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18 Burst results for "Steven Weinberg"

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 5 months ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
"steven weinberg" Discussed on Apologetics Live

Apologetics Live

13:58 min | 10 months ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on Apologetics Live

"I'm sure we'll row pin to come to speaking but the if you do that this month the the offer of one hundred dollars off per person runs out at the end of this month so strongly encourage you guys to sign up now as I've been saying the buses filling up we get one bus. That's it fifty five people and then it's cut off We're almost half full so year really gotTa make sure you do this. I know that it's a long way away. That's plenty of time to save but the issue is you cannot wait to to to sign up. It's five hundred dollars to down payment now but if you can't make it I think you get all but one hundred twenty dollars one hundred twenty five back per person so I strongly encourage you guys to sign up now twenty twenty one Israel trip Dot com and in so few can do that that would be. It's really a neat thing to go. Have you ever been to Israel Jason. Okay so we really got to convince you to do this but remember you know anytime you Israel. It's big price tag because that's the big things tourism so it's a big price tag but that includes your hotel stays your flight out of JFK your breakfasts and dinners basically everything but your lunches and you know whatever things you want to buy. I when you're there is in. It's all going to be included. There's even one of the lunches is included so you get all of that now if you're can't fly. JFK Your Madison Israel and I think you get like a thousand or thirteen hundred dollars off so so please consider joining us in Israel twenty twenty one Israel trip dot COM lastly. I'll just mention that if you want to support us we that put this on this. Show on just go to strike for turning dot org slash donate and with that we're GONNA we're gonNA bring in and see if he can do this. Are Catholic friend James. Welcome to the show. You're muted though there you go all right. Are you able to hear me coming in lobby. We can hear you James Okay Great. Okay okay. Yeah guys Dr Jason. I wanted to know I seen a video while back Richard Dawkins interviewing a scientists physicists and he I guess he thought that the scientists was going to side with him that there is no god but this particular physicists he didn't fall for it he he you know they're speaking about the creation of the universe and the physics itself and his name is. Dr Steven Weinberg Weinberg and he said that he doesn't believe that it all came by accident. He said that it's it's too finely tuned that if you just tweak one little thing that everything falls apart and you know. I know I saw that. Darkens was taken aback by this. You could tell he was surprised. and I noticed that the way that ATS tried to get around this now ever since then they're trying to put forth this idea that well okay the reason our our universe is the way it is so finely tuned is because it's one of many universes a multi births and I just wanted to know if you had any response to that and also if you could you had mentioned earlier that the the statement that the universe is thirteen billion years old is is a true statement because you disagree with it. I'm a little confused by that. If you could elaborate on that okay we're really well the design. You change certain parameters. There's some slosh through some leeway on some grammars exchange the strong force too much advantageous to be changed the weak force too much at its decay a almost immediately wjr candidate. Thank you so so the proposal is well. We're we're just the one happened to get rice. There must be an incident number of other universes for south there. I think that's a form of the GAMBLER's fallacy. It'd be kind of comparable to flip flip a coin and it lands ten times in a row then then you say well. How do we account for this. How do we make sense of this unlikely occurrence. Something that we think is now. I think the more logical position would be to examine the coins and see that may maybe it's on both sides. Maybe it maybe somebody has engineered the coins that it will end up. I think the illogic response would be to say okay well. There must be billions of other people also performing this experiment. We just happened in the room that got the right answer so I don't think that's reasonable. I think it's the Policy Allison wrote a thesis. We just happened to be the one where it works. You can apply that recent anything to anything that happens. That is unlikely you know you say. How out of this can you imagine police investigating a crime scene miss how this happened say well. It's a chance we just have to be one of the universe this habit in the end. It was all go home. At the end of scientific inquiry right there multi by its nature is unscientific doesn't make false but it makes us scientific because it cannot be tested principle any other universe would by definition be something that we would not have access to because we only have access to this universe I if you have access to it as part of this university another one so it's it's really very non scientific answer your rational with regard to the age of the universe. I take scripture face. Saudi believe that Genesis History Bucket made everything in six days as ordinary days rotation seats went down by evening morning human beings remain on the sixth day and from this genealogies that you'll have to read for bed son so de Asuncion idiot sound so you can find that it's few thousand years between Adamant Chrysler on four thousand years and Christ's earthly ministry will be about two thousand years ago so you age for the Earth Universe everything about six thousand years camp exactly on but it's certainly gonna be. It's GonNa be millions or billions of years so I take issue with my secular colleagues. One of the reasons they they need two billion years is to get evolution to happen because we all agree that evolution can't happen if this year's arguing planes either but you throw in and billion years that seems to make almost anything. I think that's the the the motivation all right James. You have anything else I I must have misunderstood. I bet she said earlier that it was a that was a statement that it was thirteen billion years old doc. I must have missed missile misheard. I think he's not understanding what you mean. By a true statement false yes I have and I have one more question censure and astrophysicists I personally don't believe I believe it's possible. Maybe there could be life out there in in the universe but not intelligent life that can that can no good from evil bad from wrong like we do because we're made in. God's image so the idea that you know all of these I don't know if you've seen the TIC TAC video from the navy maybe the navy video of them chasing that done an identified flying object but they claim that claims military claims that they've been seeing these things for decades and I just wanted to know what your opinion is with regards to intelligence specifically intelligent life in the university you believe it. It's it it could be possible or or I don't see how it could be especially also with regards to God only becoming Mann mm-hmm paternity so I think there's a lot of problems with that but I just want to get your opinion on that. I think the key issue. I don't think there is intelligent lights. It's out in space intelligent but the problem with having Vulcans Klingons out there as you pointed out not the image God that can't be saved not related to Jesus his. We're related Jesus. We roll of one blood so his his his blood on the cross counts for us. He's our easer. Kinsman Redeemer demory's or relatives that's why saints but Lieutenant Work on luck because he's a Klingon and he can't he's not related to Jesus can't say so. I think it presents huge theological problems. This is much as I like sci-fi and I do like I d like to consider this things but as sci-fi as science fiction universes that were. I don't think there's life out there. A non intelligent life like moss or something like that probably doesn't pose any theological probes we found moss on planet out there but to be honest. I not really expected that because is it just based on not just based on scripture but based on what we've found in science to the the animals for made uh partly for us and plans for made for animals to eat and even these microbes it turns out that that plants we've now found that like the roots of the plants without microbes they will work properly microbes kind of the interface between beat role of minerals in the world of plants might herbs help plastic certain minerals and so on so it seems like everything is part of the balance system that's designed and it's all on earth you know it's something that that that's got designs for for to be inhabited and to be inhabited by us the passage Isaiah Forty by eight on formed the earth to be inhabited. You didn't make it a waste place and a it also it doesn't specifically say not the heavens that does seem to be the application of your special in that. It's designed for life in the rest of the universe is designed to declare. God's glory oriented beautiful not for life in regards to things like you hoes and things like that if people signoff host while by the little little definition is have you seen something of gay. Yes was flying. Yes as an object yet whether he goes. I happen to know that a lot of those is things you know. People say well actually that satellite. We'll look at that. What's that brightly Venus. Most commonly reported the Ovo. Oh by the way is being something about strong. It's comical because Venus is incredibly bright and it's startling for see it over the horizon air when its lowest style. It'll kind of twinkling dancing around because the waiters ask your. I've seen lots of interesting things that have taken place in space. I've Seen Chemical Nicole released experiments that they've done some kind of experiment where they some satellite released the see it was glowing. It was awesome but I don't you know it's not the man made some kind of bandmate experiencing lots of stuff like that satellites people spend a lot of time outside at nights talk about everything but never seen anything that really would support the idea of aliens visiting the Earth. All right well we do. You've one last thing that I'm getting some echo there from getting a little bit echoed. Food Jason on your side get neck of from yeah. Thanks all right so one so Charles for this in God could create the Biblical world with the age of appearance now did WanNa let you we have about five minutes left to address address this because yes he did create Adam and Eve as someone else said you know fully grown but this does become a problem when it comes to starlight issues especially but One lady just that comment that God could have created the world with appearance of age yeah. This is a nuanced issue and I ah I probably agree with the sentiment of person opposed to matter but I wouldn't say it that way because technically appeared the the term appearance of age is certification fallacy because age is not something you can see age is a concept of history now and so when you say well. This rock looks older. The Rock looks you was was an old rock. Look like a young rock looks like rocks Ross. Now we use that term politically people would say Keith Boyer. Oh yeah this person looks. He looks young for his age. People say that we're speaking not literally because what we really mean you can't see someone's age. It's not like they have their age posted on for it and you can see what we what we can see our certain physical features that we associate with aging gray hair weicker wrinkles liver spots when have you and we say on normally people get characteristic when they're such an age so we see that I look such and such an age but that is a Samoan literal statement and if you think about it it wouldn't make sense to apply that kind of language to the earth because when we say personal certain age we're saying that person has certain and seizures that people typically get when they're that age. That's what we're really saying. They resemble all the other people that are kind of around that age but when you talk about the universe say how old does the universe look. Are you comparing with all the other universes and how they aged so we've only got the one heater so it looks the way that it looks. It doesn't really have an appearance terrence spatial. Here's the way appears enemy when there may I would prefer the universe was made this adult that was made sure it was made functional. Adam and Eve remains adult. She you think of the term fully grown implies the grew they didn't they were created as adults and so I think the universe was made as an adult to to the divers trees..

Israel Dr Jason James JFK Adam Richard Dawkins Dr Steven Weinberg Weinberg Saudi Keith Boyer Allison Christ Isaiah Forty Redeemer demory Mann Chrysler Ovo Eve Nicole Lieutenant Work Charles
"steven weinberg" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Has branded methane, a major source of greenhouse gas, emissions driving the global climate crisis as freedom gas, the rebranding came as part of a department of energy news. Release Tuesday hailing increased exports from the freeport, liquefied, natural gas, terminal, in Texas, u s undersecretary of energy. Mark Manassas said of the project increasing export capacity from the freedom project is critical to spreading freedom gas throughout the world. He was joined by assistant secretary for fossil energy. Steven Weinberg who said, quote, I am pleased that the department of energy is doing what it can to promote an efficient regulatory system. That allows for molecules of US freedom to be exported to the world unquote, the White House attempted to cover up references to the late Republican Senator John McCain at a US naval base in Japan. Head of President Trump's arrival, they are on a state visit earlier this week, that's according to the Wall Street Journal, which published a photograph showing a great tarp covering the name USS. John McCain on the side of the massive naval destroyer bearing, McCain's name the journal reports sailors, aboard the ship who normally wear caps with John. Mccain's name on them were given the day off during Trump's visit at the last minute officials appeared to reverse course and remove the tarp for Trump's visit though a barge was moved closer to the USS. John McCain to obscure Trump's view of the warship WikiLeaks is warning its founder Julian Assange is in deteriorating. Health has dramatically lost weight since he was jailed last month in London's Belmarsh person in a statement, WikiLeaks set Assange have been transferred to the prison. Health ward, and his lawyer per Samuelsson told reporters, quote, a sound just health situation on Friday was such that it was not possible to conduct a normal conversation with him, unquote. Asandra do to appear by video link before magistrates court today, but failed to appear reportedly due to health problems. The Trump administration is seeking a sons extradition to the United States to face. Seventeen counts violating the World War, One era espionage act, which could see a Assange jailed for more than one hundred seventy years press, freedom advocates have denounced, the charges as direct assault on the first amendment aimed at chilling investigative reporting. Vice president, Joe Biden is facing a backlash on social media over his comments to and physical contact with a young girl at a campaign event in Houston, Texas on Tuesday, Biden joined a town hall meeting, held by the American federation of teachers where he promoted his education plan, the first major policy announcement of his twenty twenty presidential campaign. Asked by a ten year old about political divisions within the United States Biden concluded his answer with this exchange. Tell you what. Do you give me a dress? I'm going to read, you along and answering told you the exact things I would do, okay. Okay promise. I'll bet your British. You're good looking. I. Joe Biden, then put both hands on the girl shoulders. Marched her over to the assembled reporters at one point leaning in close to her head last month. Biden said he would be more mindful of people's personal space, after two women step forward to some of inappropriate touching Biden's, not apologize for the incidents..

Joe Biden Senator John McCain President Trump US Julian Assange Texas Wall Street Journal Mark Manassas WikiLeaks Steven Weinberg undersecretary Samuelsson assistant secretary White House Vice president American federation of teacher London
"steven weinberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"All right. We're back or this next to mail came. I think from an episode we did about the concept of scientific reductionism whether scientific disciplines all reduce Alta to if you have a perfect understanding of them. Can they be perfectly reduced to lower level understandings of physical reality like can chemistry ultimately be explained entirely by physics and can biology ultimately be explained entirely by chemistry or at each level. Are there genuinely new and unique properties that emerge that you could not predict or understand just by having a perfect understanding of the the science underlying them? So anyway, Peter says thank you for the distilled awesomeness of your show and makes my daily workouts in exercise for my mind as well. As my body. I'm running to point out that someone and he he asks y. Amberg? I think he's talking about Steven Weinberg who we talked about him that up who holds to theory about reductionism that everything can be reduced to fundamental physics. And he's pointing out that he thinks Weinberg is wrong. And is the best type of wrong is provable wrong via mathematics, the mathematician, girdle Prue and a term Kirk girdle there proved that not all truths that exist in a mathematical system can be proved with the fundamental axioms of that system. If there are fundamental physical laws to the universe. You can't use them to deduce all the possible. Behaviors of that system of truths that can exist in the system based on the inside of girdles theorem. I think that emergence is pretty much undeniable. It's provable true in very simple mathematical systems, how much more true must it be in our universe. If it is governed as Weinberg holds by fundamental laws. You know this. Thank you, Peter. Yeah. That's an interesting thought, I don't know if I've heard of. Girdle applied to physics to like the things in the world before girdle is usually applied to logical or mathematical systems, and he eats correct about what I think he's correct about what girdles incompleteness proofs show, which is that no system like no system of numbers or anything like that. That follows a set of formalized rules can can possibly be used to prove all the things that are true about that system. Interesting. They're always going to be things that are true about a system that you can't prove using the rules of that system. And and so, yeah, I haven't thought about how that applies to physics that. That is interesting. There's been a subject I've been wanting to come back to for a while. Which is a question a sort of meta scientific question about the philosophy of science, which is the question or they're really universal physical laws. It certainly is a helpful convention to say that there is such a thing as laws of physics. But there are some very there's some interesting philosophical work. That says, you know, even though we get consistent results in experiments. Can we necessarily say from that that there is such a thing as a physical law? So anyway, I think that's worth coming back to in the future. Oh, certainly. But before we go on Carney has just alerted me that the arc episodes have just burnt through their their their wouldn't creating because we have another listener mail that relates to the ark tour. Okay. Sorry. This comes to us from Kristen. She says, hi, Robert. And Joe I really enjoyed last week's episodes on Greek fire. That was a vault episode. We did and the ark of the covenant in response to your quest for peaceful uses of the flame thrower. I present the flame Wieder last summer. I in turn on an organic farm in witnessed firsthand the wonders of this device. Farmers will plant seeds like carrots and take a couple of weeks to take. Couple of weeks to germinate then a few days before they are due to sprout. The farmers will incinerate the weeds that have grown with blasts. The fire from a large portable blow torch, not only super cool. Let's farmers we'd quickly without spring and he pesticides. I would recommend doing a YouTube. Search it is pretty awesome to watch..

Steven Weinberg Peter Wieder Kristen Prue Carney Joe I Kirk Robert
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We'll be getting a news update from NPR now, and Brian will be back with more local news, the time is eight from NPR news. In Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. Wildfires continue to rage in both northern and southern California. The campfire and Buchanan has killed at least twenty nine people and destroyed thousands of homes in the south firefighters are working to contain two massive fires NPR's Dolly cycle towel reports. Wildfire evacuees from Los Angeles and mentor county packed a high school cafeteria last night seeking answers after an hour briefings by fire in law enforcement officials. The crowd grew restless and interrupted to ask pressing questions. Steven Weinberg of Malibu says he's concerned about his neighbors. They really just don't know if there is help on. I've spoken with city council people, even they're unsure and so that's living in the dark, essentially. And the only the only like they have the fires around them doi- doi- cycle. Tell NPR news Woodland Hills democratic candidate for Florida. Governor is reiterating his call for all votes to be counted in the still undecided governor's race may not be greeting you tonight as the governor of the state of Florida, but I'm the mayor of Tallahassee and more than that. I'm an American and a Floridian, and I demand that every vote becomes in this process democrat, Andrew gillum, the Florida division of election says gillen's Republican challenger Rhonda Santa's is leading the vote count by fewer than thirty four thousand boats. This is NPR news in Washington from news. I'm Brian watt. Today. People across the nation are observing Veterans Day marking the one hundredth anniversary of the end of World War One over the weekend. San Francisco celebrated veterans of all ages with. Parade along fisherman's Warf, Sarah Husseini reports among the oldest in Sunday's procession were a handful of Filipino American World War Two fighters in a motorized cable car. They include ninety four year old Louis, publicity who gathered intelligence against the Japanese as a teenager and was later held for six months in a concentration camp. She says she didn't expect to get anything for two years of service, but says she was recently given a lump sum payment of fifteen thousand dollars in.

NPR Brian watt Florida Washington Steven Weinberg Windsor Johnston Sarah Husseini Los Angeles California Andrew gillum Buchanan San Francisco Tallahassee Woodland Hills Louis gillen
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. And we're speaking with Neil degrasse Tyson. He is an astrophysicist with the American Museum of natural history and director of its Hayden planetarium his new book with museum research, associate office, laying is accessories to war. The unspoken alliance between astrophysics and the military. There are a lot of fascinating details that emerge in this book and one of them that I loved you write about. At a time when satellites offered these possibilities of reconnaissance for the military and a big change occurred in the nineteen seventies with the development of charge coupled devices, I don't exactly get the science here. But my sense is that this allowed images from satellites to be converted to digital files and then transmitted electronically to earth. How did before that development? How did the military retrieve the images that it satellites collecting? Yes. An interesting problem, isn't it? So in some cases, they were just deorbit the satellite. Make sure it had a soft enough landing. So that you go back in and get the film, and and developed the film, and then you'd have the images, and of course, that would engender the time delay of de orbiting the satellite finding the satellite developing. And by then the troop movement could be it could be too late. If that's what it is you're monitoring or through at launch of a rocket. It's too late. The rocket already hit its target with digital detectors. Of course, you can now. Beam the signal back down to earth and have that received. And that signal is an image. It's not fundamentally different from facts. When you think about it, a fax ascending sort of zeros and ones and converting it into a a people might not remember what a fax is. I just feel. It's the same idea. It's not the same technology. But it's the same idea. You're sending information that can be assembled into an image that created it in the first place and the CDs as an astrophysicist early out of the box using CDs because there are a hundred times more sensitive to light than photographic film. Which means you can take shorter exposures and get the same integrity of data or you can take longer exposures and see things really really dim that. You couldn't have ever even drip was there. So we were early users have CDs, and they were very expensive in the day later on they got up picked up by cell phones. And other sort of camcorder type recording devices and now there's a CCD in every smartphone in the world. That's and it's cheap. So so when humans learn to launch objects of the space space eventually objects with people in them. I mean, there were all kinds of possibilities this presented, and and you're right that the United States and other countries had to figure out what its policy was going to be with respect to the military uses of space. How did the government approached this question who decides it? Well, all right. So go back to the nineteen sixties. When the space era was ten years old. So now, speaking of nineteen sixty seven the UN felt it necessary justifiably to come up with a peaceful use of outer space treaty. And if you read this document whose title is much longer than I just recited to you. It's committee long, right? They needed some market. Getting folks to get in there. But basically, you can think of it as the treaty for the peaceful uses of outer space, and in it it reads like Koumba ya. Oh my gosh. And we will go together and explore together and use the the results to benefit mankind. And if one of your astronauts is in trouble, I will come to their assistance, and it's breeds beautifully. And the spacefaring nations of the day were signatures to it. And to this day last I checked as one hundred and seven participants in the treaty. Oh, by the end of prohibits weapons in space is very clear about that. Now, here's the problem. A fact it allows you to have defensive capability of your activities and space and all right? So there's a gray area there. What do we mean by that? Well, let's say I'm a satellite, and I'm going to Nestle up next to your satellite, and I have some radiative field that will. Scramble your data. And you don't want that to happen. But you just see me ambling over towards you. Now, you whip out your lasers and destroy me. Why hasn't really done anything to you yet? You feared that. I would hurt you one satellite says to another. And I just took you out is that a first strike is that aggression is that or is that used in a defensive way this is still a bit of a grey area in the interpretation of that of that treaty, right? And one could also speaking more broadly. I mean, if I'm a country that believes that I stand for democracy and freedom, and I'm going to deter aggression, well, part of preserving freedom and democracy is military action in some circumstances against a mean authoritarian regime. That's you so I can attack you, and that's defensive it's peaceful because I'm preservers preserving peace and democracy. Yeah. And that's part of the the wiggle room that exists. So it's not clear. How binding the thing will ultimately. I viewed it not so much as something that everyone will obey to the letter. I viewed it as a hopeful. Gesture that may be when we all go to space. We'll all get along. That's how I really viewed it as as a that. We are capable of signing a document that will never fight again. Now, my as I got older, I got more cynical. That's we've seen the world through rose colored glasses but through crystal-clear glasses. And I realized who are you kidding? What do you mean? Let me go into space. We have to be nice to each other. What do you mean? By that. I'm not nice to you down here. Why should space make any difference to that at all? And if I can be nice to you in space. Why can't I be nice to you on earth? Where's the peaceful use of earth treaty? How about that? Why don't we start with that? And if that works. Hey, now, I might believe you that you can ever peaceful. Use of outer space in the book you quote, a Nobel laureate in physics who says the international space station is an orbital Turkey. This. This person says no important science has come of it almost no science at all. In further says that this person would say that the whole manned space fight flight program, which is enormously expensive has produced nothing of scientific value. What do you think of that point of view? So let me I tell you. On this program. What I have said to his face. Okay. What I said was. I'm we go into space. As a nation not to serve scientists. You are naive to think that the entire existence of the space program was to advance the cause of scientists that I'm sorry. That is not how the world works. We went into space, but driven by geopolitical forces, not only that every astronaut bought, but one that we had ever launched into space. Mercury. Gemini and Apollo was an active or former member of the military so to think of this as oh, you're wasting money. It should be spent on my at my experiment. That's just naive. And so the fact is when the country is exercising its geopolitical interests science piggybacks that too great gain. I might add. And it's that has been the case forever. I can go back to captain Cook's voyage to the Darwin's voyage on the beagle. The beagle. Didn't go to the Galapagos island for him. It went to had his own agenda. And he he hits the ride practically was a stowaway on the boat. So science happens not because governments care about science only on a small way science happens because governments care about other things that need the science and on an in its most, visible, forceful expression. It could be dominion building. Empire building heads. Gemini, all of this. And by the way, he's a friend. It's name is Steven Weinberg. He and I went to the same high school that Bronx high school of science here in New York City. And so we've talked about this and other topics. He is right. Not much science has come out of this. But that's not why we did it in the first place. So therefore, I cannot fault it. You're listening to the interview fresh Air's Dave Davies recorded with astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson his new book accessory to war is about the unspoken alliance between astrophysicists in the military after a break. The talk about President Trump's proposal for a new branch of the military. The space force also we'll have reviews of Wayne Shorter's new album and the new nonfiction book, the real alita about the kidnapping case that helped inspire nabokov's novel. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air..

Neil degrasse Tyson Bronx high school of science American Museum of natural his Hayden planetarium United States UN Steven Weinberg Nestle Wayne Shorter Terry gross New York City Galapagos island director captain Cook kidnapping President Dave Davies Trump Mercury
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yes. An interesting problem, isn't it? So in some cases, they were just deorbit the satellite. Make sure it had a soft enough landing. So that you go back in and get the film, and and developed a film, and then you'd have the images, and of course, that would engender the time delay of de orbiting the satellite finding the satellite developing. And by then the troop movement could be it could be too late. If that's what it is you're monitoring or through at launch of Iraq rocket. It's too late. The rocket already hit its target with digital detectors. Of course, you can now beam the signal back down to earth and have that received and that signal is an image. It's not fundamentally different from facts. When you think about it, a fax ascending sort of zeros and ones and converted into a a people might not remember what a fax is. I just realized. Same idea. It's not the same technology. But it's the same idea. You're sending information that can be assembled into an image that created it in the first place and the CDs. As an astrophysicist. We would early out of the box using CDs because there are a hundred times more sensitive to light than photographic film. Which means you can take shorter exposures and get the same integrity of data or you can take longer exposures and see things really really dimmed that you couldn't have ever even drift was there. So we were early users have CDs, and they were very expensive in the day later on they got up at picked up by cell phones. And other sorta camcorder type recording devices and now there's a CCD and every smartphone in the world. That's and it's cheap. So so when humans learn to launch objects into space space eventually objects with people in them. I mean, there were all kinds of possibilities presented, and and you're right that the United States and other countries had to figure out what its policy was going to be with respect to the military uses of space. How did the government approached this question who decides it? Well, all right. So go back to the nineteen sixties. When the space era was ten years old. So now, speaking of nineteen sixty seven the UN felt it necessary justifiably to come up with a peaceful use of outer space treaty. And if you read this document whose title is much longer than I just recited to you. It's committee long. Okay. Right. Say they needed some marketing folks to get in there. But basically, you can think of it as the treaty for the peaceful uses of outer space, and in it it reads like Koumba ya. Oh my gosh. And we will go together and explore together and use the the results to benefit mankind. And if one of your astronauts is in trouble, I will come to their assistance, and it's breeds beautifully. And the spacefaring nations of the day were signatures to it. And to this day last I checked as one hundred and seven participants in the treaty. Prohibits weapons in space is very clear about that. Now, here's the problem. A fact it allows you to have defensive capability. Of your activities in space. And all right. So there's a gray area there. What do we mean by that? Well, let's say I'm a satellite, and I'm going to Nestle up next to your satellite, and I have some radiative field that will scramble your data, and you don't want that to happen. But you just see me ambling over towards you. Now, you whip out your lasers and destroy me. Why hasn't really done anything to you yet? You feared that. I would hurt you one satellite says to another. And I just took you out is that a first strike is that aggression is that or is that used in a defensive way this is still a bit of a grey area in the interpretation of that of that treaty, right? And one could also speaking more broadly. I mean, if I'm a country that believes that I stand for democracy and freedom, and I'm going to deter aggression, well, part of preserving freedom and democracy is military action in some circumstances against a mean authoritarian regime. That's you so I can attack you. You and that's defensive it's peaceful because I'm preserved preserving peace and democracy. Yeah. And that's part of the the wiggle room that exists. So it's not clear. How binding the thing will ultimately be. I viewed it not so much as something that everyone will obey to the letter. I viewed it as a hope full. Gesture that may be when we all go to space. We'll all get along. That's how I really viewed it as as a that. We are capable of signing a document that will never fight again. Now, my as I got older, I got more cynical. That's seen the world not through rose colored glasses but through developed crystal-clear for new weapons glasses. systems And I realized communication satellites who launched are you kidding? and maintained by the US air What force. do you mean? The foundation Let me go into of space. the GPS We have to be nice system to each used other. in everything What from ship. what do Navigation you mean? By that. to pizza delivery, I'm not nice to you down fresh here. Air's Dave Why Davies should space recently, make sat any down difference with Tyson to that at to all? talk about everything And from the space if for I can us be to nice the chance to you in space. that a rogue asteroid Why can't may I be be nice headed to you for on its earth? earth. Where's the peaceful And what we use can do of about earth it. treaty? Tyson's How new about book that? Why with don't we natural start history with that? museum research, And if that associate works. Avas Hey, Lang now, is I might called believe accessory you that to you war. can have a peaceful The use of unspoken outer space alliance between in astrophysics the book you quote, a and the Nobel military. laureate in physics who Well, says Neil the international degrasse Tyson. space station Welcome back is to an fresh orbital air. Turkey. This Thanks for this having person me. says no important A lot sciences, of the early come parts of it of almost this no book science are at all. In explorations further says that of how this human person civilizations would say that the whole manned have space fight advanced flight program, technological which is enormously ways often expensive has produced nothing in connection of scientific with military activities value. or the What pursuit do you think of of that point empire of view? advances So in navigation let me I through the Sexton, tell you. and and the magnetic compass and On this eventually program. What I have said telescopes. to his face. Okay. Do you find What I said that was these periods of I'm advances we in technology go into space. correspond As significantly a nation two? Periods not of war. to serve Do scientists. we do this more when a nation is You focused are naive on it for its own interests? to think that the entire existence So. of the space crow Graham was to advance It works the cause both ways. of scientists So I the the blunt that answer is I'm yes, sorry. That is not anytime how the world a works. nation engages We in went war, into space, and they but don't wanna die driven or they by feel geopolitical threatened forces, not innovation. only that Picks every up astronaut innovation. bought, but one Stick get stimulated that we had ever and launched solutions into space to not Burkey, dying Gemini arise. and Apollo was This an has been active true ever or former since member there's of been the military human conflict tribal human so to conflict think from of this cave as to cave. oh, you're Why wasting else do money. you It invent should a be club spent on with my a narrow at my handle experiment. on one side? And a big That's bulb just on the naive. other side that's And easier to so wheel than holding it the other the way fact or is creating when a stick where it's the same the country dimension is exercising from the front its to geopolitical the back. interests So this is science innovation piggybacks and its that weaponry. But you can also too use great it gain. to I might add. hunt down your food. And it's that Right. has been So the case so forever. yes, this that's I the case. I can go back to captain However, Cook's voyage to the what Darwin's. I can tell you Voyage is we on the beagle. are not The we beagle. the Didn't astrophysicist go to the Galapagos island are not for waiting him. around for It military went their advances own to agenda. help us And he just plotting along he doing hits our the thing. ride And practically what we was realize, stowaway and I try to make on it clear the in boat. the book So is that we are science on a happens street, not and because we walk in one governments direction, the military care walks about in the other, science and there's like a picket fence between only us on a small way science and every happens now, and because then we governments look over care about and say, other hey, things that's a cool that thing. You need guys the science just did is a declassified and on an yet. in its I most, will be a year. visible, Okay. Call us forceful when it is. expression. I wanna use that to help It me could understand be dominion the universe. building. Meanwhile, Empire-building they look over had Gemini from their side of the picket all fence of this. and say, hey, And by the way, you he's got afraid. some serious It's name intellectual is Steven Weinberg. capital He and assigned I went to the same to high this school problem that that they've Bronx been trying high to school solve of science for years. here in New York City. And And of course, we publish it in peer so review journals we've that talked are publicly about available. this and So other topics. they don't have He to is right. get our permission. They Not can just take much science it. has That's come out of all this. too. If But they that's needed not why we did the it judgment, in the first place. it's in the So interest therefore, of national I cannot security. fault. It So may it's listening just to the this interview too. Is fresh this Air's street Dave Davies where recorded we look over with Astra. each other's Physicists fence every Neil now degrasse and then, Tyson but you're not his waiting new book around accessory for us to to innovate war anymore as about than the we unspoken are for them. alliance between But it astrophysicists happens in in either the military case and after for me, the break. They'll the talk about the President key Trump's part of proposal this is for a new for me. branch of My the military. field The space is force. overwhelmingly I'm Terry liberal gross. And antiwar this is fresh air. overwhelming ninety plus percent, no doubt about it yet. We're all curiously.

Tyson United States Air Neil UN Iraq Nestle Galapagos island New York City Dave Why Davies Turkey President Steven Weinberg. crow Graham Burkey Lang Trump Dave Davies
"steven weinberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"He had this would be this would be a hot death is a is opposed to a cold death now back in nineteen seventy nine physicist freeman dyson dyson is still with us as of this recording his born in nineteen twentythree the he pondered just how these two possibilities would impact humanity or whatever humanity becomes over the course of time and he was he was pretty optimistic yeah we should know this paper we're going to be talking about his fantastically readable but dyson was working with the knowledge available to him at the time in nineteen seventy nine so for example this predates the discoveries that seem to indicate that the expansion in the universe is accelerating dies right dyson didn't know that at the time at the time he wrote quote the prevailing view holds the future of open and closed universe versus this being the idea that up a closed universe is one that will eventually collapse into the crunch and an open universe is one that will just continue to expand toward this big freeze yeah he's a quote the future of open and closed universes to be equally dismal according to this view we have only the choice of being fried in closed universe or frozen in an open and he can he goes on regrettably i have to concur with res verdict that in the k in this case we have no escape from frying no matter how deeply burrow into the earth to shield ourselves from the ever increasing fury of the blue shifted background radiation we can only postponed by a few million years are miserable end oh wow i was just thinking so the blue shifting of radiation means that if radiation sources or exceleron toward you the radiation they emit gets upped frequency it gets blue shifted up higher so does that mean like radio waves the cosmic microwave background radiation and all that as it closes in towards you gets blue shifted up and turned into gamma rays i get something like that that's what i'm getting from this but this is with the closed universe model right and he's he largely avoids the quote unquote claustrophobic nature of the closed universe in this paper but he does offer this this idea he says supposing that we discover the universe to be naturally closed and doomed to collapse is it conceivable that by intelligent intervention converting matter into radiation and causing energy to flow purposefully on a cozma scale we could break open a closed universe change the topology of space time so they'd only part of it would collapse in another part of it would expand forever yeah i would call that optimistic yeah but i mean he's he's basically throwing it out here and saying look i i'm not sure how this would work exactly but if we're talking about a significantly advanced civilization this this sounds like the kind of thing such a civilization would be into doing and maybe maybe have the ability to do it yeah one thing i like about dyson attitude here is that he he he's essentially saying you know physicists you should explore extreme implications he starts off his paper by talking about even weinberg the steven weinberg quote the the problem with physicists is not that they take their theories to seriously that they don't take them seriously enough you know they scoff at some of the discussing some of the more outlandish implications of theories that we know to be good theories and are confirmed by evidence and dyson 's like no let's get into the weirdness okay we've got a theory we think it's a good theory because it predicts all the stuff we see what does it imply what are the weirdest things that implies again this paper is is really readable very accessible especially for a paper that has so many equations in it but but he also has some some very helpful timetable scales for instance is table one summary of timescales and he he holds it in a closed universe you'd have a total duration for the universe of ten to the eleventh hour years or one hundred billion years and then when he looks at the open universe he basically takes it by by order of magnitude so he this is what he says quote it takes about ten to the.

one hundred billion years million years
"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Show

"Large scales very large scale that we've never probe before and so if we don't have any appropriate model of gravity then we're gonna mess up those scales and so we'll get how our universe expands incorrectly now it's not so easy as that that you know we have tried to modify gravity a few times over the history of mandy and we have a mind sign modified at once and we know that is not the ultimate amancio as well his his equations so modifying it is possible but there's so much constraints now that it will have to be a modification that i think no one has really thought of yet you're on a wonderfully advantage situation however you are university this got steven weinberg who helped develop the standard model physics fifty years ago when you ask him about it he says there is gravity we have to put that aside as if it's a different kind of animal however you've also got last year the discovery clear discovery gravitational waves so so you've got things being confirmed and you've got more experiments going up more like oh more liza looking gravitational waves is that more chance now that you will know in two or three years time what gravity really is made of it's having in this particular way that's a hard question that is in the top few most important discoveries in the history of humans i'll go to bat with anyone on that one you know solis them and that is like fantastically important no question about it we will get a significantly better understanding of how gravity interacts at very high densities so when two black holes merge when two neutron stars merge we will map out what the gravitational field is around these two massive bodies that's for sure and so we may understand a lot of the details of gravity is on the very small scales that has zero implications while i can't quite say his hero but so whether or not that has any implication for the very large scales which is what we're trying to study here.

steven weinberg mandy fifty years three years
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Physics and cosmology where his studies include the early universe the nature of dark matter general relativity and neutrino astrophysics he received his phd in physics from the massachusetts institute of technology mit in one thousand nine hundred eighty two then joined the heart society of fellows in nineteen eightyfive he joined the faculty of physics at yale university and moved to take his current appointment in nineteen ninety three as a fellow of the american physical society and of the american association for the advancement of science professor krausz is the author of over one hundred eighty scientific publications as well as numerous pop pop popular articles on physics and astronomy in addition listen to this now he's the author of six popular books including the national bestseller the physics of star trek and his most recent book adam an odyssey from the big bang life on earth and beyond he is the recipient of numerous awards for his research writing and lecturing these include the presidential investigator award given by president reagan in nineteen eightysix the american association for the advancement of sciences nineteen ninety nine two thousand award for public understanding of science and technology joining previous awardees a carl sagan edward o wilson and the two thousand one andrew gaumont award given annually to a person who's made significant contribution to the cultural artistic or humanistic dimensions of physics previous awardees include freeman dyson steven weinberg and stephen hawking in two thousand two krause was awarded the american institute of physics science and writing award for his.

yale university american association adam president reagan edward o wilson stephen hawking krause massachusetts institute of tec professor investigator andrew gaumont freeman steven weinberg american institute of physics
"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's banks and financial institutions the ban stems from concerned that the currencies might be used to loan the money or fund terrorism the five candidates to be mexico's next president have held their first televised debate ahead of july's election the main focus was on how they would tackle organized crime and corruption the european council president donald tusk is due to testify trial of five former government aids accused of negligence in connection with a plane crash which killed poland's president lech kitchen ski mr tusk was poland's prime minister at the time of the disaster in two thousand ten bbc news right that's precisely machine i just need five apples measuring weighing in the like a role perfectly straightforward in the kitchen the gas station forecourt too but in the quantum world of atoms and particles of light photons measurement is very different it's complicated and as you'll hear on this edition of discovery from the bbc it's worrying the top scientists classically it really doesn't matter whether you're measuring something or not it's still has the property that you're meant to be observing independently of your observation and so basically classically whatever you measure just uncovers whatever was already dead before you started your measurement but quantum louis you actually become really entangled to the system that you're measuring put more drastically essentially the things that we could potentially make sure don't actually make sure they don't really exist so things don't exist before we actually observed them which sounds crazy i'm burdened peace and my wish to make a program about the problem with quantum mechanics came to a head when i met the godfather of modern physics recently nobel laureate steven weinberg like many of my colleagues and theoretical physics for most of my life i've been perfectly happy with my understanding of quantum mechanics and it's only from teaching courses in quantum mechanics that i realized there was no interpretation of quantum mechanics with which i was entirely happy i would like to think of quantum mechanics in the same way that i think of newtonian mechanics that is it's a set of rules that.

mexico president donald tusk poland prime minister bbc european council nobel steven weinberg
"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Birth of quantum mechanics in the nineteen twenty s by two american physicists davison and girma who used electrons the lightest and most archetypal of subatomic particles marcus aunt who's experiments today mirror the original electron tests with large molecules so the claim was that you can associate with every material massive partyka an asymmetry phenomenon something like a wave and you see the waves nature of things if you compare it with waves in opponent also yoga throw stone and a punt and you see these ripples throw a second stone and upon to see a second set of reports and the two different sets of with us in the water waves stay they overlap can constructively and destructively interfere can raise the waves and lower than depending on the face of the waves for water that is trivial somehow because there are zillions of what a particles and you can easily imagine how one valley is filled by another set of water molecules but if you do these experiments with individual molecules individual electrons like davison girma then the question is what does it really mean to have the wave nature the standard arms which has stood the test of time is that the waves represent probabilities the probabilities of different outcomes of a measurement the probability for example that the cat would end up dead or end up alive if you looked or in the case of the davison girma experiment the probability that the electrons will show up here or there on a screen the mass that relates these probabilities to the wave function is simple but seems to appear out of nowhere says physics grandy steven weinberg there is role if you look at whether the cat is alive or dead then on the basis of what the wave function is for that state you can calculate the probabilities that rule is cold the born rule that doesn't seem to be any way of formulating the born rule without referring to people deciding to measure whether the cat is alive or dead that's really the problem in other words there is no way of deriving the.

steven weinberg davison davison girma
"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Measuring weighing in the like a role perfectly straightforward in the kitchen the gas station forecourt too but in the quantum world of atoms particles of light photons measurement is very different it's complicated and as you'll hear on this edition of discovery from the bbc it's worrying the top scientists classically it really doesn't matter whether you're measuring something or not it's still has the property that you are meant to be observing independently of your observation and so basically classically whatever you measure just uncovers whatever was already dead before you started your measurement but quantum leap you actually become really entangled to the system that you're measuring put more drastically essentially the things that we could potentially mation don't actually make sure they don't really exist so things don't exist before we actually observed them which sounds crazy i'm burdened peas and my wish to make a program about the problem with quantum mechanics came to a head when i met the godfather of modern physics recently nobel laureate steven weinberg like many of my colleagues in theoretical physics for most of my life i've been perfectly happy with my understanding of quantum mechanics it's only from teaching courses in quantum mechanics that i realized there was no interpretation of quantum mechanics with which i was entirely happy i would like to think of quantum mechanics in the same way that i think of newtonian mechanics that is it's a set of rules that tell us or any given initial conditions what will happen out there in the world without any reference to human beings actually making measurements of course you can also bring human beings into the picture and then calculate what happens when they do make measurements but the underlying principles shouldn't refer to human beings the laws of nature don't know about us and yet in the formulation so quantum mechanics that we use we do refer to human choice these issues have all been known and discussed for a long time many akon some theorists has pondered the meaning of it all over the decades but maybe the arrival of technologies like quantum computing concert gravity meets is quantum cryptography is making them think harder as measurement is at the heart of it all oh maybe the apparatus to test these ideas is becoming more sophisticated in any case the.

bbc nobel steven weinberg
"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Thanks to tony ron and harry wright for showing me around that quantum mechanics is famously difficult at the same time it's famously successful mixed biting the basis of chemistry the atomic nucleus semiconductor electronics so on and so on parts of the difficulty is it's used solve wave functions mathematical constructs which vaguely describes say a particles behavior without actually specifying exactly what's going on shooting us hypothetical cat for example which is similar tena asli alive and dead boss that about that bit physicists can deal with what troubles then is understanding of the theory seems to depend on the way that we make observations which somehow turns off the quantum necess if by magic as in when the experimental looks into the box which contains fruiting is alive and dead cat the poor animals fate is apparently sealed by a single look the role of an observer troubles among others nobel laureate steven weinberg probably the most respected physicist alive like many of my colleagues in theoretical physics for most of my life i've been perfectly happy with my understanding of quantum mechanics it's only from teaching courses in quantum mechanics that i realized that was no interpretation of quantum mechanics with with which i was entirely happy i would like to think of quantum mechanics in the same way that i think of newtonian mechanics that is it's a set of rules that tell us for any given initial conditions what will happen out there in the world without any reference to human beings actually making measurements of course you can also bring human beings into the picture and then calculate what happens when they do make measurements but the underlying principles shouldn't refer to human beings the laws of nature don't know about us and yet in the formulations of quantum mechanics that we use.

tony ron steven weinberg physicist harry wright
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it's really odd and very hard to detect it was interestingly one of the first elementary particles to be discovered the only ones that were known in 1930 when wolfgang pally had this incredible feat of uh kind of insight into wition worthy proton the photon in the electron and the strange thing about the neutrino is that even now nobody understands it very well and it's one of the four fronts of particle physics because it just is this really weird particle why is science so fascinated with the neutrino what is it that we're trying to understand evening for two reasons first of all it will help explore the universe explained the behavior of these incredibly strange things that are being discovered faroff at outer space we have now entered this era called multi messenger astronomy we saw is merging neutron star event which resulted in a gravitational wave and it was also seen with light the neutrino would be yet a third messenger besides light in gravitational waves with which we can look at these exotic things like merging neutron stars were her please ours these incredibly bright galaxies often the cosmos and things of that short so it's an astrophysical tool and the neutrino has so far revealed the only physics beyond the standard model particle physics so back in the 1970s people like steven weinberg sheldon glass show up do salaam put together something called the standard model which explains by now all the known elementary particles last one that was discovered was the higgs bows aren't great fanfare in two thousand twelve well it's getting a little bit scary now because the standard model oh worked so well that it's beginning to feel like a straitjacket it seems like people have discovered everything they that they can discover and scientists don't like that they like to discover new things but the neutrino has actually revealed some physics beyond the standard model the standard model says that it should not weigh anything and an experiment very much like ice cube showed in 1997 that neutrinos have mass so right now there are probably a billion or more dollars worth of our research efforts aimed at tried to explore the neutrino to see if they can uncover new physics that might lead to oh just new beauty in the.

wolfgang pally steven weinberg sheldon
"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Since the two houses of congress the house of representatives and the senate killed a project to build an underground machine like sense large hadron collider but bigger and earlier cancelled at having already spent two billion dollas on it university of texas is nobel laureate steven weinberg whose theories it was meant to test still carries the scars we were going to build a new tunnel only about a third of it got finished on its now quietly filling up with water somewhere under the ground i could go on and on with my grief about this i mean it was so unexpected it had been cancel the year before in the house of representatives but then a conference committee between the send in the house restored it that was 1992 and then a 1993 the same thing happened and again it was restored and the conference committee but the house would not go along with it they would determine and to show that they were not going to provide what they thought of us texas pork pook beat the dismissive way that americans phrase that suspicion that barrels of federal money goes a particular states is a kind of federal bride to the electors there so haggling is no guarantee of a sound outcome and under those circumstances the random jinro steve billion as does seem attractive here's the peach from warm who knows we worked with our man who wanted to fund astronomy we introduced him to four astronomy funders he liked how one of them had established a fellowship program and he copied it and he established his own fellowship program for exa planet research an exa planets mission is not that again was once a little boy who looked up at the wonders of the universe at wondered how it all worked so people who fund basic scientific research are curious they are willing.

senate steven weinberg university of texas texas
"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Got lined up for us oh mommy mommy mommy here of the drew blair's mahdi because there's a big session going on right now about funding some specifically the contribution philanthropic billionaires can make the right at the start of the week as i was heading here the government proposed a series of massive cuts to federal science programs the aaa acid would if enacted dismantle the science and technology enterprise in the usa now it turned out later that the president in another part of this budget restored some of the plan cuts but it unnerves on his transplant ahead and as the aaa assists director of government relations joined county told me the problems run actually deeper this is a budget request at forty thousand in nineteen are but we are currently operating in fiscal year two thousand an eighteen and congress has yet to final lies that budget so it's all smoke and mirrors really and over the president can request the budget is actually to lawmakers in congress who set it higher or lower than he asked so that that's a lot of politic to come well let me said two champions in congress that may continue to fight and support for those programmes programs like the department of energy's art the e has support in the senate in addition their constituents outside of the government that will be arguing on behalf advocates in universities and industry those that fight on behalf of of the research entreprises as a whole this is an interesting example of where this policy can come about two hours drive multiple stint here in texas is twenty five years since the two houses of congress the house of representatives and the senate killed a project to build another graham machine like sense large hadron collider but bigger and earlier cancelled at having already spent two billion dollas on it university of texas is nobel laureate steven weinberg whose theories it was meant to test still carry the scars we were going to build a new tunnel only about a third of it that finished on its now quietly filling up with water i could go on and on with my grief about this array that was so unexpected it had been canceled a year before in the house of representatives but then a conference committee between the sand with the.

blair usa president director congress senate steven weinberg aaa texas university of texas twenty five years two hours
"steven weinberg" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"steven weinberg" Discussed on Science in Action

"Deeper this is a budget request four two thousand and nineteen but we are currently operating in fiscal year two thousand an 18 and congress has yet to finalise that budget so it's all smoke and mirrors early adult of the president can request the budget is actually to lawmakers in congress who set it higher or lower than he us so that that's a little of politic to come well it leaves it to champions in congress that may continue to fight and support for those programmes programs like the department of energy's rp has support in the senate and addition their constituents outside of the government that will be arguing on behalf advocates in universities and industry those at fight on behalf of of the research enterprise as a whole this is an interesting example of where this policy can come and up about two hours drive north of boston here in texas is twenty five years since the two houses of congress the house of representatives amd within it killed a project to build an underground machine like sense large hadron collider but bigger and earlier cancelled at having already spent two billion dollas on it university of texas is nobel laureate steven weinberg whose theories it was meant to test still carries the scars we were going to build a new tunnel only about a third of it got finished on its now quietly filling up with water i could go on and on with my grief a path is i mean it was so unexpected it had been cancel the year before in the house of representatives but then a conference committee between the send in the house restored it then and 1993 the same thing happened and again it was restored in the conference committee but the house would not go along with it they would determined to show that they were not going to provide what they thought of us texas pork poke beat the dismissive way that americans.

president congress senate boston texas university of texas steven weinberg twenty five years two hours