35 Burst results for "Stevenson"

Votto, Solano, India homer, Reds rough up Wainwright, Cards

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Votto, Solano, India homer, Reds rough up Wainwright, Cards

"Tyler naquin drove in four runs in the reds Homer three times in a 9 5 win against the Cardinals Naquin delivered a two run single and a two run triple Joey Votto Donovan solano and Jonathan India homered for the reds who lost catcher Tyler Stevenson to a broken right clavicle Stevenson was hit by a foul tip in the first inning Red starter Graham ashcraft threw a career high 112 pitches and tied his career high with 8 strikeouts over four and two thirds innings Adam Wainwright was tagged for a season I 7 runs over 5 and a third Paul Goldschmidt homeward for St. Louis I'm Dave

Tyler Naquin Naquin Joey Votto Donovan Solano Jonathan India Tyler Stevenson Graham Ashcraft Cardinals Reds Stevenson Adam Wainwright Paul Goldschmidt St. Louis Dave
Votto delivers, Reds surprise Yanks 7-6 in 10 to win series

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Votto delivers, Reds surprise Yanks 7-6 in 10 to win series

"The reds won their three game series with the Yankees as Joey Votto lined a tie breaking double in the tenth inning of Cincinnati 7 6 victory The red scored three times in the tenth runs that became crucial after Matt Carpenter led off the bottom of the tenth with a two run Homer But the AL east leading Yankees fell for the fourth time in 5 games Tyler Stevenson added an RBI double in the tenth followed by Donovan solano's run scoring single Labor Torres and Aaron judge homered in the 8th to tie it four four It came after red starter Luis Castillo held the yanks to a run in two hits over 7 innings I'm Dave

Matt Carpenter Yankees Joey Votto Al East Reds Tyler Stevenson Cincinnati Donovan Solano Labor Torres Homer Aaron Luis Castillo Yanks Dave
Hidden Van Gogh self-portrait discovered behind another painting

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Hidden Van Gogh self-portrait discovered behind another painting

"A previously unknown self portrait of Vincent van Gogh has been discovered behind another of van Gogh's paintings Leslie Stevenson with the national galleries of Scotland was in the room when an x-ray was taken of van Gogh's head of a peasant woman She called her boss Francis fowl She said she was absolutely bowled over which he saw it She immediately recognized it was a self portrait by van Gogh The portrait shows a bearded sitter in a brimmed hat It must be an early work the left ear is clearly visible van Gogh famously cut his off in 1888 to make sure it's the real thing they called the van Gogh museum As it turns out they've actually got 5 examples in their collection Art critic tabish Kahn says van Gogh was known for turning canvases around and painting on the other side They do one underdrawing than this side or I don't like it or they flip the canvas over and paint on the other side That's quite a natural part

Van Gogh Leslie Stevenson Francis Fowl National Galleries Of Scotland RAY Tabish Kahn Van Gogh Museum
"stevenson" Discussed on THE FIGHT with Teddy Atlas

THE FIGHT with Teddy Atlas

05:36 min | 5 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on THE FIGHT with Teddy Atlas

"And Koopa troopa was great. It was great. He looks out of his head. He's like, he said, I love it. Yeah, hanging off by his strength, Jerry. Yeah, hanging on. You're hanging on by his strength. You know, as staying as agent, you know? Because he had nobody left. He was the only client he had left. And he says, I just love it. I love it, Jerry. Jerry, I love it. The way you're hanging on, you hanging on there, Jerry, you know, and Jeff is like, oh, you know, freaking, let me get out of here, you know? I love it, Jerry. I love it. I love you, hang it on. You hanging in there, Jerry. Well, Asuka's hanging in there. He's hanging. He's hanging by a thread. He's hanging by his tread. He's hanging by a dread. He might have to take that fight with Jake Paul. You know what I mean? He might. I mean, we hope he doesn't for his sake 'cause there's no coming back from that, although after some of the pictures that have floated around him, I don't even think he cares anymore. Anything to make a dollar. Hey, one thing that you pointed out earlier about the people that were listening to the last two predictions on going to my bookie would have made a couple extra shekels this weekend to offset the price of this some of these pay per views. But with the UFC, you know you're going to be disappointed in for the guys at my bookie and if you like to gamble and gamble responsibly, you can go to my book he thought AG and use the promo code Atlas. They'll give you 50% 50% credit on your first deposit up to a thousand bucks. So if you put in 2000, they'll give you a $1000 to bet with for free. And hopefully you can take advantage and leverage that deposit and make some smart bets. Like going to the casinos, somebody and your chips before you walk in the door, right? So yeah. And again, please all joking aside. Campbell responds. I can't afford to lose. But if you like to gamble, I think my bookie provides a great product. And for the people at my book and like to play teddy, the line on the main event, just engage Charles Oliveira plus money on gaichi plus one 50 minus one 80 on Charles Oliveira. What do you like? Well, I love the old timers would say can, you know, he's been around a long time and he finally got the title when you win the title you improve 30%. I believe that. And he looks like he gets better every fight. I believe that. I love gaiji. I talk about styles. It's only going to be a great fight because it's a style of gaiji because of his approach because of his attitude because of his mentality, same thing with Oliveira. It's going to be a back and forth fight. I would not be shocked by an upset, but I'm going to go with the champion. Oliveira. Because based on what I just said, all my years in a sport the old times were right. You see a guy with a title, he finally gets the title at 30% improvement immediately. Immediately. Just by winning the title. So I'm going to, I'm going to go with that. But would I be shocked to see to see my man gauge wind up leaving that ring with the title? No. No. And again, that's what you love about the UFC. You can make an honest legitimate argument for both guys to win the fight. That's what makes for good fights. Right there. Right there. So you're going into the vaga Stevenson bank. Now I'm not being a Monday morning quarterback. I'm never that. I'm a lot of things. And people will tell you that. Not all good, maybe. But I'm not that. I'm not going to tell you something after the fact. I'm going to be consistent with what I said before they got no ring. That fight, I didn't think you could make an argument who was going to win. For the Katie teller and yes, yes, but for the vodka Stevenson fight, no. For me, you couldn't make an argument. Only one guy was going to win that fight. Only one guy. And I only explain why. Stevenson was going to win it. But for this fight on the UFC cod gay and aloe Vera, you can make a damn good argument for either side. Well, how about this over under over one and a half rounds minus one 85 for the under, you get plus one 55. One and a half over under. You mean for the over, right? For the under, you're getting plus money plus one 55. If you think it's going over one and a half rounds minus one 85, but that's a super low over under one and a half rounds. I mean, I guess they think the only way I think explosive. Yeah, explosive, which I think is the only way gaichi wins this fight is to be explosive. I think if it goes longer, the longer he stays in there with all of her, I don't know. For me, the longer he stays in there with him, the longer Charles has an opportunity to get him on the ground and grapple him. But gage is an incredible wrestler. But I think they're standing on their feet. On the feet, I think he has a huge advantage. All of that could handle himself on his feet too, but I would agree with your gauge as an event at a probably. We'll see whether or not it shows. But Oliveira, he's a python on he's a python on the floor. I mean, he raps himself this way that way. I mean, he's like trying to really. Who would want to go into the jungle and read so a python? For an alligator. Oh, it's an alligator. But it wraps himself this way of the legs, your neck. Everything. That guy, he's a monster on the mat. He earned that title..

Jerry Charles Oliveira Koopa troopa Jake Paul Oliveira UFC Asuka vaga Stevenson bank Jeff Stevenson Campbell gaichi Katie gage Charles
"stevenson" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

03:11 min | 6 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"That's the irony though of this whole thing is that just when you are absolutely in your prime as a woman, when everything you know and you feel comes together and you love who you are and you love your body and you can just, you know, you're in your wise woman fame. You are absolutely there with yourself and you know it's just a wonderful sort of period. It's never seen as that way just as we're coming to that beautiful peak is when the world loses interest in that. It's such a tragedy because my goodness. I totally agree, but you know what you're saying, Mira. Mira, what you're saying is just at the time when you think I am who I am regardless of what the male gaze says I am. I mean, it takes you that long to say, I don't care. This is who I actually am. And that's the moment in which you choose to be interested. And I don't think that's a coincidence. One of my very favorite fleabag scenes is when fleabag's talking to Kristen Scott Thomas character and she starts talking about the menopause and she says, oh, it's just. Oh magnificent. I'm not a factory anymore. It's just released from all of that and you're not expected to be this sort of constant sexy flirting thing and your body's not a factory that's all wonderful. And you don't see many representations of on screen of older women talking about the good things or it's just usually menopause is if it's depicted at all which had hardly ever is, as something tragic and dreadful, that, yeah, that means that you are no longer desirable to the male gaze as if that's a tragedy when really often it's a relief. I feel I'm coming into my face where I could probably cure people's ailments by finding flowers in a wood. I'm loving it. I'm not even that old gang. I just feel like I feel like the more confidence comes on. The only thing is I feel like I'm just losing my jaw on a touch. It's just a touch and I could if that could be maybe I'll find some herbs in the wood and fix it. I love you to bits, but I would never eat any flour from any wood that you picked for me. I mean, listen, you might be missing out on the elixir of use, my friend. Which I know is the key to all of our careers. Listen, it's been absolutely great to do this. What fun will have if we do a live show. So let's try and make that happen. In the meantime, can I say a huge thank you to Julia Stevenson? Hashtag acting your age. It's been wonderful to have you all on the girls feminist love for you. Thank you. Thank you. Love you too. Thank.

Mira fleabag Kristen Scott Thomas Julia Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:13 min | 7 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Radio. I'm fascinated by just trying to get away from it all in the South Pacific and to be inspired not only by indigenous people there today, but also by a great traveler and writer and lover of life Robert Louis Stevenson a century ago, did you pick up any sort of survival skills, Tom Hanks cast away kind of stuff in your travels that was helpful in your writing? You know, I'm sure it's you're the same. You know, once I get on an airplane and I start to go overseas, I just take up certain different habits. With regards to food and water and basics like that. But in the South Pacific, you can still be fairly careless, I suppose. You have the fruit off the trees. You have the fish in the sea. You have the water that comes from the sky. It's a more primeval life in a way. More primeval. That's a good word. I guess that's what I was imagining as you can be primeval today. Now you wrote that you felt like you had a kinship with Robert Louis Stevenson, like you were soulmates. Was he primeval? How were you soulmates? I think so. The way he lived his life. He was a born traveler. You know, he said he doesn't travel to go anywhere, but merely to travel. I love that quote, yeah. Yeah. And that's sort of the way I've been all my life as well. But what I find so curious about Robert Louis Stevenson is that the end, his sort of decision to settle in Samoa out of all places. Why do you say out of all places? Well, Samoa really is at the end of the world, and as I said before, Robert Louis Stevenson was perhaps the most famous writer of his time. Yeah. But Robert Louis Stevenson, he was perhaps the only man who didn't recognize that he was himself famous. He felt much more comfortable in his bones, sort of being on a ship and pajamas, you know, striking through the south seas, and he did in a crowd in New York. Obviously, Robert Louis Stevenson is a great traveler, and a great observer. Can he give us travel tips so that we can travel better today? I think he was perhaps a proponent of the full immersion experience. He was never sort of dabbling on the outside, you know, gawking at the locals. He very much wanted to sort of partake of their life, and he had sort of an engagement with the world around him, that I think sometimes when we travel lazily, we miss out on. So if an opportunity presents itself, the answer is yes. Yes. That's one of my themes lately. You know, I'm tired. It's late. Opportunity, yes. Yes, exactly. This is travel with Rick Steves, we're speaking with Jay Martin truce, and he's written a trilogy of books on the South Pacific, his latest travel memoir is headhunters on my doorstep inspired by the adventures of Robert Louis Stevenson a hundred years ago in the same part of the world. You can read Robert Louis Stevenson's books and be inspired that way. What about your travel memoir? Headhunters on my doorstep..

Robert Louis Stevenson South Pacific Samoa Tom Hanks Jay Martin New York Rick Steves
"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:47 min | 7 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Robert Louis Stevenson, when he started writing about the early literature of the South Pacific, described it as sort of a sugar candy sham epic, and he almost has a taunt said if you will read my work, you will know more about all the South Pacific than all the volumes combined. So it took him up on his challenge, but I was more inspired by his life, the way he lived, sort of the living in the moment and seeing sort of the majesty of the world and everything he encountered. So let's talk about that because a hundred years later, you've been inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson. He had his health problems, you were struggling with alcohol problems also. And you're following his trail around the South Pacific. What did he do that you did that worked into your adventures in your writing? What he did, what you could really tell is how much he was at present in the moment. And that sort of no small thing. You know, he had much in his past and of course there was the enormous pressure of being one of the most renowned writers of his time, but what I really took from him is sort of the delight he took in life itself. You can see if you take a look at the photographs from that era of his sort of the twinkle in his eye. Yeah. So it's a wonderful sight to see on such a sort of frail body. I was just in his museum in Edinburgh in Scotland, and he is a fascinating traveler and that really contributed to his ability to be a fascinating writer, talk to me about some specific sort of things that we would enjoy seeing or actually doing pig hunting with a spear, chasing sharks, climbing coconut trees, dealing with headhunters. What are some of the vivid things that could a modern day traveler could incorporate into their experience? Well, one of the things that I really enjoyed is traveling to the Marquez is by ship. There is one boat that does take a few passengers at departs from Tahiti, and it takes you to islands that are inaccessible by air. So only by sea, and you go to places like fatu hiva, which is a perhaps renowned for higher dose days. It was an island that he lived on for two years before World War II, and it's one of the most remarkable, most beautiful islands I've ever seen. How so? Just breathtaking, it's sort of a strange fusion of islands. You have sort of the tropical air of it, of course, with peaches and the palm trees down low, but it's a moody island. It's something that you don't typically see in those latitudes and the higher you look up, the more almost fierce it looks. And the mood of the island seemed to sort of change and shift with the change of the light. Just with the passage of the sun. I can imagine you could kind of feel the weather, the humidity, the before the storm and this kind of thing. Yeah, you do. You're very much part of the elements there. And then further on towards the two motos, Robert Louis Stevenson was really taken by the beauty of the lagoon in fukura..

South Pacific Robert Louis Stevenson Edinburgh Marquez Scotland Tahiti
"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:49 min | 7 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Does a visit to utopia sound good right about now? You know, you have the fruit off the trees. You have the fish in the sea. You have the water that comes from the sky. It's more primeval life in a way. Coming up author J Martin truce tells us how he found solace on some of the world's most remote islands. When he followed the route that Robert Louis Stevenson took in the South Pacific a hundred years earlier, Harvard professor David damrosch advocates for seeing the world through great literature. I also found that it was during the lockdown really therapeutic to really get out of the four walls and see the world from so many different angles. And Welsh historian Martin del vis sheds light on what the folklore leaves out about the legendary King Arthur. He was a military leader. He was probably about 5 feet tall,.

J Martin David damrosch Robert Louis Stevenson South Pacific Harvard Martin del King Arthur
San Francisco Voters Recall 3 Board of Education Members

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | 8 months ago

San Francisco Voters Recall 3 Board of Education Members

"A small piece of hopeful news good news out of San Francisco, the city has voted decisively. This is the voters. More than 70%. In a recall vote to throw out three of the members of the city school board. And the vote was not close. Allison Collins recalled by 78% to 21% Gabriella Lopez, 74% to 24%. Falga moliga recalled 71% to 27%. So this is massive majorities liberal majorities have decided to give these three scoundrels the boat. So you might ask, what's going on in San Francisco? Well, by and large, the city school board has been in complete, has kept the schools in complete shutdown. And parents are getting increasingly restless. My kids aren't getting a proper education. They're essentially being cognitively deprived for the larger part of two years when other schools gonna open, but instead of focusing on that, what the city school board was focused on is renaming the schools. Apparently, these three characters were leading a drive to rename a whole bunch of schools in San Francisco. The Abraham Lincoln school, the George Washington school, the Thomas Jefferson school that Theodore Roosevelt school, the Robert Louis Stevenson school, Nepal revere school all renamed, and the decision to rename them was taken literally in seconds. Apparently they had a sort of a research committee, the school names advisory committee, they did no real research. They did basically Google and Wikipedia. And they just decided, Abraham Lincoln, yeah, you freed the slaves, but who cares? You know, he was the American Indians didn't do very well under Lincoln. Boom, he's gone. And this was the methodology. No debate, no consultation with historians, no effort to sort of do a balanced assessment. The only time a balanced assessment came up as somebody said, well, wasn't Malcolm X kind of a racist in the early part of his career, and they were like, yeah, but he got better later. So what we're not gonna read. We're not gonna take his name off the

City School Board Allison Collins Gabriella Lopez Falga Moliga San Francisco Abraham Lincoln School George Washington School Thomas Jefferson School Theodore Roosevelt School Robert Louis Stevenson School Nepal Revere School School Names Advisory Committe Abraham Lincoln
Olympics Live: Shaun White qualifies for half-pipe final

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Olympics Live: Shaun White qualifies for half-pipe final

"It's it's it's it's another another another another silver silver silver silver for for for for team team team team USA USA USA USA which which which which picked picked picked picked up up up up its its its its fifth fifth fifth fifth of of of of the the the the games games games games and and and and it's it's it's it's six six six six medal medal medal medal overall overall overall overall Colby Colby Colby Colby Stevenson Stevenson Stevenson Stevenson delivers delivers delivers delivers with with with with a a a a score score score score of of of of one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred eighty eighty eighty eighty three three three three points points points points to to to to earn earn earn earn second second second second place place place place in in in in the the the the inaugural inaugural inaugural inaugural men's men's men's men's free free free free ski ski ski ski big big big big air air air air a a a a lot lot lot lot of of of of people people people people fell fell fell fell out out out out there there there there and and and and but but but but every every every every dog dog dog dog has has has has its its its its day day day day and and and and I I I I just just just just happened happened happened happened to to to to land land land land my my my my tricks tricks tricks tricks clean clean clean clean and and and and end end end end up up up up in in in in the the the the cellar cellar cellar cellar metal metal metal metal position position position position team team team team USA's USA's USA's USA's Chloe Chloe Chloe Chloe Kim Kim Kim Kim began began began began their their their their defence defence defence defence of of of of the the the the women's women's women's women's snowboard snowboard snowboard snowboard halfpipe halfpipe halfpipe halfpipe with with with with a a a a bang bang bang bang she she she she secured secured secured secured the the the the top top top top qualifying qualifying qualifying qualifying spot spot spot spot for for for for Thursday's Thursday's Thursday's Thursday's final final final final defending defending defending defending champ champ champ champ Shaun Shaun Shaun Shaun white white white white will will will will go go go go for for for for his his his his fourth fourth fourth fourth halfpipe halfpipe halfpipe halfpipe gold gold gold gold after after after after qualifying qualifying qualifying qualifying in in in in the the the the men's men's men's men's side side side side or or or or disappointment disappointment disappointment disappointment for for for for makayla makayla makayla makayla Shiffrin Shiffrin Shiffrin Shiffrin she she she she once once once once again again again again failed failed failed failed to to to to finish finish finish finish her her her her first first first first run run run run of of of of an an an an alpine alpine alpine alpine event event event event she she she she was was was was disqualified disqualified disqualified disqualified after after after after missing missing missing missing a a a a gate gate gate gate five five five five seconds seconds seconds seconds into into into into her her her her slalom slalom slalom slalom run run run run just just just just as as as as she she she she did did did did in in in in the the the the giant giant giant giant slalom slalom slalom slalom on on on on Monday Monday Monday Monday I'm I'm I'm I'm Danny Danny Danny Danny cap cap cap cap

Usa Usa Usa Usa Colby Colby Colby Colby Steven Ski Ski Ski Ski USA Chloe Chloe Chloe Chloe Kim Ki Shaun Shaun Shaun Shaun White Makayla Makayla Makayla Makayl Slalom Slalom Slalom Slalom Danny Danny Danny Danny
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The Dan Bongino Show

01:23 min | 8 months ago

This is a test This is a test This is a test This is a test This is a

"In Chicago with regards to our black and brown community our arrested and brought in custody one way but leaving a body bag Police say Irene Chavez died at the hospital in late December after a suicide attempt and Copa is investigating WLS news time one O four All right let's take a look at your travel times in traffic Solid traffic inbound Kennedy will head to the burn is 42 minutes The outbreak is moving just fine and bound Eisenhower got stop and go traffic so that's from north to the tri state and sour between Damon and the burn for three 90 old post office will take you 30 minutes The outbound is moving just fine The outbound Ryan that was close to police activity at canal port to the Stevenson We've got solid traffic from the burn We also have stop and go traffic I 57 outbound between a 119th and a 127th street and other update 15 minutes Get your news on the hour the halfway to break continuous coverage at W all the same dot com on one cone 8 90 WLS news You're rich I was afraid I was scared I didn't know what to do Everybody wanted me to have a portion The battle for life is heated up in our country now more than ever One of the most dangerous places in America is a mother's womb The ministry of preborn empowers young women in crisis

Irene Chavez Wls News Copa Eisenhower Chicago Kennedy Damon Ryan America
Jones tosses 3 TDs, Mayfield hurt as Pats beat Browns 45-7

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

Jones tosses 3 TDs, Mayfield hurt as Pats beat Browns 45-7

"Mac Jones first career game with three touchdown passes helped lead the patriots in a forty five to seven route of the Browns the rookie Jones through four hundred ninety eight yards and tossed two of his three TD passes to tight end hunter Henry from Andre Stevenson rushed for a career high one hundred yards and two touchdowns as the patriots won their fourth straight game to improve to six and four Cleveland lost starting quarterback Baker Mayfield to a right knee contusion in the third quarter Mayfield finished with a career low seventy three yards passing one TD and a pick for the five and five Browns guessing Coolbaugh Foxboro Massachusetts

Mac Jones Hunter Henry Andre Stevenson Patriots Browns Baker Mayfield Jones Cleveland Mayfield Coolbaugh Foxboro Massachusetts
Pats shut down Darnold, Panthers, cruise to 24-6 victory

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 11 months ago

Pats shut down Darnold, Panthers, cruise to 24-6 victory

"J. C. Jackson returned one of three Sam Darnold interceptions for an eighty eight yard touchdown as the patriots defeated the Panthers twenty four six Matt Jones overcame two early turnovers and threw for one hundred thirty nine yards and a touchdown rookie running back from Monterey Stevenson had one hundred six yards from scrimmage before leaving the game with a head injury Damien Harris and hunter Henry scored touchdowns as the five and four patriots improved to four now on the road Carolina's Christian McCaffrey ran for fifty two yards and had fifty four receiving yards in his return to the lineup but the Panthers fell to four and five I'm Dave Ferrie

J. C. Jackson Sam Darnold Monterey Stevenson Patriots Matt Jones Damien Harris Panthers Hunter Henry Christian Mccaffrey Carolina Dave Ferrie
"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:17 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"It doesn't mean that those vulnerable should be condemned. It just means that some of us are going to have to be stone catchers. And that's the idea that I've come to embrace is that just because people won't recognize what the right and just thing is to do that it's not right and just to cast those stones, doesn't mean that that's the end of the struggle. We have to stand up. We have to step in front of those who are vulnerable and we have to catch those stones. And I think that is one of the callings for this moment. And I think the other calling for me is that we have to begin this process of truth telling that we have to recognize that we can't get well if we don't identify if we don't diagnose the disease. And we have this instinct for quick fix and quick cure. And if you don't know what's wrong with you, you're not going to know with the cure that you've been prescribed is sufficient. And I think this process of diagnosing the many ways that we are not healthy is not something we should fear, but something we should embrace because once we've done that, I think we have the capacity, the genius, the strength, the ingenuity, the wherewithal, to begin to address these maladies, this illness. And emerge as a healthier society, a healthier nation, a healthier place in the world for everyone. And that's what animates the work that we're trying to do now. Brian, thank you so much to spend everything I hoped for. Well, I'm glad to hear that. We'll let you know when we're going to air this. I can't remember when that is, but it will be pretty soon. And I'm just so grateful for your work in the world. Do you know the only time I've been to Montgomery is when I came on that congressional pilgrimage with John Lewis? In 2000 13, I think it was incredible. And extraordinary life-changing experience, but I want to come back the next time to see you. I want to see you. I want to be at the memorial in the museum. Yeah. Well, we absolutely want you to come and see the science. When the world in the world changes again. There you go. That's right. Blessings to you. Thank you so much. And you, as well, always a thrill talking with you. And thanks so much for the opportunity..

Brian John Lewis Montgomery
"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:19 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"A lawyerly way of saying something that should be said a lot. Okay. But I say it that way. Only because we've been dealing with injustice in so many places for so long. And if you try to dissect, why is this still here? It's because people haven't had enough hope and confidence to believe that we can do something better. And I am, I am, you know, I think hope is our superpower. I mean, the hope is to think it gets you to stand up when others say sit down. It's the thing that gets you to speak when others say be quiet. I never met a lawyer until I got to Harvard Law School. I had to hope I could be something I'd actually never seen anybody be. Right. You know, we built this museum in a memorial. I didn't know anything about museums and memorial, but I had this kind of idea that we could create a space that might be a truth telling space that might help people reckon with this past. And because we had this hope, you know, even starting an organization like this in a place like this it didn't make sense if there wasn't a hope dynamic pushing you. And I think we have to have that. I get worried when I meet hopeless teachers or hopeless lawyers or hopeless politicians or hopeless advocates. Those are people who are not going to help us advance justice in the world. You know, the other, the other thing to say about that or one other thing to say about the example you gave of the people who are the most hateful. And the most consumed, right? By that fear and anger so that they have become it. They're the ones who get quoted in the newspaper, right? Yeah. They're not, they represent an extreme and I think so, you know, for me, one of the humbling things, one of the many humbling things about this year is really, really knowing myself to be white and interrogating what that means. And I insist on using the language of we thinking about that long arc because our descendants are going to see a wi and us, but the white we has a lot of work to do in this country, right? And it's easy to, for people to who feel. Oh, I don't know. A little bit more enlightened. It gets easy for white people to start pointing at the bad white people like that. Person you just mentioned? Sure. And that doesn't get us anywhere. Because we all have work to do. And so I'm curious about how you apply what you learned on death row or working with people who are criminals or being treated as criminals by our justice system that none of us is defined by our worst actions. I feel like that is such an important equation. For our common life right now. Yeah. Well, I think you're absolutely right. And I am more interested in what the we does, what the collective we does than what the outliers do. And I think one of the challenges of this era of social media is that everybody has a platform and we do tend to highlight and emphasize the extreme voices and perspectives I think the media does that. I think the larger culture kind of runs to that. But I do think it's important to push back against that. Even as we think about how to repair much of the damage that has been done, there was during the 1950s and 60s, you had all of these people engaging in horrific criminal acts the white men who killed Emmett Till who killed the civil rights workers in Selma, who a blew up the church. And in 2030 years later, we thought that the response to that should be, we should go prosecute those people. And then we had these prosecutions of older white men and 80s or 90s who were clan members and we thought that if we convicted them that we could exonerate the society. And I'm not opposed to those convictions or to those prosecutions. But I think it's a mistake to think that they act it in a setting where only they were culpable. It was the politicians who gave permission to people to talk and think and believe these thoughts. It's the larger we who created an environment where we were saying segregation forever. And just as then we are now, when we give in to rhetoric, and we start talking about using violence to silence those whose positions and opinions we disagree with. When we engage in rhetoric that tries to legitimate the conduct of people who are advancing ideology that are destructive and violent and bigoted, we become complicit, and we have to understand that, and it's not just the people who have power, the elected officials. It's everybody else, because we give those people the power that they have. In our museum, we really thought about this. You know, because when I started talking about enslavement, the first thing you'd say is, well, my people never owned slaves. If somehow that exonerates them, what you encounter in our museum is all the trades, all of the collateral benefits that people in this region experience through the slave trade. The hotel operators, the banks, the railroads, where all profiting from the slave trade and the heirs of those profits didn't have to actually own slaves to benefit from enslavement. And the same is true from the era of lynching. The political consequences of driving 6 million black people out of the Deep South into the margins of communities in the north and west are evident in the political contours of our society today. The legacy of segregation, right? And we try to run from it. I didn't do that. But in fact, you did. And just like I can't be removed from the challenges that are being created by the environmental corruption that we are witnessing in the world are continuing degradation of the play. I can't say well, it's not me. I do this with my garbage. I can't do that. Well, you have to own that. And you especially can't do it if the goal is not just the punitive or just getting justice from a narrow sense if the goal is repair and repentance and redemption. That's exactly right. That's exactly right. And in fact, what you ought to be doing is thinking about, okay, in what ways am I contributed to this? We have a project that we're starting. It's called the truth and justice project. And we're actually going to be working with institutions asking them to focus on their institution to kind of step back, put aside all the global stuff. And it began really in 2018 when we were opening the memorial, the local newspaper the Montgomery advertised. It was kind of complaining a little bit. This all we know you're going to talk to The New York Times and The Washington Post and all of these other. But you won't talk. So well, let's have a conversation about that..

Harvard Law School Emmett Till Selma Montgomery The New York Times The Washington Post
"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Of the last words you said was eternal. Yeah. Well, I guess what I would say is that my grandmother had this uncanny instinct for creating relationships that were eternal. In retrospect, I feel like she wanted us to never forget her to never think of her as this person we had a relationship with for a short period of time. But rather, she wanted us to embrace her and to carry her with us. And I think she was brilliant at achieving that. And both the things she said, but also in the things she did. I mean, she was 40 when my mom was born and 70, when I was born and so I don't know that she was thinking about it through that lens. She had a lot of grandchildren. She had a lot of children. But I so value these people and I meet a lot of older black people in particular that seem to have that instinct for creating these memories that just shape you for the rest of your life. And they have a way of creating making these impressions. And I was just in a fast food place just to pick up some food in this pandemic. You don't go inside and eat, and there was a group of black women sitting outside and with a moving things like that. I just get stopped a lot more and one of the older women said Brian Stevenson I know who you are. You come over here. And she was precious. And I said, okay, and she said, now bend over, bend over bend over. And so I did. And she just leaned up and kissed me on the forehead and she said, that's all I want to do. Now you're going to I just want you to know you're doing great things. And it was just this sort of precious thing that you don't forget. Yeah. And it takes a certain kind of spirit to be generous with who you are and your capacity to shape and encourage and affirm. And my grandmother had that. I think knowing what her parents lived through and enslavement, seeing what she saw as a child in the post reconstruction era with terror and violence. Growing up, kind of marginalized and excluded. I think she just had a certain wisdom, and she wanted us to be equipped to use that wisdom in whatever way possible. But yeah, she very much was that kind of person. So yeah, so you speak occasionally. And I think very much these days about that long arc of the moral universe that sense of time, and that sense of the work ahead of us generationally. In this country. In our world, too, but in this country, and I do feel like that is in relief now. And so, you know, what I really want to do as we keep speaking here for this hour or so is really draw out your perspective on that. Through the particular place that you have inhabited in your work and in our society, you know, where you've been proximate to use your language. Yeah. Right? And it seems to me that. You know, it seems to me that the trajectory of your work from that day as a second year law student, is that right? And 1983 that you entered into this monthlong internship. And there's something about how you write about that story until about this story. That's so familiar to I think me or almost anybody thinking about being at that age. You didn't feel at all qualified. In fact, you knew you were not qualified to walk into that into that experience..

Brian Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:28 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"A memorial and there's a museum. And so I just I'm curious if you reflect at this remove on that evolution what's that been about at heart? It's such a terrific question because you're absolutely right, this is definitely been a journey of discovery. Had we succeeded with just providing legal services to people in achieving the things that we thought needed to be achieved, we wouldn't have kept looking, but of course that wasn't sufficient until you keep digging. And I would not have imagined that today, you know, I'd be kind of working on a museum, a memorial, and these reports. But it really was about a decade ago, I guess, or maybe 12 years ago, that I began to question whether the law was enough, and it was largely triggered by this awakening that even though I'm a product of Brown versus board of education, about 12 years ago, I realized that I don't think we could win Brown versus board of education today. Gosh. I don't think our court would do anything that disruptive on behalf of disfavored people on behalf of marginalized people. And that terrified me. But it also energized me to recognize that we were going to have to get outside the court and create a different consciousness. The question for me is why wouldn't we win? And it's because we haven't really reckoned with these larger issues of what it means to be a country dealing with our history of racial inequality. Right. And what you, I think that language you use about even you, because you are a product as culture as well. When you thought about people in prison, you didn't think about their humanity, you thought about what they'd done and even how we use. And when you speak a lot about the narrative, right? Like even how we use the language of it's not somebody who stole something. It's a thief, right? It's a murderer. And also, somewhere you said you know slavery doesn't and it evolves and you go back to lynching and there's this presumptive criminality just by virtue of being black that then turns up in who is in our presence and who's on death row. What you uncover is this callousness, extreme callousness and coarseness and dehumanization that is so at odds with, you know, who we want to think of ourselves and want to be, I believe. As a country. Yeah, yeah. And I think a lot of it has to do with how we're governed, how we're acculturated. I think in the 19 70s, part of what happened is that our political leaders began relying on the politics of fear and anger as a way of shaping policy. And so we declare this misguided war on drugs. We say that people who are drug dependent and drug addicted are criminals. And we're going to use the criminal justice system to respond. To that problem. Now we could have said and should have said that people suffering from addiction independency have a health problem. And we need a healthcare response. But that's not going to generate the kind of energy that demonizing people for addiction will. That's how we got to the point where we were putting people in prison forever. Life without parole for writing a bad check. I've represented people who are serving life without parole for simple possession of marijuana taking away the minimum major trying children as adults. When you step back and you think about it, it makes no sense. And there are 13 states today that have no minimum age for trying a child as an adult. And you can't really rationalize that unless you are distracted by these narratives of fear and anger. And I think that is part of the condition that gives rise to the brutality. And the cruelty that I've seen in my work and of course, when you are governed by fear and anger when you're shaped by you tolerate things you would never otherwise tolerate. You accept things you would never otherwise accept. And I think for me, getting at that, pushing people to step back from fear and anger, getting people to think more critically about this larger legacy of racial inequality is the priority now. And that's what led me into the racial justice work that we've been doing. And this effort trying to pull apart American history in a new way and a different way than the way in which we have tended to hear it. Right. That's something we have to reckon with. We must reckon with on our way to reckoning with all of that. All of these what in fact are consequences. Yeah. And so the reckoning that has to happen in this country has to be rooted in a moral awareness, a moral awakening, a consciousness that evolves in a way that we begin to do the things that we must do if we're going to not only save the country but save ourselves. And this is where for me faith traditions become so important. Because in the faith tradition I grew up in, you can't come into the church and say, oh, I want Salvation and redemption and all the good stuff, but I don't want to admit to anything bad. I don't want to have to talk about anything bad that I've done. The preachers will tell you, it doesn't work like that. You've got the first repent. And you've got to confess. And they try to make you understand that repentance and confession isn't something you should fear, but something you should embrace because what it does is open up the possibility of redemption and Salvation. And we kind of have a very religious society where we talk about these concepts on Sundays on Saturdays and whatever. We haven't embraced and we haven't employed them in our collective lives. And I think that has to change. I'm Krista tippett and this is on being. Today with lawyer, Brian Stevenson..

Brown Krista tippett Brian Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"Shots which course stevenson that just screams like one eight hundred ten shukor stevenson at the end of the night but if he can bully him a little bit if he can use that length this is. This can be a very close fight. This is not a lopsided mismatch. Predicting i agree chris. And the one word that stands out in my mind that journal herring used when i spoke to him. He said i have to make shukor stevenson uncomfortable because no one really makes him uncomfortable. They kinda allow him to get into what he wants to do. He gets into a rhythm he gets comfortable and then he's very difficult to beat when he's in that type of rhythm and when he's doing whatever he wants however he wants whenever he wants. Juvenile herring has to make him uncomfortable. He's not a. I wouldn't say he's a A rugged fighter in it. In any way jim herring but he's gotta make it physical and he's gotta make shukor stevenson know that it's not going to be the type of fight where he can just move around and comfortably boxes way to a decision. I'm not saying necessarily they want to do that. Miss fight but he did do that in his last fight and another good point. I thought that herring made to me. And i think we all noticed that during the fight is when jeremiah nakajima who. I'm sure a bigger puncher than juvenile herring But when nakajima hits Core stevenson with a right hand toward the end of the sixth round. It definitely changed the way. Stevenson went about the fight. I mean he got. He took the shot fine. I thought i mean he didn't seem to be hurt but it seemed to get his attention in a way that he was much more defensive minded in the second half of that fight and he was in the first half. Because if you watched the first half of the fight there were times when i wouldn't say he's slugged it out with him but he.

shukor stevenson Juvenile herring stevenson jim herring jeremiah nakajima chris herring nakajima Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"Especially you know. He's about five foot ten or so so he's a taller fighter for the junior lightweight division and may felt that before. He came to them that he was you know he was too aggressive. He wasn't relying enough on his natural boxing ability which he has done more under them and it's obviously worked very well. The performance against frampton was was now france at the back under his career. But he's younger than than jamel herring that some people thought. Maybe he had more mileage on them than herring. even though he didn't have an a lot more fights than him he had a few more fights but not that many more But that was an impressive win because the odds were around even know jamal. Haring was maybe a slight favourite when the fight off and he demolished carl frampton whose had a great career two weight world champion. Probably not a junior lightweight. He's better suited for one. Twenty six or one twenty two but it was a very good win gave him a lot of momentum. Going into this fight chris So i think it's a much more to answer your original question. I think it's a much more competitive fight than ten to one But but jemil's going to have to produce a maybe a career-best performance if he's going to be a defensive defensively masterful fighter alexa core stevenson. Who has just a lot a lot of natural and high ring iq. Yeah i think what this comes down to is. How does mel hering assert his size advantage. You get into a clinical boxing match which occur stevenson year. Loose it's probably not to be entertaining like that's just kind of the way it goes but herring at the olympics. He was spiting at over one hundred forty pounds for the first part of his professional career. He was fighting one hundred thirty five pounds. He is a very big one hundred and thirty pound and you can see that at the press conference is going to have a couple of inches at least on shukor stevenson gonna have once you re hydrates probably significant amount of weight on core stevenson stevenson. May maybe even stronger as he gets more and more just at two hundred and thirty pounds. Shrinking down to get to one twenty-six but whether it's using his length fighting on the outside or being physical with stevenson in the ring. That's going to be. How juvenile herring wins this fight. I don't think you can just stand there..

jamel herring carl frampton boxing jemil frampton alexa core stevenson Haring mel hering jamal france stevenson shukor stevenson chris stevenson stevenson olympics
"stevenson" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Fu. Show me. Welcome back quick brain, your question for today is how do you use your mind to change your body? And I think everybody wants a better body and here we have back on our show. We're very excited to have one of the most come back guests on our show, probably the amazing author, podcaster, Sean Stevenson, superhero, friend of mine. Thanks for being on. Always an honor. Yeah. And now we happen to be on your.

Fu Sean Stevenson
Vegas defeats Seattle, 4-3, ruins Kraken league debut

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Vegas defeats Seattle, 4-3, ruins Kraken league debut

"The Vegas golden knights put a damper on the debut of the NHL's newest franchise with a four three win over the Seattle crack in Chandler Stephenson scored the game winner on a redirect office skate just thirty five seconds after the cracking of relic from a three nothing deficit to tie the game in the third period Ryan Donato scored the first going crack in team history at the eleven thirty two marked the second trade and Morgan Geekie scored the game tying goal for Seattle Max patch ready had two goals for the gold nice plus an assist on the Stevenson game winner mark stone had three assists for Vegas I'm Jim Bernard

Vegas Golden Knights Chandler Stephenson Ryan Donato NHL Seattle Morgan Geekie Max Patch Mark Stone Stevenson Vegas Jim Bernard
"stevenson" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Stevenson University Online leader Forensic education for law enforcement, Legal and cyber investigations. If you are preparing for career, advancement or career change, investigate our online master's programs if forensic science CSC, Forensic accounting, Forensic investigations, cybersecurity and Digital forensics. You want line sessions start every eight weeks. No application P or G r E required visits Stevenson. You slash online Botin. Real deal. Chicken sandwiches don't take shortcuts. Because bold hand breaded chicken, Huge pickles and buttered buns just tastes better. Try the new bows. Chicken sandwich for 3 99. Only at Bojangles. It's Bo time now available in Sterling Epidemic Run Plaza. Amazon is offering sign on bonuses at the $1000 plus get up to $20 an hour just elect rules. The best part we're hiring new, you know, Starting now to take home something greater new, higher wages with this sign on bonus, a range of real benefits and career growth opportunities in a top rated workplace, So come on, earn more and see how great pay and sign on bonuses can lead to a greater life. For you go to amazon dot com slash apply. Amazon is an equal opportunity employer. This is Chief Robert Conte of the Metropolitan Police Department. And I need your help. Drug Driving on D C streets is trending upwards. But together we can reverse this behavior. Driving high puts everyone at risk. So take the pledge to never drive under the influence. It's just not worth it. Your fresh start, is waiting at University of Maryland Global campus of pioneering online learning for more than 20 years, Um G C puts more than 90 degrees specializations in certificates within reach. Visit. Um G C u to learn about our fresh start program, a suite of tuition, savings and scholarships available this fall as you pursue your program, you may qualify for additional savings. Plus, um G C offers personalized, advising lifetime career services at no additional cost and flexible online learning that can happen anywhere, whether you're just starting out transferring schools or working toward a graduate degree. We've got something that's made for you. Get started on your degree or certificate online with University of Maryland Global Campus. Undergraduate and graduate classes. Start Sept. 20 seconds with no cost digital course materials for most courses and personalized support services. Um, G C can help you achieve your goals. Visit. Um GCC, EU certified to operate by chef Okay, we get it. You don't want to be hearing a progressive commercial right now. So let us tell you something You do want to hear you are powerful. You are a warrior who bathes in your enemies, tears Then you step out of that refreshing tear bath and into a bathroom that somehow looks good on you. Yeah, You can pull.

Maybe You Don’t Have the Eye for Art That You Think You Have

The Gargle

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Maybe You Don’t Have the Eye for Art That You Think You Have

"Section now. And this is the story of qatari shea who lost a legal battle recently of a five point two million dollars worth of fake ancient artifacts tip stevenson. You talk about fake stuff. All the time what's happening while the swiss dealer is disputed this claim the a two thousand year old bust of alexander. The great was worthless. I'm not sure what they're saying is fake here. Like how were they fake. Is it the age that's faked or is it not alexander the great thumb there might you've got him purchased and alexander the mediocre if stuffed yourself up so apparently this shake has lost a five point two million over these various pieces. I think there was also one that they pay two point. Two million four. A statuette of the greek goddess of victory nike or nike depending on whether you in america or england in ancient greece. Just do it. But they haven't commented on any of the other. Greek statues amaze. Which is the greek god of leaving your parcel in. Been two doors down. Cla media the greek goddess of one night stands and athena the greek goddess of topless men cradling babies so Yet so this man's angry it sounds like a bunch of people with too much money arguing with a bunch of people too much money and then paying some lawyers to argue about it for too much money. Well if you've call as much money as he has then what else are you going to do with it. I don't like feeling sorry for the rich. So sharpie but i also score the. He was suing a gallery for selling him. Three hundred thousand pounds of fake not ancient mosaics. So there's a pattern here. Is he not learning. Yeah i mean this is like blaming all of your exits at some point. You've got to realize that the thing you will have in common issue and maybe the ifa fought that you think you

Qatari Shea Alexander Nike Stevenson CLA Greece England America
Defining Calisthenics with School of Calisthenics Co-Founders Tim Stevenson & Jacko Jackson

Moving2Live

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Defining Calisthenics with School of Calisthenics Co-Founders Tim Stevenson & Jacko Jackson

"What is meant by calisthenics or water. Calisthenics effectively was talking about progressive body weight training. So people will Wrongly put in the box of pushups in. Maybe pull up as exciting guess. Callous things to say that a lot further and often the kingpins of movements things. Muslims handstands human flags strength based hansen work. That kind of stuff. Oftentimes he has a kind of a borderline with some of the strength based yoga positions. That people will be will be familiar with as well. There's kind of an overlap. There brace all the way down. So i mean a lot of my training. These days were focused around what we would call fundamental skills of just using bodyweight on pushing and pulling patterns without beyond balls or rings typically close kency chain kind of movement said one fix on the floor or in the on a ball and and yeah as feroza big paul of it was around play and that was one thing that we found when we go into it it was just gave us the freedom we being strengthened condition for while i was going into the gym which like jacko and being on a squad for the next four weeks lead to five rep zoysia. Do ten reps right. What are one. But i'm basically doing the same thing. We found calisthenics. Rely all this new stuff we can learn like it was just fun and to to how it starts in why we now have a school of calisthenics taio ganic process. We started playing around with it. Far enjoyment is that the story jacket mentioned before was had two shoulder reconstructions at the latest one antonio the physio decaying shoulder the rehab. Bassi didn't work. So i decided if i could learn to hanson and that would give me some confidence that how to stable shoulder that was the starting point and we kind of just explored played around with it and then some people at the gym that we were trading at the time just came in last as if he was to put a workshop on. We were obviously making progress. Because we were flipping all when we started. I really bad too. Old birkin will be placed trying to learn things me twelve or thirteen years old. It was quite funny. How bad we were. But we saw arrives which we'd be used what we are kind of analytical brains and what we learned from sport breaking movements down and we workshop on and some people came. We told them to do a human flagging seven weeks. I'm relaxed. you know this is. This is fun to be teaching something a bit

Taio Ganic Hansen Bassi Old Birkin Hanson Antonio
We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:06 min | 1 year ago

We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

"Bryan stevenson. Thank you very much for being on the podcasts. For having us down here in your offices at the equal justice initiative here in montgomery alabama. Thank you. It's great to be with you so before we get to the reason why we're actually down here. I want you to define a term that you see when you go to the legacy museum when you go to the national memorial for peace and justice and that is racial terror. Lynchings have that right. Yes that's right so what we're talking about our lynchings. That were designed to terrorize people. Based on their race. I think popular culture. We have a notion that lynchings were what happened when someone was hanged. And of course lots of lynching victims weren't actually hanged. They were drowned. They were beaten to death. They were shot. they were burned alive. And so when we talk about lynchings we're talking about a category of crime. Committed by groups of people and racial terror. lynchings Are murders crimes committed by groups of people of african americans to terrorize the african american community. there was mob violence. There was frontier justice in many parts of this country where there was no functioning criminal justice system. If someone did something violent or broke the law group might come together to exercise punishment against that person and that respect you would see white people hanged. Ut other kinds of people hang but they weren't trying to terrorize the community. It was typically for a well known violent crime around which there was some group consciousness that someone had to be punished. Black people were typically lynched in communities where there was a functioning criminal justice system. There was no need for frontier justice and in fact hundreds were pulled out of jails and courthouses to be lynched and these lynchings were violence directed. Not just at that individual. But at the entire african american community

Bryan Stevenson National Memorial For Peace An Montgomery Alabama
Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

"Sean. Welcome back other glad to have year is my pleasure. Always love talking with you man. Let's jump right in. And i wanna talk about top foods for brain health and nutrients. I mean there's so much out there. And i'm sure people come to you for a ton of advice and one of the things that you see especially when people are starting off. They're like which supplement or which thing is the best for that and we tend to overlook some of the most obvious stuff that's right in front of us and i feel like that's what you did a really great job in eat smarter. Is you highlighted the things that it's just easy to overlook and the power of food truly is being medicine not liked medicine but medicine for real right sometimes even better and i want to start off by this study that you mentioned inside of each smarter and it was around alzheimer's and a particular nutrient tell us what that new chain is and how this nutrient was shown to have a significant reversal on our age. Yes so the current size. When we're looking at alzheimer's you know is a really really difficult situation. There's not much as for as peer reviewed evidence on being able to reverse his condition as see much. Improvement is a lot of times. It's trying to slow down the progression but now there's so much evidence coming out in so many wonderful scientists are asking these questions. What can we do. let's try. This thing was try that thing. And the funny thing is is circling back to the world of nutrition. But of course makes sense because your brain is literally made from food and we know today. That alzheimer's is largely tied to this calling. Type three diabetes. This insulin resistance taking place in the brain and so looking at what are the nutrients that help to regulate our insulin response. What a nutrients that help to normalize and he'll brain cells to create neurogenesis and sparked the creation of new brain cells.

Alzheimer's Sean Diabetes
Mets Fire Chili Davis as Hitting Coach

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Mets Fire Chili Davis as Hitting Coach

"Late last night. The mets lose again. They've lost their record. Now is eleven and twelve and they make. I think what most teams would be considered to be some kind of a panic move. They fired their hitting coach. Chili davis they fire their assistant hitting coach This is a month into the season. Twenty three games into the season. And i have so many questions about this and i wish that i could give you the answers to but because it happened late last night because not around the team. I don't have as much information. I will get some more but i gotta tell you. This is absolutely the hallmark of a new owner coming in. I've seen this a hundred times. Where new owner comes in and the results aren't as good as Is what what we're expected. And especially with francisco indoor. They spent all this money. They spent all this capital they trade for the all star shortstop he looks terrible at the plate is swing. Looks completely messed up. You know. last week we heard from their second baseman about how in a game You know the hitters didn't have the you know the information on the pitcher that Played out during the course of the game and then over the weekend jess there was this weird by play among the mets hitters. About this new hitting guy donnie. Stevenson coming in like this fake personality and we were trying to figure out what to do with that information on sunday. Baseball in all of it added up. As i said to tim healy of newsday. Before that game on sunday like a coach is going to get fired. It just had that feel of desperation.

Chili Davis Mets Francisco Jess Donnie Stevenson Tim Healy Baseball
Why Hasn't Economic Inequality Between Black and White Americans Budged?

The Pay Check

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Why Hasn't Economic Inequality Between Black and White Americans Budged?

"Our goal going into this was to understand a bit more about the racial wealth. Gap it's been fifty years since the end of segregation and jim crow why hasn't economic inequality between black and white americans budged at all. It brought us back to slavery in everything that grew out of that system. And the truth is that as a country. The united states has never really reckoned with slavery or any of the racist violence and oppression that followed. We have created a narrative of denial. We've created a narrative that says we're not going to talk about the mistakes we make. I think it's because we become such a punitive society. We think we own up to our mistakes. Something bad is going to happen to us. We're going to get punished. And i'm not doing these projects because i want punish america. I want us to be liberated from the change that this history has created. That's bryan stevenson. He's a lawyer. And the executive director of the equal justice initiative in montgomery alabama in two thousand eighteen. Three years ago this month he opened the first memorial to the thousands of black americans killed racial terror lynchings from the end of the civil war up to nineteen fifty the museum and the memorial in montgomery and the national museum of african american history and culture which opened in two thousand sixteen in washington. Dc are steps towards correcting historical record in the us but also universities media companies and investment banks are increasingly owning up to the ways they participated in or benefited from the slave trade earlier. this spring. The virginia supreme court ruled that the city of charlottesville can go ahead and remove statues of confederate soldiers. An effort that's happening around the country but there are plenty of people who choose to ignore this part of america's history and how it connects to the present

Bryan Stevenson Jim Crow Equal Justice Initiative United States Montgomery National Museum Of African Ame Alabama Virginia Supreme Court Washington Charlottesville
Psychic Loses Abilities After Car Crash, Didn’t See It Coming

The Gargle

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Psychic Loses Abilities After Car Crash, Didn’t See It Coming

"A psychic who was caught in a car crash has failed to predict a number of things. tip stevenson. You following the story. I am the psychic call crash. He didn't see that coming gag from every single newspaper. This written about it but a psychic maurice under claims to have lost his psychic abilities and the affected his sex life as well that was also added in. I mean he couldn't see coming in a number of ways as somebody who's recently been in a motor vehicle accident. I am interested in this. I got into a fight with an airbag but it came off worse and is very deflated about the whole thing. I watched that clip on this morning. Which is way he's A paid a couple of times giving psychic predictions and on the show he claimed to do something called face reading which is reading a face then predicting the future which is what the rest of school social interaction and then it gets better. Fan says when you're doing face readings what about if if if someone who's had plastic surgery and then he said this right. Yes i have a friend. Who is a scorpio. But she went to lebron knows fitted. Yes you thought correctly fitted then she became incredibly successful. What's the kiss. Elite bernardo's is in the shape. Some scales i don't know i. I am a libra. I don't know if this is. Are we just going to stop pretending this thing now. Don't get me started on rights. Such a terry and toes look headline like this is not a thing i made. Also the once you enter this sphere. I don't know if you can pick and choose between nonsenses like if you're going into the psychic reading you gotta go into the lieber knows you can't go on this because that's a very gemini thing to do if your psychic reading abilities have survived your car crash so we can verify through anecdotal evidence. Yes they did like literally as soon as it happened. I when i'm going to lose work. Which i did because i was unable to confirm a tv. Show the next day due to having a split lip. So i feel like in many ways. My psychic abilities were fairly heavily

Stevenson Maurice Lebron Bernardo FAN Lieber
Police Officer Fired After Threatening a Black Army Officer

The KFBK Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Police Officer Fired After Threatening a Black Army Officer

"Virginia's been fired after body Cam video shows a black army lieutenant getting pepper spray during a traffic stop. ABC Stevenson Saami Traffic Stop was in December and in the police report, one of the officers wrote that the lieutenant was alluding police because he didn't stop right away and his lawsuit. The lieutenant says it was less than two minutes and that he wanted to pull over into this well lit area. He was released with no charges and is now suing the police and federal court. Dario says his constitutional rights were vying Elated protest

Stevenson Saami Virginia ABC Police And Federal Court Dario
Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

The Small Business Radio Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

"One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly so do starts fail also because not. Everyone is meant to be an entrepreneur. I think that over the last. I guess since the internet bubble of the early two thousands. We've kind of romanticized. Starting a business as a get rich. Quick scheme i mean we know we think of mark zuckerberg and elon. Musk is it because sometimes the wrong people start businesses yeah. I don't think there's there's no doubt about that. I think some some sizable fraction of of new businesses fail. Because people aren't cut out for it.

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM Mark Zuckerberg Elon Musk
"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Ally <Speech_Male> truth to facts <Speech_Male> is not always <Speech_Male> true to <Speech_Male> sentiment and part of the <Speech_Male> truth as often <Speech_Male> happens in <Speech_Male> answer to a question <Speech_Male> may be <Silence> the foulest calumny <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> affect <Speech_Male> may be an exception <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> the feeling is the <Speech_Male> law and <Speech_Male> it is that <Speech_Male> which you much <Speech_Male> neither garble <Silence> nor belie. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The whole tenor of <Speech_Male> a conversation is <Speech_Male> a part of the meaning <Speech_Male> of each separate statement <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the beginning and the <Speech_Male> end define <Speech_Male> and travesty <Speech_Male> the intermediate <Silence> conversation. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> never speak to god <Speech_Male> you address. <Speech_Male> A fellow man <Speech_Male> full of his own <Speech_Male> tempers <Speech_Male> and to tell truth <Speech_Male> rightly understood <Speech_Male> is not the state <Speech_Male> the true facts <Speech_Male> but to convey <Speech_Male> a true impression <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> truth in spirit <Speech_Male> not truth <Speech_Male> to let her is <Speech_Male> the true veracity <Silence> <Speech_Male> to reconcile <Speech_Male> averted friends. <Speech_Male> A jesuitical <Speech_Male> discretion <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not so much to <Speech_Male> gain kind hearing <Speech_Male> as to communicate <Silence> sober truth. <Speech_Male> Women <Speech_Male> have an ill name <Speech_Male> and disconnection <Speech_Male> yet. They live <Speech_Male> as true relations. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The lie of a good <Speech_Male> woman is <Speech_Male> true index <Silence> of her heart. <Speech_Male> It takes <Speech_Male> us a role <Speech_Male> in the noblest and <Speech_Male> useful of passages. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I remember to <Speech_Male> read in any modern <Silence> author. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> to to <Speech_Male> to speak truth <Speech_Male> one to <Speech_Male> speak and <Silence> another to here. <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> must be very <Speech_Male> little experience <Speech_Male> or have <Speech_Male> no great <Speech_Male> zeal for truth <Speech_Male> who does not recognize <Speech_Male> the fact <Speech_Male> a grain of anger <Speech_Male> or a grain of <Speech_Male> suspicion <Speech_Male> produces strange <Speech_Male> acoustical <Speech_Male> fx and <Speech_Male> makes the ear greedy <Speech_Male> to remark <Speech_Male> offense <Speech_Male> and we find <Speech_Male> those who have <Speech_Male> once quarreled. <Speech_Male> Carry themselves <Speech_Male> distantly <Speech_Male> under ever <Speech_Male> ready to break <Speech_Male> the truce. <Speech_Male> To speak truth. <Speech_Male> There must <Speech_Male> be moral equality <Speech_Male> or <Silence> else no respect <Speech_Male> and hence <Speech_Male> between parent and <Speech_Male> child intercourse <Speech_Male> is apt to <Speech_Male> degenerate into <Speech_Male> a verbal fencing <Speech_Male> belt <Speech_Male> and misapprehensions <Speech_Male> to become <Silence> ingrained <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and there is another <Speech_Male> side to this <Speech_Male> or the parents begins <Speech_Male> with an imperfect <Speech_Male> notion of the child's <Speech_Male> character <Speech_Male> formed in early <Speech_Male> years or <Speech_Male> during equality <Speech_Male> toll <Speech_Male> of youth <Speech_Male> to this he <Speech_Male> had. Here's <Speech_Male> noting only the fax <Speech_Male> which suit with <Silence> his preconception <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> wherever a person <Speech_Male> panties himself unjustly <Speech_Male> judged <Speech_Male> he at once <Speech_Male> and finally <Speech_Male> gives up the <Silence> effort to speak truth <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with our chosen <Speech_Male> friends on <Speech_Male> the other hand and still <Speech_Male> more between <Speech_Male> lovers <Speech_Male> for mutual understanding <Speech_Male> is loves <Speech_Male> the essence <Speech_Male> the truth is <Speech_Male> easily indicated <Speech_Male> by the one <Speech_Male> and aptly <Speech_Male> comprehended <Silence> by the other. <SpeakerChange>

"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Truth of intercourse by robert louis. Stevenson this is a libra. Vox recording all libra. Vox recordings are in the public domain for more information or volunteer. Please visit libra. Vox dot org. Among sayings that have a currency in spite of being wholly false upon the face of them for the sake of a half truth upon another subject which is accidentally combined with error. One of the grossest and broadest conveys the monstrous proposition that it is easy to tell the truth and hard to tell a lie. I wish heartily at were but the truth is one. It has first to be discovered than justly and exactly uttered even with instruments specially contrived for such a purpose with a foot rule a level laura the auto light it is not easy to be exact it is easier. Alas to be inexact from those who mark the divisions on the scale to those who measure the boundaries of empires or the distance of the heavenly stars. It is by careful method and minute on wearying attention that men rise even to material exactness or two shoe or knowledge even of external and constant things but it is easier to draw the outline of a mountain than the changing appearance of a face and truth in human relations is of this more intangible and dubious order hard to seize ardor to communicate veracity to facts in a loose colloquial sense not to say that i have been in malabar one as a matter of fact i was never out of england to say that i have read said avantis in the original one. As a matter of fact i know not one syllable of spanish. This indeed is easy and to the same degree. Unimportant in itself lies of this sword. According to circumstances may or may not be important in a certain sense even the may or may not be false. The habitual liar may be very honest fellow and live truly with his wife and friends while another man who never told a former falsehood in his life may yet be himself one lie heart and face from top to bottom. This is the kind of lie which poisons intimacy and these the recipe to sentiment truth in relation. Truth to your own heart and your friends. Never feign or falsify emotion that is the truth which makes love possible and mankind. Happy loud the beyond dea is but the.

robert louis england Vox Stevenson first spanish one lie one syllable One two shoe org one dot
"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Introductory note robert louis balfour stevenson an eighteen fifty two eighteen ninety four novelist essayist and poet was descended from a famous family of lighthouse. Builders he was born at edinburgh scotland and was intended for the ancestral profession of engineer abandoning this. He tried law with no better success and finally devoted himself to his destined vocation of letters. Stevenson began his career with the writing of essays then issued to charming volumes of humorous and of travel an inland voyage and travels with a donkey. In the event then collected in his new arabian nights. A number of fanciful short stories. He had been publishing in a magazine in eighteen. Eighty three he. I caught the attention of the larger public with treasure island. One of the best and probably the best written boys story in the language his most sensational success was the strange case of dr. Jekyll and mr hyde but a much. Higher literary quality appears in such novels as the master of voluntary kidnapped and catriona in which he to some extent follows the tradition of scott with far greater finish of style but without scott's fine spontaneity and unconsciousness key published also three small volumes of verse. Some of it of great charm and delicacy stevenson was essentially an artist in words the modern desire for subtlety of cadence and for the rendering of fine shades of expressionist seen in a high degree in all he wrote and his work has the merits and defects that. Accompany this extreme preoccupation with style but he had also great virtues of matter he was a superb storyteller and acute insensitive critic a genial and wholehearted lover of life in the essay truth of intercourse will be found an example of his gracious in. Tactful moralizing in samuel peeps a- penetrating interpretation of one of the most amazing pieces of self revelation in the annals of literature..

Stevenson robert louis balfour stevenson stevenson scott Eighty three edinburgh scotland dr. Jekyll arabian one One samuel peeps eighteen hyde three small volumes fifty two eighteen ninety four
"stevenson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I always have guessed introduce themselves. Could you introduce yourself sure. My name is mel citizen. I am the sherve under. She ran the prince's power. I made a book called pneumonia. I meet another book called lumber jeans. And i am doing various other things right now that i am excited to one day be able to tell everyone about amazing and pronouns. Wise all is what i think is true. Is that true. Yes i just. I will respond to anything <hes>. He she it's all good for me <hes>. But like yeah whatever whatever feels right to you. I honestly don't mind preference. Do you have a preference. I prefer more than they <hes>. But <hes>. Yeah i don't know this is this is a this is a weird question for me. I'm very new to like <hes>. My gender journey. This is very new as of this year. So i don't have the best answer. But yet he and she are are preferred. I don't know that <hes>. Full first of all. Thank you for answering that. And i know for me that like this is actually. This is also a tough question for me. Because i don't have a specific need and because i don't have a specific need then i feel like saying any one thing is actually kind of limiting where i'm like instructing on something that you know i know some people really do have a strong need love. It love creating space for that. And then i think for me because this has been so this becomes a common question in our community especially on like on a panel or something and they have this haircut. I think there's a lot of assumption and anyway. It's not that i don't want to be asked. I simply feel that. I don't know what to say. I feel exactly the same. And it's something that is so it's like. I suspect that there is like a system of how i want to be referred to but i do like like you said i don't i almost feel like by talking about it at all. I'm like. I'm like drawing attention to the wrong thing it's like for me. Pronouns are sort of like they're part of how i interacted in the world like. I'm actually very bad about 'gendering myself. Because i don't use pronouns for myself just you know i but like it's more about how people refer to me and so when i'm over here doing my own you know gender thing and then someone's like what are you and i'm like i don't know i'm just like i don't wanna like kinda like get really into it and talk about. I just don't know. Yet i just don't like you said i don't have a huge need for how i want to be referred to. It makes you feel good when people care when people put the effort into lake. You know referring to me. In a way that i want to be referred to. But it's like it's a. It's a hard question it's just. It's so much bigger question than it. Seems like i think at first some just still figuring out. Yeah i hear you. Well and also again i would say that the complicated thing about this question and like so many things in life is that it's i think for some people less complicated than others and so and that's true for so many things right like there's there are so many things that people are sure about that. Other people are less. Sure about. And so i think for me. It's like i would never want to take away anybody else's opportunity to be sure about themselves <hes>. But you know i. I think that this is actually part of the core experience. Even pre opponent discussion right. It's like a closed. you wanna wear. How do you wanna wear your hair like. There's a lot of different things about the queer experience that i think you know. Some people like have a real sort of idea of what they're doing and and how they want to be seen in how they want to be understood in them. I think i think some of us don't and i think it's all of that is really great. Actually i think that's human experience rate could it. This is true also for like what do you want to do with your life. Do you believe in. God like all of the questions that are like the big human questions i think it's a sliding scale of understanding. Yeah i think this might be just like sort of anecdotal. But i feel like i've noticed. I've seen a rise in people who are pronounced flexible this past year. Especially and i think there's a lot of that is like you know we're all kind of i think everybody is sort of going through. It might not be gender for everybody. But everybody's kind of going through like we're all stuck at home. We only are interacting with each other over zoom and over the internet and like who. Who am i right now. I'm not having all input from other people in my life from acquaintances people on the street. It's just like you know like like how who exactly in line. How do i want to be perceived how to present myself in this in this space where we're kind of isolated and so i feel like i for me pronouns. It's like they aren't some deep personal thing. There's not like a true part of my soul that is like oh yes. That's how i want to be referred to and for some people it they really do. Have that but for me pronounced more of a tool. So it's like it's when you're going through life like i enjoy being called here because there's a friction there. I don't particularly look or sound like he. And so when someone calls me he that gives me like a little like a thrill because it feels like that tool that pronoun tool is someone who's like paying attention to me in listening to me. I have expressed that. There's a masculine part of me that i enjoy. And they're paying attention to that. And so that makes me happy.

this year one day first