21 Burst results for "Steven Cuevas"

"steven cuevas" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:14 min | 5 months ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"If your school aged child brought home a c. minus on a report card you'd likely be concerned and when you want to do something to help him or her do better to get those grades up right now. The infrastructure in southern california rates a c. minus on the american infrastructure report card from. Ascap we all have the opportunity right now to help. Raise that report card grade. That's why it's critical to invest in our water sources. Internet roads bridges ports energy solutions and transportation infrastructure is critical for everything we do every day. We can't keep delaying the effort any longer. Other states and countries are succeeding. And we're getting left behind. We must take steps to build back better and get to work. Join the rebuild so cow partnership as we celebrate infrastructure week you can learn more when you listen to our podcast. The rebuild socal zone at rebuild so-called dot org slash podcast. or wherever. You find your podcasts. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means you're next seat-mate could be just about anyone. Hi i'm courtney jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan greene. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze managing director of culture and engagement whitney finger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for join us. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times tomorrow. A black family had their beach property taken from them by the government over a century ago in southern california now the county of los angeles trying to actually give them the land back. Our show is produced by shannon lynn steven cuevas and denise are executive producers abby swanson our engineers. Mario de is our editors shawny hilton. Our intern is brown and our theme. Music is by andrea. I'm we'll be back tomorrow with all the news. This mother gracieuse. Excuse me. is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means you're next. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement. Whitney eichenberger together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for joins..

ryan greene abby swanson shawny hilton ryan green Whitney eichenberger andrea Mario de southern california twenty stories courtney jenkins southwest fifty years tomorrow shannon lynn steven cuevas over a century ago southwest airlines org los angeles south west denise
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Says the theme of the traditional Posada of Mary and Joseph repeatedly being denied and eventually finding shelter takes on added meaning here. And so this is symbolically reminder for us to come together in prayer from both the U. S and Mexican side to remind people that there are a lot of people who need post office. They need shelter as well. And we commit and welcome. I mean, the immigrants do We want to welcome our Lord Jesus before hope. There is a political subtext to the border Posada, but that's not really with the event is all about, says Christian Ramirez of the American Friends Service Committee. They think for this little moment today, the great tensions and the many opinions that the immigration debate racist. All of that disappears. And you know I can't help but You have my heart warm in what is perhaps one of the coldest places in our country, the US Mexico border. A sunset approaches, celebrants braced themselves against the chilly ocean winds. US. Border agents need to clear the area will pull themselves from the fence. And say good bye to friends and relatives. They may not see again until next Christmas in California, reports on Steven Cuevas in San Diego County. If you attended our virtual 25th birthday party this month, you know that Scott Shaffer hosted our show for 18 years. He's a serious political journalist and now heads up our politics and government team. One of his favorite stories from back in 2007 is about the time he dressed up as an elf, a Jewish guy really going the extra mile for a story? And here's where we've got to give you a warning. If you're listening with kids who got a visit from Santa this year, you might want to hit pause. Okay, Here goes. The story starts with Scott, checking Craigslist and calling up a Santa for hire 4639. Hello. Hi. I'm calling about the Santa Claus ad. Oh, yes. How you do, That's me. Charles Jennings, AK Satya Charles losing Berkeley. Most of the year. He's a merchant Marine. But in December he's Santa Claus. I'm 34 years old. Kind of young for sound. I'm very young for Santa, but I started when I was 16. What's this? A teenage Santa Claus? Is there no sad a regulatory agency? No minimum age requirement to be the jolly old man. Turns out the owner of the grocery store where Jennings worked as a kid was supposed to be Santa at the stores Holiday party that year, But he had a bit too much to drink. So Jennings filled in and the rest, as they say, is history. Now Jennings has his own Hira Santa company called someone ominously. You better be good. I've been Santa Claus for Francis Ford Coppola for the Oakland Raiders for John Fogarty of CCR. Yep, He's a regular Santa to the stars. But, alas, life is Satya isn't always so glamorous. I've been kicked I've been threatened. I've been pushed. I mean, spit on. I've had somebody steal my point Settlers. I've had somebody steal a bag of candy for me. Ouch, Who knew there could be such a dark side to being Satya? It's 9 30 on a recent Sunday morning in the gymnasium at ST Stephen's School in San Francisco. Volunteers. They're getting ready for the annual pancake breakfast.

Santa Satya Charles Scott Shaffer Charles Jennings US Hira Santa company Posada American Friends Service Commi Christian Ramirez Mary Craigslist San Diego County John Fogarty Francis Ford Coppola Steven Cuevas Joseph ST Stephen's School California
It's Sundance Time Again

The Frame

06:03 min | 2 years ago

It's Sundance Time Again

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. But he's actually sitting right here beside me because by the time you hear this. He'll be at the Sundance Film Festival. John Thanks for taking time before you pack your bags my pleasure. I love the fact that I'm here but I'm not here John. There are dozens of feature films film screened at Sundance. Of course tell me about some of this year's most anticipated entries. I'M GONNA lean towards documentaries if you look at the movies that are nominated for the documentary feature academy me where this year three of them premiered at Sundance a year ago. American factory honey land and edge of democracy. And if you look at the very first night at the Sundance Dance Film Festival. There are new documentaries from producers. You might have heard of Barack and Michelle Obama. They've called Crip camp which is about the disability rights movement. There's another documentary about Taylor swift and about why. She is becoming a little bit more political and that's just in one theater in one night. Well one of the documentary entries premiering at Sundance that I wanted to ask you about It's when it's trying a lot of controversy and that's the Kirby Dick and amy during documentary on the record. It focuses on the sexual assault allegations against hip hop mogul Russell Simmons. The film was being executive. Co produced by Oprah Winfrey set to be released on Apple. TV then Winfrey suddenly. He withdrew support and some say. It was under pressure from Russell Simmons. She denies this and says it's because of questions arising from one of the alleged victims. What's to become come of this documentary on the record? Well it is going to show at the festival I mean I think there is the question whether or not Sundance was going to pull it The fact that Oprah Winfrey withdrew her support that apple. TV Hit pause in. The documentary is very unusual. And Kirby and amy have said listen. We think we've made a really good good film. We don't understand what they are complaining about. All of the edits and suggestions up until the time. The picture was locked where minor little things it does feel feel like Russell. Simmons complained to Oprah about the documentary. It's unclear if Oprah thought it was unfair or that featured one woman story over others the Booze GonNa show but for a film to go to the festival with this much. Uncertainty is highly unusual. Yeah not to get too far afield on this but I wonder if Oprah pulling away from this the project could somehow damage her own brand in this in this era of me too. Well I think she has said that. She believes the women who are accusing Russell Simmons of sexual assault and harassment. So I don't think she's saying I am not believing them anymore. I think she has to her. Mind legitimate questions about the documentary. Yeah it is important that she is on board or not on board because her producing does suggest that there is a level of quality ability and credibility to it and the fact that she's leaving it does ultimately damage. I think the standing of the film Another film to ask you about. Was this four part documentary. On Hillary Clinton Clinton. It'll be available on Hulu. She will also be attending Sundance for the first time to do promotion for this film. What you know about it and you know any any buzz around it? I guess I know a fair amount about it I'm GONNA be doing. QNA With Hillary Clinton at the festival is a four part series. That has a behind the scenes footage of her running against against Donald Trump. But it's really about her political career and about how things stand today so words at all. Hillary is a participant in this documentary. It s you said she'll be at the festival and she'll be talking with me. She says a lot of the documentary. I hope she says even more when we sit down to have a conversation. There's one other film I wanted to ask you about. And that's a a little film called feels good man and it's an indie production looking at the rise of of this comic pepe the frog that was actually created by L. A. based cartoonist and it sort of became an emblem for the outright. Who took this image and kind of started using it for antisemitic means racists memes all kinds of really nasty stuff? What do you know about the film and Are you going to see it? Yeah I'm definitely going to see. The artist is named fury. And it's about how something something becomes an icon for hate. And how the artist behind that I contract reclaim it and I think if you look more broadly at a lot of the documentaries that are playing the festival a lot of them are about what's going on in the world right now. There's a new documentary about the kids who survived the park. Land shooting about what they're doing to fight against against Gun. Violence US kids. I think that there's another documentary called early. Bird it's about the helicopter news pilot Zoey Tur and about what her works has about the tabloid of news and the Oj. Trial Voice State is a documentary about seventeen year. Old Boys a thousand from Texas says who join up to build a representative government from the ground up so wherever you look Especially in documentaries. There are a lot of films about the current state of the country. And what we might do to fix it. And what are some of the feature films. You're looking forward to checking out. I know that things that are kind of top of our sundance card include downhill. This is a remake of the movie force majeure a Foreign Language move from a couple years ago it stars. Julia Louis Dreyfuss Will Ferrell. It's made by nat facts and Jim Rash. Who did a movie called called way way back not that long ago Vigo Mortenson who is one of my favorite actors hell yeah written directed stars in a movie called following that I think is partially in Spanish? So there's nothing Vigo can't do. There's an Anthony Hopkins movie based on a play called the father. There's a movie about Gloria Steinem in many different iterations directed by Julie. Taymor you might know her from the Lion King. You know the other thing that we should talk about our number of movies that are going to sundance that are looking Ford distribution and one of the things that a lot of people forget is that Sundance is not only a film festival. It's a film market and it'll be really interesting to see given how a poorly some of the movies from last year as well at the Box Office if the checkbooks will be open s much as they were a year ago.

Oprah Winfrey Sundance Russell Simmons Hillary Clinton Clinton Kirby Dick Assault Apple John Horn AMY Steven Cuevas Gloria Steinem Jim Rash Vigo Mortenson Anthony Hopkins Julia Louis Dreyfuss Donald Trump Barack
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Dinner table fights with your friends family or in laws I somehow managed but maybe you bottled something up that you really want to unload well now there's an art project for that just in time for Christmas it's called not at the dinner table and it's a participatory work that gives folks a chance to cut loose and recorded phone message directed at that friend or relative the artists do who go by the name Jeff and Gordon launched the annual project about five years ago the frame contributor Steven Cuevas dialed in yeah this is Gordon and you've reached not at the dinner table were you can leave an anonymous voice mail message addressed to that important person in your life that you really disagree with about an important I didn't leave a message because I'm lucky enough to not have any major beefs with a loved one but as you'll hear lots of other people do well you're no longer at our dinner table but I think this is going to be cathartic for me for my best friend who's a total trump supporter now we're really good friend I just feel like you're getting that so wrong on gun control that sort of was the terrible icing on that awful cake that you Sir every Christmas and I'm happy that you're not around artist Gordon WNEM go and Jeff fully encourage callers to pick an issue so divisive confronting a friend or relative about it could turn a joyous holiday family feast into a vicious food fight you know in in the interest of keeping the peace we just don't talk about that that's Gordon one income these are things you're not supposed to do at the dinner table so that the family can have a nice dinner and that's Jeff boy each year the do set the hotline in a different part of the country for this year's edition they chose area code seven eight five which covers the northern half of Kansas why did you choose this area code that area code also encompasses the geographic center of the United States in years past we've looked at specific events and locations one year when it goes says they use the area code of Newtown Connecticut to raise the issue of gun control new town is where a mass shooter killed twenty children at sandy hook elementary school seven years ago this month it's one nation and is it possible that we could find a center what is it actually sound like to say those things what what does it sound like to say speech that is never sat and what would you say to that person if you actually allowed yourself to set my master listened politely and nodded my head for years but I can't take it anymore I think your beliefs are stupid for instance rattle snakes are not evil in some ways it could be like a rehearsal it's possible that someone could leave a message and then direct that person to go and listen to the message to participate you can leave a message or you can just listen to a wide selection of messages curated by the artists callers are instructed to stick to a specific issue that may also be dividing us as a country but when inco says folks are also welcome to share whatever may be feeling that dinner table conflict I remember one where the woman called and she said mom your abusive and I can't deal with you anymore and she said good bye to her one could tell that she was in tears Jeff Gordon's work often explores the way people interact with each other with public institutions and governments in one of their first exhibits from two thousand ten the artist used foreclosed homes in the Inland Empire as a backdrop for his stinging satire of consumerism and predatory lending but things get much more intimate with not at the dinner table the calls we hear get personal and specific about what's driving people apart hi Steve this is this is Mike and one call might explains to his buddy Steve that although Steve's views on stuff like evolution and guns don't jibe with his he still appreciates our friendship but Mike reached a breaking point over a movie trilogy actually atlas shrugged Steve loves it it's based on the novel by the late writer Ayn Rand was revered by many hard right conservative and and everything that lackeys and kind of picking up her flag of countless individuals in that just don't really understand what you're talking about I'm not sure about your whole perception of reality anymore and we do get messages from both sides of the political spectrum trump one accept it and get over at where there's someone berating their person for being an angry leftist stop your Cryin probably the bolt is from the last yeah yeah I mean I think for me the messages I listen to it was just a reminder to me that we often engage with these issues like guns very disconnected way like maybe were commenting on someone's like Twitter feed or something and to hear people's actual voices and to hear the emotion just as a reminder that not only are these issues complex but the people engaging in them are pretty complex to definitely in the digital age the human voice kinda gets left out of things this is still a distance but that personal internet elements there you are thinking about the other people and and maybe that step alone is one of the big big goals of the peace it's an empathy generating project if the project puts you in that space where you can kind of relate to the other person and empathize with them were it humanizes that other person please leave your message after the tone after I left my message I realized that I forgot to say the most important thing which is that I love you know I love you so much and not collide in not that we have this to ask in ninety eight this is Jeff this is going pretty good stuff here right yeah we'd like to hear what you have to say so just press pound to.

Screen Actors Guild Reveals Award Nominees

The Frame

06:24 min | 2 years ago

Screen Actors Guild Reveals Award Nominees

"Welcome to the frame Steven Cuevas filling in for John Horn our broadcast was preempted today for special coverage of the presidential impeachment proceedings. But we bring you this special podcast addition to talk about the screen actors Guild Award nominations which were announced today and what better person to call on John Horn. WHO's on assignment assignment in New York? Hey John Hey Steven how are you. Okay so let's start with the nominees for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role. What do we got so the nominees? He's were Christian. Bale from Ford versus Ferrari Leonardo di Caprio for once upon a time in Hollywood Adam driver from marriage story Joaquin Phoenix from joker car. And then probably the surprise in the category is turned Edgerton. Who Played Elton John and rocket man? If you start looking at who isn't in I think. Probably the most was notable exclusion as Robert Deniro for his lead role in the Irishman. He is getting a lifetime. Achievement Award Screen Actors Guild Award. So maybe that was part of the math but Jonathan Pryce was not nominated from two popes. Adam Sandler was not nominated from uncut gems and also left out of the competition was Antonio Banderas for pain and glory. Yeah it was a little surprised to see Bandera slept out you and I talked about that film and I think we agree that it was kind of career. Defining performance Let's move on to the lead actress. Category Who have their we have Cynthia Areso from? Harriet Scarlett Johansson from marriage story. The neon go from us. Charlie's therein Erin from bombshell and Renee Zellweger from Judy not a lot of surprises there. There were two women of color. The surprise I guess was that that search or Ronin was not nominated for little women some people thought Aquafina might have gotten in from the farewell. In fact little women did really badly today in the screen actors Guild L. Dominations and how about supporting role in the mail categories some pretty juicy performances. There are some really good pegues. Jamie Fox was nominated for Justice mercy. Tom Hanks Sup- Played Fred. Rogers and a Beautiful Day in the neighborhood. A couple of actors from the Irishman Al Pacino. And Joe Patchy and then Brad Pitt from once upon a time in Hollywood I said earlier. Jonathan Pryce was not nominated for playing Pope Francis in the two popes. Anthony Hopkins was not nominated for playing Pope Benedict in the two popes as well and this is also one of those weird categories in terms of. WHO's supporting and WHO's lead? It's one of those things where the studios can kind of say to the screen actors guild and the academy and other words as we think. This person is a lead this person's supporting I mean. They're two popes are mostly onscreen for the the same time. And you have Brad Pitt. Who is up for supporting actor? Leonardo DiCaprio for lead actor and once upon a time in Hollywood. I think he put a stop. Watch on it Leo. Joe Might have like twenty seconds or screen time. I don't know it feels like that's kind of tricky. Math and Tom Hanks's probably star of a beautiful day in the neighborhood. Even though he shares there's Screen time with another character again. The studios got to decide of the actors. Don't vote somebody in that category than they don't get nominated yes. Some people might be especially puzzled by the Tom. Hanks category for him winding up in the supporting actor. Can you explain that a little bit like why why that is well. I think if you look at that that film you can say that even though. It's a movie about Fred Rogers. It's really about the journalist whose life is transformed by meeting with Fred Rogers and something similar happened. In the supporting actress. Category according to Variety Kathy Bates is in this film by Clint Eastwood. Call Richard Jewel rule and she's been getting some awards attention in the supporting actress. Category but according to Variety Warner brothers mistakenly submitted fitted her as a lead actress for the screen actors Guild Awards and she didn't get nominated and she didn't get nominated for supporting actress because they had submitted committed error in probably the wrong category. Well who else do we have in the category of supporting actress. Another pretty strong category. Laura dern from marriage stories Scarlett Johansson another nomination for Joe Joe Rabbit this time and then to actors from bombshell Nicole Kidman and Margot Robbie and finally Jennifer Lopez from Hustler's right. We have so we have Scarlett Johansson nominated for both lead and supporting actress rare A little bit but you know pretty. Good Year for Scarlett Johansson. I don't think you can fault any of those performances. I think they were both really strong. And you know she's playing opposite. Visit Adam driver. Who was nominated for marriage story? Joe Joe Rabbit as we're GONNA say in just a second got a little bit more attention as well so both nominations. I'd say we're served in both. Were in really good films. Let's finish up with the outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture. Is it true that this winter is often a predictor for the Academy Award Best Picture winner in historically. Yes that has been true but if you look at the last two best picture winner shape of water and green book they weren't even even nominated for the Sag Ensemble Award so yes. It is a good thing to be nominated for in terms of Academy Awards because it's important to note the actress. Branch ranch is the biggest branch in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. So what the actors do in the screen actors. Guild awards is often a good harbinger of what the Oscar Asker voters might do. So the nominees for on Samba were bombshell. Which I think is a little bit of a surprise? Good news for that film. The Irishman Joe Joe Rabbit once upon a time time in Hollywood and the real surprise in this category was parasite which is a Korean film. It's only the second foreign language film in Sag History. The other one one was life is beautiful to get a nomination for the ensemble award. I think it's really important for parasite. I think it's interesting. THAT MARRIAGE BRIDGE STORY WASN'T NOMINATED FOR ENSEMBLE. Neither was little women and so all the power seemed to be going to parasite right now and I would have to say say once upon a time in Hollywood and the Irishman well there you have it this year's screen actors Guild Award nominations in the film category. John you may resume get your New York theatre going. Thank you Steve. And I'll go do it right now

Joe Joe Rabbit Hollywood Harriet Scarlett Johansson Guild Award Fred Rogers Tom Hanks Jonathan Pryce Leonardo Di Caprio Elton John Adam Sandler New York Brad Pitt Academy Of Motion Picture Arts John Horn Guild L. Dominations Steven Cuevas Joe Patchy Robert Deniro Edgerton Joaquin Phoenix
The Politics Behind The Golden Globe Awards

The Frame

06:35 min | 2 years ago

The Politics Behind The Golden Globe Awards

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John Horn. But we're about to hear from John On. He's covered the movie industry for more than two decades as a print reporter and so we figured he's the best person to explain the significance or lack thereof of the Golden Globe awards. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association today announced the nominees for its annual awards which take place in early January but rather than detail the usual inexplicable explicable nominee choices and snubs. We thought we talk about the relationship between movie fans the Globes and the entertainment industry. I John tells us who makes up the association. What's important to me about the Golden Globes and about some other kind of minor film? Awards is that this is not a representative presentative body. They're about ninety journalists. And if you go on the website for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association you can no longer even find their names teams or where they work. It's a very small group of people and they have undue influence because the movie studios have figured out that if they wou- the voters for the Golden Globes and they're filmmakers win awards at the Golden Globes it kind of create some sort of momentum for the Academy Awards but none none of it is very legitimate and H. MPA has cleaned itself up. It's not a scandal ridden as it has been in years past but this isn't an elite group of film writers or film critics that are making these selections and if you look closely at the selections not just this year but but in past years the fact that they are really that serious ask kind of film. Lovers starts to reveal itself pretty quickly. How so? Well let's talk about a couple of past nominations twenty thirteen. There were three nominations for a movie. I bet you you've never heard of salmon. Fishing in the Yemen amend that was a Golden Globe Walker. If you go back nine years to twenty ten there was a movie with Johnny. Depp called the tourists that was largely largely derided that ended up getting multiple nominations at the Golden Globes. And I think if you look closely at some of the selections this year it's clear it's it's driven by the red carpet like who do they wanna have on the red carpet you look in the TV category. There are multiple nominations for the morning. Show a apple all series. That didn't get great reviews because Jennifer Aniston is coming reese witherspoon is coming as nominees and then you look at Ava d'auvergne as when they see us. One of the most critically acclaimed TV series of the past year didn't get any nominations so it's important for the NBC. Show to have that star Klaus so there's eyeball so so people watch. I think that's part of the bias historically for the Golden Globes that you can say it judging between good filmmaker and a less name they generally are going to vote for the last name and they also have some historical by sees you know that are shared by the Academy in the seventy seven year history of the Globes. Only five women have ever been nominated for best director and this year. There are lots of really good female filmmakers that were up Greta Gerwig for little women. Olivia Wilde for book. SMART Hurrell for honey. Boy Marielle Heller for Beautiful Day in the neighborhood. Not One of them got nominated so golden gloves has a pretty poor history when it comes to nominate women the Golden Globes has made some the effort to try to rehabilitate this reputation. What has it done? It's made sure that people who are members actually have legitimate emmett credits. As journalists there been some reports of. I guess you could call it. Bribery or expensive gifts in the past. I think they've tried I to eliminate all of that so again they have cleaned up their act. But there's only so much legitimacy you can bring to yourself when you're only ninety journalists writing for publications that if we had the names I guarantee you you've probably never heard of them and yet the industry I I guess mostly plays along and an actor or director or studio can use success at the Globes as part of their campaign going into Bosco Bosko season one hundred percent and I think that is one of the most interesting parts of the story. Everybody in Hollywood knows in their soul that at the Golden Globes are really not totally legitimate and yet the studios independent companies and marketing departments. Embrace raise them because they recognize. There's a game to be played and the game is. We're going to court the Golden Globe voters we're going to have screenings and QNA's for them and and if we get a nomination are actor or filmmaker is going to be on their awards show and people are going to start talking about the film and one thing gets the other but they do know that really. It's not totally legit but it serves their purposes academy award. Campaigning is a multi title million dollar business. There are people who work as campaign consultant who get hundreds of thousands of dollars for getting nominations or Oscar wins wins. There is a huge business behind all of this and in some ways it might drive ticket sales or people to stream movies so it's driven by finance finance is driven by trying to get eyeballs on the movies but it's all kind of a hustle so John I've never covered the entertainment industry that closely so so like a lot of people in the public eye really always just saw the Golden Globe awards as the first among that more high profile award shows to spotlight the top films of the year. Going into Oscar seasons am I am I off on that. Were not technically off. I mean because the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Asian nominates into different categories for most of the major film awards they cast a wider net. So just mathematically. They're bound to include lewd a lot of movies. That end up getting nominated. I wouldn't say they're that much of a bellwether but because they're embracing so many movies. They have a a mathematical chance of getting most of those things right. John Horn out in New York. John Thanks for joining us to talk about the Golden Globes. We'll see when you get back. Thanks for sitting. In

Golden Globes Globes Golden Globe Awards Hollywood Foreign Press Associ Golden Globe Walker John Horn John Golden Globe John On Director Academy Awards Oscar Steven Cuevas Jennifer Aniston Reporter Greta Gerwig Olivia Wilde Marielle Heller Yemen
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Improving the lives of Southern Cal. fortuyn's for eighty five years learn more about blessed comet get the power of weei dot com welcome back to the frame i'm steven cuevas infra john horn thanks for joining us video games and violence often go hand in hand but what about video games and psychotherapy connie gepard is a game designer and co founder of the berlin based production house jahmai and in her new game see of solitude the dungeon master is loneliness story is set in a desolate city that sinking into the ocean the protagonist is a young woman who's become a monster and she searching the city for a cure for a way to be human again i met up with gabbard following her recent unveiling of c- of solitude at the three convention in los angeles we talked about how the female and the imagery of the game actually come from her own personal experiences but we started with her introduction to gay me when i was seventeen i got offered a comic artist jaap in berlin i'm origin from small fishing Rich my fish man. So I drew a draw redrawing have been drawing and the friends of my father had been a friend of the own Altus book house, which was very super famous in east Germany van I'm from did you submit them, some art, or was your art scene somewhere to we call it vitamin B, because the friend of my father knew the loss coming to you yoked. I'm from the Bajic. See ISIS, so and my my, my grandparents live close by. And so is a Boltzmann extra each. Tells a newish. So my parents had my daughter can draw. Very maybe you can have a look at it, and they offered me a job immediately. And how did the transition from being a visual artist to being a video game designer and artist? How did that transition happen? So I always loved computer games. So right after. Fell on my, my parents bought me, an intendo console and a tabby. I was eight something. So I love this video games. But that wasn't the thing that you could learn in Germany that you can become a game developer. So I had been coming out as well. Why I got over an animation mation industry as Stony bought artist infringe, any nation house. So I did that. And then at some point. A friend of mine said, oh, game design school would open the first game design school, beckons games academy east or the west. It was already two thousand two. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I was twenty so I applied there because immediate. Oh my God. Now you can become a game developer. So I applied to, and I got his scholarship and now I'm officially officially a game designer. Yeah. This is a child. Oh, what was it about gaming? In. I was always interested in stories, and always interested in contested worlds different settings. Like in my mind, I always wanted to travel, the whole would I lost science fiction, also, and really, not only consuming watching the movies, but replaying, it for you, and I can just relax and enjoy environment and figure out what's going on. It's funny you, you, you mentioned growing up on, on the Baltic Sea in a small village. So the sea was always part of your life and SOS. Is this submerged world? Yeah this heading on a two game. I develop is a ball and my shoes and hometown badly now for twenty years. It's loosely based on balance, but they are actually reattaching in train stations that you can recognize if you I'm boiling and if you played the game, but I love my hometown. My real hometown on the by Dixie I grew up next to the beach like I said my family fisherman's had been in boats often. So it was always like water, and BIC cities. What I loved an my whole family. I don't know why loves like Simone says we love watching jaw. My grandpa was still going to fish every every day on the morning. He he drives out. He's eighty five or something. Until he's last AM. I sure so we always watched like sea monster movies. So the setting and it was so netra to just use my pas and what I laugh. Is about this young woman named k who suffering from such strong loneliness at her in feeling the darkness anger the feeling.

Baltic Sea ISIS developer berlin Bajic connie gepard steven cuevas Germany los angeles gabbard co founder john horn Dixie I Simone eighty five years twenty years
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John horn by weekends and men in black international was hardly in the black box office returns for the latest installment of the franchise disappointing to say the least as we're critic reviews earlier today, we reached Bloomberg's Lucas shot who told me international isn't the only big budget sequel that's got a case of the summertime. Boxoffice blues is the, the latest in three or four different equals that we've seen over the past month that have not done. So well, now minute black international gross less than thirty million dollars in North America. And about half of what all the previous men in black movies that open to it did alright internationally, so its worldwide. Total is is north of hundred million dollars, but given the budget on this movie, and when it comes to market, it, most people would ask to make pitch probably gotta grow lease four hundred million dollars even break even this is just based on first week in a box office. Some of the foreign returns, isn't it a little too premature to call it a box office bomb. There are a lot of movies that underperform in the US and Canada and then have legs overseas. And so, you know, the end of eking out a lot more than you would have thought the First Pacific rim movie, is one that comes to mind, and I remember it, you know, it was really expensive at all these visual effects. It didn't it did okay in the US? But then in particular did so well, in China successful enough that they actually made a sequel to it. So it's possible that, that, that's the case here. But really the best case for this movie. Is that like it eats out? You know, maybe break, even it's probably it's, it's certainly not going to be successful movie, and look, it's it's coming out in the middle of summer. So this upcoming weekend believe we have choice twenty four which we all know is going to be a huge hit and not long after that. I think you've got both a new spider man movie and eventually in the summary, got Lion King. So it's just got a lot of competition, which makes it harder. Also, to sustain that opening well, despite its underperformance at the box office, how is men in black international doing critically with both movie critics. And with audiences very, very, very poorly, the scores on most of you aggregate metacritic and rotten tomatoes are very low. The audience score on that is a bit higher audiences tend to be less discerning. But still not really high. It's not one of those cases sometimes he'll have a movie that gets like twenty or thirty percent score and critics but ninety percent audience men in black. Is, is not that movie. Well, we also saw films like dark Phoenix and the secret. Life of pets underperform as well. So is this, a case of sequel, fatigue, or just bad movie? Fatigue the ladder. The thing about people. Fatigue is my colleague, and you did a good piece this week on some of the recent bombs, and what's behind them, and then I went and looked on the internet. And I saw it feels like every summer, we have some story on on franchise Petit sequel fatigue. And that's because Hollywood makes so many dang sequels. So if you're going to any summer, they're going to be some movies that work and some movies that don't either because they're bad or because the franchises, just tired and the marketing was not good the district Yutian strategies that movie stale all the time. And when it's the summer and all Hollywood is doing is releasing sequels in reboots and reimagining and things nothing. That's original, of course. Some of those are not going to work. Well, speaking of underperforming, you've also been looking at YouTube kids, it's kind of been bombing with its target audiences kids. Roughly fourteen and under just a little background. First YouTube kids was created four years ago. Back in two thousand fifteen can you first tell us how it's different from the main YouTube site? They've used technology to limit the videos from regular YouTube, that get pulled in two kids. They're supposed to be those that are really only, you know, the types of videos that you only want your kids to go on. I was just browsing through it last night, just to familiarize myself. And remember, what's on and you'll see what's called an unblocks video work kids, open up a toy box and talk about what Senator animated Barbie videos that kind of thing you, don't you don't have the ability to search for anything and everything in some cases, you can have search and it is not one of the main points of controversy with the kids at is that it is not all handpicked or curated. It still does pull any kind of user. Uploaded video based on YouTube of tagging and its algorithm. Which then leads to flaws where every once in a while there will be a video that had get through the sensors that should not the real problem that, that you to bad, and as you alluded to have in your introduction is that most kids don't use U two kids. So the latest data that we have in our story this week is that YouTube kids has more than twenty million weekly users YouTube has two billion users a lot more than twenty million of those are kids because if you look at some of the most popular channels on YouTube, whether it's this guy Ryan toy review, or Kokomo just for nursery rhymes, either channels with tens of millions of subscribers that on their own have a larger audience than you do kit. And that's where all that content created by YouTube users and viewers is going. And so the main site is just kind of monopolized it, I guess. Yeah. Hits between two and seven. It's a little easier to control what they do. And if. If you're an attentive parent, who only want them to use you kid, you can probably pull that off. But if you have a kid between the age of say, eight and twelve that's a kid, who's already dreaming of being like their older sister, or brother, who doesn't want to be limited to Justice kids. Aphid is probably seen as it's pretty cool. They want to be on YouTube, and frankly, the kid that might not have enough to satisfy them. And so they're going to want to use regular YouTube, and there, just aren't enough safeguard on regular YouTube in the same way that there is on TV networks like Nickelodeon, or the Disney channel factors look. Yes, they might go on to watch one thing, they might go on to watch, you know, their favorite prank, which no being really being a name is child friendly, but that could then lead to place because you have this inexhaustible library videos on YouTube. It's really unsafe for children. Lucas Shaw reporter with Bloomberg where he writes about the business of entertainment and technology, Lucas, as always, thanks so much.

YouTube Lucas Shaw North America Bloomberg First Pacific US Steven Cuevas Hollywood China Phoenix John horn Canada Senator Nickelodeon Disney reporter Kokomo Ryan four hundred million dollars hundred million dollars
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John horn by weekends and men in black international was hardly in the black box office returns for the latest installment of the franchise were disappointing to say the least as. We're critic reviews earlier today, we reached Bloomberg's Lucas Shah, who told me international isn't the only big budget sequel that's got a case of the summertime. Boxoffice blues is the, the latest in three or four different sequels that we've seen over the past month that have not been so well now minute lack international gross less than thirty million dollars in North America, and about half of what all the previous men in black movies that open to it did alright internationally. So it's worldwide. Total is is north of hundred million dollars. But given the budget on this movie, and what it costs to market, most people would estimate that probably gotta grow lease four hundred million dollars. Even even this is just based on first week in a box office. Some of the foreign returns, isn't little too premature to call it a box office bomb. There are a lot of movies that underperform in the US and Canada and then have legs overseas. And so, you know the. Eking out a lot more than you would have thought the First Pacific rim movie, is one that comes to mind, and I remember it. You know, was really expensive at all these digital affects it didn't it did okay in the US? But then in particular did so well, in China successful enough that they actually made a sequel to it. So it's possible that, that, that's the case here. But really the best case for this movie. Is that like it ekes out, you know, maybe break, even it's probably it's certainly not going to be a successful movie, and look, it's it coming out in the middle of summer so upcoming weekend. I believe we have choice twenty four which we all know is going to be a huge hit and not long after that. I think you've got both a new man movie and eventually in the summer and got Lion King. So it's just got a lot of competition, which makes it harder. Also to, to sustain that opening. Well, despite its underperformance at the box office, how is men in black international doing critically with both movie critics. And with audiences very, very, very poorly. The scores on most review aggregate, metacritic and run tomato. So very low the audience score on that is a bit higher audiences tend to, to be less discerning. But still not really high. It's not one of those cases sometimes he'll have a movie to get like twenty or thirty percent score and critics but ninety percent audience men in black. Is, is not that movie. Well, we also saw films like dark Phoenix, and the secret life of pets underperform as well. So is this, a case of sequel, fatigue, or just bad movie? Fatigue the ladder. The thing about people. Fatigue is my colleague, and we did a good piece this week on some of the recent bombs, and what's behind them, and then I went and looked on the internet. And I saw it feels like every summer, we have some story on on franchise Petit sequel fatigue. And that's because Hollywood makes so many dang sequels. So if you're going to any summer, they're going to be some movies that work and some movies that don't either because they're bad or. Because the franchise is just tired. And the marketing was not good distribution strategy movies fail all the time. And when it's the summer in all Hollywood is doing is releasing sequels in reboots, and reimagining and things nothing that's ridge. Of course, some of those are not going to work. Well, speaking of underperforming, you've also been looking at YouTube kids, it's kind of been bombing with its target audiences kids, roughly fourteen and under just a little background. First YouTube kids was created four years ago. Back in two thousand fifteen can you I sort of tell us how it's different from the main YouTube site? They've used technology to limit the videos from regular YouTube, that get pulled in two kids. They're supposed to be those that are really only, you know, the types of videos that you only want your kids to go on. I was just browsing through it last night, just to familiarize myself. And remember, what's on and you'll see what's called an unblocks video work. Kids open up. A toy box and talk about what Senator animated Barbie videos that kind of thing you, don't you don't have the ability to search for anything and everything in some cases, you can have search and it is not one of the main out of points of controversy with the kids is that it is not all handpicked or curated. It still does pull any kind of user uploaded video based on YouTube tagging and its algorithm. Which then leads to flaws where everyone's in a while there will be a video that gets through the sensors that should not the real problem that, that you as and as you alluded to have in your introduction is that most kids don't use U two two. So the latest data that we have in our story this week is that you kids has more than twenty million weekly users YouTube has two billion users a lot more than twenty million of those are kids because if you look at some of the most popular channels on YouTube, whether it's this guy Ryan toy review. Or Kokomo just for nursery rhyme Caesar channels with tens of millions of subscribers on their own have a larger audience than you YouTube kit. And that's where all that content created by YouTube users and viewers is going. And so the main site is just kind of monopolized it, I guess. Yeah. Kids between two and seven. It's a little easier to control what they do. And if you're an attentive parent, who only want them to use your kid, you can probably pull that off. But if you have a kid between the age of say, eight, and twelve Medicaid, who's already dreaming of being like their older sister brother, who doesn't want to be limited to Justice kids after that has probably seen as it's pretty. They want to be on YouTube. And frankly, the kid that might not have enough to satisfy them, and they're going to want to use regular YouTube, and there, just aren't enough safeguard on regular YouTube in the same way that there is on TV network like Nickelodeon, or the Disney channel fact is look. Yes, it might go on to watch one thing. They might go on to watch, you know, their favorite prank, which though, being really being a name is child friendly, but that could then lead to place because you have inexhaustible library and videos on YouTube that it's really unsafe for children, Lucas Shaw reporter with Bloomberg where he writes about the business of entertainment and technology, Lucas, as always, thanks so much.

YouTube Bloomberg North America Hollywood Lucas Shah First Pacific US Steven Cuevas Medicaid China John horn Lucas Shaw Canada Senator Nickelodeon Lucas Kokomo Disney reporter Ryan
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas in for John horn. Thanks for joining us. The Netflix film rolling thunder review of Bob Dylan story by Martin Scorsese is getting about, as much attention for what it is, as for what it isn't. It is a chronicle of Dylan's legendary nineteen seventy-five tour envisioned, a traveling carnival roadshow Dillon also wanted to make a movie that blur, the line between fact and fiction Scorsese builds on that idea to create his own vision of this, period. Dylan's career he and his team drew from hundreds of hours of on and off stage footage. Updating a story with recent recollections from Dylan and many of the people who were there or were they producer, Margaret Bodey and editor, David Tedeschi worked closely with Martin Scorsese on the Netflix film. We started with Dylan's concept behind the rolling thunder tour, what we have understood in gleaned from the research was that Bob's concept for the rolling thunder. Review was to really reconnect with both the performers that he wanted to have on the tour with him and with the audiences. And so there was of kind of creating more of opportunities for the performers to, to really make an impact on the audiences in place, Mahler, venues, and travel by bus and car and really go back to their roots. Which part of those routes is Dylan came out of Greenwich Village. And I think that the idea was it's almost like a happening in the sixties, he would bring the village into these little towns in New England, I asked bombs just kind of trying to think of a name for the tour in the sky boom from left to right. Boom boom boom, boom. So he said, hey, let's call it rolling Chesley Milliken was on. Tortoise? What the Indians and he goes what man? And Jessica speaking truth, and then buckled, I'm glad to hear that man decided not to call this documentary. And there is a bit of sleight of hand going on in this, Netflix film. Why should it not be viewed as a straight documentary of this very real period of Dylan's life and career? Well, of course, says it was very important to him to do something completely different. And in doing something completely different. You know, Netflix has described it as part fever dream, the idea is. It's just something else. It's a film. It's music. It's fantasy. It's all of those things together. And of course, Bob Dylan at one point talks about the committee, the larva how what he wanted to do for this tour was a musical committed alert like the traveling storyteller musicians. That will go from town to town. They would literally do that arrive in Plymouth before the concert, and they would hang up leaflets, and then they perform the next night at memorial hall, and we noticed right away that a lot of the people on the tour had a kind of an archetypal presence to them, so you have, you know, the Rolling Stone reporter..

Bob Dylan Netflix Martin Scorsese Chesley Milliken Bob Greenwich Village Steven Cuevas Margaret Bodey Mahler John horn Dillon Jessica memorial hall David Tedeschi Plymouth editor producer reporter New England
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Is the frame, I'm John horn media critic and feminist anita's are made headlines a couple of years ago when she called out sexist and misogynistic depictions in video games Surtees eons criticism triggered threats of graphic violence and virtually non-stop online harassment against her part of what became known as gamer gate, her latest project through her website, feminist frequency aims to root out toxic to pictures of LGBTQ characters in gaming, and those depictions can fan the flames of hateful speech and intolerance Sarkisian three part video series. Also highlights games that feature more inclusive characters and storylines the frame contributor, Steven Cuevas. Recently spokesman eater Sarkisian and has our story in the first episode of the three part queer tropes in gaming series directed by any Sarkisian host. Caroline Pettit explains. Its core objective. We need more games in which clear characters and clear idea. Entities simply exist, whether the player chooses to access that content or not sound simple. But Sarkisian points out that such transformations never came so easy in Hollywood. A big influence on game producers games. I still struggle with how to tell narrative, and so they pull out these tropes, which are not necessarily bad things. Right. Too often, though, they are used to reinforce harmful stereotypes, let's hear a clip from early on in the first episode. Caroline Pettit is talking about a ninety zero arcade game called crimefighters two players face clear coated enemies in leather with exaggeratedly effeminate walking animations who literally dry hump the player as an attack. But they don't stop there. These guys will try anything if there's a lamppost handy. Hell they'll hump that too. Nana's? It makes me laugh every time. I mean when you first saw video games like that. What was your response? It was my first time, and I was like. We are providing a reframing for a lot of people who grew up on these games. So games that you had played when you were younger that you didn't ever notice that we're folks are demonized in these various ways that now all of a sudden like oh my God. I played hours of this game and had no idea until I got older or were given the tools to be able to deconstruct them. It's a digital realm..

eater Sarkisian Caroline Pettit anita Steven Cuevas John horn harassment Hollywood
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Weeks after the New Zealand attack. Facebook says it will ban white nationalist southern Africa fights cholera after a historic cyclone. And could Prime Minister Theresa may be the first high profile casualty of Britain's messy European divorce? The Friday news roundup next time on one edge. Weeknights at eight on eighty nine point three KPCC. Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in for John horn. We woke today to learn that Agnes Farda had died the ninety year old filmmaker closely associated with the French new wave found new fans in two thousand seventeen when she made the documentary faces places with a young Murless known as JR near. They are getting settled on the mics for an interview back then with our own John horn, high Lohan, yes, how are you today? I'm gonna be the interviewer. And yes, how was the how was your childhood? When was your first kiss than your first kiss? And. Dear John, I hope we can speak about other things. I think we should speak about JR asked JR about his first cousin his childhood. Varda was a celebrated filmmaker well before faces places over a sixty year career, she made more than fifty feature films shorts and documentaries for a time. She lived in California, though, Varda never went Hollywood in twenty seventeen. She was awarded an honorary lifetime achievement Oscar and faces places we right along with JR invite up in a van across the French countryside. Is they banter and create massive photographic portraits of everyday people, which were then plastered on the sides of buildings went meeting people. We met people who had no power. I would do big images to make them. Big the villages and third distinct to them carefully gives them the right to speak. Brings to the audience. The they have made these people will go between. So that the audience we we'd start to love the people. And we discover them we learned about them. I think even though we are finicky capital. But where the go between we should be raised of the stories between the people who failed. JR? Would you say over the course of working on this project with on? Yes. That you discovered that you have much more in common as visual storytellers that a lot of people would assume at the beginning of the story. I knew on. Yes. Walk before we started walking together. But we have never met when we met we find so many others a point in common. Like, for example, we don't walk with brands. I don't do advertising. I don't do advertising we really independent in the way we walking we have that in common in the way, we highlight only anonymous people we also have that in common. So basically very quickly. We forget about our age defense, and we walked as two Audis and friends, and you know, we've buddies even if we have fifty five years different now, I don't agree with and yes on one thing because the female is also about our relation and there's a bit of that. Because one of the things that I had love doing in the Finn was. To understand. What is seeing? It was one of the story of the film is that she's losing slowly her eyesight, and I'm trying to envision what she see and slowly in between the travel. She let me follow up a follow her vision and try to understand it in a metaphorical way. And that's for me, one of my some of my favorite scenes in the film. Also because we communicating weed out any Mejia's, and people doesn't matter if I see whether or not, you know, I'm psychiatric focused, and I see facing me taking his iphone to take picture of me gets on my nose. My dear. JR in the film. You photograph a young woman who works at a cafe in a small village. And after you take her picture you pace your foot on the side of a wall. And she talks about how she feels uncomfortable. That people are taking her photo that it's so big. Do you see people kind of having a different experience? Once they see themselves kind of blown up. And maybe this is true of you on. Yes as well. The way you look at yourself when other people are looking at an image of yourself that waitress show accepted. And then later we kept what she said she felt a little unease because he's shy and people take a picture send it over the net, you know, of the web. But then she's probably because her kids says she's beautiful. So it's a mixed feeling. And we kept it because he was the only one we reacted not positive, but it was fair to to legend happen to letters speak about that. You know, not not everyone wants to have his photo on a giant wall. And that's interesting this waitress. She said yes right away when we did it. But we remember she was shy. And of course, when we saw her after the summer and ask her for Christian. Then she said, look, I was the center of attention for the whole summer. And I realize you know, that's not what I like to be just want to ask you about a scene toward the end of the film where you go to try to visit Gianluca Dard. And let's just say he's not a gentleman. Did you say to JR? Why don't we do a big photograph that we can pay over agenda could arts house, and maybe embarrassed him that way, it was done a project that all I wanted to make him meet J J me because Jess hit the us. No good. I'd love to meet him. Like because you kept telling me that he had some classes like me. But I didn't know he would he would be such a nice nineteen sixty one when I. I don't tell the end of the film. No. But wait a minute. Are you the females open though? Yeah. But still you cannot say what happened at the end of the fan. That's good. Jeb became very nice to me. So, you know, at the end of the thing that I become nice to her might intend that the hall of fame. Not nice. No Donald on. Now is not come on. In the way of felt you felt I was too small to old. Yeah. But isn't that true? Yes. It's true. So you guys are such a great couple. And onions, how did you get to take off his sunglasses? I know he's wearing them right now. It wasn't all the time. But not when we together when when we have dinner with friends and family is just in Obama guy. But it just this costume costume is a black hat and black glasses Michelson is to do. So I can't complain that he wants to have his special type that recognize it. But it's a joke. You know, the whole thing is not serious. I would couple was sort of funny for people to let we're comrades. That's with..

JR John horn Facebook Varda New Zealand Prime Minister Agnes Farda Steven Cuevas Obama Theresa Africa Murless Britain Gianluca Dard California lifetime achievement Hollywood Michelson
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas filling in today for John horn. And we'll start today with a story that may have you thinking twice after spilling popcorn or soda at the movies for many sinking deep into the seed of a darkened movie theater is an escape surrendering yourself to the magic of filmmaking. But a new sobering report from variety reveals a pattern of workplace abuses and wage theft for the cleaning crews at some of the country's largest theater chains AMC regal and Cinemark variety. Investigative reporter gene Mattis spent eight months unwinding the complex web of janitorial contractors and subcontractors, and a workforce that relies on a largely immigrant workforce. When I spoke to Mattis this morning. He described what typical working conditions are like for many of these workers, you know, imagine walking into a multiplex, you know, ten screens tall screams, and you and maybe one or two other people are responsible for cleaning the. Tire thing, you know, here rooms, and so you go in you got, you know, maybe you've got a leaf blower, and so that makes it a little easier. You can blow all the candy wrappers and stuff out some of the aisles leaf lowers that that we will typically see gardeners using outdoors. Yes. The very same tax. Yeah. You see people going in a row with a leaf blower, and that does make it go faster. But it does also leap dust on a screen. And so if you don't like that as much so recently, they've sort of gone away from that. And you might see janitors have like a a backpack vacuum cleaner cleaning the bathrooms equipped kitchen their clinic concession stands. It is a very labor intensive job. When you think about how big a movie theater is. And how few people they have doing it. So it might be, you know, eight or ten hours every night that it takes two to clean one of these things. Talk to them, you tell the story of a number of these employees, including one named Maria Alvarez who worked at AMC theater in Santa Monica. And she told you about the very long, our she tended to work, and how it also affected her health and her personal life. Can you tell me about her? I mean, the thing that strikes me about this compared to some other sorts of janitorial jobs is the everyday week piece of it. I mean that was the thing that really jumped out at me. And so she said that in fact, it was so strict in that regard that her son died, and she tried to get the day off to go. You know, take care of thing to deal with that and her boss like basically wouldn't give her the day off. And so I mean, basically saying if you take off and then I'll come back, and what are the typically hourly wages and benefits like for these janitorial workers at AMC theaters. I mean, typically they would get paid every two weeks. And I heard it range from six hundred dollars seven hundred dollars eight hundred dollars nine hundred dollars somewhere in there every two weeks. So that would work out to something in the range of like five to eight dollars an hour. And then, you know, in terms of benefits, there's. There's no real benefits. It's not like, there's, you know, healthcare and 4._0._1._K on these kinds of jobs in the past these kinds of jobs might typically go to young people just entering the workforce. Like like, high school kids looking for summer work and so forth. When did that start changing? I mean, my impression is that. It's changed gradually, but really sort of took off in the in the mid nineties, and you had for the first time janitorial contracting companies that operated on a on a national scale that would be able to say to the major theater chains. Hey, look, we can take you know, dozens or hundreds of theaters even and provide janitors for you at a fairly low price, and what they would do is turn around and subcontract to the individual janitors or to other companies who had done subcontract to other janitors. And so that was kind of where it really took off in terms of on a national level. I think prior to that as you say, it was very smelly. Everybody's familiar with the the high school worker doing a couple of hours a day or something. And this is not that this is a really arduous work all night long seven days a week. We've seen similar labor in wage theft issues, come up and other industries with large immigrant employee populations agriculture warehousing and also in Indiana to'real in other places, like large office buildings is what you found in theater chains consistent to what we have seen in the past and these other industries in the janitorial world, my understanding is there sort of a different tiers of this. And so at the sort of office here, you're more likely to be dealing with unionized workers. But then I think the sort of lower tier with the theaters and restaurants in the industrial stuff. You're generally talking about union workers you're talking about this sort of aggressive subcontracting model. And so I think the conditions there are generally worse. What's been the response? From AMC and considerably smaller, regal and Cinemark change to your reporting. We have not gotten much response. I mean AMC is the only one that actually gave us a statement on the record and their position on is. Basically, this is an issue of a subcontractor, and this is not really an issue for us. And so we in our contract have a requirement that every day by by, you know, minimum wage laws, and if if they're not doing that, then take it up with them. And so from a legal standpoint, it's obviously been very difficult for advocates are class action attorneys or anything to make a lot of headway with the chains. And there's not a ton of incentive for the chains, then to, you know, unilaterally raise their prices are raised the the amount they're paying their subcontractors for the service. Do you expect the national association of theatre owners to take any sort of action or take up any sort of investigation themselves? I did reach out to them for the story. And did not hear anything back. I would be surprised to see them sort of pushing on their membership, especially the larger members to to sort of change their business model around this next week is finding off of the cinema con convention the moment in the year when theater owners and service providers and movie stars all congregate in Las Vegas to talk about the upcoming year in movies. So I mean, we're gonna have reporters there, and we're going to see, you know, what we could find out about, you know, any service pastas. Gene, Mattis is enterprise and investigative reporter at variety, gene. Thank you so much for joining us. And thank you so much for your reporting. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it..

gene Mattis AMC theater AMC investigative reporter Cinemark theft Steven Cuevas John horn Las Vegas Santa Monica Maria Alvarez Indiana two weeks eight hundred dollars seven hundred dollars nine hundred dollars six hundred dollars eight dollars eight months seven days
"steven cuevas" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on PRI's The World

"He was born Richard Anthony months sewer right here in Boston his mom was polish. His dad Lebanese. So Richard had this wide world view. But it was his father side of the family that would really impact what Richard monsour would go onto musically. Saving Cuevas as a reporter in southern California and met and interviewed dick Dale several times. What did dick Dale tell you Stephen about his upbringing musical background heat spoke about those days Marco, very funny. And he came from a pretty musical family, mainly it was an uncle of Dick's that really introduced him to instruments like the food and the Tara bocci a percussion instrument, and I think it was a grandmother or an aunt and introduce them to the piano the. Piano was really his I love as well as the drums that very progressive kind of sound. You can hear it in his guitar playing throughout his career was interesting so piano, which is very much a western instrument hitting all those notes on the chromatic scale the food which is kind of a Middle Eastern lute, which kind of captures those little micro tones that you hear an Arabic music. We actually have a really early recording of miserably the song that he made famous this one those from nine hundred twenty seven. I guess you can kind of hear some of those nuanced notes in there that the dick Dale would pick up on later. It you told the story Stephen back in two thousand ten of how dick Dale turn this on miserable around making it his signature surf tone gets played slowly the but to duck. But I said that's too slow. And I thought of Jean croup is staccato drumming where he went wonder if people wanted people want, so you go decadent dot NET. So I wind putting his looting that rhythm. And. Done down down down down down. They're going to get like that. Well, there you go Marco like dick could, you know, really cut a set it best y'all have to keep in mind that when he recorded that song. He had started playing it in this gigantic ballroom in Balboa here in southern California down on the beach, all these surfers talking five six thousand people, and he was going for a really big sound. And that the kids could really feel and he talks about how young when he started playing that song man, the people would just like levitated. So he might play miserably let two or three times hundred show and the kids just went crazy. Yeah. I mean, dick del just heard a riff it's aimed in went with it. Thanks to Pulp Fiction misery who is. Now the stuff of legend. Even if you don't know the backstory as you've told her what what is a dictator kill deep cut that you like that is not miserably like where else who is talent, Sean. Well, I would like to throw to something. From the same years Pulp Fiction it's from his nineteen ninety four album tribal thunder. And it's the first track it's called nitro. And it's kind of a cousin to miserably like really proposal really per Cussing. It's dick kind of looking back on that sound. But also pushing it forward and making it this whole other new kind of beast. I see nitro is like the miserable of the latter half of his career after it was largely relaunched after the successful Pulp Fiction. Well, here's a little nitro. That's freelance journalist Steven Cuevas joining us from station K PCC in California hats off the dick Dale today. And thank you Steven through time. Oh, Marco is a pleasure. Thank you so much. Music from the late if dick Dale. He are public radio international..

Richard monsour Marco Dick Steven Cuevas California nitro Stephen Richard Anthony Richard croup Boston Tara bocci reporter Balboa Jean Sean K PCC
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"To the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in for John horn. Now more of John's conversation with Academy Award nominated film, composer, nNcholas Patel has first big break was on Adam mckay's two thousand fifteen movie the big short, but the two thousand eight housing crisis and financial collapse. The music you're hearing right now. Retell retained with McKay on vice is move movie back Dick Cheney, which stars Christian bale as the former vice president that film has eight kademi award nominations. We pick up John horns conversation now with propel talking about his life after Harvard where he had the fortune of meeting film producer, Jeremy Kleiner after college might band broke up, and the film that I had scored never came out. And I was looking for job, and I actually got a job trading currencies in New York. And I was hired by a composer, actually. And he was sort of like, you know, we'll find something for you to do here. And so I I did that for awhile in New York. And I think one day I was talking German. He was like, you know, have the script. It's a big short actually, Michael Lewis novel turning into a felon. He connect me with Adam. And I sent him a couple ideas just talked him on the phone, and he he said something like he was trying to imagine. What dark math sounded like? And I sent him some ideas, and we had a conversation. He thankfully, really liked what I sent him. So we hire me. So now, I want to ask you about vice, and I'm sure there's a clever way of saying their similarities between the financial meltdown in Dick Cheney. But when you start thinking about the themes of this movie, and it's not just about Dick Cheney. It's about his relationship with his wife. It's about his troubled past about his growth into power where do you start, and what are your first conversations with Adam about on this film will in the same way that I think the immersed. Kind of collaborative approach that Barron. I utilize gets us to places that we wouldn't expect. I think you know, you do start with initial instincts. And then you see how they feel in the movie in the case of vice Adams initial instinct was that it needed a very symphonic scope because as he would say, this is such a huge story that initial instinct led me to think about well, what is the sound of that? What is the music and for me reading the script talking to Adam? There was this sense of dissonance that I wanted to weave into the movie and the way that I explored. It was I think there's enough we think about an American sound, you know, what that might be an American orchestral sound. And then if you think about what hero's journey in film might sound like this isn't exactly that story. It's a it's a it's a very specific take and variation on those stories and the variation is with dissonance. So what I would do is. I would explore for example, a trumpet fanfare, and I would imagine to myself, you know, okay. We can have a trumpet fanfare, but what if very occasionally, there's a note that's wrong. So you know, you can take this kind of feeling..

Adam mckay Dick Cheney Barron New York vice president Academy Award Steven Cuevas nNcholas Patel John Michael Lewis John horn John horns Harvard Jeremy Kleiner producer one day
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in for John horn with his two thousand sixteen film moonlight. Barry Jenkins turned his camera on liberty city, the predominantly black neighborhood of Miami. Where he grew up. The film won the Academy Award for best picture. I follow up. If Bill street could talk Jenkins ventured into Harlem Beale street is based on the nineteen seventy four novel of the same name written by author and social critic James Baldwin Jenkins adaptation earned him. Another Oscar nomination Beale street tells the story of a young couple named Fani until they fall in love, then Tisch gets pregnant then funniest charged for rape that he didn't commit but even with so much turmoil and suffering. There's a beauty to Beale street just as there was in moonlight. Well, the story takes place in Harlem, the real Beale street is actually in Memphis and the movie opens with a reference to New Orleans so in John horns sat down with Barry Jenkins. He asked to filmmaker what all these places have in common. I think it's about the universality of the experience that Mr. Baldwin is depicted in the novel in the off is depicted in the film, just this this common sort of like spirituality community this common. Lifeforce shared amongst black folks, especially in these enclaves. You know, whether they be in Memphis, Tennessee, New Orleans Harlem, as you said my hometown of Miami liberty city, I think all these places have these stories like the one that we see depicted in this film, your film, probably I'd say even more so than the book is a love story. It's a love story about two young people who are deeply in love with each other. And in one case in particular, the family of one that's trying to make sure that this couple is not ruined. Why did you respond so much of that part of the story emphasize, it, what did you want to say about these young lovers at about how much they meant to each other and how much their families were gonna do whatever it took to make sure that they were together. How much the young lovers meant to was the first thing that grabbed me it just it's such a I mean it jumps off the page in a certain way. Especially in this novel because you know, Mr. Baldwin wrote with two very distinct voice with many voices. There were two that always jumped out to me. The most one was just almost enraptured with this idea of sensuality with love with romance with passion. The other one was just a searing about depicting societal injustices, particularly the way that the lives and souls of black folks has been treated, you know, by the country that we all call call home. And so what I read the book for the first time and saw just how how devoted Titian funny arts one another how they're basically creating this world of two people. I was just I don't know. How can you not be lifted up by that this conceptual idea of two young black people as soulmates there's just something about it? That was so rich and potent and just lush that grabbed me, and then when you bring the families into it as well what I loved about at the same time that I wrote moonlight as depiction of a certain kind of families the family. I grew up in Bill street. Features two very different family. From the one I grew up in. But what what I really felt like volume was working out was within one scene in the film. There's a scene where you have eight actress sitting in a room, and these two families, basically, the basic negotiating how do we treat the same problem? Using air quotes the same problem. You know, one family is a blessing to the other family. It's a problem. And I just love how you put all these very different depictions of blackness of black family of religion, all these different characters from a very different concept at the same thing. And so as they're trying to solve the same scenario the same problem, they're all doing it with different tools, and I just love dramas. Now, speaking purely as somebody who gets to have fun making art, it's like, oh, this is delicious. And I think when you watch the was in the film. It does read as delicious with a capital d the other thing that Baldwin is writing about your film is dealing with are the ideas of intersection -ality that on the one hand Beale street is talking about the way that black men are profiled and targeted and oppressed within our criminal Justice system. And on the other hand, there's this sexual assault narrative. There's a story about this woman who was raped and she believes the wrong person has committed the rape. What is the balance you're trying to strike about those two issues? So that they I guess in some ways complement each other, even though it sounds kind of horrible without kind of clashing with each other. Yeah. It wasn't about them complimenting or clashing with with each other. Because you know, so much of the work had already been done in the novel. And so even in the depiction of the sexual assault in the novel. And in the film is going to be really looking at you know, funnies not falsely accused of anything. He's chosen out of police lineup. Right. He's placed in a police lineup by a an extremely racist police officer and then in the sequence between the officer Titian funny. We see the exact moment when the officer decides. Okay. I am going to teach you, and so when you really dig into the language of what's being understood this idea of these two things being in concert and not being not clashing. Then it starts to reveal itself. And I think the fact that the the character who was assaulted, MRs Victoria, Raja's, she's Puerto Rican because Baldwin's just playing with everything how close the American dream, can you possibly go without being granted full access to it. You know, I mean, it's just so much in this book was so just like searingly just right at the edge. I'm gonna I think all these things are thrown into this pot together that creates this because you've mentioned New Orleans earlier this Gumbo. Could only be described as Americana in terms of making art Fani is an artist himself. He's a sculptor is that profession important because there's a scene in the film where we see him creating his art while he is thinking back to it as he's incarcerated what is his art represent to him. And why was it important to represent it in the film? I think he found in the sculpting and this art away to express himself that cannot be corrupted cannot be taken away from him by anyone but his own intellectual limitations. If he has the. Zyu- to create something can go get a block of wood and created now me making the film, the sequence you're talking about coming to the end of the movie where we finally get to see Stefan James's funny working on this piece of art trying to finesse this block of wood into a vision. But because of the circumstances that'll be followed him. He just can't just walking around it circling it, and I remember when I I understood that I wanted to make films kind of feeling the same way. And I think it's lovely that. You know, this movie is an adaptation adaptation as well. So it's not autobiographical, but there are moments when myself and the characters completely aligned, and when I think of both the character and stuff on James circling the thing that could be manifested into something other horrific or beautiful and almost being paralyzed. I'm like, oh, I know it feels like. Coming up. Mary Jenkins maintains that love family and community are what will get us through..

James Baldwin Jenkins Barry Jenkins New Orleans Mr. Baldwin rape officer Miami assault Stefan James Harlem Memphis Mary Jenkins Oscar Steven Cuevas Tisch Lifeforce Tennessee Fani John horn
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Santa Barbara county. Sheriff's department has issued a mandatory evacuation orders starting tonight at eight for neighborhoods below the Thomas Whittier in sherpa fire burn zones. Of course that includes montecito Kevin Taylor is the deputy division chief with the montecito fire department. He says they've called it an extra help. We've also pre position ten fire engines two bulldozers a regional rescue task force helicopter in five high water vehicles from the national guard. In addition to the sheriff search and rescue team and the L A homeless services. A says thirteen winter shelters that had planned to close down Saturday morning will now stay open until Tuesday morning. Six of them in south LA to in downtown LA, the midnight mission and the wind guard center, the California Highway Patrol says it has uncovered significant overtime. Abuse by officers assigned to east LA. We get details from KPCC's, Emily Illeana. Doug, dale. P captain Mark Garrett said numerous employees were claiming overtime. They didn't work. He said the abuse dates back at least two years and the officers and some supervisors were paid a total of about three hundred sixty thousand dollars. They had an earned we discovered it. We will correct it and the California Highway Patrol as an organization will be better and stronger for it. The officers involved are unpaid leave Garrett said the investigation will lead to quote, the proper disciplinary action. He's had the CHP realized something was wrong during an internal review of its overtime procedures last year, and that it has made changes to its overtime payment system since then the agency has assembled a team of thirty two investigators to continue looking into possible overtime abuse throughout California Garrett said so far there's nothing to indicate there's a systemic problem. I'm Emily Elena. Doug, del California, Public utilities commission is fine. The southern California gas company. Three point three million dollars for a pipeline explosion in Ontario in twenty seventeen not so much for the explosion. But for failing to conduct a complete investigation. Gas company initially refused. The Commission's order to test that pipeline then agreed to tested, then refused again until it settles a lawsuit related to the explosion me public utilities commission says the gas company is putting civil litigation exposure in front of public safety. Gas company has thirty days to file an appeal or pay that fine. The Rams spirit Atlanta getting ready for Sunday's Super Bowl against the New England Patriots Rams wide receiver. Robert woods says he's dedicating the game and his performance to the memory of his older sister Olivia. She died of cancer when she was seventeen before every Rams game. Robert woods kneels in prayer in the end zone. And he makes an oh with his hands for a Libya, our mayor because of her being a model living his life. Battling question at the highest level at the Super Bowl level. I'm not gonna fail. You know, say my prayer given mile sky and play fast. And while Robert woods is on the field for the Rams Sunday. Angelino and laugh lifetime Rams fans. Steven Cuevas will be in the stands to cheer on the team that he has loved even after they left L A for that two decades. Taint Saint Louis grave says it's not been easy rooting for the Rams I look back, and I said I've been cheering for us for years. But it's okay. It's all coming to fruition of this is why cheered all those years for all those teams because it's finally coming back in. We have finding something that you thought about in Los Angeles..

Rams Mark Garrett Robert woods Los Angeles Public utilities commission California Highway Patrol California Doug montecito Santa Barbara county New England Patriots Rams Thomas Whittier Kevin Taylor Steven Cuevas Emily Illeana division chief Emily Elena Libya
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"A better place to live. Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in today for John horn after Syrian filmmaker allow Durkee completed his documentary of fathers and sons he got his first and only tattoo which covers his entire right? Arm tattoos are forbidden within the strict Islamic terrorists community that he'd embedded with undercover. For nearly two years to make the film, his tattoo would preempt any temptation to return of fathers and sons tells the story of Abu Osama a bomb expert and founding member of the al-nusra fronts in offshoot of al-qaeda. The film documents. How Abu Osama grooms is eldest sons to follow in his footsteps. They're just twelve and thirteen years old one of them is eager to become a Jihadist. The other would rather attend school. Jarecki's film is now in Academy Award nominee in the feature length documentary category when Turkey, and I spoke a few months ago before he became an Oscar contender. I asked about going undercover to film of fathers and. And how we got introduced to the film's main character Osama and a quick warning. Our discussion includes talk of violence and the sound of gunfire. We found the kids in one of sharia com. During the research for the character because I was looking for a similar family and for months, I couldn't find the right people. And we found the Keats, and we talked to their sons, the he son see his son some, and we talked to the people there that we need to feel with him and his father, and they took us to the father, and I was super lucky that he except I sick. And that he's charismatic, but as a terrorist at the end of the day, he's terrorists. So it is Osama's eldest son, Osama who you meet I who also is kind of the the second main character in the film in a sense what under under what pretense did you not only gain the trust of him in the family and his associates, but also convince them to let you film off and on very intimate moments for roughly. Two and a half years. He's a good Meyer of Al Qaeda leaders and those become famous because of the media. So he understood that the media can make him famous, but it is understand the film. Documentaries can go different than media that can be in some way, like criticize or can show different with the t won't himself. So he agreed thus to feel him. Then also because I present myself as a student there that their son who want to learn more about jihad because. I told him that. I understood that I all my life was wrong. So you portrayed yourself as someone who wants to learn more about this. 'cause and and this much sympathy with with their ideology, so wow. Because it's not about them trust. You also you have to make them love you. So the the field the responsibility for you. But didn't they ever do a search on you? And then I I clean everything online. And does I told you I told them that I had the bad bust? Now, I'm here to to change in in watching this documentary. It's hard to not like Abu Osama at times and the children as well Osama is very loving towards them and very tender. And he's new flavorful. He's like any other father. Did you ever find yourself sympathizing with parts of their caused that you didn't before? No, I didn't at all. Because if you see from the moment the first heat achieve we slide built the bird at son's capture small bird little songbird, and they bring it into the house. It's still alive. But then later one.

Abu Osama Durkee al-qaeda Steven Cuevas founding member Turkey Jarecki Academy Award John horn Oscar thirteen years two years
'Miss Bala' Movie Director Interview On Gina Rodriguez

The Frame

10:09 min | 3 years ago

'Miss Bala' Movie Director Interview On Gina Rodriguez

"Border. KPCC podcasts are supported by. One brothers pictures, presenting the sole fli authentic. A star is born. Starring Bradley Cooper, lady Gaga and Sam Elliott in their Academy Award nominated performances now nominated for eight Academy Awards, including best picture invested Apted screenplays. Kenneth Durant of the Los Angeles Times calls it passionate, emotional and. Fearless. An af I calls the film of stellar achievement in its own universe for consideration in all categories. Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in for John horn today is Thursday. And that's when our weekly newsletter goes out. It's a great way to keep up with the show and with headlines from the world of culture, and we always have tips for how to spend your weekend you can sign up at the frame dot org slash newsletter. And now as Sundance continues this week one alumni from that indie film fest is poised to release a major studio movie, Catherine Hardwick, directed the action film is bott- up which stars Gina Rodriguez. It's based on a Mexican movie of the same name from two thousand eleven Sundance audiences were introduced to Hardwick sixteen years ago through her first films thirteen then came we deal with FOX Searchlight's ended job, directing the first twilight movie in two thousand eight when the frames John horn recently caught up with Katherine Hardwick. She took us back to that time when twilight was struggling to get off the ground. Producers took it to every studio in town. And nobody thought it would be profitable. Because at that time. There hadn't been a big movie. It was live. A young female character like that. So they just didn't think it'd make any money. And finally this upstart studio summit picked it up. So we because it wasn't considered a blockbuster. People didn't think it was going to be successful. A kind of got to make it like an indie film, couch included. Of course, Kristen Stewart, and Robert Pattinson the movie grosses almost four hundred million dollars worldwide. What do you think happens after twilight because it is so successful? And yet, it doesn't seem to really benefit you the way it might have some other director and also it didn't really benefit other women directors either. Because the next word twilights were all directed by men. And then the two divergence were directed by men and the hunger games were all five of them directed by men. So they, you know, they realized there was this great formula that story a novel written by a woman, you know, about a woman. And in our case deranged by woman it worked, but they didn't keep going in hiring other women, and didn't, you know, really offer me like tons of other cool blockbuster BAAs abilities or to any other woman until I guess until Patty Jenkins. Finally, you know, busted out and got to make wonder woman about miss Bala. The film that he's coming out. Very soon was a movie that you had

Catherine Hardwick Katherine Hardwick John Horn Academy Awards Sundance Patty Jenkins Kenneth Durant Los Angeles Times Miss Bala Lady Gaga Bradley Cooper Sam Elliott Steven Cuevas Fox Searchlight Kristen Stewart Gina Rodriguez Robert Pattinson Director Four Hundred Million Dollars
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in today for John horn and out before we bring you the next segment. Here's a friendly warning about some language, you're about to hear there's a really funny sitcom on the pop cable network that's named after the tiny town where it's set shits creek. And that's spelled S C H I T T S. It's also where the show's main characters the once, very wealthy rose family, find themselves. Literally and metaphorically after losing everything the series now in its fifth season two picks the roses as they rebuild their lives and their relationship is a family. It was co created by Daniel Levy, and his father the veteran comedic actor Eugene Levy, they also portray father and son in the show and the elder Levy as patriarch Johnny rose schools has a dull son David on something he never had to worry about until now. Oh, David rose. You're applying for the bag boy position. Tell me David. Want this job? I don't want this Trump. Well, thank you very much and don't expect to phone call. All right. Do what right or let's not do it again. Okay. Sean Lee, David, why do you want this job? I ran on a vi- cream. You're not going to get this job. You're not going to get this job. Daniel Levy told me he sometimes draws on his real life relationship with his dad to help shape the script and the onscreen gags. I mean, certainly there are buttons. I know that I can right into the show that I can push for him, which is fun. I know more intimately what gets his goat in our first season. For example. I wrote an episode where Johnny which is the character. My dad plays on the show wakes up to a a leak in the ceiling and dirty water had been dripping on his head all night long. My dad is someone who takes great care and attention to his hair. He does not like people touching it knowing that writing an episode where he has to wake up with just a wet sopping wet head of hair to me was was very funny, and unfortunately turned into a very funny scene. So yeah, of course, I think having that kind of father son relationship, we can access things that you wouldn't normally be able to act. You know, if we didn't have that especially the sort of bickering back and forth, and and all that fun stuff you and your younger sister, Sarah. Who in the show has a recurring role is twyla, the sweet, but dimwitted waitress at the local diner. You were actually raised in your native Canada. Even though your dad Eugene Levy was working a lot in Hollywood. What led to your parents decision to bring you up away from that Hollywood life? Yeah. He wanted us to have a very sort of for lack of a better word normal upbringing. And I know that it must have been a great sacrifice for him not being in Los Angeles. As an actor is is not the wisest choice. If you were to ask you probably an agent, but I think it's testament to my dad's values and really how he's managed to navigate a career in this industry that is entirely on his terms. And that that's a pretty admirable thing. Your character show David is is pan sexual and what I really like is that his sexuality is never a point of conflict in the show. He's not struggling with it, nor is he ever attacked for it. What is in conflict, though, is how he navigates a very kind of tumultuous love life and his struggle. With intimacy. So how did you decide to play him this way? I think it was about wanting to tell a story that had a happy ending. I think so many queer relationships are you are met with conflict or tragedy. And it's funny because even in the first couple seasons of my relationship now with my boyfriend on the show, we were hearing so many people over Twitter and social media saying, when's it all gonna fall apart? So for me, it was really important to show that you can have and that many people do have ferry functioning normal great loving relationships, and that by removing homophobia from our world, I made the choice not to ever explore that on the show. You are showing by Zampoll just how full a life and how joyous alive and how love filled a life. You can have. Without that to fight against so yeah, it was a very active choice for me. I didn't want there to be any negativity. When it came to sexuality. It's simply is. Yeah. The plane of games a spin the bottle twister. A name game is is this trope to kind of runs through the show beginning in the first season and the plane of these games almost always starts out innocently an quickly go awry, why do you come back to game playing throughout the show? I can't tell it's interesting. You brought that up because I think for being honest, I think it's because I'm an incredibly competitive game player. And with every game that is played. There is always something that comes out of it that I find very very funny. Someone loses it over the smallest little thing. I find sort of competitive situations that obviously don't have very high stakes to be quite rich territory for comedy. Well, I thought it works. Get at some aspects of the characters that maybe they're unwilling to reveal otherwise. Yeah. And any opportunity to reveal sides of a character that you don't have to write is great because exposition is so boring and it's boring to listen to in a show. It's boring to right. So the more you can find ways of revealing character through action and circumstance the better. I think one episode includes an adult game called sleepy. Mommy, could could you explain what? Sleepy. Mommy is. Well, my character David ends up planning a baby shower for one of the moms in the town, and he doesn't have any experience with children or young expecting mothers. So his version of a baby shower is very different than what most people would expect so one of the baby games because he was very turned off by the prospect of you know, putting a chocolate bar in a diaper. That was very sort of Fokker to him. What he thought was quite enjoyable was playing a game sleepy. Mommy, which is people taking tic TACs because he couldn't afford real tracks at the time and throwing them into the the mummy's mouth as means of sedation..

David rose Eugene Levy Daniel Levy Johnny rose Steven Cuevas shits creek Canada John horn Hollywood Twitter Sean Lee Los Angeles twyla Fokker Sarah Zampoll
"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:24 min | 3 years ago

"steven cuevas" Discussed on KPCC

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in today for John horn who just arrived in Park City, Utah for the Sundance film festival is going to be more than one hundred new feature film screening there over the next several days. Just some of the highlights include the net flicks produced velvet buzzsaw starring Jake. Jillian hall, Chinese-American director Liu wings, the farewells starting Aquafina and a slew of documentaries, including one that's got festival officials a little antsy over possible protests. John horn has just arrived at Sundance, and he joins me now to give us a preview of the festival. John was so many film screenings to check out. How do you prioritize what you're gonna see I actually clone myself? So it is it is possible to see eighteen movies a day. You just have to choose. I mean, I think you look for interesting people interesting, themes filmmakers, whose work, you might know tonight. For example, I think it's pretty easy to figure out what we're gonna see there's a movie called after the wedding it premieres tonight. It's a dapper from a two thousand and. Six movie written directed by Susanne bier who just made bird box for net. Flicks stars Julianne Moore, and Michelle Williams, and then kind of on the other end of the spectrum is a movie playing in the narrative competition category. It's called native son. It's based on the Richard Wright novel, and it's adapted by playwright Susan, Lori parks, and it's directed by a visual artist. Name Rashid Johnson. And it's his first feature so very different films. One had a lot of money high pedigree, other ones newcomer and both are kind what Sundance is about. And what are some of the other films to audiences seem most excited about seeing this year tweet till four who starred in twelve years. A slave has directed his first feature. It's a true story about a young man who figures out how to create wind energy in Malawi. It's called the boy who aren't as the wind. There's a midnight film that also stars a veteran of twelve years a slave lupita the ongo it's called little monsters. It's a scary movie. Adam. Mhm driver. A lot of people know from Star Wars has made a movie called the report it's directed by Scott Berns and produced by Steven Soderbergh. It's about the CIA's detention and interrogation program and that banning Jon Hamm, Michael c hall or also in it. So again, incredibly diverse films all have something to recommend them. But again, you could choose a couple dozen other movies to check out Harvey Weinstein is the subject of new documentary. It's it's called untouchable in its screening at there at Sundance. What do you know about it? Well, untouchable is a documentary that involves interviews with many of the women who claim that they were sexually assaulted by Harvey Weinstein. And I think it's really important that it's premiering in parts of Utah because there are allegations that Harvey Weinstein assaulted women during the festival in years past so in many ways and the festival has been very aggressive about dealing with creating a safe place for everybody. Who attends in terms of making sure that nobody's harassed resulted? But the fact that this movie is playing at Sundance where for many years Harvey Weinstein was the king of Sundance the king of Park City. I think it's incredibly important to not only tell the stories of the survivors of his alleged attacks. But also to bring part city back to what it was without Harvey Weinstein. Well, Sundance is hugely important as a platform for documentary filmmakers in general. What's your eye on on the schedule well for the five films that are nominated for the Oscar documentary feature premiered here a year ago? In terms of what I'm excited about Alex Gibney who is an Oscar winning filmmaker has a new film about Elizabeth homes and theranos and that whole blood scam. There's a Danish documentary about the plane crash that killed former UN secretary general dodge hammer scold, it's called cold-case gold. It's supposed to be amazed. Zing and then there's a new documentary series. That's premiering tomorrow morning about Michael Jackson called finding Neverland. That's already been the subject of a lot of attention and criticism and finally documentary called hail Satan, which is about Satan s but it's really about religious tolerance and religious plurality in the United States. The Jackson documentary is based in part on allegations brought against him by two young men who claim Jackson abused them at the ages of seven and ten so I hear this apparently some security concerns over the Friday and Saturday screenings what are festival officials worried about? Well, they're worried about threats threats that have been made to the festival, and they are going to be very careful about security at the festival, and you never really see much security here. I mean, there might be people were making sure that that audience members aren't secretly taping a film, but they're gonna. Have bomb sniffing dogs. They're going to have undercover officers with weapons they're going to have a lot of visible and I suspect hidden security. We should note that the Jackson estate says that the documentary is quote, just another rehash of dated and discredited allegations. But there are a lot of people who support Michael Jackson and have really attacked the festival for showing this film, and it's going to screen just around the corner from our condo. I suspect. We'll be hearing a lot more tomorrow morning about the protests involving that film. Yeah. If you don't witness them yourself firsthand. I want to ask you how is Sundance doing this year when it comes to representation of films made by LGBTQ filmmakers, women and people of color. They are doing much better than other festivals. If you look at last year's telluride film festival, for example. There were only two narrative features that were premiering there that were made by female directors. And if you look at Sundance of the sixty one. Directors who are credited on fifty six films because some have co credits. Forty two percent are women thirty nine percent or people of color and twenty three percent are people who identify as LGBTQ Sundance has been very active outside of the festival in promoting filmmakers who come from underrepresented groups, that's always been something that's been important to them. But in the last couple of years they've really stepped it up that's frame.

Sundance Harvey Weinstein Michael Jackson John horn Utah Park City Jillian hall Susanne bier Steven Cuevas Jake Rashid Johnson Oscar Julianne Moore Richard Wright Adam Liu wings director Alex Gibney