4 Burst results for "Steven Parent"

"steven parent" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:06 min | 3 months ago

"steven parent" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"To be introducing this best of episode of a manica. Today's mannequin was known for committing disturbing acts of violence. If you're listening with young children, you might want to sit this one out. This episode was originally part of our August 2019 theme villa nesis. Today, we're talking about a woman who went on to commit some of the most infamously disturbing crimes in U.S. history. What's so special about this episode is that we get to hear this woman's story told by the person who played her in the 2018 movie, Charlie says. Now, here's guest host Sosie Bacon to talk about Patricia krenwinkel, one of the original members of the Manson Family. Patricia Diane krenwinkel was born in 1947 in Los Angeles, California. Her father was an insurance salesman and her mother was a homemaker. Patricia's teen years weren't exactly easy. She suffered through the divorce of her parents, as well as relentless bullying at school for her weight and appearance. After her parents split, she stayed with her father in Los Angeles until she graduated from high school. She taught catechism and considered becoming a nun for a bit before deciding to go to Spring Hill college. A Jesuit school in Alabama. That didn't last long. She dropped out and returned to LA after just one semester. Patricia first met Charlie Manson in Manhattan beach in 1967 while working as an office clerk. That night, we slept together and when we made love all I remember is just crying and crying to this man because he said, oh, you're beautiful. I couldn't believe that. I just started crying. After that, Patricia left her life behind. She went with Manson along with Lynette from and Mary browner to San Francisco, abandoning her apartment, car and last paycheck. The growing so called families started traveling around the country in an old school bus. Patricia now dubbed Katie, acted as a mother figure to the rest of the group. At first Manson and his group's exploits seemed unusual but not necessarily dangerous. They ran through the Woods while Manson played the flute they did a lot of partying and they briefly crashed with the drummer of The Beach Boys. The group eventually decided to establish a more stable base. They moved to spahn ranch, a deteriorating former movie ranch located in Los Angeles County. Manson had long been preaching the racist notion that tensions between black and white people were about to erupt. Some believe this was the ideology that spurred the impending murder spree. In early 1969, the Manson Family moved to a yellow house in canoga park to monitor those disposed tensions. In August that year, Patricia took part in the first horrific crime in the family would become known for. In a scene described by one investigator as reminiscent of a weird religious Rite, 5 person. The murder of the pregnant actress Sharon Tate, along with her visiting friends. Patricia and some of the other Manson group members invaded the house, cutting the phone line and climbing an embankment to sneak into the property. They killed 18 year old Steven parent as he was leaving and then entered the house to kill Sharon Tate and her guests. Which included the coffee heiress Abigail folger. Patricia stabbed Abigail to death, chasing her even as she attempted to escape. During Patricia's trial, she recalled that she felt nothing during the murder, saying, I mean, what was there to describe was just there and it was right. 5 people were murdered that day and Patricia participated in more killings, the very next night. The following night there was another bloody stabbing and two more victims. Leno and rosemary LaBianca. Patricia wrote death to pigs in blood on the wall and also misspelled helter skelter on the fridge. After a few arrests, Patricia was bailed out by her father and moved back in with her mother in Alabama. Manson told her to go to stay there until he sent word for her return. Instead, Manson was arrested a couple days later. Patricia lived in Alabama until fellow Manson crew member Susan Atkins, who was still in jail, started talking about the Tate and LaBianca murders. Patricia was arrested in Alabama on December 1st, 1969. The next day she was indicted for 7 counts of first degree murder and one count of conspiracy to commit murder. After a 9 month trial, Patricia was convicted of all counts and sentenced to death. In the California institution for women in prison, Patricia slowly began to lose loyalty to Manson and the rest of the family. Her death sentence was commuted to life in prison as soon as the death penalty was outlawed in California and she went on to participate in many prison activities. She got a bachelor's in human services. She was active in alcoholics anonymous and narcotics anonymous and she taught reading to illiterate inmates..

Patricia Manson villa nesis Sosie Bacon Patricia krenwinkel Patricia Diane krenwinkel Jesuit school Mary browner Los Angeles spahn ranch Spring Hill college Charlie Manson Sharon Tate Alabama Manhattan beach Lynette Charlie Abigail folger canoga park California
"steven parent" Discussed on Unreserved

Unreserved

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"steven parent" Discussed on Unreserved

"Path and I'll let you know. Julie is one of the youth who shared her experiences with us about the child welfare system and her hopes in bringing lasting change. You're listening to unreserved on CBC radio one SiriusXM and native voice one. I'm Rosanna dear child. Bringing our children home, all of them. That's the goal of kaos first nation. If the name sounds familiar, it's because this Saskatchewan first nation made headlines last year. After 751 unmarked graves were found at the mayor of Indian residential school on its territory. While the work to identify the remains continues, kawasi is working to end that cycle of harm, and it's all emerging from the reserves chief red bear lodge. Basically, it's the container of the home fire. Eva Cole's is the CEO of chief red bear lodge. The creation that came out of Bill C 92, the law that now recognizes first nation authority for child and family services, and first nation is in the midst of creating its own system of care, one that helps the entire family, not just the child. Working alongside Eva is Nicole Cooke, a member of chaos first nation, and the associate CEO. It took a long time for Nicole to return to her home community. And it was at the insistent invitation of cows chief cadmus de Laurent. Called me regarding this project to jump on to for the meal from a tissue act. He wanted my support because I have lots of child care background and nursing background behind me. And so I jumped on as a volunteer, and I supported wherever I could. And eventually he just said, I want welcomed me with open arms. And so the home fire when I was able to walk the land that my cook home lived upon, it had this huge impact on me. And I think that that's what we need to build it out of. That's what Eva's talking about when she talks about home fire. It doesn't necessarily mean bringing all the children back home, but it means that it starts there. It starts with that culture, feeling the land, remembering who you are and where you come from. It's a beautiful place to start certainly. And I definitely wanted to get more details on what that home fire might build in the future. But let's back up a little bit into your own stories and how you came to be in this home fire. If you spent 35 years working in indigenous communities, what did you see in your work that indicated that this system was not working for indigenous children in foster care? Just on so many levels, meeting youth that we're wanting to connect to home that would arrive in tears because no one knew them. To attending situations with child welfare workers where it was so abrupt and brutal. And then the rules that were in place of families not able, no matter what hoops they were jumping through. They weren't having their children returned to them and I'm a non indigenous person. And would arrive at hospitals or different group situations. And be treated completely different than my clients. And so it was so obvious. In every which way, shape, or form, and I just started to be that square pagan round hole always banging down the door in 2014. I wrote a mission statement about what I would be doing as a Canadian. And that was to change things. No matter what it took, I would change things for children indigenous children in this country in child welfare. Wow, so you pretty much manifested your own destiny there, Eva. What you're doing now is it reflective of what you wrote on that piece of paper, those many years ago? This is maybe far more than I thought I could do. The ideas and the wisdom that we have in our group, I know is going to make an amazing difference. I know in our first year, we're not even hitting our first year anniversary yet. There are no children in care on the callous reserve at this moment in time. It's zero. Wow. That is an amazing accomplishment when you consider some of the numbers across Canada of indigenous people and care. Nicole, you worked off reserve before coming to work on colleges with Eva. Tell me about your experience. I was actually born and raised in the prince Albert area. My family was pretty poor. I also was raised in a very abusive home and went through a lot of hardships as a child. You know, experience a lot of racism, a lot of that kind of stuff as I was growing up. And because of the abuse that I faced as a kid, I really steered away from my childhood of learning about my culture. It's almost like a survival mode, I guess you could say. Started working when I was 14 and I got my own vehicle and I was just like sex. And I was like, hey, I'm out of this situation, you know? And I ended up going back to school and I took my nursing program at Dumont technical institute in prince Albert and I met my husband and I was set. We got pregnant. I was a nurse. I was making $21 an hour, and I was so excited. Then I had my first boy, and he was born with complex medical needs. And he was too fed till he was three and a half. He's had 5 surgeries. We were in and out of hospital for a while. Me and Steven, we stayed by his side, and eventually, because he wasn't working, I wasn't working. We had to sell everything that we got in prince Albert, and then we moved in to Regina in Stevens parents basement. And I was like, hey, we got to get back on our feet. So I started working at the possible hospital and I heard about a lady who had a little day care out of her 1000 ft² home that took children with complex needs because she was an ICU nurse. So I went into a 1000 ft² home in 2007 with Ethan. And right from that moment, she was like, you were meant to be here. She's like, you need to help me. You need to help me grow this organization. And so I did, and I helped her grow hope's home, what it's called today is hope's home. I worked there for 14 years, and I helped establish a nonprofit organization that takes care of children with complex medical needs. It went from the four kids in a 1000 ft² home up to taking care of over 550 children throughout the province of Saskatchewan and over a $14 million operational budget throughout Saskatchewan. So that was my experience insert applause here. That's amazing as I went basically from startup from nothing. So, but something was missing and I had a great career life, all of it. And eventually spirit started hitting me. Spirit, owls were flying directly at my face, looking me directly in the eye and flying over, and I knew something had to change. And that's when I started looking more at like who I am as an indigenous woman. And that's where I found true healing for just accepting who I am. And that's when chief came along and it led me to cowy. And I knew I know this is my journey. This is my path because all of the hardships that I experienced as a child, not finding home, and then helping with the development of hope's home, led me directly to.

red bear lodge Eva mayor of Indian residential sc kawasi Eva Cole Bill C Nicole Cooke cadmus de Laurent Rosanna Saskatchewan Nicole CBC prince Albert Julie Dumont technical institute Canada
"steven parent" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"steven parent" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"On the street on the way home from school. A butterfly flaps its wings. On December 4th, 1972, 7 year old Steven stayner was walking home from school and Merced California, a town about two and a half miles southeast of San Francisco, near Yosemite National Park. The weather was nasty, cold and sleety. When he was about three blocks from home, Steven was approached by a man who handed him a religious pamphlet purporting to be raising money for a local church. Stephen thought his mother, who had raised the family Mormon would likely be willing to donate. As he stood there chatting with the stranger, a car pulled up, and the man behind the wheel asked if he wanted a ride home. The man who'd given Stephen the pamphlet called the driver, minister, and got into the passenger seat, and so little Stephen climbed into the back seat of the stranger's car to get out of the sleet. But the minister didn't stop at Steven's house. Instead, he kept going toward highway one 40, telling Stephen not to worry, that they would call his mother when they got back to his place to ask if he could stay over. By all accounts, it seems little Stephen didn't cry or scream or put up too much of a fuss. This was before the era of stranger danger. My guess is Steven's parents taught him to be polite to strangers, which is apparently a thing human beings used to be, but still, it's hard to imagine a kid just sort of willingly riding off with two strangers, even if one of them was a minister. Of course, you and I both know the man driving the car was not a minister. The man driving the car was 41 year old Kenneth Parnell. A man deemed a quote sexual psychopath by a court appointed psychiatrist when he was only 19. Sexual psychopath is no longer an official diagnosis, but I think we get a pretty clear idea of this guy's issues from that outdated term. The first time he'd been arrested as an adult was in 1951 when he was about 20 years old for molesting a prepubescent boy. But by then, he'd already been in and out of juvie for a theft, arson and having sex with boys in public. In his adulthood, he somehow managed to convince not one or two, but three different women to marry him. Not at the same time, of course. That would be illegal. Between 1951 and 1972, Parnell had spent lots of time in prison and in psychiatric hospitals. And had escaped from said hospitals twice. So, not only was he not a minister, he was a serious piece of shit. Parnell's sidekick was a man named Irvin Murphy, whom he'd met working at an inn on the edge of Yosemite National Park. An article about this case in esquire from 2007 calls Murphy, quote, slow witted, but I don't know if that was some kind of official finding or what. I mean, clearly anyone who knowingly helps someone abduct a child for any reason isn't the brightest bulb in the cookie Tim. Parnell apparently told Murphy he wanted to save a battered child and adopt him as his own. And Murphy was like, okay? I guess. Who the fuck knows how these men's brains functioned. Parnell and Murphy took Stephen about a half an hour northeast to Kathy's valley, California, where Parnell rented one room cabin with no heat. Steven started asking to go home pretty much as soon as they got there. Something terrifying about the way Parnell managed to pull this whole thing off was that he's supposedly said something like your parents are angry at you, Steven. Can you think of why they might be angry at you? And of course, because Stephen was 7, he figured Parnell a grown-up and a minister no less must know what he was talking about, and indeed, Stephen had gotten in trouble that week for taking too long to get.

Stephen Steven Steven stayner Parnell Yosemite National Park Kenneth Parnell Merced Murphy San Francisco Irvin Murphy California Tim Kathy
"steven parent" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"steven parent" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"On july twenty fourth nineteen seventy the trial of charles manson and his followers began manson and three of his acolytes stood accused of planning and executing the murders of seven people. The previous year. The killing spree had stunned the city of los angeles on the night of august eighth nineteen sixty-nine four manson followers susan atkins patricia krenwinkel. Linda kosabe ian and tex watson said out from the cult's rural headquarters on a terrible mission. They drove up into the winding hills of benedict canyon and broke into the home of director roman polanski acting on manson's orders the posse murdered five people at the house including actress sharon tate. Jay c. bring abigail folder. Voi- check frank hausky and steven parent in a horrific final flourish. The murderers painted the word pig on the door of the house. Using tate's blood manson's motivation for targeting. These victims specifically has never been confirmed per one theory. Manson had a grudge against the homes last owner music. Producer terry melcher. The previous year melcher had declined to make a record with manson and raging the egotistical cult leader the following night manson himself drove six of his followers to a property in the los feeless neighborhood of los angeles where they murdered grocery store owner lino la bianca and his wife rosemary. Again the love bianca's were not targeted and manson's motivations for choosing their home are murky but as the prosecution noted manson's obsession with a race war which he called helter skelter appeared to be at the root his sadistic killings. Manson was a racist. His vision for helter skelter was really a white supremacist. Fantasy in which a conflict between white and black people would make it possible for him to seize power in manson's warped and bigoted vision of the future. He and his followers would go underground during the war itself. Once the smoke cleared he believed there would be a window left for him to suddenly emerge and takeover the murders were in part. Manson's attempt to jump start the race war. He and his followers staged both crime scenes to make them look like they were committed by the black panthers. A group manson loathed. But he was also trying to use. These flashy gruesome killings to distract from other crimes. He and his followers had committed including the july nineteen. Sixty-nine murder of gary hinman regardless of manson and his family's convoluted motivations they're killing spree was a defining moment in the nation's history the fact that his followers were mostly well off middle class teenagers was especially compelling and disturbing to average americans. The murder sparked widespread. Fear about the occult and it's corrupting influence. On the youth which contributed to the rise of the satanic panic during the nineteen seventies even though manson and his followers were jailed for life when their trial wrapped up the damage they done could never be reversed.

manson susan atkins patricia krenwink Linda kosabe ian tex watson benedict canyon Jay c frank hausky steven parent charles manson Manson terry melcher los feeless lino la bianca sharon tate los angeles roman polanski melcher tate bianca rosemary