20 Burst results for "Steven Johnson"

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Steven Johnson for coming on the show today. His book is called Farsighted. His newest book is called enemy of all mankind, the true story of piracy, power and histories first global manhunt. You can find those in the shown by the way I thought. It was interesting today when he was saying that a lot of people are making decisions and poor ways. Jeff Bezos when he said, would he seventy percent certain or only thirty percent uncertain? He'll pull the trigger on something. Imagine being less than three quarters. Sure most of us don't think about certainty or anything any decision as a matter of probability, we're usually pretty binary. As we mentioned on the show I thought it was. Was Interesting that Jeff. bezos one of the richest men in the world is confident, being more or less just over half sure before trying something and most people really only consider one alternative when making a choice I know this is true for me. It's really bad to constrain yourself like this. It's not a yes or no, it's not a this or that. Usually there's a whole smorgasbord of choices and we just tend to ignore them, because it's easier for our brain to wrap our mind around one or two choices or a binary choice decisions with multiple options, though have statistically or historically I should say been judged successful more often than binary decision so in other words if you. You give yourself three four five choices. You will be more satisfied or more successful with a choice made from there, then a yes, or no, so when you constrain yourself, not only. Do you make a worse choice, but you feel worse about that choice so in the future. If you find yourself thinking a whether or not decision, you're thinking about whether or not to do something instead tryon actually bring in other options and consider those as well so turn every whether or not decision into a witch. One decision not do I. Take This job, do I. Not Take This job, but yes, maybe I'll take this, but I wanNA modify that and I only want to do it for..

Jeff Bezos Jeff. bezos Steven Johnson tryon
"steven johnson" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Jordan Harbinger. Show with our guest Steven Johnson we'll be right back. This episode sponsored in part by Purple. Guys make amazing pillows that keep their shape. They're not too hot, not too cold. They got this patented grid in there. It's got twenty eight hundred open air channels. They wanted me to be real sure to tell you about those two thousand eight hundred open air channels that naturally our temperature, neutral gel so. Too Hot, you never too cold. Although for me, there's no such thing as a pillow. That's too cold if I could have like an ice pillow. That was soft I would do. Yeah. Where do I sign up exactly? I like the pillow so far. Jen Stole it from me. That's how good it is. And of course you know they're going to ship it free with one hundred knife trial, and then apparently you can mail back. This dirty drool covered pillow. If you don't like it, but for me, I'm keeping it. I love the hotel experience at home, so I'm excited to try mine experience the next evolution of Sleep Garcia. POEPLE DOT com slash Jordan and use perm occurred Jordan for a limited time. You'll get one hundred and fifty dollars of any pepple mattress order of fifteen hundred dollars a mall. That's purple dot com slash Jordan Primer Jordan for one hundred and fifty dollars of any mattress Oda of fifteen hundred dollars on wall terms apply. This episode is also sponsored by by optimize irs. If there's one mineral, you're not getting enough of. Let's admit it. We're probably not getting enough of any minerals, but we're definitely not getting enough magnesium right sell. Yeah, you might not. Not Know these Jordan but magnesium is actually great for helping with period.

Jordan Harbinger Steven Johnson Jordan Sleep Garcia Jen Oda irs
"steven johnson" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American Innovations

A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

The Book Review

08:44 min | 1 year ago

A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

"Steven. Johnson joins US now. He is the author of many books many bestselling books including farsighted. And how we got to now but he joins us to talk about. His latest book is called enemy of all mankind. A true story of piracy power and Histories. First Global Manhunt Steven. Thanks for being here but much having me. There are lots of exciting terms just in your title and subtitle alone. I WANNA start with those even though and we'll talk about this. There's a larger story that you want to tell with this book but let's begin with piracy because that's a fun word. What happened on September Eleventh? Sixteen Ninety Five. There's a kind of interesting bleak poetry to the fact that this happened on September eleventh. Basically the events that are at the center of the book is a clash at sea in the Indian Ocean between pilot. Ship led by a very mysterious figure who would become the most notorious criminal in the world. A guy named Henry Avery and a much larger Indian treasure ship whose name was anglicized as the gun sway and the translation of that into English is excessive treasurer or exceeding treasure. So they were being pretty conspicuous with maiming. This vessel in terms of the of treasurer on board and effectively. These two ships confront each other on September eleven sixty ninety five by all rights. The pirate ship should have been easily overpowered but to incredibly unlikely things happen a cannon onboard board that Indian ship explodes because of some kind of malfunctioning design which basically turns cannon into a bomb when it explodes in so instantly. There's this you know. Many people on Indian ship killed the deck catches on fire. And at the same time. The first cannon fire from the pirate ship manages to have this incredibly lucky shot where they split the main mast of the Indian chip in two which effectively disables at in in the water and so the pirates are able to board the ship they pull off this heist that in today's currency we be would be worth as much as one hundred million dollars so it makes one of the most lucrative crime some in the history of crime and triggers a global crisis that reverberates around the world. Okay before we get to that crisis because you would wonder why one active piracy would do that. Just general picture of the piracy problem at that time. I'm always taken aback by the way that pirates are these cute Nara dwells in children's picture books or like Johnny Depp for many people. But that's not what piracy was back. Then what did it looked like? And was this unusual. Well actually one of the origin points to this project for me was years and years ago. I mean something like fifteen years ago. When my kids were very young we went to Disneyworld and we went on the pirates of the Caribbean ride and it was right after nine eleven and I had this on. I was floating down this little canals. That ride songs are being song and everything. That's very Kelly. The that the pirates were the terrorists of the seventeen hundreds and sixteen hundreds right. They were these terrifying figures would show up out of nowhere and burn your village down and attack. The women and people lived in fear of them. Here was three hundred years later. And it's just a kind of a children's story so they'll link between pirates and terrorism. Which is something that runs kind of subtly through enemy of all mankind actually began on that. Disneyworld ride in some ways. But what's historically really important about pirates at this point in history and one of the reasons why this particular story has so much significance. I think is up until this point. There was a very blurry line in terms of the legitimacy of piracy so there was this other class of occupation. That was called being a a private here. And if you were a privateer from all outside appearances you're a pirate attacking other ships and stealing their treasure and doing all these atrocious things that seat. But as long as you weren't attacking if you were a British privateer as long as you weren't attacking British ships. You're within the zone of and people like Francis. Drake a couple of generations before Henry Avery. When often basically we live the life of piracy but then came back to England and was knighted and bought a giant estate and lived a completely legitimate lifestyle. And so in a sense what happens to this period because of crime for reasons we can get into. It's a turning point where the British crown finally has to take a stand against piracy. They have to basically announced to the world that they're not a nation of pirates the way they've been accused to be. Let's talk about what made this pirate attack so noteworthy. Obviously there was the hall but were there other things that made this a big deal at the time. There are a couple of big ones. I is the other element of the crime. This ship that they attacked was a ship that had been doing business and ports of call like Mocha in the red seat but it was also filled with religious pilgrims coming back from Mecca on a whole other level was kind of a Muslim like religious transport vessel as well and among those pilgrims were a significant number of women women in the Royal Court of Aranda. Who was the great grand mogul of India? The last of the moguls and this was an unusual thing. At the time right you would not see a lot of big vessels in sixteen ninety five. That had a significant number of women on board but there are all these female pilgrims on board and so when the pirates attack the guns way they find these women there and number of the pirates rape the women on board. Some of the women commit suicide jumping overboard to avoid being attacked. And so there's this kind of outbreak of the atrocious sexual violence that happens as part of the crime and of course WORD GETS BACK TO WRONGS. Zab that not only has a hundred million dollars of his assets been stolen but members of his extended royal family have been sexually attacked and violated and this all is crucial in terms of geopolitics. Because it's right at a moment in a time where there's a major economic transition happening in the world. There's a chapter in the book called two kinds of treasure and is basically. There are two different ways of making a fortune that are in conflict with each other here. There's a very old way which is represented by Aurangzeb which is have an autocratic dynasty tax year citizens. Sit On that wealth and pass it onto your descendants. That's what every most of the rich people in the world at this point where people who were members of some kind of royal family that had some kind of dynastic wealth. But there's this new way of making money that has just appearing in it comes in the form of this interesting embryonic. New Organization called the multinational publicly traded corporation and that was the east India company. The east India Company was the first company that actually had publicly traded shares. So that people could. Outsiders could invest in the company in those shares could go up or down in value and for the first time people were making money not just through the prophets of the business but through the increase in value of these publicly traded shares and that turned out to be the future. Right dot is how if you look at the one hundred richest people in the world today. The vast majority of them were people who made money because they had traded shares in a company. They found that their parents found it. So in a sense clash between these two massive economic forces and Henry. Avery in his little pirate ship gets right in the middle of it because once. Iran's UB here's that his money has been stolen in women have been raped he threatened to eject the east India company from India which is the main source of their income. They've been trading CALICO and chinse fabrics and so on and if that had happened if they've been thrown out of India the whole course of the British Empire would have been transformed. It's entirely likely that the British Empire would not have formed in in India in the subsequent decades. If the east India company had been injected. So why wasn't it? Attracted rings up puts a number of the employees of the east India Company under house arrest and threatens to execute them and they began a furious letter writing campaign back to London. Saying we have to find the pirate we have to bring him to justice and we have to announce to the world that we are not going to tolerate piracy anymore or else this whole incredibly lucrative business that the country is increasingly dependent on is just going to disappear and so. That's what triggers this global manhunt really the first one in

East India Company Henry Avery India Indian Ocean Treasurer United States Johnny Depp Caribbean Steven. Johnson Aurangzeb Rape London Mecca Francis Drake Iran England Royal Court Of Aranda Mocha
"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"You hope right now. Well I'm incredibly impressed with the pace of response in terms of things like the axiom development in terms of things like these therapeutics. That are going to trials. I mean there are probably hundreds now of trials of various different forms of Therapeutics and vaccines. We have a lot of expertise that we didn't have. We have a lot of resources you know. We talked earlier about challenge trials. You know we're we're talking about starting to ramp up production of vaccines even before they passed the trial so that we can get lag is actually getting them at scale. So there's just a tremendous amount of work going into that and that's certainly something we're going to be watching really closely and talking to people on the frontlines of infighting corona virus. But I think we'll start getting good news about therapeutics probably in the next month or two and that's going to be really encouraging and then we will start to see some of these vaccines being fast tracked out of trials. And maybe we'll be able to do it faster than a year. There is an opportunity I hope for a kind of a deep acceleration while while wearing a mask for us as a society two or three months from now. But it's clear that it's GONNA be a brutal couple of weeks and we're going to have to all hang in there through this period because there's not there's there's no madison coming as as a cure as the rescue in the short term. And so we just gotTa we just gotTa stay at home. I love to read a little passage from the end of it because I think it's quite uplifting however profound the threats of today. They are solvable if we acknowledge the underlying problem if we listen to science not superstition if we keep a channel open for dissenting voices. That might actually have real answers. And then you say the only question is can we steer around these crises without killing ten million people or more and I was struck by that number right clearly. It is conceivable that we could face a virus that could kill tens of millions of people and I guess one sort of slight consolation is as far as we can tell right now. This does not seem to be that virus so we may look back at this kind of fire drill for which we were grateful. You know one of the things. I don't know I haven't seen a lot of talk about this. But there's a chance that even if we follow a kind of middle case scenario over the next four five months overall life expectancy the end of this crisis will will be unchanged or or it might even go up slightly because we've reduced so many other deaths through the stay at home process car. Accidents must be down car. Accidents way down. Crime is way down and and flu is way down. Actually they're going to be far. Fewer flu deaths normal this year so we might end up with interesting the sum total of of life preserved by this. It might actually that out to be not not as catastrophic or even negative is as we thought instill tragedy and we want to avoid it at all costs but it could the the point. You're making support line. Which is this could have been worse like this you know we were lucky that the fatality rates are so low in you know in the under sixty group without you know other existing conditions and that's not inevitable that was not the case with the Spanish flu right. The Spanish flu had this weird propensity for killing twenty. Two Year olds healthy twenty two year olds. I mean just think about it as a parent. You know we've gone through this incredible trauma but fundamentally parents haven't been worried about their kids so imagine if this were happening and everybody's just like. Oh my gosh I'm going with my children are GonNa die it would. It would felt so much so much worse so I think you're right. There's there May. This is something that it's probably better to talk about when we get through it because it's so arduous going through it now but you know yes. There could very easily be a worse version of this. And if we've gone through this and build up that shield and train ourselves for pandemic mode so that we can meet that threat when that tread emerges that another good thing that comes out of this Stephen. Thank you for taking time out of your busy virtual socializing and cooking and other activities Johnson household. It's been wonderful actually not that busy but I even. If I had been busy I would have absolutely taken the time. It's always great to be with you..

Therapeutics and vaccines flu Stephen madison Johnson
"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"I'm GonNa pour a Little Cup of tea later into the pandemic that'll be just be whiskey at this time in the afternoon. But Y- okay Steven Johnson. What a pleasure. My friend to have you on the next big idea podcasts. Such an honor to be here. Thank you for having me. Well Stephen May. Maybe it's worth mentioning to the listeners. Here that we've actually known each other for for a while. I think it was fourth grade. Yes I have a whole set of stories that I could tell you to your audience but I think we should focus on more serious things today but yes. It's been a long road believe you. May I have equal and opposite stories about Ucla but yes not only to elementary school and high school together but we went to college together and even housemates junior year of college? Yes I remember that apartment well in. I'm surprised there were no terrible diseases. That erupted out of that space. Because it was probably the least Sanitary Space I've ever lived in my entire life. Well Stephen as you know you're the perfect person to be talking with our about this unusual moment where all and you're the host of the podcast American innovations which is just launched a special mini series called fighting corona virus. Which is focused on telling? I really liked this stories of heroism and collaboration and invention and you also wrote a book called Ghost map about the cholera epidemic. In London in eighteen fifty four A central theme of your book. And I think now of your podcast seems to be that epidemics have the potential to bring out the best in US and trigger innovation. Is that right? Yeah that's exactly right the particularly intense epidemics like the one. We're going through now. And and like the one h fifty that I wrote about in the ghost map tend to produce solutions to the problems that they pose right. And there's a lot of terror appropriately and uncertainty in this kind of moment but we've already seen just in the first two or three months of of this virus being a global issue an extraordinary pace of of response to it. There's already a lot of people collaborating both in terms of vaccines in terms of therapeutics in terms of you know just public health and epidemiology and data that has kind of erupted around the world. And that's that's the positive side of these things and hopefully we end up at the end of this crisis. Better prepared for the next one because we went through this. And that's that. Is You know that was one of the major reasons why I wrote goes off in the first place. And that's one of the reasons Reasons that we started the fighting corona virus series Because we want it to be talking about you know what we were going to do going forward to prevent something like this happening again. My recollection Stephen. Is that your senior thesis in college was about plays which entered. This starts to look like a pattern. Was there some kind of Morbid preoccupation that you had with massive viral infections? You Know I. It's funny I almost had forgotten about that senior thesis which was yeah it was about somewhat pretentiously subtitle. I believe was the discourse of epidemic and. I'm sure it's unreadable now because I was a very pretentious college writer at that point but I kind of came back to the topic with ghost map and largely came out of my interest in cities and in density and the history of kind of metropolitan life which of course is is a big thing going on with covert nineteen now as well and the story for those of you who listen. You don't who don't know it. London in the in the eighteen fifties was the largest city in the world had ever seen two and a half million people. No one had ever built a city on that scale before and it was being besieged by these outbreaks of epidemic disease. A number of diseases actually but cholera was probably the most pronounce them and every other year every three or four years. There'd be a wave of cholera outbreaks and ten thousand people. In a city of two million people would die of this disease and everybody at the time thought that it was transported in the air. They thought it was Kinda smells causing people to get sick and so they were fighting. What they thought was basically an airborne disease when in fact collar is caused by contaminated drinking water at so in the middle of this outbreak. That erupts in Soho in London. A doctor named John. Snow goes out in the middle of this outbreak. In does ROIC investigation tracking down where people have died and what numbers? He creates a map that shows this intense concentration of of death right around a pump in the center of Soho and using that map he solely convinces the authorities. That in fact everybody's getting sick and so because this well at the bottom of this pump is been contaminated with this disease and cholera is in fact a waterborne disease and not an airborne disease and that changes the whole understanding of what was causing people to get sick and leads to the building of the London sewers and a whole host of other things and by eighteen sixty. Six cholera epidemic. Form is gone from London for good like never to return so in in just twelve years thanks in large part to John Snow's investigation and a whole host of other interventions that were put in place after that this deadly threat was effectively eliminated and it really changed the way that cities were built. It enabled cities to get much more much larger in size without these threats of of epidemic disease. So it's a milestone in the in the history of public health and also pointed out that that that one of the things that was distinctive about that moment. Is that the public. All of a sudden had access to all this data right that they were releasing. What was it twice a week or something all this mortality which which does strike me as being reminiscent of this moment where we are all like armchair epidemiologists absolute and actually one of the things. That was interesting in in. Writing goes map was that I had always heard. The story is triumphant. This lone genius hero Jon. Snow and snow is no doubt the hero of the story in many ways but he had a lot of collaborators. There was a guy named William far who years before that had decided to release these much more data rich mortality reports. And he had this idea that if you could get data out about who had died what they had died of what their age was what what their sex was what you know what their address was. If you had all that data that people would be able to use it and see patterns in that data that other people might not be able to see and far in a sense was saying the other day someone that it's like we're all kind of living in Williams Fars World now because you've heard a lot in the last few days about Fars Law and far as law is the curve that we're all talking about epidemics tend to crest and then subside and that pattern there were all in the middle of trying to figure out. Like where is the peak? And when is when we're GONNA HIT THE APEX IT WAS WILLIAM? Far This guy in in London in the early eighteen forties who I saw that pattern and so now here we are one hundred sixty seventy years later and you know. We're we're all of US watching this. And we've seen definitely a bunch of kind of interpretations that have proven to be wrong but the presence of that data is you know it's so different from the way that it was you know two hundred years ago that that kind of data analysis simply didn't exist. Yup and even even ten years ago we didn't have some of this data like Francis. I've been fascinated about these. These new smart thermometers right there. A million plus Americans using WIFI connected. Thermometers that are providing some new data that we would not otherwise. Have about beyond set of fevers. Well before people would go to a hospital. How important do you think the data is and do you think? The mapping component that was so critical in the cholera epidemic is something that's that's equally relevant today. I mean it's huge and and you know. This is one of the things that I think will spend a lot of time talking about on fighting current virus. Such as like. What are the innovations? That are now possible. That weren't even imaginable. Certainly do William Foreign Jon Snow. But you know to to people as you say like ten years ago. Fifteen years ago like wh. What's the data revolution? That's now possible and that side of it that I think is very encouraging so for those folks listening who didn't track.

cholera London John Snow Jon Snow Stephen US Stephen May Ucla Steven Johnson Soho William writer Williams Fars World ROIC Francis
"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"I think it's safe to say that most of us whether or not qualified are spending a lot of time these days devouring the news analyzing data trying to get a read on what is going to happen in the coming weeks. Months and years were anxious about the future but increasingly. I find myself preoccupied with the past lately. I've been wondering what lessons can we learn from previous pandemics? It might help us. Find a way out of this one and candies insights from history. Dr Tomorrow's breakthroughs to get answers to those questions. I called up my old friend. Steven Johnson Stephen is written eleven books about scientific progress and one of them goes. Map feels like essential reading right now. It's part forensic history and part detective story about how the cholera epidemic in London in eighteen. Fifty four not only revolutionized Madison but also changed urban life. As we know when he's not writing bestsellers. Stephen Hosts American innovations podcast wondering about well. The title says it all. He's got a new series out now called Fighting Corona virus about the bold thinking that will hopefully lead us out of this crisis and I wanted to talk to him about some of those ideas so I caught up a stephen last week. While he was holed up with his family in a cabinet in the shadow of the Blue Ridge. Mountains working remotely. I think pretty much all of us are these days with send pro online from Pitney. Bowes you can easily print postage stamps and shipping labels. It couldn't be more convenient especially when you're trying to avoid unnecessary trips to the post office as you may be right now for as low as four dollars and ninety nine cents per month you'll get access to special discounts and save up to forty percents off. Usps priority mail plus for being listener of the next big idea. Well done good choice. You'll receive a free thirty day trial to get started and a free ten pound scale to make sure you'd never overpay we send pro online. You can calculate exact postage online print labels from your PC. That's handy schedule package. Pickups and tracked shipments from departure to arrival. You'll also save up to five cents on every letter and up to forty percent off. Usps priority mail go to PB DOT COM slash. Big Idea to access a special offer for a free thirty day. Trial plus a free ten pound scale to get you started. That's P. B. dot com slash. Big Idea to experience a savings in your shipping costs with a free trial of send pro online from Pitney Bowes..

Steven Johnson Stephen Pitney Bowes Pitney cholera Bowes Dr Tomorrow Madison Blue Ridge London
US couple being 'held hostage' at Mexican hospital because they can't pay medical bill

News, Traffic and Weather

01:02 min | 1 year ago

US couple being 'held hostage' at Mexican hospital because they can't pay medical bill

"Seven American couple says they're being held hostage in a Mexican hospital over an unpaid bill here's ABC's will read we just can't leave until the fourteenth Steven Johnson and fiance Tory Austin say they were vacationing on a carnival cruise when just two days after the start of the cruise Stephen needed medical attention he was you can onboard the ship the couple says they received excellent care but his condition was serious officials told them that once the doctor in the Mexican city of Progresso Stephen would need to be taken to the hospital after spending three days in intensive care the couple says they were slapped with a fourteen thousand dollar bill and alleged the hospital won't let them leave until they pay the one

ABC Steven Johnson Stephen Progresso Stephen Tory Austin Fourteen Thousand Dollar Three Days Two Days
The Battle of the Cornflakes

American Innovations

11:52 min | 2 years ago

The Battle of the Cornflakes

"February nineteen eight in louisiana. Intrepid woman in a lace fringed petticoat makes her way through the streets of jefferson city. She pauses at the corner of magazine berlin across the way is the creole cottage that houses her local grocer. She smooths her skirt fixes her face with more confidence than she feels and heads ads for the stores swing doors will kellogg put her up to this and not just her but all the women of america is latest commercial for kelloggs cornflakes cheaply dares women to wink at their grocer and quote see what they get for nineteen hundred eight. These ads are bold old and racy stuff but it's working beautifully now like thousands of others. This woman's taking kellogg up on the bear in her case. There's something more at stake. She's been looking for a reason to wink this particularly sweet store on her for some time. Now the grocer dressed in a white shirt and suspenders notices the woman the moment she enters good afternoon ms coleman. What may i get you. This fine day like she's for hearst miss. Miss coleman says nothing. She just winks the grocer smiles. You've seen those kellogg's ads my right. Ms coleman blesses well. Here's what that wink gets you this here. Free box of kellogg's toasted corn flakes a gift from the company. The grocer fetches. She's a white box off the shelf behind him and puts it on the counter. Oh what most wonderful surprise miss coleman notices something odd about the box wchs it looks like a box of cornflakes but it's not it's actually a box of kelloggs toasted rice flakes rice flakes. I did not know they made rice flakes. The grocer glances at the box. Oh i'm sorry ms coleman gave you the wrong bucks. The boxes do look very similar as is the grocer gets a box of cornflakes. Ms coleman looks again at the rice flakes or rice flakes pleasant. I've not tried yet but it it is made by kellogg's so i imagine it'd be pretty good in that case. I'll i'll buy a box n._b._a. Could try them and tell you what they're like. I'd like that very much. Coleman appraises ten cents same as cornflakes moments later this coleman leaves with her free box of cornflakes and the rice flakes and an excuse is to talk to the handsome grocer again but what she doesn't realize is that those rice flakes the same kellogg who makes cornflakes they're made by his brother dr john harvey kellogg and the confusion john's created with his branding is driving his younger brother nuts will thought his battles with john were over but now his brother's stealing his customers and will won't stand for it. He's no longer the downtrodden little brother subservient servian to john's every cruelty today. He's a successful industrialist with money and resources of zone dr john harvey kellogg. No longer has an underling underling to prop himself up. He's about to be shown up by the least likely person imaginable someone. He spent his whole life calling worthless from wonder this is american innovations and i'm steven johnson on the last episode. The kellogg brothers discovered the secret making flaked breakfast cereal. The masses had only just been introduced to ready to eat cereal created by their very own former battle creek sanitarium patient charles post. That's bird will keep kello to finally break free from his brother and found the battle creek toasted corn flakes company. Now it's nineteen. The weight and the tables are turning on the brothers lifelong few as it happens. The country is in the throes change to john will play a role in a sinister scientific movement laying the groundwork for unfathomable atrocities within his lifetime. Both the siblings have lasting impacts on america as we know it today safe but only one we'll give the name kellogg the meaning it's remembered by this is episode three battle of the brand it's august nineteen a week and we'll kellogg heads down mainstream in battle creek. A straw hat shielding his bald scalp from the summer heat. The look on his face is far from sunny. That's because the cereal tycoon is preoccupied with thoughts about his brother's latest intrusion on his business us right now he's trapped in his thoughts to notice just how dramatically he and john have transformed the town of their youth back then it was a small country settlement now it pulses with the wonders of modernity red and green trams rattled down the streets lined with electric lights lights and telephone poles the constant influx of new arrivals fuels a construction boom in a growing downtown marketplace factories are everywhere and they're not only turning out the breakfast. Foods battle creek is famous for their also making the ovens boxes conveyor belts and other equipment cereal manufacturers depend and on and it all began with the kellogg brothers they put this michigan town on the map by turning the battle creek sanitarium into a world famous health resort resort they kindled local industry with their innovative ready to eat breakfast cereals but will feels no pleasure from their shared achievements when he thinks of john all he feels is spite especially today. The latest batch of acrimony began last year. You're will started it when he gave his battle creek toasted cornflake company a new name the kellogg toasted cornflake company will new john john would object to the name and that he would try to use his position on the company's board to obstruct the change so we'll get the board to approve the new name while john was away in europe by the time. John got back to battle creek. It was too late. John brooded over his brother's sneaky move for a a few months and then began executing his retaliation. Just before new year's day nineteen hundred eight he resigned from the board of wills company it told will he wanted to spend more time. Focusing on the status nut food company the food business he'd formed in eighteen ninety eight is an offshoot of the sanitarium and the first thing he did was renamed his food business kellogg's food company of battle creek. The name was designed to inflate his is products with his brothers and it did now. Wholesalers roasters and customers alike struggled to differentiate between the two kellogg companies anthony's even the post office getting their mail mixed up once john begins manufacturing rice and wheat flakes. He makes his packaging indistinguishable bowl from his brother's cornflakes. The brothers have now both threatened the other with lawsuits. Their lawyers are poised for action just waiting for the word as he makes his way through downtown battle creek. We'll consider his options. He knows an ugly court battle hurt the company's brand. Getty eighty cannot stomach the idea of being exploited by his brother yet again. What's more willis obligated to defend the interests of his investors. John mauer competitor competitor a threat to the livelihoods of everyone who works at kellogg's we'll cannot sit by as sales or lost as bad as he wants to fight and when he figures he has to take one final shot at reconciliation to avoid courtroom showdown his dreadful hand-wringing is suddenly intolerable eligible to him now is the time we'll changes direction he heads north of michigan avenue and crosses the spaniel arched bridge approach that stretches over the glimmering waters battle creek he then heads west through the leafy streets and pass the sprawling fenced off grounds of the battle creek week sanitarium thirty minutes later he reaches john's large gothic revival home on manchester street will marches up painted needed white steps to the front door that twenty room house john calls the residents he removes his straw hat mops his sweaty brow and bangs to brass door knocker john's wife ella opens the door. She's a stern woman with grey curly hair. The moment she sees will her face darkens. Oh it's you low. Ella pleasure as always is john here. L. turns her back to will and yells else. John will is at the door as they wait for john will in l. a. eyeball each other on the doorstep in frosty silence they no longer pretend not to hate each other eventually. John appears in the doorway or do you want. I want to reach an accommodation. This dispute has gone far enough l. A. snaps at will yes it has it's about time you stopped using john's good name to enrich yourself wills composure snaps me me. He's the one riding on my coattails. He never cared about the cereal business until he saw my success now. He wants it from self because he cannot stand anyone anyone but him getting the glory how dare you we both know that i am the real kellogg. They buy your cereal because they think i'm the one selling it. Your success is a parasite parasite on mine will looks down and steadies himself against the bile of his hatred. He reminds himself why he's here and forces out a reasonable tone own john. What you're doing will ruin both our companies. If this ends up in court it will embarrass us. Both l. sets off so do what john says. John cuts across his wife ellen. Please but will speak. Thank you let me clear brother. I will go to court if i must. I just hope and pray that there's a better way to resolve this after our negotiating on the doorstep john and will reach an agreement john will stop selling cereals under the kellogg nick in return will will pay john fifty thousand dollars plus additional stock in the cornflakes business. It's the two brothers shake hands but the truce lasts less than a month a few weeks later. John has a change of heart and hostilities resume for the next two years. The animosity subterfuge and retaliation escalates as does the success of their cereal companies under will's autocratic leadership kellogg toasted cornflakes company thrives nineteen ten. He's selling millions of boxes axes of flaked breakfast cereal every year john's enjoying more modest success with his newest product sterilized brand. It's a serial made from the fiber. Rich outer layer of wheat grain john's promoting it as a constipation remedy. It's a powerful selling point in one thousand nine. John sells around a hundred thousand boxes of sterilized brand. The sales of sterilized brand aren't much of a threat to will cereal empire but john's copycat packaging coaching is unlike will john refuses to add salt sugar and other flavorings to his breakfast cereals that worries

John John Dr John Harvey Kellogg Kellogg Battle Creek Miss Coleman Battle Creek Sanitarium John Ms Coleman John Mauer Jefferson City Louisiana America Coleman Michigan Berlin Constipation Hearst Steven Johnson Cornflake Company
"steven johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"Go undergo treatments, and as a result of there being rifts every consumer should be as informed as possible. And that's just a general thought for that Lister. Is you need to be at a very active customer as far as her present condition. I all I could see chess not knowing what's going on exactly with you. But haven't seen Steven Johnson syndrome, myself and patience, which by the way, the deadly problem could be a problem. I would ask you to take care of the things that you have some control of at this moment. And that would be what you eat, you know, whether or not you exercise whether or not you get some sunshine. We haven't talked about bad bad habits. Hold on John. Let's let you finish up with some recommendations for Barbara. When we come back. We'll take final calls. The coast website is now conveniently optimized for mobile devices. If you're a coast insider, you can listen to live and pass shows right on your phone. Just visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android browser..

Steven Johnson Barbara John
"steven johnson" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Steven johnson. Welcome to the show. Hey, thanks delighted to be here. So you had a new book out farsighted how we make the decisions that matter. The most curious how did you get started thinking about decision making or the philosophy and science decision makes you for and all about like ideas, come from his idea of emergency. How we innovations that got us toy are. Now, what got you thinking about decision making, you know, this project I have been working on for a really long time. It's actually the longest kind of incubation period of any of my books, which is may be appropriate for a book that in some ways this about long-term thinking and visiting but I started actually working on it originally right after my book where good ideas, come from came out about the patterns of innovation. I think I started taking notes on it in two thousand eleven or something like that. And it was really sparked by two things one story from history and won a story from my own personal life. The story from history is this in where good ideas come from head of whole riff about Darwin and his notebooks. And you know, they're the incredible personal notebooks. Darwin maintained particularly during the eighteen thirties late eighteen thirties as he was developing the theory of evolution. And it's a beautiful case study in watching a mind have come up with a radical new idea. And that's why written about it. But I knew from that research that there's a kind of a comical moment in those notebooks where Darwin takes up two facing pages of notebooks interrupts his scientific musings and starts wrestling with another question, which is a little bit more intimate, which is should he get married? And he basically creates pros and cons list of of you know, pro marriage and anti marriage, and it it's kind of comical in. And it's it's it's funny to read it now because some of them are kind of like, well, if I married might have children, but then on the other hand, he says, I might have to give up the clever conversation of men..

Steven johnson
"steven johnson" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Treasury Secretary Steven Johnson is at the podium at the White House press briefing, we are launching new sanctions against Venezuela specifically against the dictator Madurai, and John Bolton has stated all options are on the table. That's the very latest news that is happening right now. This country is linked, of course, inextricably to the broader question of so-called, refugees and migrants. We have breaking news from bright Botts that we have another twelve thousand person caravan heading from Central America to the border to the Mexican border. None other than Brandon Darby. We'll be talking to us momentarily. He is of course, the director of Breitbart butts border and cut tell chronicles project who has done more to actually talk about the reality of what's happening on the border than think any other journalist, maybe with exception of Sarah Cada who went to investigate the original caravan in situ soon as we have him on the line. We will be talking to him about his latest piece on the loss Zeta cartel and its leader, which is incredibly disturbing. But let's go back to your calls line to Jerry in Jersey City line to Jerry. I feel the Democratic Party did device state. This is nothing more than a game and people are suffering for not working and getting killed. I feel every one of them. Should we sue including the mullahs commission for all this nonsense and all this waste of time and money, and basically the lives lost an absolute disgrace. And they don't have any conscience at all. Thank you, very. I think that's a very very interesting concept. What is the legal liability for Robert Mueller? A man who has apparently wasted thirty million dollars on an investigation that has brought not one not even a one prosecution a one charge of an individual who was actively linked as colluding or proving any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. So is he legally liable for wasting government time and. For these false charges that have nothing to do with his original mandate. First things first he'd have to end his investigation, at least, then he may be liable for some kind of legal action by those that he is attacked including the president and his campaign. Let's take your calls. We are on eight three three three three Gorkha G O K eight three three three three four six seven five two. Let's go to line a one Mike in California. You've been waiting quite some time. Welcome mike. Thank you. Dr Gorka after discussed with you one has to do with building the wall, we need the other has to do with Maga, hats and yarmulke. Okay. So the first question point is a question. I have for you based on your experience, they can President Trump take money from the Environmental Protection Agency budget and use it to build the necessary border security while on the basis that this massive migrant invasion is causing great harm to the environment. Littering the landscape with plastic and rape trees that they put the women's and girls' bras panties on after they rate them as trophies. There's a lot of our Mel damage going on so can President Trump re appropriate. What's the purpose? Repurposing money. Look, he's the president. And if there buckets of cash sitting around the EPA that haven't been spent every agency has these funds that we discussed the the department of agriculture has more than twenty billion dollars worth of loans outstanding to private entities that it could recall, and we could fund basically all of the construction of the wall. I like the way you think very creative very creative. Talk to us about mega hats in Yonkers please. Okay. I'm jewish. I'm the survivor programs in communist Russia. I would not be talking pay my mother and her family had not escaped from communist Russia may my relatives on her were murdered by the communist. Anyway. So what the news media has done. Basically is they is lousy style propaganda. And hey tactics to demonize Donald Trump, and then they've associated to make America great again hats with Donald Trump. And then they say that well if you're wearing a Maga hat red hat and you get attack. It's your fault because Amata had is a symbolism of hate. Now. The same process has been going on with twos and yarmulke where Jews who wear yarmulkes the Jewish small Jewish skullcap and observance of the Jewish religion. We smelled use when they wear that if they could attack because the media as well as things like Islamic created tremendous hatred against Jews. And then they say, well, the skullcap is the is the symbolism of Judaism. A hateful symbolism or symbol. So you get beach after wearing yarmulkes, it's your fault. So I see a direct connection there. He's wondering what your thoughts are look. I don't know if you heard I guess, thank you, Mike recording. I Jeff Ballard bond. Who is an orthodox Jew was in the studio last week. And he said he knows what it's like to be treated the way the Covington Catholic school boys were treated for their red hat red hat's because he remembers New York prior to med Giuliani and the abuse. He actually was the recipient of because he wore a skullcap as an orthodox Jew. But it's the same concept its collective guilt. And we know what happens when you use the concept of collective guilt. Valley's a dick detoro reflex. Whether you're communists, and it's pogroms against your family. All-weather? It's your fascist and it's the targeting during the holocaust. So yeah, I think the the analogies are very app. Let's get one more call in. Let's go to align to Thomas in San Diego. Welcome aboard. Thomas. Hey, Dr thanks for taking my call. I'll be brief cave to who. Caved on Friday Thomas. We'll tell you who was caved the Republican congress cave for the past two years. They have Trump in the positioning. And now and now he standing in fighting by himself. There's no one side by side with him from the Republican party, quiet. And I'm gonna tell you I'm so livid with them. I would love someone like you or someone to start a campaign that's called. No, no donations. I donated year after year, the Republican party, and I will not give a penny until this wall is built. That gets out there. In force. We need to wake up the jellyfish. Republicans don't know how to rally around their parties. Yeah. Thomas. God bless you. Thank you for your clarity. Think about how many people or how few people have supported the president who are on Capitol Hill. You know, their names, Mark meadows. Jim Jordan, Matt gaetz Zelda. It's a hat, Devin Nunes, it is a dozen people out of hundreds where is.

president Thomas Donald Trump Mike Republican party Brandon Darby Jerry Democratic Party Madurai Botts Breitbart Robert Mueller Devin Nunes Republican congress Central America Russia Sarah Cada director
"steven johnson" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American Innovations

"From wondering, I'm Steven Johnson. And this is American innovations in our first episode on anesthesia, we met a boyish dentist named Horace. Wells who attended a matrix frolic and watched his friend, bloody his leg without feeling any pain. Wells realized that nitrous oxide laughing gas might hold the key to making pain free surgery. A real possibility in this episode course wells crosses paths with a petty crook named William Morton, this unlikely duo would eventually make medical history. This is part two of our three part series on anesthesia is is called the swindle. And it begins in Worcester. Massachusetts. William Morton had been born near Charlton in south central Massachusetts in eighteen nineteen to parents who had more optimism than financial sense, Missouri teams. They sold the family farm to open a dry goods store in town it quickly failed which is when Morton had to drop out of school and began work at a tavern in Worcester. As far as Morton is concerned only suckers work for living. He was always on the lookout for a quick buck and one day. He saw his chance his boss the tavern keeper stepped out to run some errands. I want you to sweep up in here an empty this tunes. I've gotta run to the market. Yes, sir. And be sure to sweep the corners. And be sure to sweep the corners fat pig. As soon as the coast is clear Morton makes his move he sneaks over to the till and breaks the lock on stupid thing. But in the middle of the robbery the tavern keeper returns forgot boy, I need you to what the hell you doing get back here. Morton is caught red handed and the tavern keeper beats them black and blue then Morton's boss calls in the sheriff. I've half a mind lock you up some. But your parents are good people. We don't have room in the jail. Anyhow after the holiday last weekend all cut you a deal you go free so long as you never set foot in Worcester. Again, Morton takes the deal. It's the first town. He's not welcome in. It won't be the last. And Morton learned a valuable lesson from the intimate. The burglary was too risky. He vowed to be a subtler sort of criminal from then on a confidence man he'd charm his way into people's good graces, and then rob them with a smile. So we moved to Rochester, New York and remade his whole image. He was no longer the poor son of destitute farmers now he was William T G. Morton man about town. Rumors began spreading that he was the nephew of the governor of Massachusetts. Rumors spread by Morton himself. He became a dandy. In fact, everyone who ever met Morton commented on his appearance. He looked like a romantic lead on stage tall slender. Elegant was sharp. Blue is we've dark hair and a fashionable moustache. He also dressed beautifully dark, suits flamboyance. Silk, scarves, fancy buttons any wars pants high. Deliberately to show off his shoes. His peacocking was all the more striking because it clashed with the Sambre sober. Fashions of the day. Morton's looks charm introductions to the best families in Rochester. There was simply a buzz about the young man something exciting and being around any quickly hit upon the scam that he'd recycle again. And again over the next decade. He found an ambitious businessman in town and began talking shop with him soon. Morton had confessed his long standing dream of opening a store, apparently he wanted to sell spices silks and other exotic items pretty soon.

William Morton William T G. Morton Massachusetts Worcester Wells Rochester nitrous oxide Steven Johnson robbery burglary Missouri New York one day
"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Further little differently that's certainly true in this six part series the dynamo of dna this series is all about the stuff buried deep inside ourselves that make us who we are figuring out that janetta code has changed the world and help us explain ageold mysteries in fact dna would prove to be such an important molecule that would quickly jump the boundaries of biology and revolutionize other areas of society to creating whole new fields of research and business from healthcare to crime dna has completely transformed our world in this episode we're going to go back about one hundred and fifty years long before bill clinton announced the human genome project in the white house to meet to scientists who in their own way laid the groundwork for the discovery of dna it's a story that stars cloned sheep of room of fruit flies and salmon sperm but before we get to the salmon sperm it's the winter of eighteen sixty and in a little green house on the grounds of a monastery and burn oh among is bent over looking for green shoots in a row of people aunts the saint thomas monastery is in what's now the czech republic was then part of the austrian empire the monks here are known for being inquisitive types always doing some experiment or another and this young monk is no exception his name his gregor mendel and he can often be found here in the greenhouse or in one of the outdoor courtyards and one of the pots he spots a tiny green shoot just beginning to push up through the soil the first sign of life from the ps he planted only a couple of weeks earlier it's still cold outside but here in the warmth of the greenhouse things grow a lot quicker mendel pushes his round spectacles up as knows shuts the greenhouse and heads over for prayers.

bill clinton white house saint thomas monastery czech republic gregor mendel fifty years
"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Free trial and if you'd like to support american history tellers please when you're ready to launch us the offer code tellers to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace com slash tellers and when you're ready to launch use offer code tellers american history tellers is sponsored by ring in my conversation with stephen johnston today he got me thinking about the city as a major innovation it's not a single invention but a series of irrev an interwoven changes and improvements to the way we humans live together as we've clustered closer together we've encountered some problems but our continued ability to innovate has saved us each time our sponsoring continues to innovate to rings a high tech internet enabled camera equipped doorbell if someone rings while your way or you just don't wanna come to the door you can see who it is and even talk with them using just your smartphone recently i had the opportunity to upgrade to a ring video doorbell pro in offers ten eighty p hd video and advance motion detection so you can from anywhere in the world old answer the door check on motion alerts and see when packages arrive in ring now offers a companion floodlight cam with the same motion activated camera hd video and two audio together ring video doorbell and floodlight cam put security in your hands whether your home or way as an american history tellers listener you can save up to one hundred fifty dollars off a ring of security kit when you go to ring dot com slash tellers that's up to one hundred fifty dollars off at ring dot com slash tellers that's ring dot com slash tellers.

stephen johnston one hundred fifty dollars ten percent
"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Yeah the first series on dna is fastened you you start really actually fairly far back in history in the eighteenth century i was really interested to to learn how much molecular science they were doing and it it it really points to the i think probably a theme of your show that these innovations are hardly overnight successes a how you re moments that there's a long history of incremental movement towards some greater understanding yeah this is this process that i've called over the years the slow hunch as opposed to the a homeowner the eureka moment like you know it's always nice to tell the story where you know the apple falls from the tree and it's newton on the ad and suddenly as a theory of gravity but that's not really how breakthrough ideas come into the world it's much messier and it's much slower and what happens is with a really complicated idea like understanding genetic code dna it their pieces of the puzzle and someone has a little bit of it you know in one country in some of it and someone has a another bit of the puzzle and in some other place and over time over decades some cases over a century or more the the the final solution to the problem becomes visible but it's but it's much more incremental and actually i think you know if you tell the story right that's that is actually a much more interesting story because there are lots of different kind of twists and turns rather than just one moment of sudden inspiration so that's one of the major things we're trying to tease out in the show to really explore the the processes and the fasting lives of some of these people.

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Steven johnson thank you for coming on this show i'm excited to be here i'm a i'm a fan of your show too well thank you i had an opportunity to listen to an early edition of your podcast and it seems really interesting i wonder if you could just tell us a little about it how came about and where you think take it well the the you know the theme of innovation in the history of innovation is something that i've been researching and writing about for twenty years now written a number of books including where good ideas come from and how we got to now about this really fascinating question of technologies or scientific breakthroughs that changed the world kind of trying to dive in figure out how they happen right who who are the people involved what were the environments that made those idea ideas possible and so american innovations is is an attempt to continue that that storytelling really it's a look at a series of ideas and technologies that have transformed the modern world some of which we kind of take for granted now and tend to go back into the history and figure out you know where these came from because they're just some incredibly fascinating stories and so we're doing six episode sections the initial one is about the history of dna and the human genome project and we have future once about artificial intelligence and spaceflight so it's going to be it's going to be a lot of fun.

Steven johnson twenty years
"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on American History Tellers

"I recently received this note my best friend and i always share new books movies and tv shows if i liked it so would he invites versa about three weeks ago he shared your podcast with me as we were walking even stop so i could listen to some of it three days later he died unexpectedly of a heart attack we only shared things we really loved with each other and so i'm grateful he shared your podcast with me i have really enjoyed listening to it hardly because he did and also because it's so good thank you for making a hard time a little easier so we dedicate this episode to dent and arkansas boy who lived in texas but is now laid to rest back home and to his good friend mike with whom he shared the world so now let's get into my conversation with stephen johns we discuss his new podcast american innovations is first season on the history of dna and how innovation isn't always the eureka moment we're led to believe it is stephen join me from a studio new york here's our conversation your invited to travel the world and discover what it means to live the intercontinental life american history tellers is supported by intercontinental hotels and resorts presenting their podcast series stories of the intercontinental life with more than one hundred ninety properties around the world in icon ick destinations such as los angeles london and cartagena intercontinental hotels and resorts offers endless opportunities to gain new perspectives through travel immerse yourself in stories that will broaden your mind excite your curiosity and take your imagination to places you'd never expect hear stories of intercontinental life at apple podcasts google play or wherever you find your podcasts remember you don't travel to escape life but for life not to escape you so find and subscribe to stories of the intercontinental life and find out how big this world really is.

arkansas texas mike stephen johns york los angeles london apple three weeks three days
"steven johnson" Discussed on I Hate My Boss

I Hate My Boss

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"steven johnson" Discussed on I Hate My Boss

"Take this is liz dolan and there's a new podcast out there that i think you're gonna love it's called american innovations american innovations is hosted by popular science author steven johnson and they'll tell you the stories behind dna in the mapping of the human genome the rise of the personal computer artificial intelligence and more you know i read a lot of nonfiction about these kinds of subjects so i'm super excited that it's now coming in podcast form but american innovations isn't your typical science podcast because you'll not only hear about the science behind some of the greatest innovations of the last century you'll also be immersed in the dramatic moments behind the people the places and the time that led to those real a ha moments the first six episodes are written by new york times bestselling author sam keen and you can hear the first three episodes right now by searching for american innovation on apple podcasts wherever you're listening to this or you can find a link in the episode notes right here and while you're searching for american innovations here's a preview of the first episode you'll hear the story of very misunderstood monk whose worked with peas and salmon sperm led to the discovery of dna come on people among peas salmon sperm dna so who said science can't be sexy it's january eighteen sixty eight it's early morning and in a hospital in to binggen in germany the bearded man wearing a sick coat makes his way quickly along one of the corridors.

liz dolan steven johnson new york times bestselling sam keen apple binggen germany