39 Burst results for "Stevenson"

Fresh update on "stevenson" discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

03:27 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stevenson" discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"If you've got those you go back and you can watch this clip but you can watch the full interview inside. We're gonna play the clip right now. We'll be doing a live interview with an tomorrow. And that's going to be for all plus and pro members on real vision but right now on air this clip from august twenty seventeen and stevenson-yang and grant williams talking about ever grand back in twenty seventeen. We should look at stress in the property market so defaults a quickening of transactions in a certain place that suggests that the that people are trying to sell out of their property spikes and values one of one of the things that i've been noticing. Is that in a lot of towns in Obey province around beijing prices have doubled tripled even quadrupled in a year and that acceleration is is is a is a red light or does before it's crash had had prices i I increase month on month than week on week. And then there were some places that were posting new prices every day so that you do get to acceleration point where one person asked for. His cash can topple the whole thing. Switch just watch their and stevenson yang talking to grant williams on real vision. August twenty seventeen We'll be doing another interview again with an tomorrow. Should right here. And that's available to all plus an pro members on real vision. You're gonna wanna miss that so if you're not a pro or plus member real vision make sure you know. Get that upgrade. Now you're not gonna miss an has to say Next peter i wanna come back to you and bring it back to this conversation because as you're talking about you know. This debt is a big global problem in. it seems like maybe china's the one nation that stepping in others report just last week. I think it was from the institute of international finance showing that global debt has grown to three hundred trillion dollars the three hundred trillion with a t. There haven't been any consequences so far because as you talked about central banks have really gone in just underpinned all that dead in encourage people to move out on the risk scale but as we hit this three hundred trillion dollar milestone. Is that anything to worry about anything to think about. What are your thoughts about that. While there's no number that that that rings a bell and in fact because global growth has recovered the jets. The debt to gdp ratio actually came in touch by it. It matters when it does and it's always trying to figure out when that matters and as ever grand has has experienced it matters when the ponzi seems ponzi. Scheme sort of exposes itself because they lose access to funding and just as as leeman relied a lot a lot on short term funding us. Oh evergreen may i think of the technically ninety billion ish of debt about half matures within a year and they relied on wealth management products to to bring in short-term funding and deposits from from buyers which you know is essentially short term funding and if you continuously rely on short term funding to really finance longer-lived businesses that construction is as an example than eventually that's gonna burst because they'll be something that that.

Grant Williams Stevenson Yang Institute Of International Fin Stevenson Yang Obey Beijing Peter Leeman China Jets
Fresh "Stevenson" from John Howell

John Howell

00:55 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh "Stevenson" from John Howell

"Of the state's new ban. The ban prohibits abortion after a heartbeat is detected. WLS news. Time to 6 33 affordable taking a look at traffic on the South side in Pilsen 18th Street, both eastbound and westbound between Racine Avenue and Carpenter Street still closed due to that structure, fire there. It's been put out, but Firefighters are still on the scene on the Eisenhower traffic. Stop and go Outbound between Independence Boulevard in 25th Avenue on the Stevenson You're moving slow outbound between Ashland Avenue and Kedzie and on I 80 we have an accident on the exit ramp East bound that I 57 that's an overturned vehicle there. Next traffic update in 15 minutes. On Wall Street. Today. It was a rough day on Wall Street. The Dow closed down 614 points. NASDAQ Down 3 30, the S and P. 500 down 75 points. Get news on the hour and a half and when it breaks continuous coverage wls am dot com.

Ashland Avenue Independence Boulevard 614 Points Pilsen 18Th Street Racine Avenue Today 75 Points Carpenter Street Kedzie Wall Street 15 Minutes 25Th Avenue WLS I 57 I 80 Both Stevenson 3 6 33 Dot Com
Fresh "Stevenson" from John Howell

John Howell

00:43 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh "Stevenson" from John Howell

"Friend Stephen Moore on the debt ceiling battle. It's been a while since we talked to Stephen is scheduled. Join us next about 5 52 on and thrown with the big 89. John taking a look at traffic on the Eisenhower. We're still dealing with that accident. Two left lanes are blocked inbound before Wolf Road delays of running 28 minutes. Traffic is Salad from York Road on the Dan Ryan. We have an overturned vehicle. The left lane is blocked. Inbound at Taylor Street Traffic. A salad from 31st Delays are running 15 minutes on route 53. We have an accident just reported. Your, um at the Jane Adams hallway and on the Stevenson traffic is stopped and go outbound between Ash and Avenue and Central Avenue 20 minute delays next traffic update in less than 15 minutes. Going.

Stephen Moore Stephen 15 Minutes York Road 28 Minutes 20 Minute Wolf Road Central Avenue Taylor Street John ASH Jane Adams Less Than 15 Minutes Stevenson Salad Two Left Lanes 31St Delays Avenue Route Eisenhower
Fresh "Stevenson" from The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

00:32 sec | 19 hrs ago

Fresh "Stevenson" from The Dan Bongino Show

"$25,000 payoff. 8 90 wls. Town 35 minutes. So here on in heading outbound 22 back to the airport delays approaching Harlem Avenue in Van Nuys and our slow north into the tri state than heavy California into the burn interchange. 48 minutes 3 90 into the old post office. Stevenson inbound slow in the ramp to the inbound Ryan. 22 minutes. 3 to 5 at the Lakeshore Drive Ryan inbound slow into the Skyway from an earlier crash that are approaching the Ryan 15 minutes. 90 50 Downtown Bishop Freeway earlier crash found near siblings gone our next traffic and 15 minutes. Guys.

Harlem Avenue $25,000 48 Minutes 15 Minutes 22 Minutes California Van Nuys 35 Minutes 3 Ryan 8 Skyway 5 50 Downtown Bishop Freeway Lakeshore Drive Ryan 3 90 Stevenson 90 Wls 90 22
Maybe You Don’t Have the Eye for Art That You Think You Have

The Gargle

01:57 min | Last month

Maybe You Don’t Have the Eye for Art That You Think You Have

"Section now. And this is the story of qatari shea who lost a legal battle recently of a five point two million dollars worth of fake ancient artifacts tip stevenson. You talk about fake stuff. All the time what's happening while the swiss dealer is disputed this claim the a two thousand year old bust of alexander. The great was worthless. I'm not sure what they're saying is fake here. Like how were they fake. Is it the age that's faked or is it not alexander the great thumb there might you've got him purchased and alexander the mediocre if stuffed yourself up so apparently this shake has lost a five point two million over these various pieces. I think there was also one that they pay two point. Two million four. A statuette of the greek goddess of victory nike or nike depending on whether you in america or england in ancient greece. Just do it. But they haven't commented on any of the other. Greek statues amaze. Which is the greek god of leaving your parcel in. Been two doors down. Cla media the greek goddess of one night stands and athena the greek goddess of topless men cradling babies so Yet so this man's angry it sounds like a bunch of people with too much money arguing with a bunch of people too much money and then paying some lawyers to argue about it for too much money. Well if you've call as much money as he has then what else are you going to do with it. I don't like feeling sorry for the rich. So sharpie but i also score the. He was suing a gallery for selling him. Three hundred thousand pounds of fake not ancient mosaics. So there's a pattern here. Is he not learning. Yeah i mean this is like blaming all of your exits at some point. You've got to realize that the thing you will have in common issue and maybe the ifa fought that you think you

Qatari Shea Alexander Nike Stevenson CLA Greece England America
Defining Calisthenics with School of Calisthenics Co-Founders Tim Stevenson & Jacko Jackson

Moving2Live

02:11 min | Last month

Defining Calisthenics with School of Calisthenics Co-Founders Tim Stevenson & Jacko Jackson

"What is meant by calisthenics or water. Calisthenics effectively was talking about progressive body weight training. So people will Wrongly put in the box of pushups in. Maybe pull up as exciting guess. Callous things to say that a lot further and often the kingpins of movements things. Muslims handstands human flags strength based hansen work. That kind of stuff. Oftentimes he has a kind of a borderline with some of the strength based yoga positions. That people will be will be familiar with as well. There's kind of an overlap. There brace all the way down. So i mean a lot of my training. These days were focused around what we would call fundamental skills of just using bodyweight on pushing and pulling patterns without beyond balls or rings typically close kency chain kind of movement said one fix on the floor or in the on a ball and and yeah as feroza big paul of it was around play and that was one thing that we found when we go into it it was just gave us the freedom we being strengthened condition for while i was going into the gym which like jacko and being on a squad for the next four weeks lead to five rep zoysia. Do ten reps right. What are one. But i'm basically doing the same thing. We found calisthenics. Rely all this new stuff we can learn like it was just fun and to to how it starts in why we now have a school of calisthenics taio ganic process. We started playing around with it. Far enjoyment is that the story jacket mentioned before was had two shoulder reconstructions at the latest one antonio the physio decaying shoulder the rehab. Bassi didn't work. So i decided if i could learn to hanson and that would give me some confidence that how to stable shoulder that was the starting point and we kind of just explored played around with it and then some people at the gym that we were trading at the time just came in last as if he was to put a workshop on. We were obviously making progress. Because we were flipping all when we started. I really bad too. Old birkin will be placed trying to learn things me twelve or thirteen years old. It was quite funny. How bad we were. But we saw arrives which we'd be used what we are kind of analytical brains and what we learned from sport breaking movements down and we workshop on and some people came. We told them to do a human flagging seven weeks. I'm relaxed. you know this is. This is fun to be teaching something a bit

Taio Ganic Hansen Bassi Old Birkin Hanson Antonio
We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:06 min | Last month

We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

"Bryan stevenson. Thank you very much for being on the podcasts. For having us down here in your offices at the equal justice initiative here in montgomery alabama. Thank you. It's great to be with you so before we get to the reason why we're actually down here. I want you to define a term that you see when you go to the legacy museum when you go to the national memorial for peace and justice and that is racial terror. Lynchings have that right. Yes that's right so what we're talking about our lynchings. That were designed to terrorize people. Based on their race. I think popular culture. We have a notion that lynchings were what happened when someone was hanged. And of course lots of lynching victims weren't actually hanged. They were drowned. They were beaten to death. They were shot. they were burned alive. And so when we talk about lynchings we're talking about a category of crime. Committed by groups of people and racial terror. lynchings Are murders crimes committed by groups of people of african americans to terrorize the african american community. there was mob violence. There was frontier justice in many parts of this country where there was no functioning criminal justice system. If someone did something violent or broke the law group might come together to exercise punishment against that person and that respect you would see white people hanged. Ut other kinds of people hang but they weren't trying to terrorize the community. It was typically for a well known violent crime around which there was some group consciousness that someone had to be punished. Black people were typically lynched in communities where there was a functioning criminal justice system. There was no need for frontier justice and in fact hundreds were pulled out of jails and courthouses to be lynched and these lynchings were violence directed. Not just at that individual. But at the entire african american community

Bryan Stevenson National Memorial For Peace An Montgomery Alabama
Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Eat These Foods to Boost Brain Health & Reduce Inflammation

"Sean. Welcome back other glad to have year is my pleasure. Always love talking with you man. Let's jump right in. And i wanna talk about top foods for brain health and nutrients. I mean there's so much out there. And i'm sure people come to you for a ton of advice and one of the things that you see especially when people are starting off. They're like which supplement or which thing is the best for that and we tend to overlook some of the most obvious stuff that's right in front of us and i feel like that's what you did a really great job in eat smarter. Is you highlighted the things that it's just easy to overlook and the power of food truly is being medicine not liked medicine but medicine for real right sometimes even better and i want to start off by this study that you mentioned inside of each smarter and it was around alzheimer's and a particular nutrient tell us what that new chain is and how this nutrient was shown to have a significant reversal on our age. Yes so the current size. When we're looking at alzheimer's you know is a really really difficult situation. There's not much as for as peer reviewed evidence on being able to reverse his condition as see much. Improvement is a lot of times. It's trying to slow down the progression but now there's so much evidence coming out in so many wonderful scientists are asking these questions. What can we do. let's try. This thing was try that thing. And the funny thing is is circling back to the world of nutrition. But of course makes sense because your brain is literally made from food and we know today. That alzheimer's is largely tied to this calling. Type three diabetes. This insulin resistance taking place in the brain and so looking at what are the nutrients that help to regulate our insulin response. What a nutrients that help to normalize and he'll brain cells to create neurogenesis and sparked the creation of new brain cells.

Alzheimer's Sean Diabetes
Mets Fire Chili Davis as Hitting Coach

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:38 min | 4 months ago

Mets Fire Chili Davis as Hitting Coach

"Late last night. The mets lose again. They've lost their record. Now is eleven and twelve and they make. I think what most teams would be considered to be some kind of a panic move. They fired their hitting coach. Chili davis they fire their assistant hitting coach This is a month into the season. Twenty three games into the season. And i have so many questions about this and i wish that i could give you the answers to but because it happened late last night because not around the team. I don't have as much information. I will get some more but i gotta tell you. This is absolutely the hallmark of a new owner coming in. I've seen this a hundred times. Where new owner comes in and the results aren't as good as Is what what we're expected. And especially with francisco indoor. They spent all this money. They spent all this capital they trade for the all star shortstop he looks terrible at the plate is swing. Looks completely messed up. You know. last week we heard from their second baseman about how in a game You know the hitters didn't have the you know the information on the pitcher that Played out during the course of the game and then over the weekend jess there was this weird by play among the mets hitters. About this new hitting guy donnie. Stevenson coming in like this fake personality and we were trying to figure out what to do with that information on sunday. Baseball in all of it added up. As i said to tim healy of newsday. Before that game on sunday like a coach is going to get fired. It just had that feel of desperation.

Chili Davis Mets Francisco Jess Donnie Stevenson Tim Healy Baseball
"stevenson" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"Find out where. The true origin of parts stories came from so treasure island written by robert louis stevenson today. I'm going to be reviewing treasure island now. Monitor view is going to be slightly better than bart simpson's but only slightly rich treasure island. It's about these private with catches over. There is in china keith. In on their shoulders. Now robert louis stevenson born on the thirtieth eighteen fifty so this book was written in eighteen ninety s over one hundred years now the structure of the book. And if you.

robert louis stevenson bart simpson today china eighteen one hundred years eighteen ninety s treasure fifty treasure island thirtieth island
Why Hasn't Economic Inequality Between Black and White Americans Budged?

The Pay Check

01:47 min | 5 months ago

Why Hasn't Economic Inequality Between Black and White Americans Budged?

"Our goal going into this was to understand a bit more about the racial wealth. Gap it's been fifty years since the end of segregation and jim crow why hasn't economic inequality between black and white americans budged at all. It brought us back to slavery in everything that grew out of that system. And the truth is that as a country. The united states has never really reckoned with slavery or any of the racist violence and oppression that followed. We have created a narrative of denial. We've created a narrative that says we're not going to talk about the mistakes we make. I think it's because we become such a punitive society. We think we own up to our mistakes. Something bad is going to happen to us. We're going to get punished. And i'm not doing these projects because i want punish america. I want us to be liberated from the change that this history has created. That's bryan stevenson. He's a lawyer. And the executive director of the equal justice initiative in montgomery alabama in two thousand eighteen. Three years ago this month he opened the first memorial to the thousands of black americans killed racial terror lynchings from the end of the civil war up to nineteen fifty the museum and the memorial in montgomery and the national museum of african american history and culture which opened in two thousand sixteen in washington. Dc are steps towards correcting historical record in the us but also universities media companies and investment banks are increasingly owning up to the ways they participated in or benefited from the slave trade earlier. this spring. The virginia supreme court ruled that the city of charlottesville can go ahead and remove statues of confederate soldiers. An effort that's happening around the country but there are plenty of people who choose to ignore this part of america's history and how it connects to the present

Bryan Stevenson Jim Crow Equal Justice Initiative United States Montgomery National Museum Of African Ame Alabama Virginia Supreme Court Washington Charlottesville
Psychic Loses Abilities After Car Crash, Didn’t See It Coming

The Gargle

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Psychic Loses Abilities After Car Crash, Didn’t See It Coming

"A psychic who was caught in a car crash has failed to predict a number of things. tip stevenson. You following the story. I am the psychic call crash. He didn't see that coming gag from every single newspaper. This written about it but a psychic maurice under claims to have lost his psychic abilities and the affected his sex life as well that was also added in. I mean he couldn't see coming in a number of ways as somebody who's recently been in a motor vehicle accident. I am interested in this. I got into a fight with an airbag but it came off worse and is very deflated about the whole thing. I watched that clip on this morning. Which is way he's A paid a couple of times giving psychic predictions and on the show he claimed to do something called face reading which is reading a face then predicting the future which is what the rest of school social interaction and then it gets better. Fan says when you're doing face readings what about if if if someone who's had plastic surgery and then he said this right. Yes i have a friend. Who is a scorpio. But she went to lebron knows fitted. Yes you thought correctly fitted then she became incredibly successful. What's the kiss. Elite bernardo's is in the shape. Some scales i don't know i. I am a libra. I don't know if this is. Are we just going to stop pretending this thing now. Don't get me started on rights. Such a terry and toes look headline like this is not a thing i made. Also the once you enter this sphere. I don't know if you can pick and choose between nonsenses like if you're going into the psychic reading you gotta go into the lieber knows you can't go on this because that's a very gemini thing to do if your psychic reading abilities have survived your car crash so we can verify through anecdotal evidence. Yes they did like literally as soon as it happened. I when i'm going to lose work. Which i did because i was unable to confirm a tv. Show the next day due to having a split lip. So i feel like in many ways. My psychic abilities were fairly heavily

Stevenson Maurice Lebron Bernardo FAN Lieber
Police Officer Fired After Threatening a Black Army Officer

The KFBK Morning News

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Police Officer Fired After Threatening a Black Army Officer

"Virginia's been fired after body Cam video shows a black army lieutenant getting pepper spray during a traffic stop. ABC Stevenson Saami Traffic Stop was in December and in the police report, one of the officers wrote that the lieutenant was alluding police because he didn't stop right away and his lawsuit. The lieutenant says it was less than two minutes and that he wanted to pull over into this well lit area. He was released with no charges and is now suing the police and federal court. Dario says his constitutional rights were vying Elated protest

Stevenson Saami Virginia ABC Police And Federal Court Dario
Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

The Small Business Radio Show

02:11 min | 5 months ago

Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

"One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly so do starts fail also because not. Everyone is meant to be an entrepreneur. I think that over the last. I guess since the internet bubble of the early two thousands. We've kind of romanticized. Starting a business as a get rich. Quick scheme i mean we know we think of mark zuckerberg and elon. Musk is it because sometimes the wrong people start businesses yeah. I don't think there's there's no doubt about that. I think some some sizable fraction of of new businesses fail. Because people aren't cut out for it.

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM Mark Zuckerberg Elon Musk
The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

The Small Business Radio Show

01:41 min | 5 months ago

The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

"Well one of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM
Northern Ireland Sees Three Nights of Violence as Tensions Mount

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:03 min | 5 months ago

Northern Ireland Sees Three Nights of Violence as Tensions Mount

"Easter weekend so renewed violence in northern ireland with petrol bombs thrown and cars hijacked and set alight. The police called for calm after unionists engaged in a so called night of disorder in a suburb. In the city of belfast. The police federation for northern ireland said destroying urine communities was not the way to protest or event or for more on this when are joined by rebecca black. Who's a journalist with press. Association based in belfast. Good morning rebecca. Good to have you with us. Good morning thanks for having me so just recap what happened at the weekend. I mean we're now getting reports that more than forty police officers were injured. And yes i suppose it. Sorta stretch back to last week and there was a stevenson started breaking in londonderry last week they continued on for think. Seven or eight consecutive nights. Ny and then there was also some disturbances on nights. Skirts of belfast. As you'd neutered in the headline and i mean brexit as a part of this however at some more should have complex picture on the grind. Anger has been building within the union. Loyalist communities over the last year over brexit and this week in northern protocol was negotiated to keep northern ireland within the rules to avoid a hard border island the violent and so the system of tech support system i regarded as a border in the irish sea. And there's also anger in the loyalist community which sits back further over what they regard as to tear. Police said this was exasperated. Further last week and the public prosecution public prosecution service took the decision not to pursue not to pursue prosecutions and twenty four members of cimpian for attending the funeral of a senior republican last jin municipal during a period of ed lockdown. When in new was meant to be gathering but estimated two thousand people including leadership of champagne gathered mice. West belfast so the decision to prosecute exasperated that sort of regard to police

Belfast Police Federation For Northern Rebecca Black Northern Ireland Londonderry Rebecca Stevenson Irish Sea Ireland West Belfast
I'm a Feminist but... I Love a Good Princess Costume

The Guilty Feminist

01:42 min | 6 months ago

I'm a Feminist but... I Love a Good Princess Costume

"I'm a feminist. This week. I sent my goddaughter for her birthday. A series of costumes some of which would gender-neutral including a lion a b. and a pirate which i deemed as gender neutral at set for boys and i thought nah. I'm not having raced. But i was most excited if i'm completely honest about the bell dress from beauty and the beast. I couldn't wait and her mother who also a feminist just sent me a picture of herself holding the bell dress up going wishing me ignored the lion costume the very neutral be the only one i go into the because gm because she's generation said and they want to save the world so to be so. I'm pretty sure she doesn't care about bell. She cares about bees now. I should be proud of her. And of course i am. She's only just turned three very proud that she loves b.'s. Mold princesses because princess is going to save the world. Lapine run for ages. I've done nothing towards it was notchers. Princess diana was always kicks land mines or something but but but red overall. Yeah do more. I mean there are queen bees. Maybe she says can kind of be where great like revenge stress you know. Listen i think stripes is always a revenge outfit sting like that. How is it not revenge or mealy yet. The poor base give the ultimate revenge. Don't they believe after. Arson your arm.

Lapine GM Bell Princess Diana
Man In Critical Condition After Hit-And-Run Crash In Chicago

Bob Sirott

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

Man In Critical Condition After Hit-And-Run Crash In Chicago

"Currently in Lombard. We're watching a crash on route 53 North Avenue and again fire activity in university Park at Landau and Union Drive, a hit and run crash in the North Lawndale neighborhood in Chicago, still being investigated at Douglas and Lawndale. Harriet always. They are in good shape. Inbound Stevenson again Heavy on that north bound Dan Ryan ramp also the Dan Ryan on the breaks from the Steven sent up to Roosevelt and roadwork. Westbound. I 88 taking out your two left lanes. Orchard Road to Route 56 until seven o'clock this morning.

Landau And Union Drive Lombard University Park Dan Ryan Lawndale Harriet Douglas Stevenson Chicago Steven Roosevelt
4 seriously injured as Chicago shooting leads to crash with street sweeper

John Williams

01:18 min | 6 months ago

4 seriously injured as Chicago shooting leads to crash with street sweeper

"Kennedy just a slight delay in about at Augusta, just under 20 minutes from O'Hare downtown. It's clear in from Montrose and album Lancer Clear to the express lanes in bounder wide open as well. Stevenson. Some work on that exit to the Dan Ryan. It's got it down to one lane, and there's a crash out about on the Ryan at 79th. Now, three right lanes are blocked 25 minutes out to 95th, and that time likely to go up. Bishop forward Outbound salad from 1/30 Steel Bridge. There's a car fire in the right lane. And some gay pers and the inbound lanes to it smelled 33 from the Dan Ryan to 80 94, then in Portage Park. There's Irving Park. Cicero in Milwaukee, all closed for police activity because of that crash earlier this morning, and four people were hurt in that shooting and fiery crash near the six Corners intersection on the Northwest side. It happened around 2 30 this morning at the corner of Irving Park, Cicero and Milwaukee in Portage Park. Police said the car hit a parked a street sweeper, which caused both vehicles to burst into flames. Police say three people inside the car were taken to the hospital in serious condition. One of them a 32 year old woman had been shot three times in the stomach. The driver of the car was taken into custody. Alcohol is believed to have been a factor in the crash. Facebook is adding informational labels to posts about getting covert 19 vaccines as the tech giant tries to counter vaccine related miss information on its

Portage Park Dan Ryan Irving Park Montrose Augusta Stevenson Kennedy Milwaukee Cicero Ryan Northwest Facebook
"stevenson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:04 min | 6 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Stevenson also looks good Southside police activity 63rd and King and also Downers Grove, an accident. 63rd and spring sides. Merry band about to be Jeong traffic Central President Biden expected to sign his massive one point Diane Trillion dollars stimulus bill at any moment, Chief of staff Ryan claimed tweeting that the bill right at the White House lead yesterday more quickly than anticipated. Clean saying quote. We want to move as fastest possible spending years since the World Health Organization officially declared covered 19 a global pandemic. Today, President Biden will make his first national televised address to mark the date. Reporter Trevor Shirley. This is going to be the president's first prime time address of his presidency. He's expected to talk about the lives lost to Cove in 19, and the many ways Americans have risen to confront the virus. We also understand he's expected to give some idea as to what life may look like when it returns to normal whenever that may be. And again, That's reporter Trevor Shirley. Locally. Mayor Lightfoot cautiously optimistic that summer events will be held this year in Chicago. The mayor says the city is doing well and its fight against Cove in 19. I believe that the summer of 2021 is gonna look more like 2019 and less like 2020. But we've got still got to be driven by on led by what the science in the public health Guidance tells us now, when asked about big events, like the taste of Chicago in the air and water, show them here said it's premature to say specifically. What events will be allowed the city Council and summer activities last year because of the pandemic, tougher qualifications for vaccines at the United Center, scheduling a first dose he's now being restricted further. First, it was open to anyone who met state criteria to get the shot, then restricted to people living in Chicago. Now available. Appointments are being held for people living in areas hardest hit by the virus in medically underserved, Chicago has reserved a 60% of the appointment for people living in five West and South. Side zip codes. They end with 08192049 and five to there is a special site to register and you need to put in a voucher code to book an appointment. 30% of available appointments are being held for those in Cook County. The remaining are for those people outside of Cook County there instead of the Indians. Erica Ron. Meanwhile, the state of Illinois reporting 1700 new cases of covert 19 today. With 55 additional deaths of positivity rate ticking down a bit, and 2.2% Indiana reporting 922 new cases and 32 additional deaths. Statewide positivity raid at 9.6%. Teenager has been charged in connection to two Calumet Heights. Carjackings over the summer. WGN's Lauren Lap guy has more Chicago police say. A 13 year old boy was charged with two felony counts of vehicular Carjacking with a firearm after he was identified as the person who took a car from a 44 year old woman on July 14th on the 9200 block of South Kingston Avenue. He was also charged in connection to an armed Carjacking of a 22 year old woman on July 15th on the 9300 block of south ovals Be Avenue. The team was arrested on Wednesday. More lap Good WGN news And with a look at WGN sports Here's David. It appears Duke's run of 24 straight NC double A appearances is ending The Blue Devils air out of the A C C tournament because of a positive cove in 19 tests. They were supposed to play Florida State tonight to Paul plays Yukon tonight in the Big East, while Illinois will be watching Indiana Rutgers with the winner facing the Allied I Tomorrow, the Blackhawks here in Dallas again seven o'clock on WGN, the Bulls host Philly, Kyle Hendricks. For the Cubs today against the Rockies, Renaldo Lopez for the Sox tonight against the Reds, David at WGN Sport and the forecast now from the WGN Chicago Weather Center. Klaus will decrease here this afternoon. We'll see some sunshine..

Kyle Hendricks Trevor Shirley Renaldo Lopez World Health Organization Cook County Erica Ron Paul 9.6% David Chicago 30% 19 tests 2019 60% Dallas 2020 Blackhawks Wednesday July 14th July 15th
How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:55 min | 7 months ago

How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

"Ellen louise. Curtis was born on november fifteenth. Eighteen twenty four in schuylerville new york to henry de curtis electra. Able she was the second of eight children was a farmer and the owner of a men's hat factory family lived a comfortable life made more lively each summer by dramatic influxes of tourists. Each year notable members of society would make their way to nearby. Toga springs ellen. Later wrote that the visitors turned typically dull surroundings into places that present the spectacle of a grand reunion of wealth fashion and beauty out of doors from a young age. Ellen was interested in fashion. after graduating from school. Ellen's father helped her harness her interest into a career via women's shop of her own. The millenary shop was quite successful and after a year. Ellen moved the shop to troy new york. And then to brooklyn in eighteen. Fifty-eight ellen married william jennings demorest a thirty six year old widower with two children. The couple would also have two children of their own a son in eighteen fifty nine and a daughter in eighteen sixty five. The family moved to philadelphia where they ran an emporium. It was there that ellen's career really took off as the story goes ellen and her sister kate or working on a system of dress making when they saw their african american made cutting address pattern out of brown paper ellen was inspired by the idea to create tissue paper patterns of fashionable garments for the home sewer some historians refute that the idea originated with ellen and her maid and instead suggest it was i had by a man who had become ellen's rival ellen's family moved back to new york and began manufacturing patterns. They also opened a women's store on broadway in the fall of eighteen. Sixty ellen and her husband became selling paper patterns and publishing quarterly. Catalog called mirror of ellen. Higher journalist and women's rights advocate jane cunningham croly to work for the publication. The magazine was filled with sewing tips and tricks pictures of accessories. Sheet music poetry and fiction. Each issue included a tissue paper pattern and sewing instructions. The magazine was well timed and circulation. Grew quickly a sewing. Machines were then becoming commonplace in middle class homes the magazine also featured contributors including writers julia. Wardhaugh louisa may alcott and robert louis. Stevenson ellen frequently made strong statements in the magazine and support of women in the workplace. She also took firm stance on domestic abuse prison reform and mental health treatment among other topics as the cadillac business. Thrived ellen and williams brick and mortar store on broadway. Grew to ellen and her sister. Kate adapted foreign styles into patterns and made samples for the store. The store is fashion. Openings became major social events ellen. And william store was also notable for the couple's hiring practices. They hired african. Americans at the store on equal terms as white employees long before integrated workplaces were a norm in eighteen. Seventy six ellen became a founding member of cirrhosis. the first professional women's club in the united states throughout that decade while most businesses were failing ellen and her family continued to do well according to historians up to three million patterns. Were mailed each year but ellen success didn't last forever in the eighteen eighties. Ellen's empire began to decline ellen and william had failed to patent their paper patterns a competitor ebeneezer butterick had done so successfully at first butterick stuck to men's and children's ware but by eighteen sixty seven he'd expanded to women's patterns to ebenezer butterick company remains the center of the paper pattern industry today in eighteen. Eighty five william demerist retired to devote himself to the temperance movement. that year. He ran for lieutenant governor of new york. On the prohibition ticket a decade later in eighteen ninety five he died that same year allen suffered a stroke and was left bedridden. She moved into the hotel renaissance new york where she died of a cerebral hemorrhage on august tenth. Nine eight she was seventy three years old ellen. Louise demerist took her love of fashion and made it accessible. To the everyday woman in revolutionizing the fashion industry she also committed herself to the betterment of opportunities for both white and black women though she failed to patent patterns. Her impact is still apparent today.

Ellen Ellen Louise Schuylerville Henry De Curtis Electra Toga Springs William Jennings Demorest New York Jane Cunningham Croly Wardhaugh Louisa Robert Louis Stevenson Ellen The Magazine Curtis Williams Brick William Store Brooklyn Alcott Kate Philadelphia
"stevenson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"It stays with you for life so you went from. Being a trainer to an attrition est to at a local gym to spending over ten thousand hours becoming a master in nutrition. Which of course led to this amazing book which you need to get fire. Nation eat smarter. What prompted this whole transition brother. This good and thank you john. It was one of the most incredible experiences hanging out with you hanging out with kate and her family. We all had dinner together. That was a great time folks..

kate john one over ten thousand hours
Washington DC landlords, property managers settle lawsuits over living conditions, pandemic evictions

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Washington DC landlords, property managers settle lawsuits over living conditions, pandemic evictions

"Settling lawsuits in D C over shoddy building conditions and other acts. D C Attorney general Karl Racine announcing a host of agreements that begin with the Northeast landlord who was sued almost three years ago. Thomas Kay Stephenson, who runs to rent controlled apartment buildings, and Dean would was accused of forcing tenants to live with rats, Roaches, mold and inconsistent heat and hot water. Stevenson is now paying more than $600,000 in restitution to tenants and district penalties. Another owner who operates a building on cue street in Southie. He was also sued, agreeing to address security and gun violence around the property. And Racine also says the property management firm Lincoln will pay more than 17 Grand to D. C for improperly evicting tenants at war ones. Yorkshire apartments during the pandemic. Kenzo FEA W T O P News

Attorney General Karl Racine Thomas Kay Stephenson Southie Stevenson Dean Racine Lincoln Yorkshire
Chief: Capitol police were unsure about using force Jan. 6

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Chief: Capitol police were unsure about using force Jan. 6

"The U. S. capitals acting police chief says officers made some mistakes during last month's riot Yogananda Pittman's giving new details about the police response to the attack in a statement submitted for a house hearing tomorrow she says officers did not properly locked down the capitol complex once an order was given and did not understand it when they were allowed to use deadly force her statement fills in crucial details as lawmakers investigate what went wrong Pippin took over the force after chief Stevenson resigned under pressure following the attack despite what she called internal challenges Pittman stressing officers acted heroically Sager mag ani Washington

U. S. Capitals Acting Police Yogananda Pittman Chief Stevenson Pippin Pittman Sager Mag Ani Washington
House fire on Chicago' South Side

Bob Sirott

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

House fire on Chicago' South Side

"Some breaking news and a little bit of drama unfolding this morning in Chicago, Bob two alarm fire is burning in a couple of residences 27 12. South Lowe. And we've just seen video from our helicopter this morning of a firefighter jumping from one roof of one of those buildings to another roof to escape of what is have become an inferno there. Mayday has been issued there. That's a call for help for the fire department personnel that are on the scene. We believe this is a two story brick residential home that now is communicated to some other buildings there. And fire two alarm fire now burning and so we'll have more on that. As we go through this morning. Let's see address against 27 12 south low so that would be right off of the Stevenson near hall stead on the

South Lowe BOB Chicago Stevenson Near Hall
"stevenson" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

02:54 min | 8 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"Today if you have been e before guys. Hey i'm dan. I'm the host of the epa podcast and he gets all forms of legends from around the world experts. If you will tell you all understand you and improve your performance this jaws. We have another expert this man. He hosts the number one health. Podcast in america which is being touted number of times over. His name is shawn stevenson nash. Sean is an absolute boler block. He has credible cold. Sleep smarter number easier and now he's released another cold eight smarter both of which are topics that i love to come here so the topic today specifically we discuss around his lightest eight smarter where the first word eight is so apparent to me everything that i do smart. Well i try to keep op. Goose say ended discussion. We just go about sean. Saad journey himself how he can't raised today and it's truly remarkable it's food because Sean was once touted as a very strong athlete. Prospect and then.

Today america Sean Saad today both dan first word shawn stevenson sean number one eight epa
"stevenson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:58 min | 8 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I always have guessed introduce themselves. Could you introduce yourself sure. My name is mel citizen. I am the sherve under. She ran the prince's power. I made a book called pneumonia. I meet another book called lumber jeans. And i am doing various other things right now that i am excited to one day be able to tell everyone about amazing and pronouns. Wise all is what i think is true. Is that true. Yes i just. I will respond to anything <hes>. He she it's all good for me <hes>. But like yeah whatever whatever feels right to you. I honestly don't mind preference. Do you have a preference. I prefer more than they <hes>. But <hes>. Yeah i don't know this is this is a this is a weird question for me. I'm very new to like <hes>. My gender journey. This is very new as of this year. So i don't have the best answer. But yet he and she are are preferred. I don't know that <hes>. Full first of all. Thank you for answering that. And i know for me that like this is actually. This is also a tough question for me. Because i don't have a specific need and because i don't have a specific need then i feel like saying any one thing is actually kind of limiting where i'm like instructing on something that you know i know some people really do have a strong need love. It love creating space for that. And then i think for me because this has been so this becomes a common question in our community especially on like on a panel or something and they have this haircut. I think there's a lot of assumption and anyway. It's not that i don't want to be asked. I simply feel that. I don't know what to say. I feel exactly the same. And it's something that is so it's like. I suspect that there is like a system of how i want to be referred to but i do like like you said i don't i almost feel like by talking about it at all. I'm like. I'm like drawing attention to the wrong thing it's like for me. Pronouns are sort of like they're part of how i interacted in the world like. I'm actually very bad about 'gendering myself. Because i don't use pronouns for myself just you know i but like it's more about how people refer to me and so when i'm over here doing my own you know gender thing and then someone's like what are you and i'm like i don't know i'm just like i don't wanna like kinda like get really into it and talk about. I just don't know. Yet i just don't like you said i don't have a huge need for how i want to be referred to. It makes you feel good when people care when people put the effort into lake. You know referring to me. In a way that i want to be referred to. But it's like it's a. It's a hard question it's just. It's so much bigger question than it. Seems like i think at first some just still figuring out. Yeah i hear you. Well and also again i would say that the complicated thing about this question and like so many things in life is that it's i think for some people less complicated than others and so and that's true for so many things right like there's there are so many things that people are sure about that. Other people are less. Sure about. And so i think for me. It's like i would never want to take away anybody else's opportunity to be sure about themselves <hes>. But you know i. I think that this is actually part of the core experience. Even pre opponent discussion right. It's like a closed. you wanna wear. How do you wanna wear your hair like. There's a lot of different things about the queer experience that i think you know. Some people like have a real sort of idea of what they're doing and and how they want to be seen in how they want to be understood in them. I think i think some of us don't and i think it's all of that is really great. Actually i think that's human experience rate could it. This is true also for like what do you want to do with your life. Do you believe in. God like all of the questions that are like the big human questions i think it's a sliding scale of understanding. Yeah i think this might be just like sort of anecdotal. But i feel like i've noticed. I've seen a rise in people who are pronounced flexible this past year. Especially and i think there's a lot of that is like you know we're all kind of i think everybody is sort of going through. It might not be gender for everybody. But everybody's kind of going through like we're all stuck at home. We only are interacting with each other over zoom and over the internet and like who. Who am i right now. I'm not having all input from other people in my life from acquaintances people on the street. It's just like you know like like how who exactly in line. How do i want to be perceived how to present myself in this in this space where we're kind of isolated and so i feel like i for me pronouns. It's like they aren't some deep personal thing. There's not like a true part of my soul that is like oh yes. That's how i want to be referred to and for some people it they really do. Have that but for me pronounced more of a tool. So it's like it's when you're going through life like i enjoy being called here because there's a friction there. I don't particularly look or sound like he. And so when someone calls me he that gives me like a little like a thrill because it feels like that tool that pronoun tool is someone who's like paying attention to me in listening to me. I have expressed that. There's a masculine part of me that i enjoy. And they're paying attention to that. And so that makes me happy.

this year one day first
"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:28 min | 10 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Museum just. I'm curious if hugh reflect at this remove on on that evolution. What's that ben about at heart. It's essentially terrific question because you're absolutely right. This is definitely been a journey of discovery. Had we succeeded with just providing legal services to people in achieving the things that we thought needed to be achieved. We wouldn't have kept looking but of course that wasn't sufficient until you keep digging and I would not have imagined that today. You know we. I'd be kind of working on a museum a memorial these reports but it really was about a decade ago. I guess or maybe twelve years ago. That i began to question whether the law was enough and it was largely triggered by this awakening. That even though i'm a product and brown versus board of education about twelve years ago. I i realized. I don't think we could win. Brown versus board of education to. I don't think our court would do anything that disruptive on behalf of disfavored people on behalf of marginalized people and that terrified me but it also energize me to recognize it. We were going to have to get outside the court and create a different consciousness. The question is why wouldn't we win. And it's because we haven't really reckoned with these larger issues of what it means to be a country dealing with our history of racial inequality. And what you. I think that language you used about Even you because you are. A product is culture as well when you thought about people in prison. You didn't think about their humanity. Thought about what they've done and even how we use. I mean you speak a lot about the narrative right like even how we use the language of. It's not somebody who stole something. It's a fee right. it's a murderer and also He has somewhere you said you. Slavery doesn't end it evolves. In the end you go back to lynching and there's fist presumptive criminality. Just by virtue of being black that then turns up in who is in our presents and who on death row at what you uncover. Is this callousness. It extreme callousness and coarseness and dehumanisation. That is so dot with you. Know who we want to think of ourselves and want to be. I believe As a country. Yeah yeah and i think a lot of it has to do with how we're governed. How're acculturated i think in the nineteen seventies part of what happened is that our political leaders began relying on the politics of fear and anger as a way of shaping policy and so we declare this misguided war on drugs. We say that people who are drug-dependent and drug addicted are criminals. And we're gonna use a criminal justice system to respond to that problem now. We could have said should have said that people suffering from addiction independently have a health problem and we need a healthcare response. But that's not going to generate the kind of energy that demonizing people for addiction will. That's how we got to the point where we were putting people in prison forever life without parole for writing a bad check. I presented people are serving life without parole for simple possession of marijuana taking away the minimum age or trying children as adults when you step back and you think about it. It makes no sense and they're thirteen states today. That have no minimum age. We're trying a child as an adult and you can't really rationalized that unless you are distracted by these narratives of fear and anger. And i think that is part of the condition. That gives rise to the brutality in the cruelty that i've seen in my work and of course when you are governed by fear and anger when you're shaped by you tolerate things you would never otherwise tolerate you accept things you would never otherwise accept and i think for me getting at that pushing people to step back from fear anger. Getting people to think more critically about this. Larger legacy of racial inequality is the priority now. And that's what led me into the racial justice. Work that we've been doing and this effort at trying to pull apart american history in a new way in a different way than the way in which we have tended to hear right as something we have to reckon with. Must reckon with on our way to reckoning with all of that all of these these what infect our consequences and so the reckoning that has to happen in this country has to be rooted in a moral awareness a moral awakening consciousness that evolves in a way that we begin to do the things that we must do if we're going to not only save the country but save ourselves and this is where for me faith traditions. Become so important. Yeah because in the faith tradition. I grew up in. You can't come into church. And say oh i want salvation and redemption and all the good stuff but i don't wanna admit to anything bad. I don't want to have to talk about anything bad. That i've done preachers will tell you. It doesn't work like that. You got the i repent and you've got to confess and they try to make you understand that that repentance and confession isn't something you should fear but something you should embrace because what it does is open up the possibility of redemption and salvation. And we kind of have a very religious society where we talk about these concepts on sundays. On yeah i haven't we haven't embracing we have employed them in our collective lives and i think that has to change I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with lawyer bryan stevenson.

hugh ben Brown krista tippett bryan stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"Completely different case. What's what was that case? If Iran interested in his sister's death many years ago ago named Lilly she committed suicide in a small coastal town many years ago and Ryan and six to think that there's something a bit suspicious that link these two crimes is mom suicide on the television and the suicide of. His sister always a guy. So that's why he gets soaking ball. We Lilly lived and San and. Harry lived was in his toddler place could we is comes and I think A lot of US probably know this top of the come little coastal town gives a little bit more feel about it yet wills prototype a town that I suppose expands of Osama and then shrinks of a up. It's very small the residents very close knit the nearest cops got a half an hour drive away, and one of the centerpieces in the novel is the transient fairgrounds, the gums third wireless code every year, and so this is kind of semi. Tacky rusted bolted together background ground with affairs wheel and a small rollercoaster in. Sausage Jars economies. than the Connie's don't quite fit in with the locals Aita So yeah, it's just that kind salt lighted some holiday spot and the people that live there. On the not that Lily died soon, Harry could not have been involved because they had a must secure alibi where. That they were writing to Paris wheel big round. And nobody realized that I will on the bears wheel and so they all the Ryder to let and there was stuck there all not. So the not that lily died, that were both suspended ten maters in the in Paris will get risk the morning after. So their alibis pretty wartime and yet it's kind of Sam feels a bit guilty her being up in that Paris will when he was at the time when she sees dot. Well certain is on back to the TV station. On the first page of Benjamin Stevenson's book the other side of midnight we have a description of a cameraman and I'm quoting he's chair was mounted to the saying wreak as the camera so he could swivel with it like a machine gun tarit. So it's billing attention of behind the scenes this Gareth Armant the cer of channel fourteen and checks describes him has key cup and play squash that shows he cares about the environment and plays a land sport with goggles on. Touted check get into channel fool and and what's he offering the? Yes, basically, Jack used to be a podcast a he's to true crime podcast, which were the events of the first novel, and he kind of the reason is in jail is because he intervenes with the placing mitigation more on on my his TV show more exciting. So used to work at channel. he kind of talks his way back in because you've got Harry's money in his pockets is do a good job and he basically tells the CEO that he will make another show if he can find it out but he also puts to account the ethical responsibilities in leading something like this go outlawed to that families and children are saying so that's kind of how he. Actively bit blackmail, and bid of enticement a convinces gas to letting dig around. Now there's a ratings will there's rumors. Beth washes. Now she's the executive producer on midnight tonight she may have been offered a job but she's got history was saying and she also knows.

Harry Paris Lilly Lily Ryder Gareth Armant Iran executive producer Ryan Sam San Benjamin Stevenson Connie US Beth Jack Osama dot CEO
"stevenson" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"This is a three CR podcast and this is published or not. A good crime novel keeps you guessing until the very end and that's Wash Benjamin Stevenson has written in the other side of midnight. Welcome. Benjamin. I remain. San With it was the compare of TV show. I'm quite a bit from the book. Midnight, tonight was light entertainment masquerading as news human interest stories laced with gentle political ribbing harmless stuff. Now, I'm sure everybody recognizes this talk of TV show said let's hear how San. Seen by the all the Benjamin. Benjamin, would you mind reading from page seven plays? The Inter music will and Sam stopped talking spot a career in television still struck by the dazzle of it. Sam Mid had seemed to switch Mr Benign breath calm blue eyes locked board on camera. One anyone guests. He had to be a bit of a one the kid to host his own nightly television show in twenty nine and he delivered on that expectation wall. Everything about him polished image conscious if left a giant smile is take like American Republican voters why and strikes This from page seven very early in the book in the pop schooled, we interrupt this broadcast. So tell us what happened to San Northampton as an acetates delivering his opening monologue Bagel charming for the cameras and in the middle of it, he starts look a bit nervous the crew dots kind of wound up Wisey a bit these game they stopped to think that maybe he's GonNa propose go in the middle of the live TV broadcast at the end of the broadcast reaches into his pocket and instead of pulling Anna a bring he pulls out a gun and shoots himself live television and ask state hardening of the book. One million people witnessed it not since brought the Harry just doesn't believe it was suicide. He wants. Jack. Quick to investigate it. Where does Harry Guard to ask Jack to take on this kinds? Harry has to convince Jack to take on the case from prison because Jack has wound up in prison at the end of the events of last novel. So yet he's going to go into the prison in kind of convinced Jack and Jackie bit hot on his luck he's been imprisoned by him. So He's Kind of Cain when Harry dangles a check a blank check by the in front of it. There's a reason why Jack needs money. Let's Ashish. Is Fama late, he's raised by single father and his brother had an accident he was in child and so he's in a permanent vegetative state. He's in basically in Jack. Is Paying for the upkeep of the end of life care because he doesn't want to make the decision whether to turn the machines off on the more money you can get out of this medication the longer. brother-in-law. Will. Stan is that Jack up outside the prison but this old sir? Ryan there and Ryan Wants Jack to investigate a.

Jack Harry Guard Benjamin Stevenson Sam Mid San Wisey San Northampton Ashish Ryan Stan Fama Anna Jackie Cain
"stevenson" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"You went to Alabama. To establish a center, a Death Penalty Defense Yeah center that evolved into the equal justice. Initiative, but you tell a story about the first execution. Witness I. Mean You know I was in Alabama, because Alabama didn't instill doesn't have a public defender system. There's no statewide public defender system. There were no resources allocated for people on death row. there are a lot of people getting execution dates, and so We open up this office with the hope that we could recruit some people to help us meet the needs of the legal, poor and. As soon as I got there, call from a man who was scheduled to be executed in thirty days, and he begged me to take his case, and I said look I'm sorry. I can't take cases yet. We don't have books. We don't have staff. We don't have computers and I. Never will forget him just. Stay on the line, and not saying a word, and then he hung up. And I was so unnerved by that that I didn't sleep much the next day he called me back. He said Mr Stevenson Annoy. You don't have your books in your computers, I. You don't have tell you can stop the execution. You don't have to tell me you can keep them from executing me. He's a please. Tell me you'll represent me so i. don't think I can make it these next twenty nine days. There's no hope at all. And when you put it like that, it became impossible to say no so I, said yes. We worked really hard. But couldn't stop that execution, and it became a defining moment for me because being with him on the night of the execution when he told me about how all day long people were saying. What can we do to help? You can get stamps to mail. Your letters can get you the phone. Do you want water? Do you want coffee and him? Finally? Saying Brian it's been so strange. More people have asked me what they can do to help me in the last fourteen hours of my life than they ever did in the first nineteen years of my life. It became really clear to me that we were not. We were failing people in some pretty profound ways, and I didn't want US continue failing, and that was kind of really important, because you can't do the kind of work that I do representing people were condemn without being prepared for some setbacks and some heartbreak. The central story in your book is about a case involving a man named Walter mcmillen. who was? Convicted and sentenced to death in. In a shocking way, yeah! overtly. Unjust. talk talk a little bit about that well, it was you know in some ways. I focused on that case because it's sort of a microcosm of all wrong. With our criminal justice system, including our collective indifference. Because water, McMillan was actually accused of a crime that took place in Monroeville Alabama. And MONROEVILLE. Alabama is of course where the famous Knob Hill Mockingbird Harper. Lee grew up, and that's where she said her novel to kill a Mockingbird and that community. has this just romantic relationship to that story? They've renamed streets after characters in the book. They closed the old courthouse. In Gregory Peck came to mobile to shoot one of the scenes for the movie. They've turned it into a museum. It is the thing about which the community is proudest of. And yet there was complete. Hostility to the idea of providing a fair trial to this black man accused of killing a young white woman. And, it was one of these outrageous cases where the crime takes place in downtown Monrovia. The police can't solve the crime months go by. and there's a lot of pressure on law enforcement which we frequently see. And, so they arrest Walter mcmillen, I think most of the new then that he wasn't guilty, and there were witnesses who had him in a completely different play. That's the really painful part on the day of the crime. He was actually with his family, raising money for his church. There were dozens of black people who were with him eleven miles from the crime scene and so. So when he was arrested, they all went to the sheriff. In the Popkin said look you've got the wrong person and they were ignored. They actually put Mr Macmillan on death row pretrial so for fifteen months before the trial, he was on death row until the the press would say deathrow defense. Walter mcmillen will be arraigned deathrow defendant Waldwick McMillan and you create this environment. and. Black folks would say to me. They'd say Mr. Stevenson it would have been so much better if he'd been out in the woods, hunting by himself in this crime took place. Because, at least then we could entertain the possibility that he might be guilty, but because we were there with him, because we know he's innocent. We feel like we've been convicted to yeah, and that sense that it's a that a community accusation that it's a community conviction community sentence was very palpable, and notwithstanding the romance of Tequila mockingbird. MOCKINGBIRD was just complete hostility to confronting the overwhelming evidence of his innocence. We found kind of evidence. The man who they got testify against him, admitted that his trial testimony was false. We tapes of him acknowledging that we had other witnesses, a police officer had been to his house on the day of the crime buying from the fish fry where he was selling money. Who could confirm is innocent, and still everybody just resisted in fought. I got more death rats working on that case, an.

Alabama Walter mcmillen Waldwick McMillan Mr Stevenson MONROEVILLE Gregory Peck Walter mcmillen. Monrovia Mr Macmillan officer Brian Mr. Stevenson Popkin Lee
"stevenson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I'm podcast and you wrote this book. That's great influence. So I guess my question to you is. Do you use a different method of persuasion persuasion or think about persuasion differently. When you're in a courtroom and arguing emotion or arguing that appeal then you do when you're talking to people outside the courtroom room is something different where there's is there something the same about those things? Yeah well I think you have to talk to the audience that you're in front of right and I mean as a lawyer I I I WANNA know. WHO's on the jury I wanNA know who's on the bench and I wanna find out as much about them as I can because I need to go where they are and get get them to follow me someplace where they can in my judgment? Make the right decision. Make the decision if I pretend like it doesn't matter who they are and where they they are with their presumptions are and just insist that they come where I am not going to be very effective and I think that's true whether you're in the court or out of the court so I speak in faith spaces and I. I WanNa talk about my faith in those spaces. I speak in other places where people don't respond as well to the faith tradition and that's not going to be a priority for me. I think the goal is to reach people where they are. I don't think we should imagine if we change laws that things will change. Its that hearts and minds. The thing I think narrative is really powerful in both places and both inside and outside absolutely to shoe lawyers appreciate the power of narrative they rely rely on facts and law and they are disappointed by the outcome. Because you haven't given people of having given people a a path to travel to follow you to that right place and it's really powerful and I think outside of courts We have to use narrative more effectively. And that's why we want to tell the stories of people who were enslaved in who were lynched and who had to overcome segregation so that we can appreciate the power of that struggle. But Yeah I think you have to for me at least I I wanna go where people are if I'm talking abroad and their set of issues that are distracting people in a particular country that I want to know what those issues are So I can be responsive to that even as advocating for something broader. You said once in your household gifts were microscopes not football absolutely. That's exactly right now. My mother my family. We didn't have a lot. There were times when you know The water wasn't working the way it's supposed to be couldn't do this. You couldn't take shower. You couldn't think about but my mother went into debt by us. The World Book Encyclopedia. We didn't have a lot of things we didn't have. We didn't have a TV but we had that World Book Encyclopedia and if my family was upset if my parents were upset I knew that if I went over and got one of those books and started reading it would change the dynamic in the space because in our family there was something hopeful about this ability to explore new worlds through books two words and that's a gift that and my grandmother gave my mother. My mother gave to me. And you know if I've had any success in these professions that require study and application of reason and all of that is because I you know I was loved by these people who thought it not wasteful to push themselves to create opportunities for their children to read. You said something else about reading which I totally agree with the number quite thought of it this way that by giving people who might not otherwise have opportunities to read you were giving them a gateway to something that they wouldn't otherwise have and that's imagination absolutely which is not just about creative imaginations not just about you know understanding you know the Harry Potter world but in the real world and they get older they can look at something and see it for what it is and how it could be different because they have learned the power of imagination from books. Absolutely no you you become someone who believes things you haven't seen which you have to if you're going to change the world if you're going to create more justice. I never met a lawyer here until I got to law school i. I'd never met a lawyer. I had to believe I could be something I'd never seen. You beat the first one but it's just that kind of relationship you develop with the world around you and right weeding will allow you to imagine things to think. Think about things to believe things that can be created. Even if they haven't yet been realized in science science it's amazing to me how scientists absolutely except except that they innovate they discover things. They believe that. Just because we haven't seen that planet yet that it that it could still exist and we think of science being the opposite of that but it's actually a fulfillment of that hope and that's you know if anything been what's defined by my career. I just believe you have to stay hopeful. I actually actually think that hopelessness is the enemy of justice. Injustice prevails were hopelessness persists. I think hope is our superpower if I've had any ability to do anything thing is because I've been willing to hope for things that haven't been seen yet. I'm GonNa continue with that because I almost persuade myself. The hat persuaded myself that. You're either hopeful where you're the problem. There's no real middle ground and we have to keep pushing keep wanting more more Dr mercy more compassion justice more opportunity. That's what animates by work. Why don't you think that a lot of politicians don't practice the politics of hope When all the evidence shows it's very powerful is it because they don't know how to do it? And the second best way to motivate people through fear so you have the runner up to I. Hope is fear and so a lot of people don't know how to practice hope so they do fear. Well I do think that I think that what we've seen succeed in too. Many situations are the politics of fear and anger. And I think it's easier frankly to try to govern through fear and anger then to inspire people through hope open aspiration and commitment to caring about one another. It's harder to be hopeful when we're dealing with very real problems you also have thank you feel an absolute. Everyone feels presumably some amount of anger and frustration. And it's about conquering that and appealing to your better l.. Absolute some people can't do that absolutely. And what's bizarre is that we know in our personal relationships. You know that that we shouldn't make judgments about our children when we're angry with them or we shouldn't make judgments about other people when we're fearful about them that really get a to a good judgment. We have to kind of push those things aside which can distract us from really seeing people. Clearly we see this obviously in courtrooms and and yet you see so many elected officials so many politicians reaching for those very powerful I think fear anger the essential ingredients of oppression of treating people. Because you accept things you wouldn't otherwise except you tolerate things you wouldn't otherwise tolerate and that's why I think rejecting the politics of fear and anger is so important and you don't have to do it. In the abstract it can be replaced with something hopeful. We have the highest rate of incarceration in the world. I I hope that that changes. I don't think our country can be a great country if we have one in three black male babies born in this country expected good to go to jail or prison if we put six million people on probation and parole. I think we should hope for something better than to be the world leader in incarceration and their whole host of things. I think we should hope for something better for our planet in terms of climate change in the kind of spaces that we create for our children. I think we should hope for something better than the kind of income inequality the quality that we see all around us. We hope for something better than seeing struggling families trying to cross borders because they're so desperate and traumatize in their home spaces that they would do anything going to get into this country. We should hope for something better than what we're seeing and I think that's the only way we progress. That's the only way we evolved. That's only way become a truly the great society and that hopeful note right Stevenson. Thank thank you.

World Book Encyclopedia Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"I am so excited to get this particular episode out to you unexcited because the person's will not about to make you listen to is someone who is so so charismatic on sage in fact. She is the guy who got me excited about. Solving the mind valley podcast in the first place backstory in shawn stevenson is an incredible author and broadcaster islam casts immortal held show which you should be subscribed to is one of my favorite podcast out there by far in this one of the trump podcast in the world right now is focused on how but it's also also focused on a remarkable story my favorite episode of the model podcasts episode where he goes through the history of this cola he goes through the history of coca cola sprite and all of these other drinks that billions of people put into their bodies and when you understand that his is a fascinating but you understand the manipulation that goes on behind the scenes to make you put so much hyper sponsor deal and that is what i love about sean style style. He is just so brilliant at getting these messages out now in this episode of the mind body or cast brought on sean to discuss something something that he knows best which is how to stop your own podcast and the same ideas here apply. If you want to stop a youtube chat so listen to this talk. This talk was delivered at nine bally's eighth incorrigible the particular theme of this as as was growing your influence. It was for anyone out there who wanted to grow the audience size our reach for themselves for the of this and sean across was the number one name on myanmar hi my when i asked myself who can i put on stage that did teach us all how to build a world-class forecasts so again if you are thinking about growing growing you instagram following or building podcasts or starting a youtube channel the idea you're going to hear here will apply to you. This is not just for podcasting stick shawn's method of thinking this philosophy here applies to matter what type of audience you're trying to build and in today's world but they said body insists assist matter in a way all of us get to be a media company what and whether you're trying to get out or service or even just grand yourself the next job interview being able to have an audience truly matters so listen to this podcast. Take a lot of notes and i wanna give you one tip. If you're driving i mean obviously listened to the podcast and trump remember as much as you can put it in action..

shawn stevenson sean youtube bally
"stevenson" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

They Walk Among Us

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

"Stevenson and the daily brothers run sacked the house looking for what they came for money but they culprits.

Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Backlisted

"Available Ayaan on the web so that is village green by the kinks and we're excited about talking about Miss Broncos Book. Ah some for several reasons one of which is that it is a classic of English village life and we all thought it would be fun to have a little village theme today's episode so the wake is indeed a village of hands where it would is a village go onto the bad potent. What was the link with Sam Riviera's pawn. I think there's a couple of links there and I think one is that that Miss broncos book is very very much self-consciously book. You are sitting there reading roads and the other thing is just this little thing. He was talking about money and for me. One of them is moving. Parts of the book is actually actually when the market gets paid. No actually it is genuine lead tearjerking because who ever thinks about that who ever writes about whoever writes about it and actually she is just two hundred pounds. It's life changing it changes. It does because she bloody. He needs money 'cause she's. She works. It's not fair easing fairies giving you stories. I'm going to give some topics. I think this book is about village life. It's a book about books as a book about the mechanics of writing and publishing which is of course very atlas station and it's also a brilliant example example of the sort of novel republished but in the last twenty years which is we would call Middle Brow Middle middle-brow as we talked about this on the cross before is a legitimate term adopted by academia rather than I'm not being snitty by using the word Middle Brow Shelley. When did you first read this book or come across this book so I have to soften one is a direct onsite question which she's actually that I was in hotshots bookshop and I really really really wants to come to read and honestly. I wish I could remember what had happened in my life that we we all have everything happening. Our lives now that means we need to comfort read and of course you know. Booksellers are gods and this particular books that are just look. This is the key you need never ever have picked up ever and I actually loved it. Can I tell you another story can I can. I tell you how Sarah waters waters heard about Miss Bengals book she had about me sparkles book because I'm a real dickhead so basically I am really really bad around people whose work I hugely hugely admire and I'm just awful and I have just learned the I literally physically need to staying away from people because of a really bad thing I did to offer. Miller wants and I'm not kidding. I'm not kidding so I'm all I was the thing that she was at and I can't tell you how much I love her work. I mean words don't express and she was in the room and I said to the person that was wave shit. Okay don't worry I'm going to press my back against this wall and not go near her. Things will happen and after a while the person always I said I think it needs to be a bit braver and pulled me towards her and I- involuntarily curtsied bobbed much as perhaps a maid in one of her lovely books might Bob and she was absolutely charming and love issues she was writing the paying guests at the time and we were talking about all the things she'd read lally willows and stuff like that and I said Oh you must read sparkles book and she said that's fabulous. WHO's it by and I was so struck I said R L Stevenson and she kind of went from nineteen thirty four. Ah Yes thinking Kaneko yes R L Stevenson and dwayne. I think cried into some crisps Bart's. It's you were almost right because Stevenson is a second cousin of our L. Stevens here we go. I'm going to do the bio right now. Dorothy Emily Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in eighteen ninety three. She was the daughter of one of the Lighthouse Stevensons. Robert Louis was her father's father's first cousin and she lived in Scotland all her life is everything I got stage. I just had a sudden thought back keys but it's okay and she lived in Scotland all her life which is interesting when you consider that she wrote about English villages many of her books she didn't go to school but was educated by a governess started to write stories when she was eight. She applied against her parents. France wishes sat and passed the entrance exams for Oxford University and was offered a place but her parents for better to go fearing university degree was an unforgivable unforgivable deterrent potential suitors so you certain when you read Miss Broncos book the wishful Film Element is coming through loud and clear rights so here's the thing about d e Stevenson she wrote her first book in Nineteen Twenty three when she was US thirty one a second did not pay for nine years in nineteen thirty four she published Miss Bungles Book and thereafter she wrote a normal year selling over four million copies of her books in Britain and three million in the USA. She is amazing. If you go on the Internet she's and and there are numerous American fan sites devoted to her work. There is a fantastic website with a page on it where you can download what's called. Susan's never ending the Stevenson's spreadsheet which cross references every character and location in all those fourteen novels because Stevenson light to use the same names locations locations and characters and have them pop-up like proper world building her you know and so noble or sequences of novels that appear to have nothing in common with one another. She would thread together for her for her own amusement. I think those are cushy. New Readers like to play the game along with her. I have I just I have absolutely love this. This is like a large steaming Mug of all ix on a cold winter's night. It's just the most fun to remember when Doc Syrian very impasse in with here talking about g cooper we said what's good about Judy Kufa's books and he went pleasure. This book is I found this Solo. How incredibly enjoyable shedding because it's because persona so closely your there's no Jew. Do we think we could offer the listeners are like in a nutshell is set up of the book is all right. I'll give it a go okay so miss. bonkers book is the book within the book. Say Misbehaves uncle lives in what at the opening of the novel seems to be an absolutely picture postcards chocolate box English village and she has written. This incendiary book called disturb. Oh is it colder server pace. No go on it's cool. They chronicles rules of English village and her publisher changes the title so this incendiary book is about what she's really going on in an incredibly thinly disguised silverscreen. Her villages called Silver Stream. She calls it. Copperfield in the book and the People are she just as a little name substititions like themed substitutions fool them and what's interesting is that the book within the book the Gins with setting the scene with a peaceful little village and then a goat skin clad golden piping being boy comes through the village. Piping Music and the music sends people crazy and sub huge anarchy and subversion Russian occurs. People's lives disrupted and actually pretty much. That's what happened in the book. We are reading people with one another. Can you read this. A A little bit about one of the character's lives in the village is reading disturbed the pace for the first time yet. I will so the character who's reading Sarah Walker. She's the doctor's wife. Mr Abbott who was mentioned in this extract is the editor of of disturbance of the peace or chronicles English village and the known not too plume is John Smith so Misbach wrote the book but the Non Diplomats John Smith the one that's she's at the point with golden boy has has arrived the golden boy piped on through the High Street and up the hill and then down again past the vicarage and the old church which slumbered quietly likely by the river wherever he went he left behind him on rest and strange disturbance people woke up cast aside the fetters of conventional behavior and followed the primitive impulses of the hidden natures in some hearts the clear sweet music woke ambition in some it won't memories of other days and prompted kind actions. Some of his hearers would driven to acts of violence in others. It kindled love at least John Smith said that the music kindled love but Sarah Walker who knew something about that commodity something more she suspected than John Smith would have said the emotion which the boys pipe kindled in the heart of its here is was not love at all but passion after this things began to happen in Copperfield incredible things major waterford discovered that he'd loved Mrs Mildmay for four years without without ever having suspected it so he rushed across the road and found Mrs Mildmay in her garden and propose to her with fervor which almost made Sarah's eyebrows disappear appear into her hair. It may be remarked in parenthesis that Sarah's eyebrows wear a distinctive feature darker than her hair and beautifully arched this was the love scene which made such an impression upon Mr Abbott it was a passionate scene and had either been written by somebody who knew very little little about such matters somebody who knew a great deal it was either very innocent or else it wasn't and I love the lightness of the pros. The pros is really really really good. It appears to have been simply chatted down and in order to do that. You have to be really good writer so that's the first thing the second thing is. This book was published in the Nineteen Thirties. That scene is like a brilliant Mickey. Take Ove- kind of strand in English fiction the time in which we might include Sylvia Townsend Warner we oughta make him the great go pan I after making this so idea of of Magical Pantheon stick things occurring in the English countryside is a is a is a trope in that era we had I take the Mickey Alba in this context seems really funding the company but it also goes through don't you think into sort of Elizabeth Jenkins's World Uh Tortoise and the Hare which we did this sort of the things bubbling under kind of supernatural things bubbling under English villages the book itself is brilliant because Uh nobody can tell whether it's satire or just innocent and Miss Broncos book is exactly the same you know I mean you know. You never quite sure how on top of how clever she is being. I think she's actually being very clever..

R L Stevenson Dorothy Emily Stevenson Broncos John Smith Sarah Mr Abbott Copperfield Sam Riviera Nineteen Thirties Sarah Walker Ayaan Mickey Alba Middle Brow Middle Scotland Sarah waters Middle Brow Shelley Mrs Mildmay hotshots bookshop Stevenson
"stevenson" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"So I was watching. My father's his dad was dying. And I knew from the growing up that my grandfather was not kinda gentler type, especially my dad. But I watched the tenderness is he's eyeing. Yes. My dad he's a sit with him and hold his hand as he passed. So I asked him my father said over you last time he showed a infection. He's the last time. I remember I was too. I said, so you're sixty three. So I don't think I'll wait that long. We weren't to be big huggers. Goes, you know, he's a construction worker and hard head and hard hat, but we learned to sit and watch television. Just hold hands. Wow. To on that. I want. Everybody listening to take a second. And imagine yourself sitting on the couch holding hands with your father met my dad, and I have become close this year. And we've had a lot of breakthroughs, and we have a very new relationship things are incredibly good. However that makes me squirm it makes me feel intensely uncomfortable to imagine myself doing that which in the spirit of what we're working with here. I think I think I will probably I'm trying to get the courage up here to say, I will I'm quite do. I'm going to propose that to my father next time. I see him. He's actually going to be here. The week end. After this podcast airs man that sounds like digits on terrible. But I'm going to do it. And I will report back how it goes. So who you heard there his name is herb Stevenson, and I've been holding onto this recording for the right time. And this week was the right time, and I got to go back through and listen to the whole conversation in I feel like this is such a a rich conversation, and I'm pretty honored to be sharing it, and I'm going to start us, right? Smack in the middle of a conversation. Herb is from Ohio. He's been doing work with men for twenty to twenty five years. And I was connected to him last year. He comes from a native American background and has just an immense wealth of experience and knowledge around this entire project. We're taking on at every man. And so he's had a pretty wild career. He's designed and successfully led change in the turnaround of financial institutions nine of them to be exact he's worked as a corporate consultant for firms as large as Fannie Mae..

herb Stevenson Fannie Mae consultant Ohio twenty five years
"stevenson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Here is Bryan Stevenson, give us one time. You will not regret it. Bryan. Stevenson, welcome to the show. Thank you. It's good to be with you. I wanted to begin by asking you about something that you say often and every time I've heard it. I've thought that's interesting. But I'm not sure I quite understand it, which is the opposite of poverty is not wealth. The opposite of poverty is Justice. What do you mean by that? America's credibly wealthy country. But we've always had enormous stratification the wealth of the colonies was built on ah genocide of removing native Americans from lands that they occupied we kept their names, but we made them leave. There were millions of native people on this continent before white settlers came and we killed them through famine Warren disease, and we didn't really knowledge the injustice of that the unfairness of that. Because we were persuaded that our economic security and our political development required. The acquisition of these lands. And it began this way of thinking about wealth that is disconnected from the inequality injustice, the abuse the oppression that is sometimes used to create that wealth, and that that habit was reinforced through slavery and. And we created great wealth in new territories and the south and the colonies by relying on enslaved people and the labor and the benefits that that created without any real thinking about how that wealth was sustained by abuse and oppression and inequality and injustice, and even after slavery. I don't think we ever really dealt with the unfairness of exploiting people for decades centuries. And then doing nothing to help make them whole. And it wasn't just formerly enslaved people. It was poor white that came to this country as immigrants who were also often abused in working places in minds. And this idea has emerged in America. That wealth is created by people with great talent in great ability. And we value wealth, we respect wealth, we admire wealth and. We disdain the poor. We blame the poor. We fought the poor for not achieving more economic security, and we have a I think really unevolved attitude about about how to address poverty when I look at our history of using power and abuse to sustain and creates structural, poverty and institutionalize it without any Shane. It makes me question with we truly understand what poverty represents there are a lot of countries across the world that are poor. But in most of the developing more ninety percent of the people eighty percent of the people are poor..

Bryan Stevenson America Bryan Shane eighty percent ninety percent
"stevenson" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"Come out and say, hey, hey, hey, hey, you get back out there in the hallway. You wait until your lawyer gets here. I don't want any defendant sitting in my courtroom without their lawyer, and I have to apologize to say, oh, I'm sorry, your honor. I didn't introduce myself. My name is Brian Stevenson. I am the lawyer and then the judge will laugh and the prosecutor will laugh and I'll make myself. Flaps. I don't want a disadvantage, my clients and the burden of this presumption which manifests itself in our criminal Justice system where people are wrongly, accused wrongly, convicted or unfairly. Sentenced is the reason why we can't talk about slavery. Terrorism segregation without talking about mass incarceration without talking about police violence without talking about this contemporary presumption of dangerousness in guilt. The continues to burden black and Brown people, and we live in a country today. We're one in three black male babies is expected to go to jail or prison, and nobody cares. Nobody's talking about it, it's not a political issue. It's not a campaign issue, and it is the same indifference to a crisis impacting African American communities that existed during the time of segregation that existed during the time of lynching that existed during the time of slavery. And if we don't wake up, if we don't challenge that indifference, they'll be new. Manifestations fifty years from now. One hundred years from now in part of the vision for me of this museum, I want to create a country one hundred years from now, black and Brown people are not presumed dangerous and guilty will we acknowledge this history where we recover from it, where we don't want to celebrate the mid-nineteenth century by talking about how glorious romantic it is by simply ignoring slavery. Well, we don't talk about how great our country has been without acknowledging this hardship, this brutality, and I just think we're not going to get there until we create spaces like this museum. I want to take you back to a story that you told they believe it was in a TED talk that you gave where you were invited by a woman here. And Rosa Parks was, yeah, and she wanted to hear. And then she used said Rosa Parks, told you that you would be tired. Tired, tired. By the work. You are undertaking hair the equal Justice initiative, and then the woman who invited you said that you needed to be brave, brave, brave. Yeah. Where do you draw the strength. To be brave and not be tired when what you're doing is it must just sap you? Yeah, of all kinds of energy. Yeah. Well, you know, I feel really fortunate in some ways to be doing this work in Montgomery because when you live in a place like Montgomery when you work in a place like Montgomery, it's impossible to ignore that you're standing on the shoulders of so many people who've done so much more with so much less. You know, I sit in this room and I look out that window and sometimes when I get really overwhelmed and really challenged a look out the window, nothing about the people who were trying to do what I'm trying to do sixty years ago. And what they had to frequently say is my head is bloodied but not bowed. I've never had to say that and as difficult as the task that we have to face as hard as the work is. It's been made easier because enslaved people found a way to endure and survive. And when I think about the kind of courage, it took to do that. When I think about the kind of commitment, it took to do that. I just don't feel like I'm entitled, I don't even feel like I'm allowed to say, I'm tired. I can't do this. I can't do that. I feel like I have to do it because I'm being watched by the souls and spirits of the insects. I really do feel that this street, it's so historic right down three blocks. Here's where people were brought. They will be paraded up the street where on the site of a former warehouse, all around here spaces where people were lynched. Rosa Parks was pulled off that bus three blocks from here, Dr. king's churches. This I feel like I'm being watched by the souls and spirits of the enslaved, the lynched, the segregated and with their sacrifice with their struggle with their heroism and their courage and their dignity. I can't actually stop. I can't not do what has to be done. And the beautiful thing is that when we actually do something that I hope is good, like this museum that I hope is. This memorial, I just feel watched by those souls and spirits. I feel encouraged. I hear them may be saying, okay, you keep doing that. That's a good thing. Now that you heard the elephants Bryan Stevenson, you can find the full interview on apple podcasts, Stitcher, Washington, Post dot com. Slash podcast or anywhere else. You listen to podcasts.

Rosa Parks Brian Stevenson Montgomery prosecutor Washington apple Dr. king One hundred years one hundred years fifty years sixty years
"stevenson" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"stevenson" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"There you have it my conversation with sean stevenson folks out of everything that we covered if he could only implement one thing just one of all just one thing out of everything that we covered what's the one thing that you can do such that by doing it would make getting better sleep easier or unnecessary i'll share with you i absolutely have used flux i have it on my computer i have that setting enabled on my iphone at eight thirty pm all of a sudden the blue light get stripped away and it doesn't come back till 700 am and my wife and i have made it a real priority to be in bed by ten o'clock there were times when we were up watching game of thrones or house of cars and all of a sudden it's you don't you're watching you're episodes and all of a sudden it's eleven o'clock at night and you're going to bed when i heard that from just tend to to you wanna get just does hours will give you the majority of the results of your sleep all of a sudden boom it just became priority sorry policing we have to go earlier otherwise gotta go to bed what's the one thing you can do folks is always gift fish show has made an impression on you please leave a review on your podcast player of choice note this episode specifically because all those reviews come to us we get to see and we could see your feedback and most importantly other people see it and it may inspire them to take action and listen which you know the impact of that can make thank you so much if you were not yet subscribe to the show go ahead and hit that subscribe button so all future episodes while automatically be downloaded cheer device with that go get a good night's rest give it a shot see how you feel about your field awesome who will see in the next show.

sean stevenson