19 Burst results for "Steven Pinker"

Understanding Australia's Political Narcissism

Between The Lines

10:12 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Australia's Political Narcissism

"Have you often thought that are major political parties don't offer a choice? They just offer an Tweedle dum Tweedle day. Well, that's more or less been the case since the mid nineties when both labor and the coalition champion what's called the economic reform agenda, or as some of the critics deride the neoliberal consensus deregulation privatize -ation tariff cuts tax cuts leban- microphone all that. Well, my guess says those days are over the may eighteen election. He says could represent an audio logical shift in Australian politics, and that's a good thing. To teams palmesano is professor of practice at the university of Sydney, he's a former rice discrimination Commissioner he's worked as a library vase, and is the author of book called on height. Published by 'em UP, get item welcome to between the lines on now. In your recent Sydney Morning Herald column. Mm USA just quote out political Nassim of monitor Frances that could be coming to an end house. Oh, we're saying perhaps the most ideologically significant election for quite some time here. And it's because we have the lay the pioneer Bill shorten offering a forthright progressive social democratic platform. It hasn't gone about presenting itself as a small target in this election. It's put a quality registered bution back on the Genda. You say this in the fact that it's pushed for capital gains tax reform, negative, gearing reform pushed for higher wages, the childcare policy announcement during this election is another example. So what you're seeing here in some is a muscular rejection of market liberalism assigned that the state is back at least on the lie beside and that you'll you'll saying challenge to the idea that a marketing. Clemmie must also mean a market society. So long gone are the days when you had a lie bellator running for office. Kevin rod describing the stalling himself as an economic conservative precisely and that has been the template in many respects full libero position. Now who's reflect the thinking of a lot of people in the community just how has the power of market liberalism. How is that filed? Let's just look survey at from the global perspective with still saying the effects of the global financial crisis with seeing here. What is a transitional transformation from stable managed capitalism to speculative financial capitalism. And the legacy of this committee described as follows when not saying global growth in in any significant way, you might even say the global economy is in naming with saying ultra-low interest rates with seeing quantitative easing by many central banks, huge jumps in public indebtedness. Also significant increases in inequality and on top of that when not necessarily saying the market operate in the perfectly competitive foam that you would expect of market liberalism, think of the concentration of market power in the new digital Konami the enormous size and influence of organization such as. Google or Facebook, or Amazon, I think these are all signs that market liberalism is not working the way that and that exit Bill shorten is championing this notion of famous, but is income inequality really Rausing in this country. I'll turn to a productivity commission report last g got the quotes. He it found that sustained growth has delivered significantly improved living standards full the average Australian in every income group that the economic mobility is high and quote movements in inequality indexes a slot rather than series in other words, Australia. According to productivity commission is not locked US where we have seen real income inequality Nora, we lock Europe where growth has stagnated for decades. How would you respond to the productivity commission all the productivity commission report still acknowledges that income? Inequality has risen of the past three decades. It's suggest. And here is that they may be a question about the degree to which income inequality has risen. But also, the productivity commission is also clear that when you look at the ends of the distribution on income, it's become in their woods stickier. So you seeing less mobility in some pockets of distribution, and as they put it stickiness is indicative, some entrenched inequality. So thought wholesale repudiation of the rising inequality in some of this is also that up in methodology. So the methodology that the productivity commission us was to look at surveys conducted as part of the Hilda exercise, the household income and labour dynamics in Austria study that is very well regarded, but if you look at other methods of measuring inequality, for example, looking at national accounts, dotterel taxation statistics drawing on the methodology that people Thomas Pickety have developed measuring income inequality. Then does appear that income inequalities at historically high levels going back to nineteen forties or the mid twentieth century. We've not had income inequality at such levels in it straight. And that's based on research done by Andrew Lee. Mentioned Thomas Pickety who Thomas Pickety fringe economists? I think climbed to find on this issue of inequality, but opportune to people have been on this show over the last few Yee's team. Keisha Mahbubani from Singapore. Johan Norberg from Sweden Steven pinker from Harvard met really from London victim Putin in Melvin and nisi that market liberalism, including free. Tried has delivered the single greatest reduction in extreme poverty in human history effect, isn't it? Yes, it is. And imagine if the distribution will equal even see more people having been liberated from poverty or enjoying a rise out of hardship. There's no question about the absolute gains that come from market, liberalism and not rejecting the idea of market economy. We know that the market distributes resources in a much more efficient way than a centrally planned economy does. This is the lesson of the twentieth century in the listen of the failure of of communism. The point here is about whether we want to be a market society is will that we have the logic of the market being applied to conduct government and to add relations between between people see Mahbubani, nog- and Pinkett, they'd respond inside that government policies lie policies, if you like to force inequality down that would incur a cost in lower economic growth, and that would argue low living standards, not just in Australia, but across the world. Well, that would argue that and it's an it's an idea that I believe should be contested. I'm not arguing for a perfect equal distribution of resources. But if we believe, for example, when the idea of Aaquil opportunity, I believe you need to have some redistribution of resources for that to become realizable. No question that socialism is having some sort of resurgence. And you mentioned that in your recent Sydney Morning Herald article, certainly if you look in the United States, you see Bernie Sanders doing very well, politically, Jeremy Corbyn later of the party, and there have been plenty of polls. And we've had guests on this program talking about how socialism is becoming very popular, especially among millennials. Now, you say, quote, what those on the right to cry as the evils of socialism, a good number of us regard as decent common sense. But what about the terrible atrocities committed in the name of socialism in the twentieth century team. What about the? Abject failure of socialism everywhere has been implemented. Let's not get too blunt Tomei to when when when our third to run I refer to those on the right decrying was socially. I was referring specifically to the education minister Dantin criticising. The labour party's announcement recently on childcare policy as an example of socialism, if not communist or words that affects and I think that's a bit of blown somewhat exaggerated when I'm talking about social democracy. I'm talking about an ideology that still exists within the limits of multi-party, democracy, individually Berty and the rule of law that what social democracy means is that the state has a role in regulating markets and in redistributing resources, it's about elevating the value of community and the value of quality beside the value of freedom. Young people who are attracted to socialism. They also distrust government regulations, and they mar on Pinerolo and small businesses. They're disconnected between the two. No, this is this is precisely and it will strike of the point. I'm making about a mock economy. This is a market society. Millennia was understand perfectly. Well, the power of entrepreneurialism and the benefits of of the market what they don't accept is that the market must govern everything in society. What I don't accept his that the distribution thrown up by the market is is something that is necessarily desirable in all cases. So if you look at how millennials are experiencing, the housing market and housing affordability. If you're looking at how they experiencing work and the diminishing job security that they experience all the precarious nature gig economy that many of them are engaged in their frankly, not saying the benefits of of market liberalism market. But you tackling dance. You can't tax a loss. You can only tax prophet and

Sydney Morning Herald Thomas Pickety Labour Party Australia United States Tweedle Dum Tweedle University Of Sydney Konami Professor Of Practice Commissioner Andrew Lee Genda Johan Norberg Clemmie Kevin Rod Europe
"steven pinker" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Kickass News

"The podcast the Harvard, professor renowned cognitive scientists in leading intellectual who's also known as Bill Gates favourite author. Dr Steven pinker, I had him on the show last year to discuss his most recent book enlightenment. Now, the case for reason science humanism and progress which presented hard data that proves that. Despite the doom and gloom in the media. People are living longer healthier freer and happier lives. Now, you might think this would be welcome news for public besieged with negativity from the Russian investigation to the government shutdown, but you would be surprised at how many people just didn't want to believe his findings or worse accused. Dr Steven pinker of ignoring the problems of those who are still suffering now a year after the publication of his important book, Dr pinker, addresses the criticism pointing to hard evidence that proves that the way. World as a whole just keeps getting better he reviews fifteen metrics of societal progress that continued to show improvement and discusses to areas that give him particular cause for concern. Steven pinker, ponders weather. Trump's trade war might lead to a hot war whether the retreat of liberal democracy in Europe could signal a resurgence of authoritarianism, and whether the immigration debate might actually be a turning point for the better as polls show that Americans are rejecting alternative facts and alarmism he reveals how genetics may play a part in our political preferences and explores how linguistics can make for more productive political discussions. Dr pinker, recalls the turbulent sixties in his hometown of Montreal. And how he went from a teenage anarchist to a leading proponent of science reason humanism in progress plus an update on his ongoing fight against political correctness. Why we need to stop giving words too much power. And why he says those baby boomers who hate on Molyneaux. Heels as a generation of snowflakes have no one but themselves to blame for it. Coming up with the brilliant. Dr Steven pinker in just a moment. Dr Steven pinker is one of.

Dr Steven pinker Bill Gates Harvard professor Europe Trump Montreal Heels Molyneaux
"steven pinker" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"From NPR. Guy Roz. So if you've watched the news lately, you might think that the world has never been worse tally of ISIS and the ongoing war in Syria have triggered an epic humanitarian crisis. Children being hosed off treated after an alleged chemical attack and Duma first pictures. Now coming in from Puerto Rico after taking a direct hit and fourteen hundred people killed at this point in this massive, seven point, eight magnitude earthquake, fifty, eight people now dead more than five hundred people wounded in a horrific shooting on the Las Vegas strip. It's the deadliest mass shooting in modern United States. History police say a sixty four year. Okay, so thank seem pretty horrible. Right. Well, actually, according to this guy, yes. Can you hear me the world is getting better? Is that right? Mostly, yes, this is Steven pinker. He's a psychology professor at Harvard and author of the book enlightenment. Now, starting with the most precious thing of all life. Life expectancy for most of human history is about thirty years at birth. Now it's seventy one years globally in eighty years in the developed parts of the world with increases in the developing world as well. So the the gap is closing people are much more likely to be literate to be educated, their chance of dying in a war or a inactive. Personal violence has decreased in most parts of the world work hours have decreased. So people have more leisure time. They have more disposable income. They can afford more small luxuries like beer and TV and smartphones. So yes, in in by most measures, there has been progress in the sense that the things that make life worth living have increased for more and more people compared to two earlier historical periods. All right. Now when some people argue, hey, how can. You save. It's been progress. Look at all the suffering on the world, etcetera, etcetera. Your your main argument is look at the data. The data is clear progress is a fact of life. That's the way the other way putting it is. Yeah, they're suffering now and there was more suffering in the past, the less the better. There are a lot of trends that indicate that at least certain kinds of suffering are going to continue to decrease if we continue our efforts to reducing them. So it's not just a matter of looking at the data. It's the data show that, yes, there are obviously problems. Progress is not magic progress, not perfection progress, not a miracle. It doesn't mean that everyone is maximally happy. It doesn't mean that everything gets better for everyone everywhere all the time, and always that would be a miracle. That's not progress. The question is however bad things are now, were they worse in the past. And those are questions Steven pinker tackled on the Ted stage. Many people face the news each morning with trepidation and dread every day we read of shootings inequality, pollution, dictatorship war, and the spread of nuclear weapons. These are some of the reasons that two thousand sixteen was called the worst year ever. Until two thousand seventeen claimed that record and left many people longing for earlier decades when the world seems safer cleaner and more equals. But is this a sensible way to understand the human condition in the twenty first century as Franklin Pierce Adams pointed out, nothing is more responsible for the good old days, a bad memory. You can always.

Steven pinker NPR Duma Las Vegas Puerto Rico Franklin Pierce Adams Syria United States Harvard seventy one years sixty four year eighty years thirty years
"steven pinker" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Right i have the pleasure today of able to sit down and talk to dr steven pinker our university who's just written a new book may he's written many books this is the newest one it's called enlightenment now and it's a new york times bestseller for seven weeks so that's a great accomplishment and darker baker is indicated to me that it's doing it's it's a stewing better than his other books and the hen they've also done very well so that's really something so stephen paker is the harvard college professor psychology at harvard university he's a twotime surprise finalists and the winner of many awards for his research teaching in books is being named one of times one hundred most influential people and one of foreign policies one hundred leading global failures is oaks include the stuff of thought the better angels of our nature the blank slate and the sense of style and so i'm welcoming dr paker sleep and i'd like him to start telling us to start by telling us about the book itself and then we'll talk about broader issues in the other than that sort of thing we'll be a book subtitle is the case or reason science humanism and progress at all begin with with the progress because that was the that more than anything inspired the book i didn't a previous book the better angels of our nature when i was surprised to come across eight sets showing that many measures of files it declined over the course of history i was stunned to see a graph that shows rates of homicide from england and other western european countries from the thirteen hundred's to the twentieth century showing a decline of anywhere from thirty five to fifty in the chances of getting murdered.

baker professor harvard university england dr steven pinker york times stephen paker harvard college seven weeks
Bombay Blood Group or HH Blood Group — The rarest blood Group

Something You Should Know

01:51 min | 2 years ago

Bombay Blood Group or HH Blood Group — The rarest blood Group

"Ever knowing it allows for life saving blood transfusions before the discovery doctors had tried blood transfusions but unless they just happen to matchup donor with a receiver by chance or if the donor had universal typo the patient would die that's because your immune system knows your blood type and recognizes another blood type as an invader in nineteen fifty two some people were discovered to have no blood type at all it's called the bomb bay phenotype because bombay was where the first people with this were discovered it is very rare and people with no blood type must get transfusions from other people with no blood type even the universal type oh can kill them and that is something you should know if you think there are a lot of problems and dangers and horrors in the world you're right of course there are there always are but does that mean the world is falling apart as some people seem to think it is if you watch cable news you would think that things are getting worse and worse in that we just go from one horrible thing to the next and we're on the road to self destruction and it creates this cynicism the sense of dread i know i felt it but then along comes steven pinker one of my favorite writers stephen is an experimental cognitive scientists he's a professor of psychology at harvard and he has written some great books his brand new one which has already zipped up the bestseller list is called enlightenment now became for reason science humanism and progress and he brings a very different message i stephen so you have good news which is always wealth.

Bombay Steven Pinker Harvard Professor Of Psychology Stephen
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I don't retire book on the highest it's a worlds and a lot of people nausea walk men doesn't sound quite right man walkmans i i would i would actually go closer to walkmans for reasons i explained in my book words and rules which also has explanations of why it's the toronto maple leafs instead of meat believes why you sixwoman flight out to centerfield instead of flew out all of those little commend rooms of language he hit another remarkable book pace even patriots' even thank you so much for being undefined matters today and i thank you for helping as i understand the world's withering in a lot better be my pleasure thank strategy to find out more that stephen pink field go to steven pinckert dot com steven pinkers remarkable new book is titled enlightenment now the case for reason science humanism and progress this is the 14th year i've been doing design matters and i'd like to thank you for listening and remember we can talk about making a difference be can make a difference per we can do i'm tippy melvin lent look forward to talking with him again soon for more information about design matters or to subscribe to our newsletter go to debbie mellman dot com if you love this podcast please consider contributing to our new drip kickstarter community members get early access to the podcast transcripts of every interview invitations to live interviews qna sessions with guests and a brand new annual magazine you can learn more about this at d dot rip slashed debbie dash mellman that's d dot rip slash debbie dashed hillman if you want others to know about this podcast please read review in the eye in store and linked to the podcast on social media designed matters is produced by curtis fox productions the show is published exclusively by design observer dot com and recorded live at the school of visual arts masters in branding program in new york city the editor in chief of design matters media is accurate pettit and the art director is emily weiland generous support for designed matters media is provided by wicks dot com.

debbie hillman pettit director toronto stephen pink curtis fox new york editor in chief emily weiland
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Go back to normal at set point the set point yeah the sat point determined like a what a lot of things in in large part but not completely by genetics so there's there's some truth to that but it turns out to be an exaggeration that people their happiness can change over their lives as a result of events like like be married having uh like moving to a richer country that winning the lottery contrary to an earlier understanding used to be thought that winning lottery does leave you any happier in the long run the kids are kind of dice made happy glad to hear that i guess there's alqaeda kind of feels like wow if that doesn't make you happy what will yes there is a kind of tragic moralistic view that uh everything that we are almost media buddhist view that our stride in is for nought doesn't make you any happier in the long run and the earlier finding that lottery winnings were no happier turns out to be false kind of fit into that narrative that all of our striving after wealth and comfort and saw his for not to that it's not for nought him he's not the only thing and a lot of a lot of us make choices that leave us less happy but more fulfilled maybe diving we all too but still we have to acknowledge that when things go well you believe do it up happier ultimately at the end of your remarkable book i am left with a sense of hope and optimism and it's something that i think is a rare thing feel these days in the final chapter of enlightenment now you state that history confirms that when diverse cultures have to find common ground they converge towards humanism is it possible to speed up this process.

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"There were were wellfed uh why are we as and the answer is most countries are united states is an exception in that the american level of happiness has remained pretty constant since the late 1940s and that's not typical of western nations most western nations have gotten a happier and most nations in general get happier as they get richer united states not possibly in part because of inequality because a lot of the gains have been enjoyed much more by those the top than those at the bottom that may be one possible explanation another may be that the united states it's fortunes have in some ways have sunk since the heyday of the 1950s when everything seemed great you know yankee ingenuity gave us the atomic bomb we went to the moon we will be went to the moon and the a women were happy consumers and housewives and negroes new their place and america had a mission to spread democracy across the world so we started at a high a point of selfconfidence of the 1950s swin it just seemed like it was going to be the american century well then there was bureau vietnam met and watergate and recognition of poverty and added clear arms race and this is great disillusionment in the united states senate may be that we had confirmed that a fall in terms of our national self concept how is it possible to measure happiness is it just asking somebody help happy are you on a scale of one to ten that's that's the main method yeah it sounds kind of dumb but on the other hand uh what better measures kennedy who could be better expert now of course if you're a social scientists you can't just take it on face value and in fact self reports of happiness do correlate with other measures that we would think our our other ways of measuring happiest like how happy do your friends and family think you are what parts of the brain are active are the insane parts the brain that light up when you see you'll kittens clinton's kittens if people say they're happy.

united states vietnam clinton america senate kennedy
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Of anarchy then you do get the the worst of human nature you tend to get high rates of violence you get the abduction and rape of women you get a constance plotting of revenge or of preemptive attacks let's do it to them before they do it to us you get going love lord the fleiss type scenarios but if you have a strong civil society under the umbrella of stable institutions like schools like rule of law court system institutions of business then that tends to allow people to trust one another more they're not constantly thinking how can i screw him before he screws me and it can be a virtuous circle and successful societies like those of northern western europe super duper de well united states is by many measures a bit of a laggard in terms of successful liberal democracies by water measures we don't measure up that well to new denmark and france and norway and germany we have higher rates of crime and of lower lifespan higher infant mortality more drug abuse which is shocking which is kind of shocking considering how rich we are yeah so the united states it's a pretty a pretty good place to live as far as countries go across the world but were were kind of underachievers given her which we are you read this in the chapter unhappiness today's americans are not one and a half times happier than they were fifty years ago as they would be if happiness tracked income or third happier if attract education or even an eighth happier if attract longevity people seem to bitch mon wine carping vaj as much as ever and the proportion of americans who tell pollsters that they are happy has remained steady for decades why is that the case yes there is a paradox about the united states and actually led to a misconception among psychologists and economists in general we we life has gotten objective so much better yet mug of longer were richer and.

europe denmark united states rape france norway germany fifty years
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Changed questions but they're on the first pages of this 500plus page book you reveal the most arresting question you have ever fielded after one of after talks and as running if you can share the question with our listeners and then tell us how you responded yes so i i give it talking during the course of the talk is based on the blank slate ice i noted that the mind is the physiological activity of the brain and that uh when the physiological activity the brain uh ceases person goes out of existence all attempts to try to communicate with the source of the dead have failed and this is decidedly standard bureau science say just for you we are what our brains us and suit stood up and said why should i live um extraordinary quite extraordinary question and she didn't obviously she choose not suicidal she didn't need a sarcastic reach you sincere my guess was on it and i used to she had a traditional religious upbringing which included the immortal soul and this is a new ideas to her and she really one of the no and and my policy in any case in ataka's there's no such thing as a stupid question i always try to answer them sincerely in on the terms the questioner so the the response that i put in the book was undoubtedly more coherent and eloquent than what i actually said at the time but i had luxury of recreating it from memory but i reiterated what i think of as the ideals of the enlightenment that we are intelligent creatures were social creatures we can learn we could argue we can debate each one of us has sources of pleasure and flourishing we enjoy the beauty of the natural world we enjoy the beauty of the cultural world we bring up children we enjoy the love of our our family and and our meets.

ataka
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Made some progress we abolished slavery the soviet empire collapsed with very little violence rates of violent crime had gone down since the middle ages a little factory that i was aware of and when i repeated these positive comments in a blog post i started to get mail from historians and social scientists saying did you know that rates of death in warfare have plummeted since nineteen fortysix someone else also did you know that rates of domestic violence or down from an ulcer did you know that rates of child abuse down and these are people who didn't talk to each other whose work was kind of buried in the academic journals and i thought oh my goodness there seems to be a pattern here in area after area if you look at file its objectively quantitatively it's going down that's a very different picture than when you get from the headlines i think since i am privy to all of these different facts they deserve to be between a pair of covers and as a psychologist what a challenge to try to explain them how is it that with human nature which should change is very slowly if at all we managed to change our behaviour so dramatically so that led to the better angels of our nature the title was just waiting for me to steal his from abraham lincoln but i believe in a complex human nature sylvie metaphor of the better angels of our nature suggest that that's not all there is to human nature but it is an important part of human nature that we can encourage and clearly we have encouraged given the way all of these forms of violence have gone down over time then i realized that the story is even bigger than violence that if you look at other measures of human wellbeing such as how long we live how many kids die in infancy how many mothers die giving birth how many people are illiterate how much free time we have how much time you spend on housework all of these show improvement and the adds up to a picture that really vindicates is somewhat oldfashioned notion of progress we've made progress and you wouldn't know it reading the papers.

abraham lincoln
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"In writing his not instinctive which is why i wrote another book of the sense of style rain on how to write clearly where do our instincts come from i think for ultimately from evolution for the process of natural selection which gives us the tools to survive in our environment let's talk about your brand new book enlightenment now the case for reason science humanism and progress what made you decide to write this particular book it away it grew out of a book verbal in two thousand eleven called the better angels of our nature why violence has declined which in turn was kind of a glud of the blank slate the modern denial of human nature the common thread is human nature what makes us tech what kind of creatures are away and in arguing in the blank slate that there is such a thing as human nature that were not blank slate that parents right on the or society i had to do with the fact that lot of aspects of human nature our are our notsopleasant we have jealousy we have revenge we have dominance we have lost we have selfishness and i think the reasons to believe that evolution program those into our brain that leads leaves the question well jesus if words that mean that were doomed to constant conflict and war and crying and harassment and rape because you know we can't help it it's in the genes evolution made us do it and at the time i i said no that doesn't follow because those nasty parts of human nature aren't the only parts evolution also gave us empathy and reason and a moral sense and selfcontrol and at any given historical period how he actually behave depends on how strong our norms in our institutions and our values are compared to our our unpleasant urges impulses and that can change over time and i even noted well in fact you look at history you see obviously behavior isn't the same in every stoorikhel period we.

harassment rape
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Business sprained you've had it's the on what you're talking about takes a lot of work to take abstract thoughts and to shake them into a grammatical sentences you also asked this question if language were really thought it would raise the question of where language would come from if it were incapable of thinking without language so how did we think before the exactly yogurt on a going back to her earlier topic a language development of children part of my own furious how children develop languages that they are just crypt tug refers hearing in blah blah blah blah blah find a decode sequence of sounds figure language and context they see their parents looking at things they see the things that parents are looking at the constantly updating their own mental model of the world they have a good hunches to what their parents are probably referring to and what they do is they just deposed the sounds that they hear coming out of other people's mouths with their interpretation of the world which is not itself language it can't be the how to learn language yet that's how they learn language likewise language is always changing we invent new words to label thoughts that we didn't have words four we struggled to put our thoughts it into words and our nonverbal thinking overlaps with that of other species like chimpanzees were pretty smarten chips have a concept of objects and locations and caused that affect and other agents and their intentions rudimentary compared to ours but they are clearly other animals can think i'm and i think the are thinking got more sophisticated in the course of evolution and language developed as an accompaniment to a cognitive system which existed we before language came into the world so you believe that language is an instinct yes so that was the title of my first popular book which i stole from charles darwin man hasn't instinctive tendency to speak as we see in the babel of our young children that not to right very denard to write yomiuri not.

denard charles darwin
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Killer language child here's all this noise coming in his parent's mouths for a couple of years and in it within a couple of years the child is producing his or her own sentences brand new sentences then nargiso memorizing what they heard before what's the algorithm in the child's brain that goes from one to the other goes from speech from parents to an ability to speak and understand and can strapped and constructive crucially two to construct and i started off just looking at a computer simulations from artificial intelligence from math models justice houses problem even soluble and what could allow a child to acquire language and then i started to test these ideas by bringing kids into into the lab or by analyzing transcripts of their speech what happened was that my field seemed to be more interested in my work in language acquisition than in visual cognition visual cognition was more crowded field there are other people who were doing the work better than i was but the world was kinda telling me that it would found the working language more interesting and so i gravitated towards the end diet took over my research life in your first pets language instinct how the mind creates language you wrote this you and i belong to a species with a remarkable ability we can shape events in each of his brains with exquisite precision i'm not referring to telepathy are mindcontrol or other obsessions of fringe science even in the depictions of believers these are blunt instruments compared to an ability that is uncontroversial lee present in every one of us that ability is language simply by making noises with our mouths we can reliably cause precise new combinations of ideas to arise in each other's minds the ability come so naturally that we are apt to forget what a miracle is steven headed wiebe.

steven
"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"About identical twins that you know so they have the same genomes they are brought up in the same family of the same parents same older serbs younger serb same school same neighborhood so the heredity is the same in their environment is almost the same very close to being the same so therefore they should be completely indistinguishable right well if you donate identical twins you know no they're not completely distinguishable they're highly correlated they're much more similar then two people plucked off the street or even two fraternal siblings but they have distinct personalities they followed from passing life how can that happen if we're shaped by our genes in our environment and they have the same genes in the same environment but still they end up not exactly the same the has to be a big role for sheer chance the luck of the draw both in the way your brain develops because the genes can shape brain development but the can't control it down to less connection and to random events that unfold as you live your life that may have a big cumulative effect that it's very hard to keep track of moment by moment which twin gets the top bunk bed which who gets the bottom bunk bed did one of them in here will virus and get a cold and stay home from school other went to school that day wounded chased by a dog none of these are formative but they add up to a different lifeline for each individual an all of these developmental neurological individual idiosyncratic events seemed to play a huge effect in shaping the person about the same size as the effect of the genes indicated that you think a lot of what makes us what we are we don't have any conscious tale is there any way to understand this better will they're always be some part of our consciousness aside from how it evolved that will never be able to understand i suspect there will be not because there's anything mr kohl or uncanny or paranormal but we're not going to ever i suspect have a.

mr kohl
"steven pinker" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on 1A

"Joining us from harvard is steven pinker the johnstone family professor of psychology his new book is called enlightenment now the case for reason science humanism and progress professor pinker welcome to one ah thank you bill gates said that your book is his new favorite book of all time that's really strong praise from someone who thinks a lot about aiding human progress what do you think it is about your book and the argument that you're making it's resonating with people like him it's a datadriven argument the heart of the book consists of 75 graphs that plot measures of human wellbeing overtime virtually all of which show that uh that that life has been getting better for more and more people people are living longer fewer children are dying fewer mothers are dying in childbirth at there are fewer people are victims of violent crime fewer people are dying in wars more people are living in democracies uh and and we have more leisure time you name it and so this is not a book on optimism in the sense of urging people to put a smile on their face and take a severe attitude toward the world it's a book that asked people to look at the cold hard facts that is don't get misled by headlines because until the messiah comes there will always be terrible events somewhere on earth and the news will present to us it's only when you try to measure human wellbeing with a constant yardstick over time that you see how much progress we've made is not a guarantee that the progress will continue in this direction forever progress isn't magic it's the result of uh people in the past uh looking at the human condition uh with reason and science and setting the goal of making people better off and bit by bit they've been succeeding how did this argument come about what got you starting to think about office in some ways enlightenment now is a natural sequel to my two thousand eleven book the better angels of our nature why violence has declined and it had a similar origin namely uh i was stunned to come across graphs showing the rate of uh homicide falling by about a factor of 35 between the middle ages and modern times in europe uh and i i commented on this once in a blog post and then i got a slew of.

harvard professor steven pinker johnstone professor of psychology bill gates europe
"steven pinker" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Hello folk music lunch o on the fox media podcast network i am as recline i am excited about the show today so we've got steven pinker on the show steven pinker is the harvard college professor of psychology at harvard university and he's a very very famous linguist and a couple of years ago he wrote a book the it was not primarily about linguistics it it was a book that changed my mind about some very big things changed a lot of people's minds about some very big things called the better angels of our nature and in that book he demonstrated there's been an astonishing drop in violence in human society over generations going back to to to the earliest data we have on human beings we have become less violent crazy jerks to each other than we were and and it's an argument if you read that book correctly i think that shows you know what for all that we hear about things getting worse for all the modern day civilization seems alarming times we are living within a story of tremendous progress a a story of so much progress it it is sometimes hard for us to keep it in mind so much progress of that it almost seems insulting to the problems we have to stated clearly he's now brought out the new book called the enlightenment now and the new book is a arts it's a follow up to better angels of our nature bill gates has called at his favorite book of all time so that is quite a recommendation and in the new book what he's really arguing for is what he sees as the preconditions of nauseous at drop in violence but but quite a broad range of other societal indicators he he argues have done a lot better and that is the basic fundamental ideas of the enlightenment ideas that sometimes we take for granted now like reason science um but but but the he would argue are under attack and under attack both in more explicit and at times it more subtle ways and than than people recognize so we have a lot of discussions on the show where i am talking.

steven pinker harvard university harvard college professor of psychology
"steven pinker" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Ably be put in jail for denying the holocaust i i don't agree with that there's some limit though that there is some room for play and like what is hate speech what's what's too far what's in incitement to violence there's a little bit of play in the joints and we can argue about it but what would steven pinker ducts and what a lot of these people do who make themselves poster people usually poster berth for free speech is they give is a rousing emotional uh diatribe about the enlightenment and how free speech was crucial to the enlightenment and its cruise to the science the only way to solve anything is free speech and they do it as though once again as as though the person they're arguing against doesn't want any speech like they just want zero speech knowns allowed to talk we all going to be silent and that that's never up for debate now this is one of those times where i can say a pretty literally i don't think there's anybody who believes there should be no speech her prep pretty sure nobody believes that so the actual discussion to have would be well how how restrictive is it if you want to make your hate speech laws a little more strict nine americans always balk at that but keep in mind i have quite a few european australian listeners given mine they're kind of going along just fine you can argue that these stress slightly stricter hate speech laws are bad that's fine but you can't argue that they ruin the fabric of society there's no such thing as science are inquiry or anything i mean there's still plenty of great science and enquiry coming out of europe and australia other places and if you were to listen to his talk which i'm gonna go into a couple more the points of you wouldn't know that that's that's the case you would think that he there's there's this big movement of people who want to shutdown science and philosopher and just get rid of all of it so in this video which i'll link he has what he thinks is a knockdown argument which is whenever you argue about free speech journey using free speech so you.

steven pinker europe australia
"steven pinker" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steven pinker" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Goals and liberal circles and facebook and social media pretty much everyone that i am friends with and who i listen to saying nah so i i don't think i need to cover that it seems as though virtually everybody in my circles the consensus seems to be let's not do that and that's certainly how i feel if you disagree let me know but i don't i don't think i needed i think it would be preaching to the choir but that's when i came across something else that of course since you've already seeing the title of this podcast you know what it is just to give a very brief bio steven pinker in case you're not familiar he's a harvard professor in the department of psychology he he specialize in psychology little bit of linguistics that kind of thing cognition interesting guy brilliant guy of course um as far some contacts and kind of how i think of steven pinker um a his work is often his his book better angels of our nature from two thousand eleven is very often tweeted at me in response to any sort of attitude that we need to improve things so it's a common and frustrating non sequitur where in indeed is what you'll see when i started discussing the video progressives hey progress the theme is essentially why are progressive was winding look at how good the world is and it's just a complete non sequitur i'll get into more of that later but that is very frequently brought up by people like christine off summers and and anyone who wants to argue against people who want change systemic change that conflict with that in mind what happened was i actually there's a a video circulating that has been edited to be a little shorter and and i think a little misleading of steven pinker but i actually had just been on youtube in had seen a video you know it's suggest video for you and and if my my youtube can be just an absolute mess in terms of suggested videos because oftentimes i'm having to watch these videos of shit lord's and dave rubin and stuff like that but i saw.

facebook social media steven pinker youtube christine dave rubin