17 Burst results for "Steven Heller"

"steven heller" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:38 min | 10 months ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"And I'm your host Josh Bennett. Each episode we take a closer look at a story that we think deserves just a little bit more attention when post to house a museum in New York closed. Its doors in early March. It's director Julia night. Wondered what the institution could offer in the way of support for the city. Working WITH PRINT. Magazine night commissioned a series of digital public service announcement posters to subject messages to those venturing outside and of gratitude to essential workers to post. Were initially on billboards in Times Square and whether Lincoln Tunnel. But the success of the campaign means that these colorful posters can now be found across the city's five boroughs and as far Afield Chicago in Boston. Julia night post a house. Museum's director tells our producer mainly Evans. Where the spark for the project began. I had been reading an article in print magazine by Steven Heller. Who's one of our advisory board members and it was all about the polio epidemic and the posters that had been developed for that that were about science and the progress of the vaccine and instructions on how to behave the posters. Were great I called up Steven Heller and we just started talking about. It can put your house do something similar in this respect. Is this how we can fulfill? Our mission has a poster museum in this time of crisis through around a couple of ideas. Do we WANNA do it open. Call do we want to host a competition. Time was clearly of the essence We partnered with print magazine. Who was able to reach out to their very good friends in the design community and ask are you willing and able to contribute a PSA and at the same time on the poster how side I worked with our marketing manager Burrell Awadhi to reach out to advertisers. We had worked within the past to see. Do they have any space as anybody dropping out? Can we present these? Psa somewhere this is designed right so it has to function can't just make PSA's and have them be pretty but they have to actually reach. The audience at first are intended target for those advertisers was more websites and digital ad spaces thinking obviously people are online more than ever before but even then it was difficult to try and figure out like which websites are people actually going to wear as trusted information being presented. But who came to rise to the call was actually out of home. Advertisers people had been pulling ads from those spaces. We knew that people were still going out on essential journeys. They were going to the grocery store or they were walking their pots. And all of the frontline workers were still on the streets. It was actually really amazing. One of our first takers silver cast and they had a gigantic double sided digital billboard by Lincoln tunnel and then link nyc answered the call with. I think the total number is one thousand seven hundred seventy five screens in all five boroughs of New York and that was incredible because that just meant so many people could actually encounter these as they couldn't work. They could have an impact they could reach New Yorkers and from there. We found out that time square arts was doing a similar project that we're reaching out to the artist's friends and communities to figure out what they could put up because they have access to gigantic billboards all around time square and we had again. Just try to motivate so quickly that we already had designs in hand. We already had designer. Signed up for the project so we were able to push those through to their billboard owners as well Times Square is such an icon of the city. And so we knew that having these PSA's up on these gigantic multi-storey billboards would have a real visual impact. Public Art Project unveiled today. Covers time. Square's famous built your house. Me Damn and print magazine. They decided to collaborate part of this. Is that once the media takes pictures and writes about the PSA's have even greater reach. We had wonderful contributions from Pearl media an Atlantic terminal network. They're up Atlantic terminal in Brooklyn and then J. C. Toco offered us three hundred additional digital bus shelters and newsstands all around New York City and they enabled us to expand the project to Chicago and Boston. And we're working with some partners in la now. The project just keeps growing and growing the offered that I just found incredibly touching was from a Yukon hospital and they had heard about the project and they have screens coming into the hospital and they wanted to mount the PSA's their for their staff. That's coming into work. They had seen them. They were uplifted by them and they wanted to share them with their own frontline workers. That really made me think okay. This has worked. We had about twenty designers contribute so it was just again such an overwhelming and wonderful response. The first piece to launch at Times Square on these gigantic scales was my ric. Edelman who did a peace love and a time of Cove Ed and it's an illustration showing faces on either side of sort of a sun that could also be interpreted as a virus molecule. I think it hits so big because it's about hope you del Rodriguez. His visual style is really just perfect for the scale of a billboard. He did A- campaign that is features doctors. That says New York loves you. I think it got picked up by basically every single outlet had huge impact and appeal. I know that there's a bit of an Internet. Backlash about frontline workers don't want to be called heroes. They want to be you know treated with respect and given the proper equipment but the sentiment that New Yorkers are so grateful that New Yorkers are appreciative of all of this work. It's not about the politicians in what they say it's about the actual people on the ground clearly struck a chord with everybody. Class for plunk is peace had a lot of humor in it to people leaning out of the Building Plane Ping Pong back and forth. A little bit of Levity was needed at that time we starting to work on these as early as March fifteenth. So there was just so much weightiness and so much concerning information at every second of the day and so I appreciated that designers really took that route one piece that I particularly love by Paul Sarah with a space man floating in the cosmos with a shopping cart. And one of those. Thank you plastic bags. Another kind of frontline worker getting attention and it's so ethereal and beautiful and speaks to a sense of isolation but also of innovation at the same time and I thought really genius all of these essays were really about lifting people up. They weren't about scaring people further. I was so impressed with the ingenuity with the speed at which they came out with how heartfelt they were just really smart designs. We heard a lot about not wanting to be alarmist at first we were like will. This is scary though. You know like we have to be realistic. But as we started fielding designs from the designers themselves we realized that they too had gone much. More in the route of levity clarity beauty and it seemed like that's just what everybody was looking for a needed at that time so it ended up being a big meeting of the minds as long as there is a need. Advertisers have been very open to continuing the project expanding it. We see a lot of interest in different places cropping up. I'd be interested in getting these out of the major cities and into smaller arenas as well as long as this lasts and we don't know how long that is. Hopefully we can just continue to be useful.

New York Times Square Lincoln Tunnel Julia night Steven Heller director Boston Josh Bennett Square print magazine polio Chicago la Pearl media advisory board Burrell Awadhi marketing manager
"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

"As she said well doctors and even then I knew I don't like blood not going to be doctors and lawyers and I'm like well. That sounds kind of boring. And then she said architects architects. What's an architect? And she said well they built buildings and at that point. I knew I wanted to be an architect and because I love buildings I loved the built environment. I love the just the energy of a building just looking at a building and seeing what the dialogue it has with you. Every building had saying something. It's many times negative. But they're all saying something. Yeah and so That's were rolling and I was sort of driving around. La yesterday and we passed by a police station. Really sharp jagged amber rocks outside. Like I guess they sort of like how you would normally see shrubbery or topiary or something. These rocks as if to say. Don't come here. Don't sit here or whatever. It was really like an odd bit of like defensive design and said every building said something to you that was in skid row by the way That that was don't even think about laying down around here and I think that's really unfortunate but that's that's the language architecture does have that ability to speak and so from from that point. I wanted to be an architect and I was very fortunate to have role models or to see architects. Who looked like me at a very early age. That was a blessing. So that was in Indianapolis you those role models. Yes in I was about to fourth grade. We went on a field trip to an architect's office was Walter Blackburn. I didn't know anything about anything. Except he's an architect he's black and I want to be an architect so I guess I'm GonNa be architectures. That was a blessing. It really was. I didn't know at that time that you don't really get to see those those role models that was a very fortunate set of event because in my mind. I wanted to be an architect. I saw a black architect I saw office. So what's the problem? Although there were plenty of people who didn't think I could be an architect when I was in high school graduating my guidance. Counselor I told him I WANNA go to architecture school. At that time I had a work study program where I worked. I go to school in the morning. I worked at the City Hall in Indianapolis on the twentieth floor. A Counselor said you got a great job with benefits. Were you WANNA go to architecture school for just call? Look Dan. How's like but but on the serious tip just think how many young black men have been discouraged from following their dreams because they didn't see a role model and they had a person of authority that told them they couldn't do it And that that was disturbing. Yeah you had asked me to serve yesterday. Sorta during our drive like drive. We were at humor park at the out of remember. What the name of the coffee show. How cool how cool. Okay we red hot and cool and you were asking me sort of out of the three hundred plus people I've talked to like what's one of the common things and I was telling you like. It's sort of that like lack of a role model or person that they can see. That's in some position of authority or whatever when their child when their in their formative years to say okay. This is something that I can do myself like seemed to be a very sort of common thread. So That's interesting that you were able to kind of have that as an early influence for you. Was it like that? Also at ball state when you're studying architecture no architecture is is in. That's where I started to learn. It's back then and today is there's a white male elitists profession the curriculum you get indoctrinated into the white male elite us. And you don't even know it is just de facto. The architects the classical architects. The modern architects the cutting edge architects. They were all white male with no exception at that time. And that's something that to this day. Disturbs me in terms of the architectural curriculum? And how one is indoctrinated into a certain way of thinking where you don't see yourself you don't see your culture. Yeah you don't see a way to express who you are. You have to find a way to fit in and to speak that language when your language is just as relevant if not more relevant if given the chance and given the venue to express into practice it reminds me of This is an essay by the late. Sylvia Harris it's in this anthology from Steven Heller called education of a graphic designer and so she has an essay in there titled Searching For an African American design aesthetic or think it's black design aesthetic but she talks about mostly about education and how for black students often learning out of imitation as opposed to kind of like what their culture is about so they learn about Swiss styles in Germany styles and Dutch styles etc. But then it's like well if I'm a black design student are we learning about Nigerian style or Botswanan styles or South African styles and the answer is no you know and I wonder. Why is that still today? When we have access to the Internet we start to know our history available but yet we still don't know who we are when I was at ball state and I don't know how a why I did it. I research the Pyramids and the construction of the Pyramids and was was crazy. I didn't realize they were because the Egyptians were black because those illustrations that I research they were all just people drew illustrations of how they were built with white looking. Egyptians and so I knew it was an Africa but it wasn't until far after I graduated and I went to Egypt that I saw those folks look like me. Yeah they look just like me. We design those pyramid. The folks that look like me designed structures that far exceed what the classical Greek temples were that far exceed any monuments that have been built to this day were designed and built by people like me and so that looked like me and so that open up a door to me to explore more about what what else do I don't know what else have I been indoctrinated. And that is not true. And that's the journey on one to this day to discover who we are as a people so that we can express our design aesthetic that comes from our spirit that comes from some some discipline that you've been given and that you've been taught but it comes from your spirit there it's a we are a very spiritual people and. I think that we are in danger of losing that spiritual connection because we are so busy. Trying to adapt adopt and fit in to what popular culture is which is not us. When did you end up moving to la? Was it right after Balsa? Yep So my ass. People actually well. Why don't you come to la? Say you've been Indianapolis ever be like. It's a great place to raise a family. It really is but in terms of a career in architecture. I can imagine where what.

Indianapolis La Walter Blackburn City Hall Steven Heller Dan Egypt Sylvia Harris Africa Germany
"steven heller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

17:13 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of management executive education presenting women on boards a program, which coaches executive women to secure a seat at the corporate board table begins October twentieth. Learn more of is searching for Yale women on boards artists performers. Doers. I'm Helga Davis. I speak with artists like cigarette songwriter salons and film director, Kenneth Lonergan. I'm curious little newsy, and I want to know their paths from there to here. Join me for a special week of surprising conversations were together. We'll find the stories and experiences that connect us all all this week at nine pm on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. You're listening to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart. Whether you're walking down Broadway or canal street, or you live in Brooklyn or queens, the Bronx you've probably seen. The font that is slowly taking over New York. It's called shop, and it's featured on signs for bagel shops treatise, salon sushi, restaurants, laundromats all over the five boroughs Ramsey Taylor. The eagle-eyed art director for the New York Times who spotted his all of the city finally decide to figure out where the heck shot came from. And how it began to spread aiding him in his quest and quoted in the resulting article published in the New York Times, Steven Heller, the co chairman of the MFA program at the school of visual arts runs in Steven. Thanks for coming to the studio. Thanks for having me. All right. I'm gonna ask you to describe. The font shirt, I think historically is described as e script typeface, but even with that classification it it's really unique syncretic. So it looks like it was drawn. With a brush it has very thick strokes. It's not a classic script because the letters don't connect together. But it's hugely bold. Typeface? It looks organic like it was drawn by human beings. So you can spot it from across the street. When did you first notice so everywhere for me? This was something of a frequency allusion at I will I should backtrack a little bit. So I I've studied as a graphic designer and went to grad school. So I knew its history a little bit. I knew the designer knew where it comes from new that is from the nine hundred fifty. So by the time we spotted it out in the open. I knew a little bit about it. But when I moved to New York City, I started seeing it all over the place. And I didn't know if this was unique to the city or something in my imagination when I started working in this article, I went through Google street view and try to earmark as many places as I could find and lo and behold, it's everywhere. So I found something something over fifty or sixty locations, and I'm sure there's nowhere near comprehensive. So the article mentions that the shock stands out for its irregularities. Stephen even think about fonts in regularity. What does that mean? Well, when I think about irregularity, I think about Christie. And this font has an idiosyncratic quality to it. It doesn't follow. What reading font would be. It's not a sense, Sarah. If it's not a if it's a brush stroke. So has this non traditional attitude? It's an attitudinal font. It's kind of like I often describe typefaces as clothes you put on certain garments, blouses, coats, whatever, and they evoke a certain sensibility a project something about you. Or at least about the store that you got it. And that's what typefaces are. And this typeface is one of those very. Personal. Impressionable expressionist fonts. What do you think this typeface? This font is trying to say to us if it was I think you maybe in the article use the word voice. What is it trying to tell us? I think for for non designers in New York City. My conclusion would be is that it says something generalized about East Asian culture. If only because that's the context for it in New York City. That's what it's used for an issue so consistently and has been used so consistently for so long. That here if you see it on top of sushi restaurant, for example, it feels appropriate to that context. And it should add that shock is not used exactly in that same way and other cities specifically in Europe and in America, it seems to be the case. Well, it's origin is in Europe. Correct. That's right. Tell folks were cayden from when it started it originated in France in nineteen fifty five it was designed by typography named Roger excavation and he specialized he's done a number of different things. But he's he's most known I think for his script typefaces, and they're all different in. They're all. Pretty stark contrast to what was what was trendy at the time in the mid century, which was like modernist modernist design the era of Helvetica there's a little late for that. And all of his work really stuck out as a sore. Thumb, and I think there's a lot of designers that weren't so kind to hated. And I think I mean, it's endured over time. And I think that's a testament to its distinctiveness. What say, but in in Europe, generally in one of one of the people I spoke with Sandra Shemmari, who's a French designer who wrote a monograph for co wrote a monograph on extra funds were simulates that in Europe, the fill European and they're they're not they're used. More broadly, extra funds work is used more broadly there than it is here here. It's very very very specific speak with Rummy Taylor was in your art director and Steven Heller co chairman of the school of visual arts MFA program. We're talking about the mystery font that took over New York. It's the piece that Romsey wrote. So you said it was hated hated as a mild word for him. There was typefaces have. Fashionable fashion qualities and one of the aspects of typefaces novelty, and the novelty expresses something about either the time the place where the thing that it's representing there were in the thirties things called perfume fonts why because they advertise perfume. So every type has a personality an extra funds types were very bold. As Ramsey says, they were very shocking as the name of no pun intended. And he also did a typeface called mistrial, which was script typeface that you find almost everywhere in Paris. Mostly on dry cleaning stores, and it's very frequent here. And it's frequent here. Go look that up. There are there are certain typefaces that look like they just got put into a template book and in the case of sign painting. It's one of those typefaces that assigned painter who isn't necessarily trained as typography will use because it explodes because it has bold qualities because it makes the sun shine, whatever the reason is they use it without thinking. And then when you introduce a designer into the mix they start using either differently or don't use it at all and switch to other typefaces. How did shock make it from Europe to the US that's really difficult to determine. But what I what I've discovered my speculation. Rather would be that. Sean come from. It comes from a time where type was produced in hot Olin's. Houston letter press machines in. It's evolved with the with the industry of how type is used to produce pieces of graphic design. So it it was used for photo typesetting after that in the digital era digital typesetting. So I think it's sort of been a a standby let's say along with dozens if not hundreds of other typefaces over the course of the past sixty years, my guess would be that Chuck is so distinctive that over time. It's been reused because people just notice it that has a lot of potency of your it telegraphs something right away for some short some sort of shorthand for sure even if it doesn't telegraph something specific to you. I think it's it stands out there. Something historically permanently distinctive about it. So if you if you open a brand new restaurant today, and you need to come up with the storefront from it. And you're looking through a catalogue of typefaces. I think there's something about it that will that will jump out at you. So I think like that quality in that type typeface is the. The reason for its proliferation. But it's also an interesting typeface and we've been talking about this. There's type for the masses and type for the classes, the classes is when you go to John's yours restaurant, you're not gonna find shock. It's just not going to be there. When you go to a supermarket, and you look at something that is an RT seasonal product. You're not gonna find shock. You're gonna find shock for mass, market foods or. Something other that appeals to a larger group of people. That's true. There's something very inherently informal about his appearance. And also, I think this is just my observation. What do I know? There's a sense of a human being did it. That's right, right. In this world of we know everything is mass marketed and machines and robots that brush stroke. We all know it's been reproduced. But somehow you have this feeling maybe somebody paid to that on that that human element is that part of it. Absolutely. I the just recently I got a piece of junk mail from spectrum cable or something like that in. It's it's a letter addressed to me, and it's written in a font that looks like handwriting Mistral, for example. And I look at it for a nanosecond before I realize it's not a fun. I put it in the trash, and I'm fooled by this piece of design because it emulates human correspondence, anything chalk, and Mistral and other typefaces of that ilk. Have that quality were there's something informal organic humane about. Conversely, I got when I started applying for Medicare. I got an Email from the social security department, and it was signed in Mistral. And I thought this got to be fake. You know, why would the government agency used the typeface like this? So I called them and somebody answered right away. You know, who I am? Well, somebody answered right away. And I said, this is really the social security office. And they had all the information on the computer. So he convinced me was for real. And I said, you know, your emails don't give off the sense of legitimacy because of the typeface he said, yeah, we've had a lot of complaints about. We're speaking with Steven Heller who is co-chairman of the school of visual arts MFA program and Rum's e Taylor who wrote the article the mystery font that took over New York is as well, the New York Times art director. What does there have been the response to this? We know times readers have responses will the response has been overwhelmingly good. I think my my guess is to why that is is that this is. It's not a pretentious piece of graphic design. Something anybody has access to free to have an opinion about in as stayed in the piece that you can just walk outside and within five minutes. We can go find this right now. It's everywhere. It's a part of New York culture. And I think that this. There are a lot of people who may have read this who have seen it before. Now. I know what it's called. Now. I know words from and I would add the she did a great job. First of all second of all he got terrific play. I was an art director at the time as well and wrote design stories, but you know, they always kind of shoved it under the carpet because they didn't think the readership would be all that interested in. And the fact is it's we live with design every day, and we live with type, more and more and more. It's not going away as vinyl records were supposed to go away. It's not going away as books were supposed to go away. We're always going to have it unless we get some chip in our heads translates things into digits, and one of the thing I would say is that this inasmuch as we're sitting here talking about typography and type history. This is a story about New York City. This is how a piece of design is become assimilated into New York culture. And as I said earlier using a specific a very specific way. They said a simulated is it ingrained or will this go away when ten years will people think oh, remember shock? It's hard to say. So has it happened before has has it gone away. Has it has a certain sort of fonder typography of a city been ubiquitous and then disappear in other cities. Yes, like Gill. Sands in London. Or in the thirties in New York Broadway, and it still is the art deco type place. So you see it on building scaffolds where they're doing renovation of old prewar buildings and these things do stick around for a long time or they have their ups and downs and go in and out of fashion. In in my research. We we spoke with the few sign makers and. The stories are really about this. But I learned that there with the sign making industry there. There's something like an old school sign. Sign maker in New York City in the technology that they may use might be outmoded might not be the same thing that like if if assigned makers making a lake the sign in the front of this building, for example, might be a new one, but like these this this is a piece of vinyl siding in fabric fabric, sign engine stores throughout Brooklyn, for example. And the way those things have been manufactured hasn't really changed for decades, and they still produce them. So I think there's something about the technology. That is also has also resulted in why Chuck is so prevalent is there a font either of you think you'd like to see more of or less of in New York. I'm sure Stephen has opinions. I have opinions. But they're always there. They're your own. There's no wrong. Now. I mean, what I would like to see is more consistency. I mean, the term I use in his article was chaos as opposed to cacophony. And I think when you go out into the boroughs. There's a lot more chaos or if you go onto the major shopping streets. There's a lot of chaos a lot of it now is chaotic because it's just one brand after another and these brands have been. John. With a lot of. Design research involved. So they've become kind of plastic. The the kind of unique quality of type is been lost in Manhattan. Just as many of the unique stores in New York have been lost. I would like to see more. Of. Immagination being brought to bear in New York sign age and less of this chaotic quality because of the chaotic quality is underscored by just bad type. That's true. That's true. I I the the chaos doesn't bother me as much because I think in some ways the the typographic chaos, let's say is emblematic of the city's cultural or anthropological diversity. So like, even if the type was all consistent, and well-considered that diversity would still be there. And I like the idea that graphic design echoes that aspect of the city, but to go back to your question, I would love to see, and we only we only touch on this a little bit when we were conversing for this article, Stephen, but I would love to see more handmade stuff more handpainted signing because that that is long gone. And it was a it was beautiful. I mean, this is before I was born back. Can't imagine walking through the city and seeing the storefront for grocery and everything had been. Drawn by hand the day before to advertise. What's.

New York City director Steven Heller Europe New York Times Stephen Ramsey Taylor WNYC Brooklyn Alison Stewart chairman John Kenneth Lonergan Chuck MFA executive Helga Davis Yale Mistral New York
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And i asked her if she wanted to interview for the job of administrator because i was the chair and she did it for two years it is administrator and then took on the chair ship and then by the time i was ready to leave the times we agreed that i'd be a co chair and then at that point we started the other programs so the first program i actually started independent of mfa design with social documentary film and that's because two days before i had lunch with marrow shemaya five inch my daughter and ivan told me she was filmmaker and i said okay good maybe she can run a program so that happened we met in a similar fashion at lunch and so anybody who i had lunch with i'd asked to start a program i still have the email that steve sent me on july seventh two thousand seven that said wanna have lunch so it can't it couldn't be done this way anymore because our president esta is not a typical academic president he he has great enthusiasms and he trusts his people to do things that they think are right and can be successful or not as the case may be because graduate programs are more prestige than they are moneymakers when you were asked why the first wave of students entered the program from the late nineties through the mid two thousands your answer was to get back to the hand what kinds of things have your students done over the years well the most famous thing that came out of our program was debris adler 's prescription drug packaging for target stores and put her on a trajectory to do medical design just had another big deal with cvs yeah you know it's funny we we're going into our twentieth year we have a book that lists everybody's we call them ventures because it's entrepeneurship we don't call them thesis and i just don't remember any of them you know it's like i we have a lot of students who have made names for themselves and made successful businesses like bobby martin and get it friction for kind and who have cd sam eckersley who is here in stuart rogers who did read there are a lot of people who met in our midst and have gone on to great things some of them did their ventures some of them didn't do their ventures but it became the foundation for for other work they were doing you've said that teaching is where the most insignificant thing can be viewed as significant i said that you did i was going to ask if you could elaborate but given that you don't remember saying it might wanna just load of leave it there as beautiful poetic very poetic i think you're right let's leave it so this is my last question you've said that you are experiencing a blossoming of tolerance and appreciate design ideas that used to annoy you and so i was wondering if you could share what those are well go back a dozen or so years i wrote something called cult of the ugly yes which became whenever you most famous essays infamous essays i read it over again and i'm kind of embarrassed by it but still became standard reading and a lot of courses and it garnered a lot of animosity from particularly young designers who were working in the new wave for in the digital realm many of whom i've since become friends with but my idea about design was always that it had to serve a social purpose that the reason i didn't go into advertising was i didn't want to sell something to somebody that they something that they didn't want the reason i never went into branding was because i didn't want to create a story that was a fictional story about something that had no history i was happy to work at a newspaper because i never got faced with the dilemma of doing something for somebody that i didn't wanna do in fact i got a call a couple of weeks ago asking if somebody could do a documentary on me that would run on fox business news and i said absolutely not yes but wait not that i didn't do it he then he then told me we do the documentary you pay for the shoot and i said this is a fucking scam isn't it vanity documentary oh my so there are companies that do that stuff but i was glad i said right up front no fox so now you can club

administrator five inch two years two days
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Not only co founded that program with lita tele rico but you also helped co found interaction program with liz dan's icho the designing writing and research program with ls twenty below you helped me create my program in branding so what made you decide that this was an area that you wanted to pursue this higher education graduate education and not only your own program but then help really push sva into the future with numerous graduate programs will what i was also doing just to add this because it's so morbidly fun i wrote obituaries for the new york times all the designers that i would get into the paper sixty ritu areas i liked it really because they couldn't complain that i got the facts wrong i started writing for the paper which was even more exciting than being an art director for the paper so i did that when it was time for me to leave the times i needed a landing spot and i had two years after i was thrown out of spa i got a job teaching spa doing the school newspaper i still have layouts from it never amounted to anything because that's when i got the job at the times but marshall ayres men who threw me out of the school asked me to teach in his new graduate program the design the illustrator as journalists and i said i would do a history of illustration for him and we did and i was with him for about fourteen years and while i was there i had an idea with richard wild who was the bfa chair to do a series of conferences called modernism and eclecticism a history of american graphic design so we would do those and then the then chairman founder of the school asked me to do an education conference and i did that doc on and when when silas asked me to do this i was roads i put together this program it was really quite a good one in fact one of the conferences we had was that the world trade center the week before the first bombing and we were in the room that was right above where the bomb went off it's very spooky but at one point he called me and he said i'd asked paula shared come up with a graduate program and she came up with something but we can't do it and i want you to come up with one so what hers was that they couldn't do yeah it was to use the city as a canvas and it was a good program but he wanted something that was graphic design and this he felt would be to the focus would be off and it was their first graphic design mfa so i use the school as idea as a great professional school or what some people would go trade school to come up with the idea that the next thing designers should do is entrepreneurship except you couldn't get the word entrepreneurship through the accrediting agents interesting so which were you know the the state government so we called it author ship because it was more scholarly and we always knew would it was about entrepreneurship and i four million changed we it's no it was never a formal name okay it's called them if a design formerly and we just added the subtitle so i i felt this could this is easy all i have to do is run it like a design conference you know i picked classes instead of speakers but i have the teachers who are basically the speakers doing it for an extended period of time and i never learned much about academia not having been allowed to stay in school you do have to honorary doctorate two honorary doctorates yes so i can be called doc heller but i lead to tell the rico when i had been working together prior to this on some of my books she was doing research i ran into her at a basketball game where our kids were playing and i said i'm starting a program i know she was working for suny purchase which was the state school.

fourteen years two years
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Your first book my very first byline book was artists christmas cards so you have a pseudo named book that we don't know about no i worked on some other books that either never went anywhere or the credit was not on a cover so talk about the first book deal how did you get it how did you approach publish or did they approach you what was the way in which that happened and set the stage for this prolific writing career well again it was certain amount of luck in a certain amount of note you don't have the life that you have an us luck as some sort of an excuse for what you've made well i did persevered i had this idea for a book which was to take artists christmas cards and put them together and i did a lot of research i even had albert einstein's christmas card really how did you find that from a friend of mine in fritz i can bird who was who knew him he wasn't i stein was not a very good artist well he can't be good at everything right let's be grateful for that but so i had this idea but before that i was working on a book called guests food and lodging with john baiter who is a painter some people may know his work he paints diners among other roadside things and i put a dummy of a book together for him and when we sold it they said they didn't want me to design it they wanted their in house person too and i said that's fine because even though i wanted to do it very much it was more important for him to have the book out so his agent really appreciated that because i could have been a problem and she said she would be my agent so she started taking this artists christmas cards book around and it took two years we kept getting knows knows knows than one yes from the museum of modern art went to a meeting they said yes yes yes i said i'm taking you out to dinner on thursday night this might have been on monday and when i went to pay for the meal she said let's go dutch and i knew what that meant so then it was another few months and a an independent publisher called an w not the root beer published that and then it went to simon and schuster and they published paperback edition and then i did four or five more books for an w before they went under and what is your way of working now when you have i mean we saw the funny thing about how you come up with an idea and by the time louise wakes up you have a contract you smoked at funny is that that's not i mean head is it word for i have an idea or wake up i'll go to the computer all right somebody with the idea and bug them until they tell me yes wow and that's how all your books come to produce twice ten times as many ideas than there are books and quite to be honest with you there are six or seven books that i am under contract for that i've never done and will never do and so they're just hanging out there and putting in space there in somebody's file they also get upper tunities to write books where people come to you and say steve would you like to write this book not very often well that's how i got my first book deal steve was asked to write a book called how to think like a great graphic designer which i still maintain is the worst book title of any book ever ever ever written but it was my first opportunity and steve you passed on it and recommended to ted crawford the publisher of allworth press that he called me because then i subsequently got any a voicemail that steve passed on this idea but had recommended that i'd be the person that they reach out to to see and that was my first book deal there are stories like this probably a million fold of people that steve has influenced of people that steve has helped of people that steve has mentored and therefore i don't take any of this luck thing with any sense of seriousness because the way in which you've live your life and the way in and the generosity in which you've shared your opportunities is something that i've never witnessed before and so i want to thank you for that to appreciate the q right.

two years
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And i said no and he said well if you don't we're going to have to throw you out and i said say well the and then i got reclassified for the draft as one a and that's when i went to spa okay you were twenty three years old when you've got hired by the new york times and that's where you really learned about political graphic commentary then you branched out from the history of character and cartoon into design talk a little bit about your trajectory at the times what you i hired to do by the time you left you were doing quite different things so talk a little bit about that that experience will what i will say before i start that is that i am so damn lucky there's not there's hardly a thing that i wanted to do that i haven't been able to do except be a british actor try to be ben kingsley for a while you probably could get away with but there's a similarity right so you think ben kingsley gandhi right well there's a photograph that louise took of me coming out of the shower looking like on the and i was proud the trajectory was i i met ruth end sell who was the art director of the times magazine section at brad holland's house i showed her my work and it was all this porn stuff but i was really good too puffy and i could make a page thing and she was impressed by that and she wanted to hire me for the magazine so she introduced me to lose silverstein was the legendary does art directors later assistant managing editor and he needed somebody for the op ed page jc suarez who had originally hired me at free press was doing the oped page and he had to leave because he did something that the times didn't want him to do can you share what that what it was just he broke rules a lot and i even have the letter somebody found in the more which is where they store all the clips and old things records found the letter that said if he if he comes into the building we're going to fire him he wouldn't even come into the building so that could technically could never be fired but i took his place everybody thought that he got me the job which was maybe true maybe not but silverstein hired me for the oped page and to me that was the greatest job i could've thought of that i could have dreamed of and for my parents boy they it's like being a doctor i mean the new york times my son none of the screw stuff my mother was so pissed off that when i was arrested for the new york review of sex which is something else that you did in between right so the new york times i was written up in time magazine and she said why did you have to use your real name and i said well technically i'm not using my real name because i have a first name that i don't use but she was right i was using my name and i just said you're always bugging me about what's right and what's wrong i'm leaving home so i left home at seventeen and a half and got an apartment which i cohabited with roaches now the new york review of sex and politics was a magazine that you actually started on your own with a bunch of other people from the new york free press right and you did that for a number of years just for a year and a half the government put us out of business why well because porno we were arrested we couldn't afford legal bills even though we had a great constitutional lawyer and i did something stupid i didn't know what copyright meant so in one of our centerfolds fourpage pull out on heavy paper i took all these weird crew some pictures and put a logo from the daily news on top of it and it was the original logo and i got a call from their lawyer who is very nice until he said we're gonna sue you to death and so they put us out of business and so that's after that it was when you went to the new york times and so what did you do how long were you with.

twenty three years
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"A freak and now he's got the most successful tv show it's the same with porno back then there was pornochic and goldstein was at the head of it because he was so provocative so he he got me involved and we became close friends actually until i had to leave and go to the times but you didn't talk about the logo of oh oh the milton glaser as their logo i mean he would've thought that milton glaser was designing porn well i asked i said if we're going to redesign let's go to the best and i hated push pin at that time you didn't like their style i didn't like their style i thought it was too decorative but i thought they were the best so i said and i actually there was a moment the the chronology is a little off here but there was a moment where i didn't think i was going to go back to screw so i said have screw redesigned by push pin and moments later i returned to screw so i realized i would have to execute push pins redesign and did you know milton at this point not really no i'd heard of him i had heard about seymour cost they showed us a whole bunch of roughs for logos and things and there was some really nice ones but the one that was picked was this helvetica logo with an e that was wrecked into the w and i didn't like it i didn't like the typography they were using light line gothic i didn't like the helvetica i didn't like that there was white space a lot of white space and just straight photographs without any kind of cruel accuser decoration so i put tissue paper over all of milton's layouts and redrew them and they sent them to milton goldstein let me get on the extension phone as milton was saying who is this asshole and so we kept his design for a year and then a year later i redesigned it and i still remind milton of those days and see more than i see more as my best friend and has been for thirty years so that didn't seem to get in the way now before you went to the times you are yours like still in your late teens early twenty s at this point i mean it sounds like at this point he'd be in his early thirties but no and you were just actually thinking about going to college so you went to nyu for about a year but you got thrown out of nyu and then you went to i didn't know this you enrolled at the school of visual arts but you never went to classes you never went to one class now i went to one hundred with marshall heiress men so so you met legendary illustrator marshall harassment at the time and he told you that if you came to sba he'd make you a senior but you never went back and he threw you out as well now you're also very good friends with marshall why don't you go back i was working so did you feel do you ever feel that you would have liked to have had a more formal education oh definitely i mean i i'm not a designer today because i didn't have a formal education i think i would have benefited a lot from it but it just wasn't in the cards it wasn't in my blood the nyu thing was they threw me out because i was working for screw you didn't you put your feet from your in one of the cartoons i made him a character made him a character so to me tell that story that sounds well there's part of that story i don't wanna tell but his name was professor glickman so i had a superhero named glickman and he did nassif things that was not rehearsed i promise and so they found out he was readings and they sent me to nyu shrink which is like sending me to a military band to study rock and roll and the shrinks me three or four times and said i really suggest you come in to on a regular basis.

goldstein milton thirty years
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The to the art scene in new york and the max's kansas city crowd and so i became their designer glenn became the art director i was the designer and i had free rein in terms of type auger fee but glenn picked the photographs which were you know were wholly kind of things fifteen minutes of fame what i gather is that andy never even looked at the magazine well you said that he was never there you never met him but you wrote that his spirit was pervasive like bewigged phantom peering through the clouds yes they always say well andy would like this and i said but if he never looks at them magazine what's the point now while you were there you redesign the magazine and you used your favorite to typefaces at the time to redesign the magazine broadway and bus aram ah which you admitted was a big mistake and the dumbest combination ever wrote i showed that the students earlier today it's still a big mistake the dumbest combination but now it's history it's classic right vinson artifact shortly after you were at interview you left for what you considered greener pastures and we're part of a group with al goldstein who started a magazine called screw which was the first sex tabloid in the city so talk a little bit about how that came to be and how you were able to make this magazine well i went back to the free pros and the free press was also trying to make money so it could survive and i also show this to the to the students we would run periodically nude photographs and sexy stuff on the front page to get the readership new the new york review of books used to do singles ads and that's how they got their readership it was always some subterfuge and so what was the question the question was how did you get to screw i mean didn't come out right i read a book you couldn't have planned that any better right how did you get to develop the magazine how did you meet the free press he came in to addition for a job really and he met his future partner business partner jim buckley and they started talking about starting this magazine he had been working for these blood and guts magazines published by a real classic sleaze and they myron fass and who comes up pops up in the history books now there were blood and guts they were just about violence and and goldstein would use our names and the stories so i may have eaten two babies in one story interest and he wanted to do he felt that that porno had a bad name and wanted to do something that was not as clean let's say as playboy but had some grit to it but also had some political content can you talk a little bit about the screw logo screw logo at first which is why i left screw was designed by somebody i don't know who is disgusting and then goldstein one and a new one so he hired somebody to do a psychedelic thing and i hated psychedelia at that time so i tried doing a logo that if it had worked it would have been off the page by two feet it was just too expanded and we got into a big fight and he made me cry and i quit but then when i came back he wanted to be on another level he had gotten a lot of publicity he had made a lot of money he was a cultural you know it's like rupaul twenty thirty forty years ago would have been considered.

new york kansas twenty thirty forty years fifteen minutes two feet
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And mechanical 's but rather than pay you they printed your cartoons is that correct well not exactly they printed my cartoons because the editor actually liked them okay despite what jaycee said they called it a heller okay and he called me the kid there was once a great cartoon in the new yorker of a little hobby horse tied onto one of those horse things that you people enjoyed you know about and it was in front of a saloon and these two guys are talking to you and says i guess the kid is back in town it's funny outta be there anyway said heller well i was funny you know we have to tell them what's bob gill actually had a great line and he was saying something to an audience and they didn't laugh as much as he thought that they should and he said what are you an audience or jury so you stopped drawing cartoons now from what i understand you stopped wearing cartoons because you didn't think you were very good now was that true where you just being you're sort of overly critical self no i wasn't very good but brad holland one of your mentors disagreed he thought they were good you never told me that until after i stopped okay but if it wasn't for bread holland i wouldn't be sitting here i wouldn't have been art director wouldn't have known about type i wouldn't have ever heard of her blue ball and you've said that he taught you how to think and that he got you off the rail he got me he got me interested in making magazines happen and got me interested in l a straight straight could say rather than what it did what it did was a luminated something that was written his belief was that it was stray shin had its own life and that it should complement not supplement and speak not illustrate and that was always very important to me to do with his way because he became my father figure so he was who i wanted to please and he ended up going to the new york times before i did and i was always an all of his stuff he's my oldest professional friend we talk every so often he only lives a few blocks away and i haven't seen him in five years we know which call you need to me when you get home you started working at interview magazine in nineteen seventy one how did you get that job and what were you hired to do their assuming it wasn't paste up mechanical 's well it wasn't part i i'm trying to remember the sequence of events i worked for the free press at some point i worked for a bunch of other publications i worked for one publication under the name stephanie heller because they just wanted a woman i have somebody else i wanna follow up and ask you about i was doing i was art director of rock magazine which was a rolling stone wanna be and it was the same kind of thing intelligent writing about rock and roll in fact i worked with patti smith s who what was fired after two issues it was like here's this young girl who wanted to be a rockstar and just dropped names all the time but she wrote interesting stuff and we became kind of friendly and we went to a couple of concerts together and then she got fired because the guy who ran the paper was a jerk and she disappeared from my life and then two years later she's a rockstar and that's where she met lenny kaye who is her guitarist to principal collaborator he and i used to say we looked exactly alike except he was six foot two and i just started shrinking once i was born so i was working at rock and at a certain point we we bought typesetting machines and we wanted to on downtime because it was a biweekly we wanted to bring in some business so we one of the things we brought in was interview and it was edited by guy named bob cole cello who you could read who's done books and magazine pieces and glenn o'brien died a few years ago they were both very much into.

five years two years six foot
"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Steve you were ten years old how did you even become introduced to the idea of politics at that age i have a ten year old nephew he's into batman and star wars so we didn't have minute star wars we had at least evenson who was the liberals dream and i grew up in a liberal household i had on who was more or less communist i mean he wasn't a stalinist or anything but he was you know in the church they call it hi hi roman catholic and low and he was high liberal fan right so and he introduced me to mort solve the comedian some of you in my elderly state might remember him he i just got an education and so i started when i was younger seven may be working at a democratic club near stuyvesant town stuffing envelopes so when kennedy ran for office he was just so young and beautiful everybody that i knew fell head over heels and my parents were like that so i thought this is this is the guy for me we'll your parents also working for the campaign or was that just something you were doing on your father couldn't because he worked for the government and that was against the law anybody now no it doesn't my my mother was supportive but now she didn't go out and work but i did meet kennedy twice what was that like well the first time was purely accidental i had my uncle the almost communist one had as a research assistant a woman who had a doctorate and statistical analysis and he had moved to washington to write a book on academe ick freedom and i went down there on a bus when i was eight years old no no i couldn't i was ten years old and i went alone from new york to washington he buy your own ticket that my parents bought the ticket and they told the bus driver to keep an eye on me if i got off and delaware but i went down and she lawyer was her name and she was part cherokee indian she was terrific she was working as a stringer for life life as well life magazine so she had press credentials to get into congress and she took me through the congressional doors to get visit being the gallery of congress and we go into this elevator and somebody says hold the door and who comes around but this very tall not very attractive looking man with a long nose very burly it was lyndon johnson and right after him came john kennedy and i just i mean i saw jesus i saw moses i saw everything it was great and then the second time after i had been working at the headquarters they gave me tickets to go to this new rally at the coliseum in new york and i managed to wiggle my way all the way up to the stage and there was a congressman who remembered me from the envelopes corners yeah and he pulled me up on stage and i was.

Steve ten years eight years ten year
"steven heller" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"In san francisco i'm ali woods sitting in for kyra doll it is wednesday july eleven thanks for joining us today we begin with and this should not be a surprise tariffs and trade we have been talking and talking about a potential trade war and how it could get out of hand and what it might mean so but did it just get really real last night the trump administration announced its tariffs on china would increase fivefold and no surprise here either beijing said it would respond in kind and increasingly economists and market signals suggest actual tangible affects like the kind you may start to notice from washington marketplace it's got tongue reports bigger and tariffs against chinese imports hit industrial innards compressors engine parts boring machines yeah boring around to if it happens taxes chinese fridges furniture seafood about half of everything china sends here this is a new ballgame game that's the kind of lynn reaser at point loma nazarene university in san diego to her falling commodity and metals prices today suggest factories slowdowns are coming because of tariffs and the dollar is up making us exports expensive and less competitive well so we'll be fighting and four goals overseas so it's gonna be harder road for exporters in the next several months big investments by us companies are being scaled back or delayed by trade and certainty that's according to the latest federal reserve meeting minutes and here's the math when you add up the threaten tariffs coming from the us china europe and everywhere global risk has really stepped up says adam slater at oxford economics told me about a hundred billion bowl with the world trade tariffs he says that helps explain some global market wooziness we're seeing today but economists mickey levy at bernburg capital markets says investors can overreact and when they see unfavorable heads line about new proposed tariffs the shift gears but the underlying economic and profit fundamentals are positive things could stay that way but other see this trade spat at or near an economic turning point i'm scott tong for marketplace if you think the conversations over tariffs have been testy i mean remember when canadian prime minister justin trudeau said that canada would not be pushed around well you should have seen the pushing around in brussels belgium today the first day of a summit of the north atlantic treaty organization at a breakfast meeting the president's slammed other members of the military alliance for not spending enough on defense almost a tremendous amount of money years back where delinquent for them concerned because united states fame for them and that was just at the photo op here with more on the nato summit is marketplace european bureau chief stephen beard hi steven heller molly steven tell us how our relations i mean how did the you know these were very blunt words delivered by president trump how did they go down with other nato members well it was it was pretty bruising stuff even by president trump standards but i think you know to some extent the other leaders arrived in brussels already in the brace position they knew an onslaught was coming and come it did president trump has made pretty clear the us is very dissatisfied and has been for many years about the huge disparity in defense spending there's no doubt that the us counts for the lion share of the alliance is total defense spent something like seventy percent so many analysts say the us is quite right to feel aggrieved nevertheless things are changing the european allies are beginning to spend more on defense in some cases a lot more germany in fact has increased its defense budget by thirty percent over the possible years analysts say that some president trump can claim some credit for this increase well let's let's talk about germany for a moment because not only did the president have strong words for germany raised this kind of other issue that's been it sounds like bubbling up for a while it here i what he said germany's totally control the russian because they will get it from sixty to seventy percent of their energy from russia at a new by blood and you tell me because i think it's not and i think it's a very bad thing for nato so what is this pipeline that president trump talked about and why is it such a source of irritation this new pipeline bypasses poland and ukraine to get russian gas directly into western europe trump says this pipeline puts germany on.

san francisco ali woods kyra seventy percent thirty percent
"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

"Still get up every day and be hungry and go out and and gather no i'm glad you you mentioned that basically for people that are listening what jillions affirmative was that i won the steven heller prize for cultural commentary from asia back in april of this year and it's funny because i was at the gala and i'm you know meeting people talking to people and they're like oh what's what's next what's the next thing and in the back of my mind yeah i was thinking i yeah like i gotta go to work on monday but i was also thinking that's still going to get next week's episode like i didn't have time to do it because i was up here so when i fly back on saturday morning i'm going to get back to atlanta i'm going to unpack taken that wake up to start producing and get the episode out so like nothing nothing is really sort of changed but i guess i'm just curious about that 'cause awards tend to be this really weird thing there's people that i've talked to for the show who don't submit their work for awards even though it has won awards in the past there's people who i've talked to for example there's actually this one young lady she's a design well not really designer she called herself a chronic creator she's into york her name is kim goulburn and she has a webby and she was sort of saying the same thing you were about like yeah i have it but i don't really like tell people about it i'm like please i would enter every room like webby award winning designer see what you mean about it being able to kind of give you an advantage maybe in like negotiation situations or something like that where it can give you a bit of a leg up could start walking into meetings with like i'm three six mafia but they're asked why so talk to me about kind of you know the work that you did as you mentioned this this box set what sort of other types of work were you doing there so now i'd see a little bit differently as i did there my job came from the ranks of being a i don't even know what i started at a may have started as a designer or maybe a junior art director or something like that but by the time i left i was designed director so my role was really creative directing and art directing designing packages working with artists coming up with concepts the represent ideas and now in each artist i didn't use this at didn't have this row cavalieri at the time but each artist was their own brand so you learn how to come up with a concept that can extend for the life of a project and has his own particular identity so if i'm working on the project for now is it's very different than it feels different than what i'm working on for lauryn hill or wycliff zone or wu tang clan or you know sometimes i covered some things for destiny's child or whatever it may be so all of these things i learned that's where i learned the fundamentals branding and the importance of building campaigns because i'm starting with these conversations with lead to a logo which lead to meet figuring out who i want to partner with to shoot a campaign who's the right person the styling who do we need for hair and makeup and how do i take this stuff to create a package that's going to be an album package is going to be single as it's going to work for the websites and live through i need to create assets to extend for life of a campaign so all of that set the foundation for me learning branding and as i grew in my role i learned how to manage people because you know you're managing those crews and art director capacity but when you become a design director creative director function on that level i'm also responsible for the output of other creatives you know who are part of the staff and the team so how many assignments can i give to this person making sure that make making their deadlines we're managing budgets for bigger things so all of that set the foundation for me to you know how i learned how to run my own business in the mechanics of that which don't transfer to when i stopped when i kind of took on projects outside of music learning how to.

asia steven heller
"steven heller" Discussed on Hanselminutes

Hanselminutes

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Hanselminutes

"For his podcast revision path from the the american institute of graphic arts how are you sir doing pretty good scott how are you i'm doing pretty well i've known you for a while and just like my podcast your pockets had been chugging along for a long time you are definitely been in the podcast game for while you have to almost fifty episodes at this point yeah we are actually i think factoring in our bonus episodes we might be right at two fifty but we're getting up there we'll hit we'll definitely hit two hundred and fifty regular episodes in july it's fantastic like i know that having hit you know over five hundred now basically every week is your show weekly or by weekly it's weekly weekly so even doing this now five years plus there's so many podcasts that are out there where people get into it for you know eleven twelve fifteen episodes they missed one and then they miss another and then their weekly show is a monthly show and then it's like it's just sad how how did you stick with it for so long and and not stop on a really helps to have a plan on a schedule the good thing with these interviews is that i do a lot of them ahead of time so i usually try to put at least maybe about a month between the interview and when it airs which gives me more than enough time to juggle scheduling to handle any sort of editing issues or things like that and i've really been able to kind of keep on that particular path now for five years and you've been doing this for a while you switch to weekly in april two thousand thirteen are you producing all of this by yourself i know now i do have an editor so that also helps my editor rj is worth his weight in gold and he is the one that sort of takes the raw conversations that i ended up having an he sort of edits and shapes them into something now i still produce the episode every week so while he may handle the actual interview part i still record every intro tro in every ad every week and i packaged the show together and exported in schedule it yeah my editor mandy who is hopefully listening to this right now she's editing is also worth their weight in gold and so you won the steven heller prize which is actually for cultural commentary and you've also won awards like most inspiring design pockets it's.

scott editor mandy american institute of steven heller five years
"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

"Search results in one misconception about paul rand is not been american cultural hero leads me finding myself at a yell interview we examine the down the path from a juilliard audition and so is incredibly lucky in portas moment that i could be additioning juilliard and interviewing ale for mfa but that happens in i realized that putting myself at this foregin the road with force it decision just out of pure exhaustion so old smith we you know decided to pursue an mfa in design at yale and realized or my interview paul ryan was not an african american but that would become the ongoing no a job of all time but that i want to billy notes that actually be the african american presence at yale on actually kind of funny that right now among faculty at yale and i look back on that and think of while i would never been able to imagine that when i was interviewing as an embarrassed candidate some thinking that paul was african american is what sort of wanted you to go there sort of was a compelling reason and then all of a sudden finding out oh wait no he's not that have to be kind of embarrassing i guess it was it was an absolute shot because missing section came from working in finding library undergrad and taking a dust jacket from the steven heller monograph that everyone hasn't book show and to me that black and white side profile a picture of paul ryan looking out reminded me of all the civil rights images from is the prize that me and my parents had me watching endless reels of from rosa parks dystopia carmichael to you know snack new freedom riders in so when i saw that image of paul rand that only goodness just another cultural just not cultural hero from the sixties trying to to level the playing field in so i always situation hand within a civil rights on sex and has napkin inert cultural hero so when it came time to choose between juilliard and yell it was oh i want to go to place where where this african american culture hero was was was able to infect cultural in corporate identity be at ibm ups and then you're my interview.

paul rand mfa yale paul ryan paul ibm ups billy steven heller
"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on Revision Path

"We have to design a better experience but no i i really liked the way that you have mentioned that i liked this sort of system built up it's not just in our work environment it's you know it's it's in our homes if we think of an analogous tuition it's red lining when it comes to cities right like okay yes we have removed the law that says you can't say that black people or jewish people or hispanic people can't live on the north side great we got rid of that law but the banks still aren't giving those people loans so that they can move into those neighborhoods or minnows people move into their neighborhoods air harassed to the point where they are forced out of those neighborhoods the system like you can't just get rid of one piece can't just say like oh we need more diversity okay yeah we all agree okay we're all done like no like okay what's the next step actor that like it's going to happen in a vacuum or something yeah yeah it's not like we've just randomly showed showed up right we didn't just all of a sudden start working at a google and apple in always other places like we've been there we just aren't moving look montoya store so no i i say that to say yes i agree with you but so we're for people that are listening recording this in may last month there was the i g awards gala in new york city and i was at the gal i want an award there one steven heller prize for cultural commentary for twenty eighteen it with me and a woman alison aria i hope i'm saying her last name right but we co won this award together and i thought was interesting about the award they gave us these little cer.

google apple montoya new york steven heller
"steven heller" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"steven heller" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well oh they're welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show where it is my job to share the habits tools and patterns of world class performers of all different types this special episode is shorter than usual and features thoughts and recommendations from debbie millman who in her first appearance on this podcast gave a wide ranging and very emotionally impactful injury that is still one of the most downloaded episodes of all time on this podcast you can check that out tim dot blog ford slash debbie if you want a longer form conversation but this will be a shorter taste of debbie debbie debbie millman on twitter has been called quote one of the most influential designers working today and quote by graphic design usa she's the founder and host of design matters the world's first and longest running podcast about design where she's interviewed nearly three hundred design luminaries and cultural commentators including mossy mova neely and milton glaser debbie has a supposed to put one way done at all her artwork has been exhibited around the world she is the president emeritus of ai one of only five women to hold the position and the organizations one hundred year history the editorial and creative director print magazine and the author of six books into nine debbie cofounded alongside steven heller the world's first master's program in branding at the school of visual arts in new york city which has received international acclaim so she has been on many different adventures and many different fields and has learned a lot of very very impactful lessons that you can apply hopefully to your life in this episode debbie outlines more than a few things but among them she talks about how abounds back from rejection and criticism and share some personal stories the importance of mental health whether courage or confidence is more important if you had to pick one five questions to help you clarify your own purpose and much much more with further do please enjoy this sure episode with debbie millman.

debbie debbie debbie millman twitter president emeritus director new york city tim ferriss milton glaser steven heller one hundred year milton