18 Burst results for "Steven Laura"

"steven laura" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:30 min | 7 hrs ago

"steven laura" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Unfortunate. That's one of the reasons I think we're going to take over the house because of her. But former vice President Joe Biden hits back, saying the president needs to get his own house in order. The Republican leader in the United States Senate said he can't pass it, He will not be able to pass it. He does not have Republican votes. Why ain't he talking to his Republican friends closer to home? The president of the New England counsel is slamming Washington leaders for dragging their heels on more stimulus aid. He spoke with our Mike Macklin. Despite marathon negotiations involving the House, Senate and White House, there's still no agreement with the presidential election a little more than a week away. New England Council president Jim Brett says there's too much at stake for businesses and workers alike to allow for partisan politics to stand in the way. This isn't the Democratic issue. Republican. This is a national crisis and I'm just Frustrated that we cannot get people in the same room from the different parties to say, Why can't we address this crisis? With Democrats and Republicans still apart on a number of issues, it appears unlikely the aide to fight covert 19 and boost the economy will be on the way before Election Day. Mike Macklin. W B Z Boston's news radio. The FDA gives the green light for the drug room. Disa veer to treat patients infected with Koven 19. ABC is Matt Gutman with more. The FDA says that it believes that from disappear, it's safe to use and that it's effective to some degree and shortening the duration of people's illness from the virus. But the W. H O and others say that there are no peer reviewed clinical studies that show that it actually does work. The anecdotally it has worked on many patients, including the present So it's very unusual for the FDA to bestow this kind of gold seal of approval on a drug that hasn't met one of the most basic criteria of the medical world. The Census Department says. Most Americans have filled out the census, but it still might have missed some of you after a court battle. The census count abruptly ended last week, and officials now say they did reach more than 99.9% of the nation's households. Still, that leaves out hundreds of thousands of them in some parts of the country. Such a storm battered Louisiana and tribal lands in Arizona. The numbers came in lower the most accurate information comes from people who self respond to the questionnaire online or by phone or mail and don't get a knock on the door. 67% of people counted in the census responded that way. Steve Cave and CBS News. The condition of bridges in Massachusetts. Road bridges is rated as among the worst in the United States. This, according to the American Road and Transportation Builders Association. A top state official is warning that these conditions are going to get any better without Maur investment, meaning money. Transportation Secretary Stephanie Pollack says 462 state bridges are in poor condition. And the story new legislation on Beacon Hill that would require hospitals to clearly marked their emergency rooms. Here's Coral Stevens. Laura's law is named after Laura Levin. She died outside Somerville Hospital four years ago, She was having an asthma attack. Tried to find the entrance to the emergency room. There were no signs, no lights. She died outside Elect emergency room door. This is the bills. Prime sponsor, state Senator Pat Jalen. This is a very simple and common sense, Bill..

president FDA Mike Macklin Laura Levin Senate United States vice President Joe Biden Census Department Senator Pat Jalen New England Boston ABC New England Council White House Disa Steve Cave
"steven laura" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

03:35 min | 7 months ago

"steven laura" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Sure. And the mortality rate. Yeah is It's frightening truly us. So let's preface this entire conversation with that but everyone from Dr Anthony Fauci on down saying oh in the. Us alone the death rate as a result of Covet nineteen could be anywhere from one hundred to two hundred thousand people but do those doomsday numbers. Add up six thirty eight now thirteen ten. Kfi A thirteen ten KFI K. A. Dot com morning so gail live local. Fueled by Great Western Petroleum. I pulled this great piece out of Well it was K. Unc was a piece by John Hamilton not sure if it originally appeared In people or not but the credit is there so I will give credit where credit is due but anyway. Here's what Mr Hamilton has to say. The Koran virus appears to be much more lethal in some countries than in others. All right. I think that's something that we can. All agree upon in Italy about ten percent of people known to be infected have died in Iran and Spain. The case fatality rate is higher than seven percent but in South Korea and the United States. It's less than one point. Five percent and In Germany the figures close two point five percent. So what gives well? The answer involves how many people are tested. The age of an infected population and factors such as whether the healthcare system is overwhelmed. Dr Steven Laura Lawrence is an infectious disease experts and associate professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis and he sums it up. I believe rather succinctly by saying case fatality rates relative to Covet Nineteen. Have been very confusing. The numbers may look different. Even if the actual situation is the same. So what does it mean by that? He goes on to say it's likely that the seemingly stark difference between Germany and Italy is misleading and will diminish as scientist get more data. We need more input. Also because of the way countries monitor pandemics like the corona virus the case fatality rate tends to decrease over time the reason when a new disease such cove nineteen first shows up testing usually focuses on severely ill. People who are at high risk of dying later on testing is more likely to include people with milder cases of the illness who are less likely to die. And that's exactly what happened. With West Nile virus which first appeared in the nation in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine at first when scientists only knew about a few dozen cases it appeared the mortality rate. Was Pretty much off the charts in relative terms. It was it seemed to be higher than ten percent but wider testing eventually found hundreds of thousands of people who had been infected but never got sick enough to notice today more.

Covet Dr Steven Laura Lawrence Dr Anthony Fauci Germany John Hamilton Italy KFI scientist Kfi Great Western Petroleum K. Unc South Korea Washington University School o Saint Louis associate professor of medicin Iran Spain United States
"steven laura" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

FT Banking Weekly

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on FT Banking Weekly

"Percent of the discretionary money each month, and you save nothing. What exactly do they do because they're awesome clear behaviors that differentiate the people who spend all that money and the people who save quite big proportions and not sort of the start of the journey. We're not asking. You to change your main Bank account. We'd thing run this account to the companionship, existing Banken. It doesn't have to be not west could be Lloyd. Right. Just basically your Santander and just start getting back in control of that discretionary spend each month. And as you start saving, we think that will allow you then to sort of have more ambition, and then move onto some other areas that will radio allow you to take back financial control. And I think the stock which struck as most when we started this was from the money advice service estimate sixteen point eight million people or forty percent of the working age adults of the UK have less than one hundred pounds of savings. Are there any fees for both? It's started motor within the K, which is free and credit free in credit. Okay. And as you might imagine we have been out there all skiing monzo, and the other digital to Novo banks. What they think of both. They say it's very flattering. They think you're learning some of them new tricks, but they say storied Bank like obvious just come operate with a startup culture like. How would you respond to that Mark? Well, it's a communist made quite often and undoubtedly the new banks have created some quite interesting cultures. And they've definitely delivered quickly. And we've unapologetically copied a lot of the good things that happened so running the business entirely separate from the core on a separate technology stack with the Decatur people. He's only job is to deliver bow and people who came with the purpose in mind. So who look out there with the world and say actually customers need more help us the problem. We're gonna solve has worked and his created this huge amount of pace and a huge amount of desire within the business to solve that problem. I think reflective one of the things that was said when we started this by some of the Novo banks was banks could never react quickly. So they may see what we're doing. But they'll never be able to copy it in any time, and it's taken as about two year to build a working Bank. So I think that some evidence that we can copy the culture. The other thing I'd say is to coach within banks isn't all bad so risk coach masters and understanding to you dealing with the precious assets. If somebody else, and you've got to be able to monitor the fraud you've got to be able to do sanction screening you've got to be able to run a Bank properly. I think there's a slight offset. We can probably go quicker in the longer term because we understand the risks already taking okay? Well market secure hit to create Bo. Hopefully, you'll join us again check back in and tell us how it's going a little bit sooner than that. Thanks a lot take castle be letting. Yeah. Well, that's it for this week. All it's left me to do this to. Thanks, Steven Laura, and our guest, Mark Bailey and to thank you to for listening.

Mark Bailey Novo UK Lloyd Banken Steven Laura fraud Decatur one hundred pounds forty percent two year
"steven laura" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"City and northern Virginia has sparked a frenzy of local activity. Condos are flying off the market city leaders are fighting over tax incentives. Businesses are already preparing for a rush of new customers lost though in all the commotion. It will likely take many years if not a decade before residents see a massive army of Amazon employees invading their cities. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing so interesting because a lot of people are expecting that there's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something are going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process in that. Most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred a little bit slower than a lot of people are anticipating and probably about just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle overseas campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices faith already in those those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple years approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this would all happen in six months. I guess. Those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right, definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they ended up splitting the headquarters in. She was because it can be a huge influence to predominate workers to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five hundred employees. There is now over forty five thousand seen a huge impact Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So in in total, we've all heard these numbers, right? Fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's a big question. Amazon's only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things to happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to say how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that that growth, maybe hard to sustain speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle locations, just because. Especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They would really need to move some team leaders and different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate and what about the cohesion? I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I don't think they'll be fine. I promise the the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe. But yeah. Like, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. He says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens Virginia New York City reporter Wall Street Journal New York Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"City and northern Virginia has sparked a frenzy of local activity. Condos are flying off the market city leaders are fighting over tax incentives. Businesses are already preparing for a rush of new customers lost though in all the commotion. It will likely take many years if not a decade before residents see a massive army of Amazon employees invading their cities. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something are going to start working for Amazon. But really it's going to be a much slower process that most of these jobs are going to be at over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred. I'm going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are tipping and part of that just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle over-sedating campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that their leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were all happen in six months. I guess. Those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they up splitting the headquarters in two because it can be a huge influence predominates worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty five thousand a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy, right. So mean in we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's the big question. Only been around for a little over two decades is pretty new it's been going in incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things like happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to see how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been going so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens piece pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to one of the locations just because. Especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They would really need some team leaders and different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazons, of course, said that we will be forced to relocate and what about the cohesion? No, you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be fights. I promise the the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things is very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Laura Stevens Seattle Virginia New York City reporter Wall Street Journal New York Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island America Amazons two decades five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"City and northern Virginia has sparked a frenzy of local activity. Condos are flying off the market city leaders are fighting over tax incentives. Businesses are already preparing for a rush of new customers lost though in all the commotion. It will likely take many years if not a decade before residents see a massive army of Amazon employees invading their cities. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something and are going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process in that. Most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred a little bit slower than a lot of people are intensive painting and part about just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle over should he think campuses? It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the cities have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling some temporary office wasted their leasing both crystal city, and in Long Island City, New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this will all happen in six months. I guess. Guessed that those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they ended up splitting the headquarters in was because it can be a huge influence predominates worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty five thousand a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So in in total, we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's a big question Amazon's. Only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in an incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things that could happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to say how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last two years that growth may be hard to sustain speaking. With Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens piece pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people were actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to on the new location just because. Especially when it was going to be one HQ to that. They would really need to move some team leaders and different people there with the two headquarters, that's less of a threat this point, at least, that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate what about cohesion. I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle north Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be fight. I promise the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens Virginia New York reporter Wall Street Journal New York City Long Island City Lawrence Wall Street Journal America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years two years
"steven laura" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that there's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city tomorrow or something going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process in that. Most of these jobs are going to be added retention years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York spending get about seven hundred a little bit slower than a lot of people are getting and probably about just because they're. They're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle originally, think campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were to happen in six months. I guess that those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they up splitting the headquarters in two was because it can be a huge influence about many worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've. Added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty five thousand seen a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So in in total, we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's the big question Amazon's only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in an incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things like happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic. Down like, you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to say how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that growth may be hard to sustain speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens or pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need from Seattle to on the new location just because especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They would really need to move some team leaders and different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate what about. Cohesion know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be fight. I promise the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way that they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens New York City reporter Wall Street Journal Virginia New York Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months
"steven laura" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something and are going to start working for Amazon. But really it's going to be a much slower process that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are eating and just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring sending people from Seattle over two campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years just because of the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this all happen in six months. I guess. That those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason. They splitting the headquarters was because it can be a huge influence predominates worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand plays there. It's now over forty five thousand seen a huge impact in Seattle. They've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So I mean in total we've all heard these numbers, right? Fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's a big question Amazon's. Only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in an incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things like happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to stay how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last two years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking. With Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to on the new locations just because. Especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They really need to move some team leaders and medicine different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate and what about cohesion? I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be fine. I promise the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle New York City Laura Stevens reporter Wall Street Journal Virginia Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island New York America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years two years
"steven laura" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that there's going to be twenty five thousand workers show in their city. Tomorrow or something? Going to start working for Amazon. But really it's going to be a much slower process that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York spending get about seven hundred I'm going to get a little bit slower than a lot of people are anticipating and part about just because they're going to be doing organic growth. Mercy's hiring sending people from Seattle overseas campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and dubbing it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years just because of the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do this all happened in six months. I guess that those cities are locations. Be overwhelmed in some way, right? Hey, definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason splitting the headquarters, and she was because it can be a huge influence predominates workers of the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty five thousand a huge impact in Seattle. They've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So I mean in total we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's the big question Amazon's only been around for a little over two decades is pretty new it's been going in. Incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to see how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that growth may be hard to sustain. We're speaking. With Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens piece pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle locations. Just because especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They would really need to move some team leaders and different people there. With the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of the executives feel and Amazon said that now we will be forced to relocate and what about the cohesion? I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I don't think they'll be five. I promise. The the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe. But yeah. Like, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they've managed to do a lot of cohesion through different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things is very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. He says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens New York City reporter Wall Street Journal Virginia New York Mercy Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KTOK

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something and are going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process. And that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred. So we're going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are anticipating and about just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle over to anything campuses. It's gonna be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of space already in those those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were to happen in six months, I guess. Guessed that those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason. They splitting the headquarters and was because it can be a huge influence to put that many workers of the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty thousand seen a huge impact in Seattle. They've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. All right. So in in total, we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right? It's a big question. Amazon's only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in an incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things that could happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic down like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to see how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been going so incredibly rapidly for the last two years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens piece pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people were actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle locations, just because. Especially when it was going to be one HQ to that. They would really need to move some team leaders in different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate what about the cohesion. I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be fight. I promise. The the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe. But yeah. Like, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way that they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company says nice Lawrence, Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Seattle New York City Laura Stevens Wall Street Journal reporter Virginia Long Island New York America Lawrence two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years two years
"steven laura" Discussed on WWL

WWL

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on WWL

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something and they're gonna start working for Amazon. But really it's going to be a much slower process than that. Most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred a little bit slower than a lot of people are anticipating and probably about just because they're going to be doing organic growth. Mercy's hiring or sending people from Seattle over-sedating campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city and Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years just because of the site approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were to happen in six months. I. Guessed that those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon's been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they in splitting the headquarters in two was because it can be a huge influence to put that many workers to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty thousand seen a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lunch and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So I mean in total we've all heard these numbers, right? Fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right, it's the big question Amazon. Only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in an incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things to happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to say how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking. With Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York in Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to on the locations just because. Especially when it was going to be one issue to that. They would really need to move some team leaders in different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that nobody will be forced to relocate and cohesion. I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I I don't think they'll be I promise the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture, and they've already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way that they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon New York City Seattle Laura Stevens reporter Wall Street Journal Virginia Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island Mercy New York America two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that there's going to be twenty five thousand workers show up in their city. Tomorrow or something? Going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process. And that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York spending get about seven hundred going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are eating and probably about just because they're going to be doing organic growth verses hiring or sending people from Seattle originally, think campuses. It's gonna be a lot of hiring locally and dubbing it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office space that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break crown, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were to happen in six months. I guess that those cities are locations could. Be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason. They splitting the headquarters, and she was because they can be a huge influence worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since twenty ten they had five thousand employees. There is now over forty five thousand so seen a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus, and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lines and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So in in total, we've all heard these numbers, right? Fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right, it's a big question. Inbound only been around for a little over two decades. It's pretty new it's been going in incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things that could happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to stay how quickly they can continue to grow because they've been growing so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens or pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York and Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? That was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to new locations just because especially when it was going to be. Be one issue to that. They would really need to move some team leaders, and listen different people there with the two headquarters says a threat at this point, at least, that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon said that nobody will be forced to relocate and cohesion. I know you address that because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is going to be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I don't think they'll be I promise the the idea is to kind of have these all play at some point in the distant future. But yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture, and they've already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they've managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way that they do things it's very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company says Lawrence, Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first.

Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens Wall Street Journal New York City Virginia reporter New York Long Island America Lawrence two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that there's going to be twenty five thousand workers show in their city. Tomorrow or something? Going to start working for Amazon, but really you couldn't be a much slower process. And that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, working is going to get about four hundred jobs, New York, spending get about seven hundred going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are interesting and part of that just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle originally, think campuses. It's gonna be a lot of hiring locally and dubbing. It very fully. Is there construction I presume or remodeling? It has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city of already have Amazon presences. So they have a lot of officers faith already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling, some temporary office suites that they're leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island City, New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years just because of the site approval than all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do. If this will all happen in six months, I guess those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon's been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they ended up splitting the headquarters and was because it can be a huge influence predominates worker the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand plays there. It's now over forty five thousand seen a huge impact of Seattle. They've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people. So that city on to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups that.

Long Island City Amazon Seattle Laura Stevens Wall Street Journal New York reporter six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"City and northern Virginia has sparked a frenzy of local activity. Condos are flying off the market city leaders are fighting over tax incentives. Businesses are already preparing for a rush of new customers lost though in all the commotion. It will likely take many years if not a decade before residents see a massive army of Amazon employees invading their cities. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura, what are you hearing? So it's interesting because a lot of people are expecting that. There's going to be twenty five thousand workers that show up in their city. Tomorrow or something and are going to start working for Amazon, but really it's going to be a much slower process. And that most of these jobs are going to be added over ten years next year, for example, Virginia's gonna get about four hundred jobs New York, sending get about seven hundred going to be a little bit slower than a lot of people are anticipating and probably about just because they're going to be doing organic growth versus hiring or sending people from Seattle, you campuses. It's going to be a lot of hiring locally and building it very slowly. And is there construction I presume or remodeling that has to take place on these campuses. Right. Well, both of the both of the city's already have significant Amazon presences. So they have a lot of offices space already in those areas, but they'll have to start by remodeling some temporary office wasted their leasing in both crystal city, and in Long Island city of New York, and then after that they'll be able to break ground, but that's gonna probably take a couple of years of the state approvals and all the preconstruction stuff that they have to do if this were all happen in six months. I guess. Those cities are locations could be overwhelmed in some way. Right. Right. Definitely. And I mean, this is something where Amazon's been pretty cautious the entire time. And that's part of the reason they ended up splitting the headquarters in two was because it can be a huge influence to predominant worker to the city and in Seattle alone. They've added since two thousand ten they had five thousand employees there. It's now over forty five thousand seen a huge impact in Seattle as they've added, you know, about more than forty thousand people to that city to the downtown area where they have their main campus. And and I think they would like to lessen the impact of some of the hiccups come along with traffic and tons of people waiting in line for lines and all those things without many employees. Boy. All right. So I mean in total we've all heard these numbers fifty thousand employees spread over these two sites. Five billion dollars in investments over the next two decades butts. What if the economy slows, right, it's a big question. Amazon. Only been around for a little over two decades is pretty new it's been going in incredibly rapid pace. But you know, there's so many different things to happen that could change that. There's a lot of regulatory scrutiny right now from DC that could have some kind of impact on the company. And additionally, they you know, there could be some kind of economic slowdown like you're describing or or something else could happen. I mean, it's just one of those things where it's unpredictable to say how quickly they continue to grow because they've been going so incredibly rapidly for the last few years that that growth may be hard to sustain speaking. With Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens pieces called why the Amazon invasion in New York in Virginia will be slow. What does this mean for say managers in their teams? So that was an interesting thing that we learned in our reporting originally Amazon said, and it's always kind of maintain that nobody will have to relocate. But a lot of people are actually kinda concerned that they might need to move from Seattle to win the new locations just because. Especially when it was going to be one, Hugh that they would really need to move some team leaders and different people there with the two headquarters that's less of a threat at this point. At least that's the way that a lot of executives feel and Amazon, of course, said that now we will be forced to relocate and what about the cohesion? I know you address that. Because you've got Seattle northern Virginia. New York City is gonna be fights for supremacy or anything like that. I don't think they'll be fights. I promise the the the idea is to kind of have these all play equal roles at some point in the distant future. I believe, but yeah, it's it's an interesting thing because Amazon has a very strong culture. And they've they already have eighteen tech hubs around the country with more than twenty thousand employees, and they've managed to do a lot of cohesion through some their different internal principles that they have you know, the way they do things is very structured, and and definitely something where they've laid it out to try to keep the company. So he says nice Lawrence Wall Street Journal reporter Laura Stevens. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Amazon Virginia Seattle Laura Stevens New York City reporter Wall Street Journal New York Lawrence Wall Street Journal Long Island America Hugh two decades Five billion dollars twenty minutes six months ten years
"steven laura" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"steven laura" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Amazon is cracking down on seller scams and has fired employees in the US. And India who were suspected of abetting scammers efforts. The crackdown comes amid the busy holiday shopping season. Joining us now via Skype from San Francisco with more details is Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura can you start by telling us about some of the biggest scams that Amazon is facing on its website. Currently, yes. So Amazon's been facing a lot of problems from its sellers which total more than two million out there in the world right now selling on Amazon in Amazon has its marketplace. At it's developed in addition to its retail business. That's where some of these problems are sending from because these sellers are really competing, especially during the holiday times to get as many sales as possible. And that might mean trying to gain the systems by getting up higher in the search ranks. You know, typically if you search for a product, you're going to pick one of the first few that you see this is really important to be. Hi there. So that entails things like fake reviews positive reviews. Attacking rival sellers and other tactics. Like that a new tactic that we're seeing as Amazon's crackdown on some of the other bad behavior is that sellers are buying or renting wholesale accounts. So the accounts that are used for those who actually sell to Amazon directly in they're going into those accounts had a lot more power than the average account. So they might swap out a photo or change a listing to sabotage rivals. We mentioned one seller in our article who saw that his unicorn sequin pillow is actually changed to an adult product which meant that it wasn't searched surfacing and search results. So it's an interesting new tactic in. I'm sure aims on will quickly work to fight against that one to what can you tell us about the employees who were fired in the US and abroad. What exactly were they accused of doing to help scammers? Will we have reported previously that s- some internal employees at Amazon were being bribed by intermediaries typically who were selling them. Information to these third party sellers on Amazon. So basically, they were trying to get competitive information like what keywords do the best or maybe some of their competitors information's on sales and using that to to do better on Amazon. So that that was the type of accusation that was happening and Amazon his now fired several employees for sharing internal data allegedly Laura what steps says Amazon been taking in recent weeks to help root out scammers. I imagine. There are plenty of challenges technologically to trying to keep ahead of them. It's been described to me as a whack a mole game. So basically Amazon will come up with new track deke's in you know, they've very clearly that they fight the stuff. They're coming up with new systems all the time to keep anybody from scamming or trying to manipulate their systems. So a few things that they've done recently is kind of crackdown on some of the different practices. They wiped a lot of reviews that were perceived to be fake. They have limited what people can act. Access through some of their internal systems and one of the bigger things that they've done to crack down, of course, is firing some employees suspected of turning over some internal data. We know that more and more shopping is shifting online. Especially now during the holiday season,

Amazon Laura Stevens US Wall Street Journal abetting San Francisco Skype India reporter
Amazon Works to Weed Out Scammers

WSJ What's News

01:40 min | 2 years ago

Amazon Works to Weed Out Scammers

"Amazon is cracking down on seller scams and has fired employees in the US. And India who were suspected of abetting scammers efforts. The crackdown comes amid the busy holiday shopping season. Joining us now via Skype from San Francisco with more details is Wall Street Journal reporter, Laura Stevens, Laura can you start by telling us about some of the biggest scams that Amazon is facing on its website. Currently, yes. So Amazon's been facing a lot of problems from its sellers which total more than two million out there in the world right now selling on Amazon in Amazon has its marketplace. At it's developed in addition to its retail business. That's where some of these problems are sending from because these sellers are really competing, especially during the holiday times to get as many sales as possible. And that might mean trying to gain the systems by getting up higher in the search ranks. You know, typically if you search for a product, you're going to pick one of the first few that you see this is really important to be. Hi there. So that entails things like fake reviews positive reviews. Attacking rival sellers and other tactics. Like that a new tactic that we're seeing as Amazon's crackdown on some of the other bad behavior is that sellers are buying or renting wholesale accounts. So the accounts that are used for those who actually sell to Amazon directly in they're going into those accounts had a lot more power than the average account. So they might swap out a photo or change a listing to sabotage rivals. We mentioned one seller in our article who saw that his unicorn sequin pillow is actually changed to an adult product which meant that it wasn't searched surfacing and search results. So it's an interesting new tactic in. I'm sure aims on will quickly work to fight against that one

Amazon Abetting Laura Stevens Wall Street Journal United States San Francisco India Skype Reporter
"steven laura" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"steven laura" Discussed on KOMO

"Forty four i might conclave on komo news well it a little different outside let's face it shared a lotta sunny days this week but that's not the case for this weekend we're going to go mostly cloudy skies chance of showers high temperatures will be harboring ride around the level of sixty degrees so i wouldn't call that bombing and there's a chance of some showers on an all throughout the day and that could go into the evening hours so headed for the husky game machine you're prepared for the chance of a little rain all right there you go and the komo weather center i'm steve pool twenty four seven news continues on komo news in a solemn ceremony friday their seattle fire department honored six of its fallen firefighters komos jeff pohjola has more on the event that was held in pioneer square in the middle of oxydental park amid the red cobblestoned walkways ms a small monument to the seattle firefighters it made the ultimate sacrifice fire chief union president's tom walsh every level maury represents gave his life for the citizens of this city at every aim represents void credit the boy for the crew back from a with it at the upper addis that at the locker stared at every day the voice for their families that this daughter mom and dad a brother or sister it leaves a whole the whole of the life of left on live in on friday morning six more were added assistant chief eighty vickery steven laura 2009 jess hernandez 2000 answer pain wallis chevrolet.

oxydental park president tom walsh maury komo seattle jeff pohjola fire chief assistant chief steven laura jess hernandez sixty degrees
"steven laura" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"steven laura" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Support for wsj comes from comcast committed to improving your customer service experience with two our appointment windows including nights and weekends because they should fit into your life not the other way around learn more at xfinity dot com slash service amazon's expansion and groceries could spell more trouble for some major food brands what's news from the wall street journal top story without in no way i'm charlie turner in new york major food companies have been struggling with slowing sales for quite some time amazon dotcoms planned acquisition of whole foods could put pressure on these companies even further amazon agree to buy whole foods about a week and a half ago for thirteen point seven billion dollars and relatively little is known at this point about what amazon strategy will be joining us from san francisco was wall street journal reporter laura stevens laura i gather that amazon has said next to nothing about a strategy for whole foods but seemingly everyone is betting at this point that amazon will lower its prices riot law in the deal came together really quickly sell about six weeks between the first meetings at the execs took a deal actually being announced says been a very fast world when acquisition anz do that amazon hasn't had time to fully come up with a strategy according to the people that we've talked to him so as a result though you know everybody he of course the speculating about what will happen and um you know talking to a lot of former amazonean some people familiar with the matter it does sound like amazon would likely look to lower costs quickly at whole foods and then reduced prices as a result of that.

wsj comcast windows amazon wall street journal charlie turner new york food companies san francisco the deal reporter laura stevens seven billion dollars six weeks