10 Burst results for "Steven Weissman"

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Campfire lawsuits from the twenty seventeen wildfires, and it's January bankruptcy filing. Steven Weissman joins us to discuss what this profit loss might mean. For ratepayers. He's utility expert at UC Berkeley at a former administrative law judge at the California Public utilities commission. I guess first off probably no one is surprised that PG would have a drop in earnings. But did you expect this big of a drop? It was really good going to depend very much on what the company decided to set its. Priorities to -ccomplish, and and so one potential outcome was as we've seen that they actually have been taking some of the net revenue said available in the short run. And if used to try to get on top of its efforts to stiffen up the system to help prevent future welfare. So this is not not entirely surprising outcome. What do you think this might mean for electric rates, we pay? The letter is really don't have any particular direct impact on rates if the company was collecting a enormous amount of net revenue that might put downward pressure on rates. I think the company is indicating right now that it's spending money where it can it's trying to preserve. Some net earnings to help reassure investors. But it'll probably use this as further argument for why it should be granted the rate increases currently requesting. Do you think that there needs to be some fundamental changes? And and if so what do you think needs to become contemplated here where we're going to have a very big challenge with the wildfire costs. If we continue to have the types of losses that we suffered over the last two years money has to come from somewhere. It's gotta come from utility ratepayers shareholders or come form of higher insurance premiums higher taxes or uncovered losses if their people a future wildfires. There's a tremendous amount of economic liabilities state from I'm going wildfires. And so there's really no alternative no acceptable alternative to finding a way to reduce your city of wildfires. And what do you think of governor? Newsome's ideas, thus far he's right now working on thirty five projects across the state to mitigate wildfire risk with courage to see the the wildfire risk reduction strategy becoming a much higher budget priority for the state. These projects are all moving in the right direction. However, frankly, I don't think there enough. I think what we're going to need to have some kind of of standards established by the state and enforced by the state that apply to all people who manage property, whether it's local governments the state itself or private citizens standards. That will ensure that that everybody will be taking the steps they can take to reduce the intensity of what wildfire feeding fuels on their land. And if not face some liabilities from from having failed to do so. Okay. Thank you, so much pleasure. Steven Weissman is utility expert at UC Berkeley. And a former administrative law judge at the California Public utilities commission. And I'm Tara Siler KT news support for K Q E D comes from the corporation for public broadcasting and San Jose center for the performing arts presenting national geographic's symphony for our world,.

Steven Weissman California Public utilities co UC Berkeley Tara Siler KT Newsome San Jose two years
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For ratepayers. He's utility expert at UC Berkeley at a former administrative law judge at the California Public utilities commission. I guess first off probably no one is surprised that PG would have a drop in earnings. But did you expect this big of a drop? It was a really good going to depend very much on what the company decided to set its priorities to Catholic. And and so one potential outcome was as we've seen that they actually have been taking some of the net revenue said available in the short run and abused at to try to get on top of its efforts to stiffen up the system to help prevent future welfare. So this is not entirely surprising outcome. What do you think? This might mean for electric rates, we pay the the letter earnings really don't have any particular direct impact on rates if the company was collecting a enormous amount of net revenue that might put downward pressure on rates. But I think the company is indicating right now is that it's spending money where it can. It's trying to preserve. Some net earnings to help reassure investors. But it will probably use this as further argument for why it should be granted the rate increases as it's currently requesting. Do you think that there needs to be some fundamental changes? And if so what do you think needs to become contemplated here? We're going to have a very big challenge with the wildfire costs. If we continue to have the types of losses that we suffered over the last two years and that money has to come from somewhere. It's gotta come from utility ratepayers shareholders or come form of higher insurance premiums higher taxes or uncovered losses if their people a future wildfires, there's a tremendous amount of economic liability state from angling wildfires, and so there's really no alternative no acceptable alternative to finding a way to reduce the overall intensity of wildfires. And what do you think of governor? Newsome's ideas, thus far he's right now working on thirty five projects across the state to mitigate wildfire risk with very courage to see see the the wildfire risk reduction strategy becoming a much higher budget priority for the state. These products are all moving in the right direction. However, frankly, I don't think there are enough. I think what we're ultimately going to need to do is have some kind of of standards established by the state and enforced by the state that apply to all people who manage property, whether it's local governments the state itself or private citizens standards. That will ensure that that everybody will be taking the steps they can take to reduce the intensity of what wildfire feeding fuels on their land. And if not face some liabilities from from having failed to do so. Okay. Thank you, so much pleasure. Steven Weissman is utility expert at UC Berkeley. And a former administrative law judge at the California Public utilities commission..

California Public utilities co UC Berkeley Steven Weissman Newsome two years
"steven weissman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:50 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KGO 810

"And that is exactly what they're doing. Good afternoon. I'm Pat Thurston. Holy majoli's. Okay. This story is actually a few days old, but it comes out of the biz journals dot com PG any electricity rates could double from more wildfires, according to a utility expert. Okay. So in a memo that was prepared for the governor's office. Gavin Newsom office, Steven Weissman who is a lecturer at UC Berkeley's Goldman school of public policy. He is also a former administrative law judge at the C P. You see the California Public utilities commission. He stated that if wildfires continue as they have in the past two years, the average electricity customer statewide would experience a fifty percent rate hike in the first year. Here. He calls it. Simple math. I call it balderdash. He said peachy any estimate thirty billion dollars in damages for twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen fires but the operating revenue of its electricity. Business is less than thirteen billion dollars a year. Why spin argued that while one time losses can be spread over years by borrowing money that strategy doesn't work if the losses recur every year and if future fires with similar liabilities occur? They say. Yeah. PGA would not be able to cover the new losses by selling bonds. But you know, what I'm thinking I'm thinking, you know, what how about they just start doing their jobs. So that they stop killing people. Look part of what's going on. And we've discussed this before part of what's going on with the wildfires in the state of California has to do with the long drought that we suffered under. I think we're officially out of the drought. Now, I think Caroline would you find out are we officially out of the drought? I think we are. So we don't really have to worry about that. So much right now another part of it does have to do with global climate change with global climate change. A lot of different things are happening that affect foliage that affect the Beatles that affect wildlife, it affects a lot of things and all of these things are intertwined all of it works again there. But the other thing we know and a major player now in this that we are finding out is PG e we are out of the drought. Thank you and page it that was my producer. Caroline copeland. Thank you, so much PG is one of the factors here because they have not done what they have to do in order to ensure. Sure, first of all of the greatest safety that they possibly can replacing things to ensure safety where it is necessary and keeping the damn area cleaned out. They have to keep the brush they have to keep the areas where the lines are above ground and their traveling through these they have to keep that clean. They have to clear the brush away, they have to keep the smaller trees away, they have to clean it a Cape it as clean as they possibly can end. They're not they're not doing it. Peachy any has been implicated in some of these fires fires that have resulted in death. So this is now our killer utility. And so what the killer utility is saying is golly these fires. You guys are holding us responsible. And when you do that, we're going to have to charge you. This this utility this PGA has been so utterly irresponsible has has been guilty of malfeasance, and we become aware of the malfeasance for a long time. I think they got away with it. Because we didn't know to ask the questions we didn't realize how much culpability they might have. You know, a change though that San Bruno San Bruno made people go what? It did what PGA did not do. What are you kidding? There may be others. There may be other gas lines that are causing dangerous in areas around the bay area. What you mean, my neighborhood could be affected what an explosion people died homes were destroyed what when that happened. And we asked so many what we didn't like the answers we were getting and so when other things have happened, and we hear PG name. Boy, we want some answers, and we're not gonna just take the company line. We want investigations we wanna know what's going on. And when PG immediately comes out and says while there may have been a problem at such and such we believe that we had an issue. Well, okay. That right. There tells you investigate more because they're already admitting it, and then we have the issues that occur in when the fire start, and when they spread and they spread with kind of speed that they have they're causing massive devastation, massive dis-. -struction and yes death. But what they wanna do is. They wanna put it on the shoulders of the ratepayers. So for all the things they do wrong. They don't want to be held responsible. What about some of the people PG the people who have established the policies? They're the people who are cutting back on on expenses, or for whatever reason they give they're not doing following the safety procedures that they need to be following. What about those people facing actual criminal penalties? What about that? Instead when we think of a company when we think of a corporation corporations are people, my friend, according to Mitt Romney. We don't think about them and their Cup ability as being actually criminal. They are criminals they have been charged criminally. So when are they going to have to pay criminal penalties? When are they going to have to pay jail time? When are they going to have to pay for that utility to be broken up? It's a massively large. Utility. And apparently, they can't handle it. So so there's that they want to raise the rates fifty percent. Guess what else? They're doing this. This is just a hoot. This is just absolutely amazing. The other thing that they're doing is. They are increasing the rate of pay for the the CEO that they have just hired to replace their previous CEO. They wanna double the pay to the new CEO. I kid you not they wanna double the pay for the new CEO at PG, and and they have an, but by the way, they're in bankruptcy right now. Yeah, they're in bankruptcy. So the bankruptcy judge would have to approve this increase. So here they are. They're in bankruptcy. There are major concerns about their culpability with the wildfires. And whether there. Doing what they need to do as the season. Is opening up here where more wildfires may come? Are. They doing the right thing. So these things are going on. And now, they're incoming chief executive officer Bill Johnson will receive an annual base salary of two point five million dollars for a three year contract. That's more than twice the base salary of former CEO geisha Williams. This guy is finishing up a six year stint stint as president and CEO of the Knoxville, Tennessee based public utility, Tennessee valley authority. He's also going to get on top of that. He's also going to get a one time transition payment, you're gonna transition payment. Kenny, I don't even know what that is for from one job to another. That's what it sounds like from Tennessee valley authority to PG any. He's getting a one time transition payment of three million dollars on his first day on the job. Oh, a Moran. I mean, we were you here. When I said two point five million dollar a base salary annual base. Owlry? Who could live on anything? Okay. So he's going to get that plus an annual equity award of about three point five million dollars. I mean, this is stunning to me. This is absolutely stunning to me. Stunning. Oh, by the way, the last CEO resigned in January on the eve of PG. Bankruptcy collected a severance package of two point five million dollars in cash ridiculous. Yeah. But they want the ratepayers they wanted double the electricity charges if there are more wildfires, and I gotta tell you this if peachy and is responsible for those wildfires. Something else has to happen. Now, if we had the opportunity we would move we would say, we don't want our electric city from you. We want somebody else to provide us our city service because you are inept incompetent dangerous that is what we would say. We don't have very many choices not where PG any operates some small areas. Do have choices. They have municipal utilities. That's what it seems like needs to happen with the entire PG any that is much as possible. This sucker needs to be broken up, and we need to establish it in. In. Smaller increments that are manageable. That are manageable eighty eighty eight ten it just doesn't work to throw money toward payouts. You have to fix the problem. So that there aren't more wildfires in lines blowing down in the wind. And you know, all the all the complaining that was going on. It wasn't that long ago when they were going to the bankruptcy judge and saying and we wanna pair employee bonuses. What you're in bankruptcy your criminal corporation. You have been charged criminally. You are a criminal company. You're in bankruptcy. You are liable for all of this damage. You have killed people. And you wanna give bonuses to your workers? I mean, I think it was just so offensive. It was so offensive to hear that. Let's go to the phone calls. Eighty eighty eight tennis the telephone number eight oh eight oh, eight ten and you know this. Here's a couple of things I want to tell you real quick. And then we'll get your you. Get your phone calls. We need to find alternatives. We need to be seeking alternative forms of energy. And in one regard, maybe PG Aeneas doing us a favor. Maybe they're pushing us toward making that a priority in our lives. There are certain things we need to start making priorities in our lives. You know, getting off a fossil fuels getting rid of PG knee in your life. And and whatever you need to do is an alternative form of energy that has to be some we focus on and getting rid of plastics in our lives. These are things we need to start focusing on very very quickly. And right now PGA may push us over the edge in that one area. So that we do establish it as a priority and start making changes eight ten is the telephone number eight oh eight oh, eight ten. Do. You think PGN is worth it. Do you think the CEO is worth a do? You think the bankruptcy judge for the northern district of California? Should okay? This compensation package. Let's go to Dennis. He's in Vacaville. Hey, Dennis welcome to K GO. Dennis. Hi, you're on the air. Get this from speaker over the phone you exceeded now, I can tell the difference. California. I think shares part of the responsibility by not upgrading their water plan, and this wonderful snowpack is going to melt with the global warming quickly. This summer is not going to be there like the old days. Snow some of it alter the summer is not going to happen. And it's gonna flush out through the Golden Gate. They need to start pumping water to the central valley with the whole idea that the farmlands that have had to Auster Cise away from farming. We don't have water for you is what they've been told. They need to give them the all this good water. And if they have to damn it somewhere. So they can hold it. And I don't mean these Ridler dams. I'm thinking damn out ocean rise, maybe the Golden Gate or Richmond centre Phil bridge, or the carquinez strait s- something like that where you'd have freshwater saltwater barrier, and you can control the excess flows, but hold it. I'm sorry. Dennis. I don't understand how this relates to PGN in the wildfires in that if you can get that water into the use in the valley, the plants will event will breathe it out. You'll go up make summer clouds, and what would have been little wisps will turn into clouds will get summer rain. And we'll go back to a climate similar to say the nineteen sixties where we didn't have the dry, right? Yeah. But but but we, and it's the state's responsibility. Not just PG e. Okay. All right. I'll buy it that the state has to has to make changes in terms of its water management. I will buy that. Because I think there are things that go on. There have been a lot of arguments about the diversion of the river. And there are a lot of things that go on in terms of water, man. So I'll buy that droughts have occurred though in California history throughout our history. They are likely worsened because of the issues of global climate change. None of that though. Absolves PG any of its responsibility for not maintaining these areas that they're wires cross not maintaining them properly. They have liability in that regard of when the fires are starting there and win it's because they have been negligent. And this is the area. I believe that we need to not allow them to foist responsibility onto our shoulders. We have to say, no, we are not paying fifty percent more in order to pay the penalty for your mouth seasons in this. We want you to do the right thing and do the right thing. I so that fires are prevented. Remember smokey bear. Eight ten is the number. This is K G. O Pat Thurston on K G O. Hi, I'm RIC Edelman, and I have. Feeling that retirement is on your mind?.

PG CEO California Dennis president and CEO PGA Pat Thurston PG Aeneas California Public utilities co Caroline copeland Gavin Newsom Tennessee valley authority Beatles Mitt Romney San Bruno San Bruno Steven Weissman Goldman school of public
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steven Weissman, America's lecture at the Goldman school public policy at UC Berkeley, and former director of Berkeley laws energy program. Also, former administrative lodge in there's something in the report about administrative law. Judges let me go to you on this Marie about Nali stream Ulli streamlining regulatory proceedings and reforming. I just wanna flesh this out a little more. But also actually changing. The number of commissioners delegating. More to staff and lodges. There's long Venison's. I think among critics of the PC that that there is things take away too long there and that there's too much deliberation. And I think what go pick are the president of the commission would say is. That's exactly how this commission was set up that it is a sort of plotting regulatory process, the notion, go to streamline and. Yeah. And I think that there's been these sort of echoes of this for a while. And so yeah. One of the things they're putting out there as the idea of basically shortening proceedings, putting less in front of commissioners, more in front of staff lesson front of administrative law judges, and I think that you know, one thing that I think almost everybody would hope to see is one of the other ideas, which has to expand their budget. I think that you know, if you look at the service territory of what they are charged with overseeing. And if you compare it. Two other states in which the regulators actually have far less on their plate that, you know, California's really far behind, and you know, I think that one thing that we thought we might see more of an here. And that lawmaker still may consider which is kind of splitting up see it self and taking some things off of their plate. So yes, they're looking at electrical and gas lines, but they're also responsible for overseeing lift an Uber. These transportation companies even though they're not responsible for taxis. And so there's a lot of questions. I think about the efficacy of the and weather there sort of core mission of safety can be realized when they have so many things that they're responsible for overseeing. And professor Weissmann did spend some time there. So he might have some thoughts on this setting rates and improving enforcement. And the transmission costs came on this reporter artificially, low which many had assume for quite some time, professor Weissmann gonna get you to open their. Yeah. Well in terms of. Of the the issue of of trying to put more of the decision making to PC and the staff level. I think that there's there's a suggestion in the report that it might be necessary to change to some extent to do that. I think that there's a lot that could be done now in terms of of expanding on what's really done for a long time, which is taking the experts on the staff and delegating to them. The back background work in the analysis necessary to make some of these perhaps more minor decisions. And then lining up that decisions to be reviewed by administrative law. Judge then passed on to the commission the commission when it meets every couple of weeks. They have a lot of things that are consent agenda, meaning that they they don't spend a lot of time reviewing them or have an open public debate about those subjects, and so there are tools that are already in place to try to move some of the more minor things largely off the plates with the commissioners and ministry of lodges. I think that going beyond that to actually give final legal legal authority to the staff, maybe problematic because of the the issues related accountability. And and to additional review, but I think I think that there certainly is more room for tightening things up there in terms of trying to shorten proceed. Eating's a single is a lot of a lot of callers on the line. I want to get as many as I can here. But I wanna go back salute. Just a quick question to you, though, if you could because Maria alluded to Michael picker who actually said at a commission meeting that commissioners said a majority of board appear to have little experience with building corporate safety programs and. What are your thoughts on that? Well, the spend a little early to scrutinize all of the new board members and be able to reach a conclusion on that. But I think struck by something that was said by a commenter it Commissioner commissions meeting yesterday who talked about the challenges in developing effective safety culture at alerts institution like this. He he he said that there's no he's he's turn. There's no slam dunk way to reorganize the staff or to change the personnel. That's going either manically give us that better safety culture. And I think again, there's going to have to be reliance on much closer monitoring and oversight by the state and by the public utilities commission. That speaker also pointed out, for instance, that on the federal level the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a resident inspector and each one of the commercial nuclear power plants who lives there who works with the staff has full access to all information on site with PG, we'd be. Talking about the need for much more than one person. In residence. I'd certainly like to see the commission establish an office at PCP PT's headquarters and have experts are inside who can be asking hard questions all up and down the line. I'm gonna go to our callers. Now, I read a comment by Lisa song. Opinions. She writes, we need to stop yours with genie abuse too much power for an inept corrupt organization public. Utility monopoly. Must be accountable to the people not the stock market. And here's our first caller, Jake. Join us you're on the air. Thanks for taking my call. Again. I've got a comment regarding the bankruptcy. I it's interesting that the board of directors filed for voluntary chapter eleven to be immediately replaced by new board of directors. I'm curious why that was not vision made by the new order. These phone records. In seconds. My comment on that is that my wife actually worked for g need the division that handle tree clearing outlines day. And you know, basically, why response program and noted that they've had an exceptionally hard time finding trackers that are willing to do this tree trimming work for them. Because of that chapter eleven bankruptcy. That seems like they kind of themselves in the foot on this. Bankruptcy by making it more difficult to do what they desperately need to do. Jake. Thank you for them. Well, I share J phone fusion and sort of. Bewilderment let's say at the process of the oversight of this incredibly important. You know ages. Business like I have the same questions. Like, okay, wait. If the entire board of three members of thirteen member order getting fired, and you have an interim CEO who's actually making the call on these new board members. I think it's their interim CEO John Simon who is a longtime counsel lawyer for genie is a sort of lifetime or there. But I think it is. You know, I think there's a lot of valid questions that he's bringing up that I have been asking as well. And the truth is I think this gets to some of the weirdness of the sort of pseudo public private relationship that the state finds itself in with an investor owned utility. There are so many decisions being may behind closed doors that the state really has no power over our hand in there is so much that is writing on the way that Wall Street reacts to this in terms of shareholders, but also in terms of bonds bond ratings, and what the agency is decide in terms of how much organization. Can borrow money for you know, I think it's I find it sort of I have not to my liking gotten sort of sufficient answers to those questions yet. And I promise that I will continue ask him all your dog. We we have a great deal of faith questions. And here's Thomas joining us from the vital Thomas. You're on the air. Good morning. Yes. Good morning. Can you hear me? Yes, sir. Excellent. So I my point of view is possibly a little bit different. Now, I am not saying that PG knee shouldn't get their power lines in order and such. However, I think a lot of the issues is deferred maintenance on properties. So I am actually I do work in the field. And I noticed that there are many properties that are completely overgrown we have what's quote called a plant or a fire safe list of plants, which is just kind of B S all plants or fire-resistant as long as the properties are maintained properly. And I just think it's a little bit. Output it a little bit unfair to point all the finger that PG knee when there are many properties that people just don't maintain. There's so much undergrowth and brush and fire ladders and all this stuff that there's proof and examples of a maintain property being able to withstand fires much better than one that has so much undergrowth. I think you make a reasonable point. Yeah. I thank you for it to let it stand unless anybody wants to fine. Right. I mean, if you read fifty pages of the governors report, he gets up that this is a discussion we've been having the truth is taped genie out of it. If I maintain my home, my Michael, you don't and we're next door to each other. You know, I'm not I don't live in a bubble. Right. So those are all making a difference. The question is I mean in the campfire, for example, the thought is and the belief is and has. Said that they think this is probably what happened that one hundred year old huge tower that had not been properly maintained fell down and sparked that so I think I think both are true. And I think that that something that the state is grappling to get its arms around, which is the the personal responsibility piece along with the sort of private company is and then of course, what the state needs to do it self. Stephen, please, go ahead. I was just gonna go from Chris. I he says we must remember PG news bound to geography and service before lawmakers in California, PC moved to change PG's corporate structure. It's circumstance must be considered to avoid a similar problem with the different name utilities. Even those privately owned do not operate with full freedom. Sorry. Go ahead, professor Weissmann. Oh, that's fine. I just wanted to say that I was gratified that the governor's report lead with discussion about how to better manage the fire prone lands. We're talking about about reducing the intensity of wildfires. Last caller was just discussing and I think that that ultimately, of course, we're not going to eliminate Welfare's. Even if if the tilles can be perfect in their management of their system, we thousands of wildfires here. Most of which are started by lightning and other things we need to do is have. I believe have a centralized tap down. System of stabbing standards for individual property owners accountability, and then working with local governments and federal government to make sure that that comprehensively we're doing things across the state to reduce fire risk, but we will continue to follow and stay on top of this story Mercer. Thank you for joining us. Thank you, Steven Weissman for joining us. Good to have you with us. Good to have you our listeners if you want to continue to discussion, go online to our website dot org slash forum..

professor Weissmann Steven Weissman California Jake Michael picker Nuclear Regulatory Commission Berkeley interim CEO Marie Goldman school UC Berkeley president America PG Thomas director Commissioner reporter
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"PG eight which faces more than thirty billion dollars in potential wildfire liabilities. We're going to discuss the proposals, and we're gonna get the latest on PTA's recent leadership overhaul and chapter eleven reorganizations. And let me tell you who is joining us Salah goes is here with us in studio politics, correspondent K Q E D Colo's political breakdown podcast morning Morita also say good morning. Steven Weissman who joins us America's lecture at the Goldman school of public policy at UC Berkeley, former director of the Berkeley law energy program. And he's also former administrative law judge for the CPU, see the, California, Public utilities, commission and policy and legal adviser to three PC. Commissioners. Welcome stephen. Iceman? Good morning. Good morning to you. Let me begin with humorous. This report come out of kind of a roadmap really from cover Newsom to protect the utilities really summer saying. And I think that at least from class where wildfires are concerned, but there's a possible path here in terms of that protection. Let's outline for listeners. Yeah. So I mean, I think it's important to know first off that Nissan was very careful not to specifically endorse. Anyone plan? He his offices framing. This is a menu of options for lawmakers to sort of consider as they move forward with both the short term concerns of stabilizing the utilities, not just PG any the other two. Big investor on utilities have seen some real sort of threats from Wall Street around their ability to borrow capital and southern California and San Diego. That's right. And then there's the sort of longer term concerns. Obviously, how do we not have a repeat of the past two years every fire season? And so. I would say it's a fifty page report. There's a lot in there beyond the sort of. I hate to say, but obvious things around, you know, forest, maintenance, and sort of preventative measures. I think the biggest ticket items are three different proposals. For potentially stabilize the utilities. Two of them are some sort of insurance fund that utilities possibly other parties would pay into those essentially act as a backstop if a catastrophic fire occurred, another is to change that much debated liability lie in California called inverse condemnation, which essentially says that these utilities are responsible for any damage, even if they acted responsibly. It's going to have to stay constitutional right into the governor did lay out that they basically feel like the past two that is to go to the state supreme court petition the state supreme court and asked them if they will consider kind of reinterpreting the law because the way that the constitution has been interpreted by the courts, I is a big part of this. And that if the court sort of agreed with a different reading of that law that possibly could be changed through the state legislature. Now, that's not to say there's any appetite to change that law in the state legislature. But it is interesting that Newsom at least put it on the table topic. There's so much depends on the state legislators legislators response the response of the legislators to what he's put on the table here. But he's also put on the table. Even the possibility of breaking up a genie in a smaller government agencies. Yeah. I mean, they essentially say that no option should be off the table in could ING potentially making Genia smaller a set of smaller utilities government takeover. I mean, I do think that one. One of the challenges with those proposals, which I haven't seen anybody really seriously put forward any details around is that, you know, arguably, the aging infrastructure is the biggest problem, and so if the state were to sort of acquire the company, they would acquire that mess themselves, and then there's an entire section on PG any they did not pull any punches all say, and they really took them to the woodshed. They said that, you know, something that I've lawmakers say which is the tilles decision to voluntarily filed for chapter eleven reorganization under the bankruptcy code. This is a quote punctuates more than two decades of mismanagement misconduct and failed efforts to improve it safety culture. And so I do think that you know, Newsome is trying to sort of walk fine line here between what his office and lawmakers really see as a sort of untenable option, which is these utilities failing which I do think it's important to know. In our other guests Weisman can talk about this in depth. But rape pairs lose out. No matter what like there's not a situation here where PG can just get punished and those of us paying our electricity bills. Don't see an impact on you know, what those bills look like. But I also think that, you know, from political perspective Newsome is really striking very different posture than his predecessor. He knows that. This is something he's going to be judged on and watch Newsome since he was mayor. I was interested. I feel like on a personal level. Like, he's pretty mad at PG any, and there's always been a lot of feeling in San Francisco that folks like Newsom were very close with utility this is their hometown here. You know, he's the former mayor, but I think that he is you know, when he was mayor they we saw some of their underground quipped explode that of course, predated San Bruno where people died when their neighborhood blue app from a gas line explosion. And then he's into the fires of recent years. So that's all. Say I don't think there's a ton of level for this utility right now. And I think that Newsome is going to go as far as he can to hold them accountable. But I think what that looks like again isn't mentioned governors language in the language was very curious to me when he talked about the fact that they won't quoting her this direct mislead or manipulate the people California that sounds pretty hopeful, particularly when you think about the fact that there was a meeting of the just yesterday during which the commissioners express skepticism about PG's, new board and its ability implements safety. Yeah. And I mean before those board members were actually publicly announced Newsom unusual step of sending a letter a public letter he made public essentially blasting their first slate of directors. I know that they changed a couple names. I think there's a lot of questions in California about both. These tenure directors and the new head Bill Johnson who's coming from the Tennessee valley authority who I think has a lot of success in his past of cutting costs and bringing down debt, but. Husband questions around safety and other projects that he's overseeing. And so yeah, this EP had harsh questions. Lawmakers have had a lot of hard questions. I think this is something where in some ways they have no control of her, right? This is a publicly traded company. It is not a state, you know, they're regulated by the state, but the state in theory doesn't have a lot of power over them. I think what you're seeing the governor and others, including the state regulators, the CPU see look at is what power they can exercise in terms of win PG any exits bankruptcy because they will have to agree to any rate increases the state will. And then I think sort of in the court of public opinion, there's a sense that, you know, pushing this company in a different direction as something that they're trying to do. And again that you know, potentially other options could be on the table if they don't like where they go. But it certainly I think speaks to the culture that we've seen repeatedly at PG any that they did sort of buck what the governor law. Makers were expressing concerns about and still put in a slate of directors that has largely representing Wall Street interest, and we can get into that. But I have other stock is going up after one of about twenty percents Newsom gave this report on Friday. And it's not just that. It's that we've seen the stock which I think was around forty dollars last year last summer before the campfire after the twenty seventeen fires plummeted to seven dollars, a share ripe for the bankruptcy is back up to around twenty haven't checked today. But there's a sense on Wall Street in let me say this one thing that has come up. A lot is how many Wall Street investors and bond agency is have flooded the state capitol in recent weeks to make the case that stabilization of these utilities is necessary. It is a case that the governor in lawmakers seem to have heard, and I think that there is a sense on Wall Street that which is true in some ways that we need these companies to survive to keep the lights on and their probab-. Gonna come out looking pretty good at the end of this bankruptcy, which is sort of remarkable, given they're in chapter eleven and let me go to student Weisman on this because the lobbyists are all over Sacramento on this Maria just indicated Steven Weissman, and we talk I with you about the CPS's since we've been alluding to. There's been a lot of criticism that the past they met too much behind closed doors and work with lobbyists too much. I think there has there been a number of issues. I think that have made it a little bit of a challenge for the commission to maintain the level of credibility with the public. I think it ought to be able to do I is as you mentioned. There has been a culture the public commission for as long as I've known to entertain private meetings with parties they have an interest in the outcome in proceedings, and this is relatively of an outlier approach. Most economic regulatory agencies around the country don't allow for that that kind of communication, but it does happen in California. And so the question is how do best make sure that the things that are behind closed doors, I reported out and people have a chance to contest, but they the challenges commissioned his face here also has strong historical element to which is that the commission. I think for many years really the emphasized its work in terms of trying to protect the safe. Safety of utility infrastructure in the state, we saw that with the San Bruno accident after that I remember looking back at and or reports from the commission for decade prior to that to see how often the commission was talking about point safety, and basically very virtually never talked about pipeline safety and in the staffing. I think in terms of the number of people who were placed in safety roles reflected that as well. Well, now, you have much more of an emphasis on safety and the governor's report he talks about even ramping up the safety expertise, even more. But I think that part of what the commission has been left up in has been a fence. I've probably across the Sidey for many years that government shouldn't hit should not have a heavy hand in terms of of overseeing and regulating the companies within its jurisdiction. And I think that in this instance, we've got a got a company that despite often changing its management structure despite different rules being put in place in despite having as much as a billion dollar disallowance imposed on the company after the San berno accident still has had a history even post San Bruno of falsifying pipeline safety records and doing other things to to make safety lesson than the top priority. How do you get on top of that? And I think that that part of that has has to involve having much more close oversight, at least of this particular company for the near future in order to to ask critical questions about the way incentives are structured in the way that the utilities plan to resources to they have enough inspectors place themselves. They have enough money put into improving if it structure, this is going to require I think much closer. Management for this company going forward, regardless of what happens with bankruptcy proceeding. And you've pointed out that if that management is not scrutinizing carefully. What's going on the rates are going to skyrocket, and that's going to become too risky with Fiji name borrowing. More and more and the rates really going to be to to some extent not only much higher, but it's going to be much more of an effect on things like climate change in really the environmental concerns of many have. But you've gone kind of out on a limb in some ways, I want to get your thoughts about this to talk about undergrounding as a real plausible way or option to be thinking about the future. Because most people say it's just too expensive in can't be done. And you've kind of looked at the math and the numbers. And I think I don't know if you're a strong, advocate, you're saying it's plausible can be maybe should be done. Well, I think that the assumptions that have been underlying our willingness for the last hundred and forty years at this point. Just rely on nineteenth century technology and put polls in the ground attack. Some wires to them our decision to do this based on the assumption that this is the least cost way to provide utility service. It's that's interesting in and of itself because I don't think there are a lot of things in our collective efforts that we require to be the least cost approach all the time. We we don't apply that to most of our decisions, but we do apply at here. And and the the assumption is proving to be not not not inaccurate accurate one since it appears that this type of nineteenth century infrastructure carries with it a lot of potential liability. So if you assume for instance, building a big new transmission line for a billion dollars. That's it's going to cost that assumption may not pan out. If in fact, you're going to have to spend several billion dollars to recover to pay off liabilities related to fires. That are triggered. By that particular line. And so I think that I don't have specific numbers specific proof yet. But I think that the that what is clear is that we need to be more honest with ourselves when we look at the cost of one alternative versus another. We put lines above ground. We put them below ground. Do we try to avoid the need? For more transmission lines by building more generation close to where the customers are. We rely more on distributed resources like rooftop solar these questions, I think that may have different answers to them. If we're honest with ourselves about the potential costs attached to the poles and wires approach..

California Newsom PG Newsome Steven Weissman Weisman stephen San Bruno Salah UC Berkeley Goldman school of public San Diego Morita Q E D Colo supreme court director America Bill Johnson
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning. Assange is attorney Jennifer Robinson says the charges should serve as a red flag. This president means that any journalist can be extradited for prosecution in the United States. Having public truthful information about the United States is on his supporters argue that WikiLeaks is a news organization protected by freedom of the press. His critics say his tactics jeopardize national security. British judge says the US must produce its case for Assange extradition by June twelfth Windsor Johnston. NPR news Washington in Louisiana. A suspect is in custody in connection. With a string of arsons at three historic African American churches. Eileen Fleming of member station. WW NO reports the suspect has ties to the local law enforcement community, the three century old churches were burned to the ground over a ten days span and Saint Landry parish more than one hundred miles north west of New Orleans. The suspect has been identified as twenty one year old Holden Matthews the son of a sheriff's department employees at Saint Landry. Parish officials have so far not branded it a hate crime. Governor John Bel Edwards said the case remains under investigation. What was young man's motive wolves? I don't know what was in his heart. But I can't say it cannot be justified or rationalized these were evil the churches were empty and no one was injured for NPR news. A my lean Fleming in New Orleans US stocks are lower this hour. The Dow's down fifty eight points at twenty six thousand ninety eight. This is NPR from K Q E D news. I'm Brian watt. Froze right now are working to make repairs to the most heavily traveled section of San Francisco. Airport's runway network an airport spokesman says an inspection at dawn found a twelve inch hold on runway twenty eight L the airport has closed the runway to patch the area. Twenty eight L is expected to be closed until three this afternoon. That work is expected to cause delays for several hours SFO says over two thirds of all flights at the airport travel in that area where the whole was discussed. Covered. PG customers would see their rates double if utility caused wildfires continue to sweep through California as they have the past two years. A UC Berkeley expert warns of this in a new memo K, Q E politics. Correspondent Maria logos reports the two page memo prepared at the request of governor Gavin Newsom office says it's not just PG any customers who would see skyrocketing. Rates U C Berkeley. Lecturer Steven Weissman says if the state continues to experience devastating utility caused fires most electric city customers in California would see a fifty percent increase in the first year alone. And to me the answer really lies in more aggressively and comprehensively working to reduce the intensity of the wildfires. That are inevitable. Wiseman says ideas floated in years past like letting utilities borrow money to pay for wildfire. Costs are only sustainable if the states stops experiencing. These types of blazes. I'm Marie Salah goes K Q, eighty news her story and more. Is it news dot org? Thanks for listening. I'm Brian watt. Support comes from breach Bank,.

United States Brian watt NPR Eileen Fleming New Orleans Assange Governor John Bel Edwards Saint Landry California Steven Weissman Jennifer Robinson intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning WikiLeaks president Marie Salah Gavin Newsom Holden Matthews San Francisco
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dangerous precedent for only organiz ation and journalists in Europe and elsewhere around the world, this president means that any journalists can be extradited the prosecution in the United States. Having public truthful information about the United States. She says her client will fight extradition of the US earlier today. British judge found Assange guilty of breaching the terms of his bail, which carries a sentence of up to a year in jail. Assange's defense maintains he could not expect a fair trial in Britain because the UK's intention was to quote, secure his delivery to the US. Work any faces much more serious charges. The long-serving president of Sudan, Omar al-bashir has been overthrown in an apparent military coup. Many demonstrators reportedly are disappointed with this news Lima Gandhi has the latest from Nairobi Dan's minister of defense, Awad Muhammed of an announced that the military had arrested president Bashir who ruled the country for nearly thirty years vol months of demonstrations, which culminated over the weekend with thousands of people protesting outside the army headquarters demonstrators had been cheering throughout the streets of heart tomb since the early morning activists told NPR that many of their calling had been released from state prisons, but the excitement quickly turned into crushing disappointment. When the defense minister said that the military was the spending the constitution dissolving the government an implementing two years of military rule before any democratic elections will take place. Protests may continue for NPR news. I'm Lameck Condie. In nairobi. This is NPR news. From news. I'm Brian watt. PG customers would see their rates double. If you Tila caused wildfires continue to sweep through California as they have the past two years. A UC Berkeley expert warns of this in a new memo cake, you ED politics. Correspondent Maria logos reports the two page memo prepared at the request of governor Gavin Newsom office says it's not just PG any customers who would see skyrocketing rates UC Berkeley. Lecturer Steven Weissman says if the state continues to experience devastating utility caused fires most electric customers in California would see a fifty percent increase in the first year alone. And to me the answer really lies in more aggressively and comprehensively working to reduce the intensity of the wildfires. That are inevitable. Weisensee ideas floated in years past letty utilities borrow money to pay for wildfire. Costs are only sustainable if the state stops experiencing. These types of blazes. I'm Marie Salah goes cake. You eighty news. The judge in the trial of two men charged with thirty six counts of involuntary manslaughter in the Oakland ghost ship warehouse. Fire is expected to decide whether mayor Libby shaft should be ordered to testify opening statements in the trial for Derek Amena. And max Harris are set to begin at the end of the month. A defense attorney say chef has critical information about the shortcomings at the fire police and building departments at the time of the fire. City officials say the mayor had no knowledge of the warehouse or the defendants before the incident, I'm Brian watt.

United States Brian watt NPR president nairobi California Assange Steven Weissman Europe PG involuntary manslaughter president Bashir Lameck Condie Omar al-bashir Gavin Newsom Libby shaft Sudan Awad Muhammed
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And attorney general William Barr says he wants to investigate the origin of the Russia investigation will ask one Republican Senator if that's the right move also more on the political unrest that is rocking. North africa. Today is Thursday, April eleventh Ethel Kennedy turns ninety one years old today. And the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. The Justice department has charged WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in an alleged computer hacking conspiracy as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports the charges were announced following Assange arrest earlier today in London. The Justice department has charged Assange with conspiracy to commit computer intrusion. The indictment alleges that in March twenty ten Assange entered into an agreement with then US army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to help manning crack password for US defense department computers. The indictment says Assange also actively encouraged manning to provide WikiLeaks with more classified information. Manning didn't give Wiki leaks thousands of classified government documents, which Wiki leaks then made public Assange was arrested Thursday by British authorities in London. The Justice department says it is working with the United Kingdom on a Sandra's extradition. Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington. A British judge has now convicted Assange of skipping and earlier bail in twenty twelve that's when Assange fled to the. Ecuadorian embassy to avoid questioning in Swedish sexual assault investigation by President Mike Pence travels to the US Mexico border today to receive a briefing on asylum seekers from member station. K J Z Z Mitchell. Mary SCO has more pencil tour the border fence around the gals at border town that has been among the calmest of the cities along the us. Mexico line Novellus has not experienced sheer numbers of asylum seekers seen in places like western Arizona or the Rio Grande valley of Texas customs and border protection has warned that the situation in those areas is not sustainable as agents arrested more than ninety thousand people the majority families and children travelling alone last month Pence's visit comes just a day after the homeland security department was left with an acting secretary following the resignation Sunday of Kirstin Nielsen for NPR news. I'm be muddy school aircraft maker Boeing is undertaking. A global campaign to try to regain the confidence of aviation regulators and the airline industry. This follows deadly crashes of it's seven thirty seven max jets, and THEO Pia and Indonesia NPR's Russell Lewis has more the move by Boeing as part of an effort to speed approval of changes to the seven thirty seven maxes flight control systems. Boeing has already shown some of the proposals to pilots and now the manufacturers reaching out to skeptical. Aviation regulators airlines the plane has been grounded globally since last month in two accidents which killed three hundred forty six people the plane's automated flight control systems forced the planes to nose down control ably. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration initially said the seven thirty seven max was safe now Boeing hopes the software changes and demonstrations will be enough to sway aviation regulators to allow the plane to return to flight status in the next few months. Russell Lewis NPR news on Wall Street. The Dow is up twenty one points. It's. APR from K Q E D news. I'm Brian watt. PG customers would see their rates double if you Tilleke caused wildfires continued to sweep through California as they have the past two years. A UC Berkeley expert warns of this in a new memo K, Q E politics. Correspondent Marie Salah goes reports the two page memo prepared at the request of governor Gavin Newsom office says it's not just PG any customers who would see skyrocketing rates UC Berkeley. Lecturer Steven Weissman says if the state continues to experience devastating utility caused fires most electric city customers in California would see a fifty percent increase in the first year alone. And to me the answer really lies in more aggressively and comprehensively working to reduce the intensity of the wildfires. That are inevitable. Wiseman says ideas floated in years past like letting utilities borrow money to pay for wildfire. Costs are only sustainable if the states stops experiencing these. Types of blazes. I'm Marie Salah goes K Q eighty news. A San Francisco supervisors committee is expected to vote today on a proposal to ban cashless businesses in the city, a growing number of local businesses have moved away from cash, preferring credit cards and electric methods supervisor valley Brown says that shuts out people who don't have access to banks. It's kind of appropos to be able to go in and have a credit card or Bank account to get that that ATM card for any business to say that you cannot shop here without that is actually discrimination Amazon announced yesterday that it's Rick and mortar stores will now accept cash. I'm Brian watt, kqed news.

Julian Assange Boeing NPR Justice department us Chelsea Manning Brian watt Marie Salah Mike Pence Ryan Lucas Steven Weissman Ethel Kennedy Russell Lewis London Washington Mexico William Barr North africa Lucas NPR
"steven weissman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"And Katie green on talk radio five sixty K as some of the other stories on K as so let's see here. My goodness electric city rates could double. We okay. We had we talked about this yesterday. I have a dear friend who loves or tesla loves it. And that's cool. I'm good with that those tesla actually look pretty darn sharp. And then we learned the story earlier today they've got a security feature. If you so much lean on a tesla. Just lean on so much tesla security cameras start rolling. You ain't gonna get away. If you try break it with that car. It was a robbery just solve because of that. That's the beautiful thing. So PG is saying electrobi- rates could double so. Okay. Beginning back to our friend. She was just shocked stunned amaze because her personal genie Bill gone through the roof with tesla. Of course, it has your car. So the story is in California wildfires continue to be as well if California wildfires continue to be as devastating as they have in the last two years, and we'll probably have another big wildfire summer. Why we've had an incredible rainy season, and there's gonna be lots of foliage. And once we get to August and September that fully is going to be super Super Dry, and all it takes a spark. So of California wildfires continue be as stating is they have been in the last two years. And by the way, you can look at the history of the state. There have always been wildfires truly. I mean, basically, California you have two seasons you have flood season wildfire season. That's just the way we've always rolled in this state. It's always been like that. And by the way, most of the fires in the state are not caused by PG Andy lines and are not caused by careless people there caused by lightning. If you really wanna get down to it. So nature strikes it self. So if California while fires could tend to be as devastating as happened in the last two years, I'm reading here. Millions of customers electrobi- rates could skyrocket fifty percents and threaten the state's ability to execute some his top clean energy initiatives, the likes of which I don't particularly care about. But they're saying here. This was Steven Weissman, America's lecture at UC, Berkeley, Goldman school of public policy. This is what he's saying to governor Newsom. The problem in the state is we already have some of the highest if not the highest literacy rates in the country why because we've gone so green. We don't use coal anymore. A source of electric city. We're trying to go all solar and all wind, and that's very very expensive. And by the way, every time you go solar. Go wind. There's got to be a backup. It's called natural gas. So we put herself in this pickle where our energy rates are already sky high. Okay. Next story. I haven't seen. I didn't read this one. I only saw the headline. So this has to do with this kid. They've Nick bossa. So he deleted his tweets about Trump and capper Nick because the Niners might draft him. So he's this big kid from Ohio State university's huge. He's he's gigantic and his older, brother. Joey already played for the chargers. So this is one of those brother brother, you gotta wonder what's in there. Gene. Right. This kid this massive is he is he is a giant. So he called capper Nick a clown. He's called beyond say's music complete trash. He's pro-trump. So he deleted tweets because he said, well, there's a chance I might end up in San Francisco what's too late but out there, but you know, what you'll be welcome this show anytime. You're part of the cast of family any day come on come on. This is just amazing political opinions are so toxic. Now that. Players can't I guess if you're a super super Libya could pop up all you want. But if you're conservative you better shut up. That's okay, Twitter will make sure those tweets don't get out there. Anyway, he'll be he didn't need to delete them. Nobody seeing them right? It's it is amazing. How politics can actually destroy someone's career at this point. It really is stupi. It's stupi Trump wasted. Okay. Let's see what else we have from the Sherry. This Sherry h R Block says their average customer paid twenty five percent less than taxes this year, even California. Well, that's the average customer. Hashtag Trump tax cuts say thanks Obama for the tax cuts. Yeah. Palo alto. High is bribing students to take the state assessment tests. Yeah. So Palo Alto school district. Obviously extremely well regarded because it's pally. It's too high schools are ranked best in the bay area. And so now the district they're saying is a low performer one area getting students to take the state assessment tests. So these are the tests that we take that you don't have to take any more. Right. Sherry is that the deal those are now they're different now. That's that's the graduation tests. I think the high school exit exam. Yeah. Exit examining more. No, get rid of it. I don't think they got rid of it. So these assessments I think they're they're being given Cording my daughter being given next to the next two Tuesdays. And it's just I think it's a measure of how the schools are doing. Okay. And then the Palo Alto high school. Apparently, they only have a thirty percent test taking rate of their students. Yes. Last year only forty percent of the Palley juniors completed the test compared to ninety five percent. Compared to the ninety five percent required participation rate. So the question is white students to take the tests. So I'm reading an article here Palo Alto online that says one student said he many classmates quote chose to opt out this spring to use the two days to sleep catch up on homework and study and spend more time on social media. I'm guessing right. More screen time senior cut day. Well, yeah. So that's probably what I was senior. I'd probably do the same thing. It'd be by that time, you're already you probably already locked into the college. You want to go to it cetera checked out of high school juniors. They're saying forty percent of Palley juniors completed the test. I'm thinking your daughter junior. She is actually the school districts are making a big push. They sent letters home and made all these announcements like make sure your kids. Get a good night's sleep the night before get breakfast and vocal and have them study at these websites. I'm thinking there must be some kind of funding. Yeah. Tied to the amount of kids taking and I'm seeing I'm seeing here, they're they're bribing the students with parking permits. Ooh. Is that usually cost? Those those usually cost up to about one hundred bucks, and they are going to be giving out a raffle to the students who participate. Okay. Well, there you go, folks. There you go with weather coming up just a moment. We've got a few slight changes to the forecast..

California tesla Nick bossa Palo Alto high school Katie green Palley Palo Alto school district Palo alto Palo Alto robbery Ohio State university PG PG Andy Sherry Steven Weissman Twitter governor Newsom San Francisco Obama
"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"steven weissman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm ari. Shapiro chang. Coming up, Dallas basketball fans. Say goodbye to a man who spent more than twenty years playing for the Mavericks. Let me say this about Berkman Bisky. He's denies this man ever. We'll get the scene from Dirk Nowitzki. Final home game that story after the news. Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm Wayne Brown Torney general William Barr says he thinks US intelligence agency spied on the Trump campaign during the two thousand sixteen presidential race. But the G provided no evidence to support his claim today. NPR's Ryan Lucas has this update bar told lawmakers he plans to review the Genesis and the conduct of intelligence activities directed at the Trump campaign in two thousand sixteen asked by democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen why he felt the need to do that bar said this. I think there's a spying did occur. Yes. I think spying did occur. Well, let me. Predicated adequately predicated, and I'm not suggesting it wasn't adequately. Predicated Republicans in congress have repeatedly accused the FBI and Justice department of abusing surveillance powers in targeting Trump associates Barr says he believes spine on a US political campaign would be a big deal and he wants to ensure that strict rules governing how American intelligence agencies and law enforcement used their surveillance capabilities were not violated Ryan, Lucas NPR news Washington in Florida families of some of the students killed and injured last year in the mass shooting at Marjory stoneman. Douglas, high school filed a series of lawsuits they claim the Broward sheriff's office school district and behavioral health clinic where negligent Bob Kelly as an attorney for some of the families. He says the school district failed to take proper measures to ensure the safety of students and staff. This is an open shut case. Right. Not only against nNcholas crews who has confessed for what he did. But also against the school board and the brower sheriff's office, and all of the boggling bureaucrats who let this thing on full the Valentine's Day massacre left seventeen people dead and seventeen wounded stocks finished modestly higher today. On Wall Street, the Dow was up six points. This is NPR fan KiKi leading news. I mean, akin PG customers would see their rates double if you Tilleke caused wildfires continue to sweep through California as they have the past two years. That's the warning from a UC Berkeley expert in a memo today, he politics correspondent Maria. Logos reports the two page memo prepared at the request of governor Gavin Newsom office says it's not just PG any customers who would see skyrocketing rates you see Berkeley lecturer Steven Weissman says if the state continues to experience devastating utility caused fires. Most electric customers in California would see a fifty percent increase in the first year alone to me, the answer really lies in more aggressively and comprehensively working to reduce the intensity of the wildfires. That are inevitable weisensee floated in years past letting utilities borrow money to pay for wildfire. Costs are only sustainable if the state stops experiencing. These types of blazes. I'm Marie Salah goes eighty news governor Gavin Newsom says he's directing five million dollars for family reunification and legal services for immigrants and asylum seekers in California Newsom shared his plan after a three day visit to El Salvador where he met with people trying to flee gang violence, and poverty immigration is dominating our political discourse for me, not to understand what lies underneath that debate is almost malpractice on my part. President Trump recently announced plans to cut aid to some Central American countries incl-. Including El Salvador for what he said was their lack of action in curbing the number of migrants coming.

Gavin Newsom Ryan Lucas William Barr NPR California Bob Kelly President Trump US Steven Weissman Dirk Nowitzki El Salvador Shapiro chang Dallas Trump Marie Salah incl Berkeley Senator Jeanne Shaheen