed much as perhaps a maid in one of her lovely books might Bob and she was absolutely charming and love issues she was writing the paying guests at the time and we were talking about all the things she'd read lally willows and stuff like that and I said Oh you must read sparkles book and she said that's fabulous. WHO's it by and I was so struck I said R L Stevenson and she kind of went from nineteen thirty four. Ah Yes thinking Kaneko yes R L Stevenson and dwayne. I think cried into some crisps Bart's. It's you were almost right because Stevenson is a second cousin of our L. Stevens here we go. I'm going to do the bio right now. Dorothy Emily Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in eighteen ninety three. She was the daughter of one of the Lighthouse Stevensons. Robert Louis was her father's father's first cousin and she lived in Scotland all her life is everything I got stage. I just had a sudden thought back keys but it's okay and she lived in Scotland all her life which is interesting when you consider that she wrote about English villages many of her books she didn't go to school but was educated by a governess started to write stories when she was eight. She applied against her parents. France wishes sat and passed the entrance exams for Oxford University and was offered a place but her parents for better to go fearing university degree was an unforgivable unforgivable deterrent potential suitors so you certain when you read Miss Broncos book the wishful Film Element is coming through loud and clear rights so here's the thing about d e Stevenson she wrote her first book in Nineteen Twenty three when she was US thirty one a second did not pay for nine years in nineteen thirty four she published Miss Bungles Book and thereafter she wrote a normal year selling over four million copies of her books in Britain and three million in the USA. She is amazing. If you go on the Internet she's and and there are numerous American fan sites devoted to her work. There is a fantastic website with a page on it where you can download what's called. Susan's never ending the Stevenson's spreadsheet which cross references every character and location in all those fourteen novels because Stevenson light to use the same names locations locations and characters and have them pop-up like proper world building her you know and so noble or sequences of novels that appear to have nothing in common with one another. She would thread together for her for her own amusement. I think those are cushy. New Readers like to play the game along with her. I have I just I have absolutely love this. This is like a large steaming Mug of all ix on a cold winter's night. It's just the most fun to remember when Doc Syrian very impasse in with here talking about g cooper we said what's good about Judy Kufa's books and he went pleasure. This book is I found this Solo. How incredibly enjoyable shedding because it's because persona so closely your there's no Jew. Do we think we could offer the listeners are like in a nutshell is set up of the book is all right. I'll give it a go okay so miss. bonkers book is the book within the book. Say Misbehaves uncle lives in what at the opening of the novel seems to be an absolutely picture postcards chocolate box English village and she has written. This incendiary book called disturb. Oh is it colder server pace. No go on it's cool. They chronicles rules of English village and her publisher changes the title so this incendiary book is about what she's really going on in an incredibly thinly disguised silverscreen. Her villages called Silver Stream. She calls it. Copperfield in the book and the People are she just as a little name substititions like themed substitutions fool them and what's interesting is that the book within the book the Gins with setting the scene with a peaceful little village and then a goat skin clad golden piping being boy comes through the village. Piping Music and the music sends people crazy and sub huge anarchy and subversion Russian occurs. People's lives disrupted and actually pretty much. That's what happened in the book. We are reading people with one another. Can you read this. A A little bit about one of the character's lives in the village is reading disturbed the pace for the first time yet. I will so the character who's reading Sarah Walker. She's the doctor's wife. Mr Abbott who was mentioned in this extract is the editor of of disturbance of the peace or chronicles English village and the known not too plume is John Smith so Misbach wrote the book but the Non Diplomats John Smith the one that's she's at the point with golden boy has has arrived the golden boy piped on through the High Street and up the hill and then down again past the vicarage and the old church which slumbered quietly likely by the river wherever he went he left behind him on rest and strange disturbance people woke up cast aside the fetters of conventional behavior and followed the primitive impulses of the hidden natures in some hearts the clear sweet music woke ambition in some it won't memories of other days and prompted kind actions. Some of his hearers would driven to acts of violence in others. It kindled love at least John Smith said that the music kindled love but Sarah Walker who knew something about that commodity something more she suspected than John Smith would have said the emotion which the boys pipe kindled in the heart of its here is was not love at all but passion after this things began to happen in Copperfield incredible things major waterford discovered that he'd loved Mrs Mildmay for four years without without ever having suspected it so he rushed across the road and found Mrs Mildmay in her garden and propose to her with fervor which almost made Sarah's eyebrows disappear appear into her hair. It may be remarked in parenthesis that Sarah's eyebrows wear a distinctive feature darker than her hair and beautifully arched this was the love scene which made such an impression upon Mr Abbott it was a passionate scene and had either been written by somebody who knew very little little about such matters somebody who knew a great deal it was either very innocent or else it wasn't and I love the lightness of the pros. The pros is really really really good. It appears to have been simply chatted down and in order to do that. You have to be really good writer so that's the first thing the second thing is. This book was published in the Nineteen Thirties. That scene is like a brilliant Mickey. Take Ove- kind of strand in English fiction the time in which we might include Sylvia Townsend Warner we oughta make him the great go pan I after making this so idea of of Magical Pantheon stick things occurring in the English countryside is a is a is a trope in that era we had I take the Mickey Alba in this context seems really funding the company but it also goes through don't you think into sort of Elizabeth Jenkins's World Uh Tortoise and the Hare which we did this sort of the things bubbling under kind of supernatural things bubbling under English villages the book itself is brilliant because Uh nobody can tell whether it's satire or just innocent and Miss Broncos book is exactly the same you know I mean you know. You never quite sure how on top of how clever she is being. I think she's actually being very clever..

R L Stevenson Dorothy Emily Stevenson Broncos John Smith Sarah Mr Abbott Copperfield Sam Riviera Nineteen Thirties Sarah Walker Ayaan Mickey Alba Middle Brow Middle Scotland Sarah waters Middle Brow Shelley Mrs Mildmay hotshots bookshop Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"So I was watching. My father's his dad was dying. And I knew from the growing up that my grandfather was not kinda gentler type, especially my dad. But I watched the tenderness is he's eyeing. Yes. My dad he's a sit with him and hold his hand as he passed. So I asked him my father said over you last time he showed a infection. He's the last time. I remember I was too. I said, so you're sixty three. So I don't think I'll wait that long. We weren't to be big huggers. Goes, you know, he's a construction worker and hard head and hard hat, but we learned to sit and watch television. Just hold hands. Wow. To on that. I want. Everybody listening to take a second. And imagine yourself sitting on the couch holding hands with your father met my dad, and I have become close this year. And we've had a lot of breakthroughs, and we have a very new relationship things are incredibly good. However that makes me squirm it makes me feel intensely uncomfortable to imagine myself doing that which in the spirit of what we're working with here. I think I think I will probably I'm trying to get the courage up here to say, I will I'm quite do. I'm going to propose that to my father next time. I see him. He's actually going to be here. The week end. After this podcast airs man that sounds like digits on terrible. But I'm going to do it. And I will report back how it goes. So who you heard there his name is herb Stevenson, and I've been holding onto this recording for the right time. And this week was the right time, and I got to go back through and listen to the whole conversation in I feel like this is such a a rich conversation, and I'm pretty honored to be sharing it, and I'm going to start us, right? Smack in the middle of a conversation. Herb is from Ohio. He's been doing work with men for twenty to twenty five years. And I was connected to him last year. He comes from a native American background and has just an immense wealth of experience and knowledge around this entire project. We're taking on at every man. And so he's had a pretty wild career. He's designed and successfully led change in the turnaround of financial institutions nine of them to be exact he's worked as a corporate consultant for firms as large as Fannie Mae..

herb Stevenson Fannie Mae consultant Ohio twenty five years
"stevenson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Here is Bryan Stevenson, give us one time. You will not regret it. Bryan. Stevenson, welcome to the show. Thank you. It's good to be with you. I wanted to begin by asking you about something that you say often and every time I've heard it. I've thought that's interesting. But I'm not sure I quite understand it, which is the opposite of poverty is not wealth. The opposite of poverty is Justice. What do you mean by that? America's credibly wealthy country. But we've always had enormous stratification the wealth of the colonies was built on ah genocide of removing native Americans from lands that they occupied we kept their names, but we made them leave. There were millions of native people on this continent before white settlers came and we killed them through famine Warren disease, and we didn't really knowledge the injustice of that the unfairness of that. Because we were persuaded that our economic security and our political development required. The acquisition of these lands. And it began this way of thinking about wealth that is disconnected from the inequality injustice, the abuse the oppression that is sometimes used to create that wealth, and that that habit was reinforced through slavery and. And we created great wealth in new territories and the south and the colonies by relying on enslaved people and the labor and the benefits that that created without any real thinking about how that wealth was sustained by abuse and oppression and inequality and injustice, and even after slavery. I don't think we ever really dealt with the unfairness of exploiting people for decades centuries. And then doing nothing to help make them whole. And it wasn't just formerly enslaved people. It was poor white that came to this country as immigrants who were also often abused in working places in minds. And this idea has emerged in America. That wealth is created by people with great talent in great ability. And we value wealth, we respect wealth, we admire wealth and. We disdain the poor. We blame the poor. We fought the poor for not achieving more economic security, and we have a I think really unevolved attitude about about how to address poverty when I look at our history of using power and abuse to sustain and creates structural, poverty and institutionalize it without any Shane. It makes me question with we truly understand what poverty represents there are a lot of countries across the world that are poor. But in most of the developing more ninety percent of the people eighty percent of the people are poor..

Bryan Stevenson America Bryan Shane eighty percent ninety percent
"stevenson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Stevenson is about the worst forty from the tri-state to the drive also an accident downtown at Harrison and Jefferson. Personalize traffic on demand get the Traffix Chicago app approved by the mortgage experts team hochburg just search T R A F F, I X Chicago Mary van bowel WGN traffic central. Business news. That matters. I'm Steve Bertrand. So what are you thinking more about the gravy or the deals? We'll talk holiday shopping on the next wintrust business lunch. Steve Bertrand and the wintrust business lunch today at noon on twenty WGN. There's a reason we invented things like same day delivery, and PB and J and the same jar. We love convenience, which is what makes Kaiser Permanente so special we offer healthcare coverage together. So rather than having your doctor over here and your insurer. There we provide quality healthcare and coverage under one roof. Bring you up for other important tasks quick sandwich. Kaiser Permanente together we thrive. Visit KP dot org slash degraded condition. Mill estates, inC, struck five two. After suffering horrible chest pains for a few days. I knew I needed help fast. My name is and after two emergency department trips. I went to northwestern Memorial Hospital. Apparently third time really is a charm. Northwestern medicine is on a relentless pursuit of better heart care, my cardiologists diagnosed me with advanced heart failure. I was the first patient in Illinois to receive the heart mate three that a left ventricular assist device that improve blood flow and help me breathe easier. The benefits.

Kaiser Permanente Steve Bertrand Traffix Chicago WGN northwestern Memorial Hospital wintrust Chicago Stevenson Mill estates Harrison Jefferson Illinois Mill
"stevenson" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Come out and say, hey, hey, hey, hey, you get back out there in the hallway. You wait until your lawyer gets here. I don't want any defendant sitting in my courtroom without their lawyer, and I have to apologize to say, oh, I'm sorry, your honor. I didn't introduce myself. My name is Brian Stevenson. I am the lawyer and then the judge will laugh and the prosecutor will laugh and I'll make myself. Flaps. I don't want a disadvantage, my clients and the burden of this presumption which manifests itself in our criminal Justice system where people are wrongly, accused wrongly, convicted or unfairly. Sentenced is the reason why we can't talk about slavery. Terrorism segregation without talking about mass incarceration without talking about police violence without talking about this contemporary presumption of dangerousness in guilt. The continues to burden black and Brown people, and we live in a country today. We're one in three black male babies is expected to go to jail or prison, and nobody cares. Nobody's talking about it, it's not a political issue. It's not a campaign issue, and it is the same indifference to a crisis impacting African American communities that existed during the time of segregation that existed during the time of lynching that existed during the time of slavery. And if we don't wake up, if we don't challenge that indifference, they'll be new. Manifestations fifty years from now. One hundred years from now in part of the vision for me of this museum, I want to create a country one hundred years from now, black and Brown people are not presumed dangerous and guilty will we acknowledge this history where we recover from it, where we don't want to celebrate the mid-nineteenth century by talking about how glorious romantic it is by simply ignoring slavery. Well, we don't talk about how great our country has been without acknowledging this hardship, this brutality, and I just think we're not going to get there until we create spaces like this museum. I want to take you back to a story that you told they believe it was in a TED talk that you gave where you were invited by a woman here. And Rosa Parks was, yeah, and she wanted to hear. And then she used said Rosa Parks, told you that you would be tired. Tired, tired. By the work. You are undertaking hair the equal Justice initiative, and then the woman who invited you said that you needed to be brave, brave, brave. Yeah. Where do you draw the strength. To be brave and not be tired when what you're doing is it must just sap you? Yeah, of all kinds of energy. Yeah. Well, you know, I feel really fortunate in some ways to be doing this work in Montgomery because when you live in a place like Montgomery when you work in a place like Montgomery, it's impossible to ignore that you're standing on the shoulders of so many people who've done so much more with so much less. You know, I sit in this room and I look out that window and sometimes when I get really overwhelmed and really challenged a look out the window, nothing about the people who were trying to do what I'm trying to do sixty years ago. And what they had to frequently say is my head is bloodied but not bowed. I've never had to say that and as difficult as the task that we have to face as hard as the work is. It's been made easier because enslaved people found a way to endure and survive. And when I think about the kind of courage, it took to do that. When I think about the kind of commitment, it took to do that. I just don't feel like I'm entitled, I don't even feel like I'm allowed to say, I'm tired. I can't do this. I can't do that. I feel like I have to do it because I'm being watched by the souls and spirits of the insects. I really do feel that this street, it's so historic right down three blocks. Here's where people were brought. They will be paraded up the street where on the site of a former warehouse, all around here spaces where people were lynched. Rosa Parks was pulled off that bus three blocks from here, Dr. king's churches. This I feel like I'm being watched by the souls and spirits of the enslaved, the lynched, the segregated and with their sacrifice with their struggle with their heroism and their courage and their dignity. I can't actually stop. I can't not do what has to be done. And the beautiful thing is that when we actually do something that I hope is good, like this museum that I hope is. This memorial, I just feel watched by those souls and spirits. I feel encouraged. I hear them may be saying, okay, you keep doing that. That's a good thing. Now that you heard the elephants Bryan Stevenson, you can find the full interview on apple podcasts, Stitcher, Washington, Post dot com. Slash podcast or anywhere else. You listen to podcasts.

Rosa Parks Brian Stevenson Montgomery prosecutor Washington apple Dr. king One hundred years one hundred years fifty years sixty years
"stevenson" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"There you have it my conversation with sean stevenson folks out of everything that we covered if he could only implement one thing just one of all just one thing out of everything that we covered what's the one thing that you can do such that by doing it would make getting better sleep easier or unnecessary i'll share with you i absolutely have used flux i have it on my computer i have that setting enabled on my iphone at eight thirty pm all of a sudden the blue light get stripped away and it doesn't come back till 700 am and my wife and i have made it a real priority to be in bed by ten o'clock there were times when we were up watching game of thrones or house of cars and all of a sudden it's you don't you're watching you're episodes and all of a sudden it's eleven o'clock at night and you're going to bed when i heard that from just tend to to you wanna get just does hours will give you the majority of the results of your sleep all of a sudden boom it just became priority sorry policing we have to go earlier otherwise gotta go to bed what's the one thing you can do folks is always gift fish show has made an impression on you please leave a review on your podcast player of choice note this episode specifically because all those reviews come to us we get to see and we could see your feedback and most importantly other people see it and it may inspire them to take action and listen which you know the impact of that can make thank you so much if you were not yet subscribe to the show go ahead and hit that subscribe button so all future episodes while automatically be downloaded cheer device with that go get a good night's rest give it a shot see how you feel about your field awesome who will see in the next show.

sean stevenson