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South Dakota Community Saves Beloved Curbside Cornstalk

"Good Morning I'm Steve Inskeep from Sioux. Falls. South Dakota comes a kernel of perseverance. That's dad joke because a single stalk of corn sprouted. Curb and busy intersection people were excited until it was found up rooted in the gutter. But Despair Not Sioux falls local heroes came to the rescue moving the fifty-seven street corn into a bucket where they say she's doing well, they've named her Cornelia it's morning edition.

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Amanpour: Evelyn Farkas, Dimitri Simes, Steve Inskeep and Sarah Hurwitz

Amanpour

57:19 min | 11 months ago

Amanpour: Evelyn Farkas, Dimitri Simes, Steve Inskeep and Sarah Hurwitz

"Hello everyone and welcome to on for. Here's what's coming up. You solemnly swear in Washington. Senators prepare for jury duty in president. Trump's impeachment trials while he flies off to join world leaders in Davos Switzerland. We ask where the Putin's Russia is making hay out of this DC dysfunction plus imperfect union. NPR's Stephen Steve inskeep tells me about his new book on America's first power couple and impeachments passed. Then I would show up at the major holidays. Right get some friends together together. We go to this then. I God I was proud to be Jewish. Full the White House. speechwriters Sara Horowitz says signing up for an intro to Judaism led to her own spiritual awakening. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane on four in New York. This is the week the the president. Trump's impeachment trial starts in earnest in the Senate but when it does on Tuesday the president himself will be at the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland joining other world leaders from climate change to conflict in the Middle East the global challenges are as towering as ever and right up there. US US relations with Russia now more strain than at any time since the Cold War. Those tensions come against a major power. Grab at home by President Putin Tim and his proposal for the most dramatic constitutional overhaul in a decade. It would be up the power of the parliament and reduce the cloud of the presidency. So is this all to retain his own grip on the country when his current term ends and what about the opportunities. Putin seems to be vacuuming up at America's expense dance on the world stage with me to discuss is Evelyn Farkas former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia and she's now running for Congress from New York. Aw and Dimitri Simes who runs the center for the national interest. A think tank the specializes in Russia. Fez Welcome both of you to the program. Oh Graham I'm Demetri. Can I ask you first but as you were at the last big Putin sort of press conference at the end of the year and you heard him talk about impeachment burnt about what it meant to him and Russia does Russia does he consider it a problem in terms of us. Russia relations or in terms of I guess as somebody who he considers friendly to himself survivability of President Trump Putin about the impact of impeachment on the US Russian relations. And that should. It was surprised when he said well. Impeachment It's just just something that this company because he will not be. The president will not be removed by the Senate at least set. I don't think so so. He expressed expressed relative optimism regarding his ability to to work with trump but from US as Russian government. Where of course here publicly alien privately exactly as you said relationship is very bad that not much? You may happen before the end of trump's first stem and even if Donald trump is reelected. They're skeptical that there will be fundamental changes since relationship so dmitry stand by a moment. I'm going to ask Evelyn Focus. Focus so The word from Putin's Russia is of course that they expect impeachment acquittal reelection and that yeah the relations between the two countries are bad and perhaps Russia count expect to have a different relation ship with the United States until the very end of whatever trump term. How do you see especially put but your old hat on assistance? I think that Vladimir Putin must be very happy right now because he is seeing America divided this this this process that were undergoing right now with impeachment hearings in the Senate or trial it is actually going to probably result in the president then being let off the hook and in a very partisan fashion and again if you remember when when President Putin when the Russians attacked our elections in two thousand sixteen ecksteen it wasn't necessarily about electing president trump. It was first and foremost about dividing US and defeating the United States making us weak and so far. So good for the Kremlin. I'm Lynn unfortunately so do you see that sort of systematic a interference in the last election. Two Thousand Sixteen. Do you see it revving up. I mean a a lot of people have said that all the signs and actually the actions of their for twenty twenty as well Christiane I see it every day. I see it on my twitter feed because I'm still a target of these Russian bots right that get together with some of the American bots and real people who get fooled by them so I see that all the time especially on the issue of Ukraine embarrassment right. I mean this is what the Kremlin is using right now to discredit vice president Biden to discredit anyone who criticizes trump president trump bright. So they're using this hard core they're also attacking Berra's my we you know about the hack that the the the oil company one hundred recently right that is very reminiscent of what they did here in the United States when they hacked when the Russians hacked into the DNC computers and stole the information and released it. Now we don't know how. How did they steal something? Will they release something but I think we can expect that. That's part of the Russian playbook Dmitri what do you think and how do you think Russia wants to leverage its abilities in its powers for this next election and do you think I mean. Do you get the sense when you're there that there at all concerned about about the incredible negative publicity and all the other you know not sanctions but all the other you know. The system has come off to them since the two thousand sixteen election. Well first of all let me say that there is no doubt in my mind. Is the Russian interference in lust election into. They're going linked to do it again. I actually said it several times on Russian TV in quite remarkable the Russian official participants would normally ignore it and would not even try to argue The best defense they provide is twofold first. We are not really trying to change the outcome of the elections. We're trying to influence American political process. And everybody does it and the second defenses. Well she was the United States. This is doing to us and others. Why shouldn't we try to do the same? But I'm got quite pessimistic that they interference would stop in. It would not be a major issue in our electoral campaign. So what would you do Dmitri I mean you've talked to many candidates in the past you council trump over the years what would you do to advise president trump or those around him about this danger and do think from your contacts likes that that they that they aware of it and that they care about this ongoing cyber danger well as you may know in two thousand sixteen My device compaign who was to stay away from the Russians at not to have any official contact with them whatsoever. Now I think That ministration understands how dangerous cities to have any Columbus and contacts any columbus arrangements. So he's the Russians. I think that they should be able to heat every day. Having said that you can look at the impeachment on those characters Around trump or at least on trump's periphery who do incur. Whatever they wanted and they thought it would win? President swimmer of a obviously cannot exclude That we would have certain individuals who is access to trump who try to make their own private arrangements enjoyments? I assume that ministration would certainly try to discourage that it is not an presidents interest. How do you respond to that It is so I think that this administration welcomes any assistance from foreign actors. The president. He's being impeached. Because not for the Russia stuff although that's also impeachable but because he asked the Ukrainian president to interfere in our elections by providing dirt on Vice President Biden so clearly clearly. This president invites this kind of interference. And I don't think he would turn the Russians away. The other issue is this communication sadly I think we have have clandestine communication occurring in the White House between the president and the Kremlin. They're not releasing transcripts of phone calls between the heads of state. That doesn't seem I'm very transparent to me and makes me and many others who follow Russia. US relations wonder what president trump is discussing when he has those phone calls with Letterman Putin. And what what did he discuss in Helsinki at the summit when they sat for about two hours right. So what you put back your your Pentagon had how should this country tree and the relevant departments and agencies react to all of this. How do you protect a nation in this in this situation? First and foremost we're having a whole host of elections presidential election. My own election. At the congressional level and local elections occurring. The Russians will attack these elections nations. If they see an opportunity to make progress in their agenda which again is weaken us get rid of people who were outspoken. Like me against them and so we need more money any going more money and more effort overall going into fortifying campaigns providing assistance to campaigns. That still isn't happening. The basically the Senate then it came under so much pressure so Mitch McConnell. The majority leader wasn't releasing funding increased funding to the states and Ford protect against this. Violate hacking right. Right and under a lot of public pressure. He finally did because people were calling in Moscow Mitch and he didn't like it but there's still a huge reluctance to come up with a comprehensive. The plan the White House doesn't even have cybersecurity. Czar anymore I mean it tells me that there passively inviting interference because they think it's not going to affect them now that's where they're wrong because again the Russians the North Koreans Iranians they will attack president trump. They will attack the White House if if they feel it's in their interest and they can get away with it again. It's so weird because there's so much that just doesn't seem to compute. I mean mixed messages. Who Gains Wyan? Wyan how Dmitri you also have heard. And I'd like you to expand on this that given the fact that Russia doesn't Putin doesn't expect Berto auto warmer relations with the US anytime soon. And I think you said that they don't they know that they can't challenge the US economically that they're planning other ways to challenge the United States. Can you explain what you mean. Well let me say fast that they completely agree with that what's the Russian Goldman to wants to do is To divide America entering cottage politicization in the American society. And I think that was the Republicans consider the Democrats have been very careful not to contribute to this politicization process And it's very easy unions elections kind trying to F- to forget about the picture in Dubuque PICCI's that if we go off to each other our Amos our adversaries cannoli welcomes and that is true for both parties know just for Republicans second. I'm interested to hear more school. To what extends area allies How weeks comically their knowledge in private conversations that economic meats and amusing gene expression the language? They use themselves but they also think they're strong militarily and that in a number of global conflicts it's still can play a role in can can count and I think that the different views on how rich this state of relations with Russia Russia Who is responsible for that? What if anything we could do better but we have to understand no is relationship with adversary? Oh and twelve Russians may prefer. Let's say to Biden. They certainly don't like trump's defense budget they don't like trump is using force loss more aggressively than about my administration in the number of global conflicts relationship. The Russians covers the United States. It's not auto is one party is another relationship across the political spectrum. Okay so this is really quite worrying to hear Dimitri who's really plugged into into the side. Talk about an adversary relationship. That involves them thinking. There's some kind of military response to the United States. How how exactly does that work? Because Dmitry says I mean. The military budget is much less than the United States. They're much less militarily powerful than the United States. How are they going to respond militarily? Yeah so I think I I agree with Dimitri here too because again Russia perceives all of the United States as its adversary. The way that they're getting at it. Christiane is first and foremost asymmetric. It means so attacking US through social media's part of it but remember the intelligence community also warned us last year about the fact that Russian bots and malware are are sitting on use energy and water systems right so these are energy systems water systems that are controlled by computers. The Russians can turn them off or manipulate manipulate them. Now you say to yourself. Why would they want to do that? Because in a worst case scenario for the Russian generals that's how they would play war with us right and we have to understand that's really dangerous because what the Russians also don't understand is if you play with our water and if you play with the lives of our citizens you're going to get a huge American backlash clash just nine eleven Pearl Harbor Right but somehow their doctrine allows them to take these asymmetric moves which are very risky very escalatory but they think they can prevail. They can cause us to say okay. Russia we win. We don't want a war with you. We'll back-off well made that into the big global picture. Then translate that into global pitch because we hear that you know I mean the death of Awesome Sulejmani by the American targeted killing the and the idea that might push the US out of the Middle East. The idea that they've I've had so much success in Syria. Thanks to a sort of A. US pullback over the years even since President Obama when you're in office from Syria how much are they gaining in in terms of finding a vacuum left by the United States or is there no vacuum left by the United States. So here's the thing we're still the most powerful country in the world power as defined lined by how much military hardware we have how much economic resources we have political power but influence our influence has declined whereas Russian influence has increased so the Iranians. The Syrians will listen to the Russians because their their power resources are sufficient and again their influence their know how to use it so unfortunately the Russians are playing a bigger role in the Middle East. Because they're willing to be more reliable than we are. I mean it is true. The president trump's unpredictability has caused problems for our allies including our western European allies by the way are with us on the ground in Iran and Iraq and and have been subject of these attacks by in the Middle East recently so the Russians have used all of this to their advantage to gain influence. They can't prevail. They can't can't solve the war in Syria alone ultimately the US will actually need to be at the table to solve it but they can drag it out and maybe overtime exhaust us. Exhaust exhaust NATO and our Western European allies exhaust the Democrats in the Middle East and get their way. That's the Russian game. And in the meantime they also strategically embracing embracing China. America's other major strategic rival. So Dimitri can you translate for US deconstruct for us. What President Putin route just done at home in terms of paving the way for this big constitutional change towards parliament and away from the presidency? And he's the president what ladies He. What is he actually doing? Well when he has done what he has done in his address to the federal assembly. I was in Washington so so I don't come in you particularly inside from private conversations and most goal but what I can tell you that from informed Russian observers to whom I talked talked by phone or visit in Greece in Washington including last week. I hear that this was quite significant. That they're looking for formula. Went in Portugal would be able to maintain power or at least considerable influence of his presidential term in two thousand twenty four at the minimum q wants probably two straight that he's not a lame duck in he's still number one and remained number one is the details are still be incorrect out but I think that what we should expect that there would be continuation of the Putin era will after twenty twenty four. If of course else cults and she seems to be good girls if sculpture would allow so let us just play a sound by when he described why he was doing. This we're just play this sound bite from President Putin last week go national. She's I know that's a constitutional provision is being discussed in our society that the same person should not be president the more than two consecutive terms. I don't think this is a fundamental issue. I agree with that. It's somewhat mixed messenger. NJIT DMITRI and indeed Evelyn because he's also said that people you know somebody's shouldn't be in power for forever and ever you said it would be very worrying to return to the situation we had in the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s when state need is stayed in power one by one until the end of their days and left office without ensuring the necessary conditions for a transition of power. So thanks but I think it would be better not to return to that situation and yet it looks Evelyn from here as returning to that situation but just using different public public offices to hold onto that power. Yeah what I predict. Is He'll end up behind the scenes holding onto power so the the the person that he put into to the prime appointed or said we'll be the next prime minister. He's a tax guy. He's a technocrat. He's not a threat he's fifty three years old and doesn't seem to have major ambitions and so he's. He's not considered a threat to Vladimir Putin. And I think what Putin we'll probably do if you can find someone else to be president who will be as obedient As Medvedev was he'll put that person in place and then behind the scenes he can control. Levers we see it in Republic of Georgia actually the oligarchy their bids Eva Zena. Yvonne is really. He's he's still the power behind his party. So it's doable in this kind of system where you don't have a full fledged alleged civil society full-fledged democracy I hate to criticize Georgia in the same breath but because they're trying very hard unlike in in Russia but there is a mechanism for Putin to hold on behind the scenes. So he doesn't look like Brad Chef Brezhnev's you know lean in Russia the old Soviet leader getting wrinkled in the public eye and dying. And then somebody else so Dmitri final question to you because people are looking at all these popular protests that are going on around the world from Iran and around the Middle East to wherever Hong Kong and everywhere and even some of them that turn out on the streets of Moscow. What impact do you think? The young people might ever have in Moscow or in Russia. Because there's been a huge amount of attention on how so many young people I mean. Forty percent forty million Russians born and raised in the age of of Putin two-thirds of Russian schoolchildren's say they have no interest in politics. On what sort of. I don't know social movements. It's can you imagine that could ever challenge Putin well obviously depends upon social conditions in Russia in the major part of his speech. The Federal Assembly was what she's going to do to provide different benefits to the people all people young people Mazdas the CETERA I do think that Putin is still popular but the level of popularity does not remains the same and they think that one reason he proceeded to resist changes right now that he's concerned about forthcoming relation relations too reluctant to the parliament. In that you may not have a full control over the next State Duma and he needs this full control to make changes in the constitution which would show his influence so so I think that Putin is clearly awarded but there is no yet crisis that would be a looming right now really interesting Dimitri Simes Evident Farkas. Thank you both very much for joining me there on the wrong side of history. That's me Daniel Radcliffe can steeper semi dark ages of Miracle Work Permits January twenty eighth at ten thirty nine thirty central on. TBS turning out to another contentious election year eighteen fifty six in imperfect the union the CO host of NPR's morning edition. Steve inskeep tells the story of America's first political power couple. John and Jessie Fremont Fremont was the first I ever Republican nominee and the campaign was dominated by immigration race and political demagogy. Does that sound familiar. Steve inskeep joins always me now from Washington. I can see you smiling because I recognized a train. How is it possible that these things just last and last first and last that is the nature of democracy there are politicians who said of democracy that in our politics nothing is ever over and you understand why we have new generations? We have new people entering the political system every single time. We have the same essentially political system with that. We've had for centuries now and and as a result. Christiane what I'm able to do here by going into these years before the American civil war is find the backdrop to the discussion. You've just been having we're in this time of extreme politics in which a Lotta people fear not just losing election but that their side will lose for all time forever you have. Republicans concerned about the demographic change in the country. Democrats are confident that demographic changes in their favor over time but they are also so now worried about being shoved out of power forever by President they see as an authoritarian. So there's a lot of anxiety in the air and in the eighteen forties and fifties It was similar. The United States was divided between the North and south free states and slave states and there was a big demographic change going on causing the free states to be far more populous which the south found really really threatening and in my story. I traced the story of an ambitious couple Bowl Jesse and John Fremont as they He was a western explorer. She helped promote his experiences and they ended up so famous that John ran for president in aged fifty six and this brutal election. So tell me about it because I'm fascinated I mean first of all. It is the first Republican nominee. So I don't know whether everybody knows that. The Republican Party was so news right then and then also. His wife was so impact but important. Explain the dynamics between Republicans and the other party and then the role of women now okay. We've Seen Hillary Clinton really powerful first lady and then in her own right. Michelle Obama really powerful first lady but then it wasn't so much not at all women of course had gender roles that were much more limited but the emergence of Jesse as a character and in of women more generally at that time and the creation of the Republican party are connected In the early years of American politics slavery did exist in a bunch of states. It's in the south and if you wanted to have a national political party that was viable you needed to accommodate what was called the slave power you needed to be pro slavery or at least keep your mouth shut. The Republican Party was founded in the eighteen fifties on the idea that the north had become so populous that they might be able to win a presidential the election with northern votes alone which meant they could be anti slavery. They weren't actually for abolition at the beginning. That was considered extreme but they were against the expansion of slavery and so they captured a lot of the energy in the country in eighteen. Fifty six when they ran their first presidential candidate. Women had not been allowed to be in politics up to now but they were allowed to take on what was called Benevolent. Cause and a lot of women took that opportunity grabbed that loophole in order to to speak up against slavery they were a big part of the Anti Slavery Movement and win. The Republican Party nominated John C Fremont as their first candidate. Jessie Fremont who was prominent herself. The daughter of a United States senator was taken up as a kind of symbol of there. 'cause she was a southerner from a slave owning family whose mother had turned against slavery and had translated her views to Jesse and in a way that was unprecedented. At the the time people would go to the Fremont House by the thousands and demand to see the candidate that asked him to come to the balcony but when he came and waved and went away again they weren't satisfied aside and they would shout for Jesse to come out to let me read this passage from your book where you say. It was no coincidence that his career began to soar a few months often. They eloped when he was twenty-eight and she was seventeen I thought as many others did said one of their critics that Jessie Benton Fremont was the better man of the the two. Well there's a compliment in eighteen fifty six. Yeah the guy who said that may have actually been trying to diss John Fremont and away by saying that his wife overshadowed him but he was also in many ways telling the truth she was a young woman who had grown up very close to her father in some ways you could say that she wanted to be a man by which I mean that she wanted to do things that were supposed to be limited to men. She couldn't really do that but she was able to operate through her husband and he explored the American West in the eighteen forties and fifties went out in these dramatic. Expeditions even took part in the United States. Conquest of California from Mexico was considered a huge hero but as an explorer. He didn't actually discover that much. That was new. What he did was come back east and write these dramatic accounts of his adventures and also make great maps which were intended to promote the American settlement of the West Promotion was the point which is one of the ways? This is a really early modern story and Jesse helped him with that. She was his secretary as he wrote sometimes his editor sometimes his CO author Sir occasionally even his ghostwriter she was his political adviser someone who had grown up around senators and even presidents and was entirely confident. Even there's a young woman telling President her opinion even when she knew they did not agree. With that opinion. She was a remarkable figure who even before this campaign of eighteen fifty six had begun to develop public profile of her own now. It's not unprecedented. That women in Washington in the early days of this country were influential. There were a bunch launch of influential women in that time but it was unusual that a woman would becomes so public and so publicly associated with her husband's policies and when he did run for president she was also viciously attacked as a woman for being so forward. Yeah that hasn't changed has it Let me ask you this though if if John was the first Republican nominee president trump or candidate trump in September. Two Thousand Sixteen just before the election. said that he might be the last Republican nominee. Because of the situation of demographics. You're just talking about now and how you know immigration then and now is still obviously a a major issue and and used by demagogues really this is what president trump said about why Americans should vote for him. I think this will be the last asked election that the Republicans have a chance of winning. Because you're gonNA have people flowing across the border you're going to have illegal immigrants coming in and they're going to be legalized and they're going to be able to vote. And once that happens you can forget it. So Steve I mean look you know clearly politicians being pointing the finger and pointing the the fear at the other. It's happened for hundreds of years. I mean is there any way you can see a society. Changing political campaigns campaigns would be less like that in the future or is this just something this country and many others are going to be living with well let me say two seemingly contradictory things I Christiane one is what I said before. Nothing is ever over. There will always be new voices in the political system there will always be people entering the political arena. And they may well start with certain views that have to be argued over again and again and again there is a similarity between right now and the eighteen fifties because there was a demographic change that people found to be threatening In modern times you know. The elite of the Republican Party tried to deal with that demographic change by shifting Republican Party policies to be more welcoming specifically Latinos a huge growing population in this country. But they found out that their electorate had a different set of concerns. And I'm sure that many people watching this who voted for president trump would say I'm not against immigrants but what they did did want was a reduction in immigration. They did want less illegal immigration as well they did want a wall or some kind of border security. These were things that people voted for more explicitly. It wasn't just a metaphor to them that has been profoundly divisive but the other thing to realize is that America gets passed asked these faces phases and changes and the people that we worry about assimilating end up fitting into America just fine in the eighteen forties and fifties John. Charles Fremont running for president was revealed to be the illegitimate son of immigrant which was true and then the opposition press has turned him into an immigrant. said he'd been born outside the United States there were burgers in eighteen fifty six. He was also accused in a way that can sound familiar to us a being a member of this dangerous alien religion. We talk about Islam today or some of us do in that way. In those days the dangerous religion religion was Catholicism and there was a great deal of paranoia that Catholics would be used by the Pope or by European forces to take over the country. It was a very very real fear in a lot of people's minds in a very big thing driving the anti-immigrant sentiment in the fear of change in the country. But one thing about looking back in history is that we can see how our fears of the moment. Turn out over time and as we know very well. There is a very large Catholic population in the United States today and they fit into America just fine and there was a Catholic president. Of course John F. Kennedy. I had to go through that as well. Look we're talking on the anniversary of Dr King's birthday a federal holiday and we're in the middle of a presidential election race. There's not a single candidate of color left in the Democratic race and obviously not on the Republican side either Ah But but there are women and the New York Times has come out and endorsed two women running for the Democratic Nomination Elizabeth with Warren and Amy Klobuchar two senators who will be sitting in on the impeachment trial. Of Course A. What does that say to you? You're not just an author your a host of a morning newscast which is massively successful. What does that say to you and did you see that coming? I didn't see the joint endorsement coming but it would be hard not to know about the conflict at the time chose with this endorsement to illustrate they explicitly said let's pick somebody that we like from the more progressive wing of the party. And let's pick somebody that we liked from the more moderate or pragmatic wing of the party and Amy Klobuchar. WHO's the moderate there would say? I'm perfectly progressive but that she wants to be practical and and and get things done. That is a divide that the Democratic Party faces and as a writer as a historian I can say that that is a classic American political dilemma. Lamma do I go for the candidate who stands for my ideals or the candidate who stands for some of my ideals and I think can win. It's not always. It's a really clear choice. Is it in two thousand sixteen. Republicans went for the most radical choice available and also one so the radical choice can be a winner. But you have to face that dilemma in doing my research about eighteen fifty six. I found that one of the greatest Americans. Frederick Douglass faced this kind of decision whether to go for a true through anti slavery candidate or for this New Republican Party. That was sort of anti slavery was against the expansion of slavery and he changed his mind and decided to go the pragmatic route and just very quickly. Because we're running out of time impeachments past as I said these senators are going to have to take time off the campaign trail to fulfill the jury duty so to speak. What should we be thinking in light of history as well? Andrew Jackson and and other presidents who've been through this process well Andrew Johnson in eighteen eighteen. Sixty eight was impeached and put on trial before the United States. Senate and it was Nominally Republican senator. WHO's our president who had sort of become a Democrat crat It was a heavily Republican. Senate that was going to judge him and there were a number of senators who had to make the difficult choice to vote against their party and keep Andrew Johnson in office. Now that doesn't mean that the right and patriotic thing to do now is automatically to keep president and trump in office. Let's set aside that judgment but what I think is really valuable about that. Moment is first. That impeachment was significant as historians have pointed out. Even though Andrew Johnson was not removed he was limited. He was constrained by that process. And second that it is a good idea for senators however they vote to think in the longterm to think about the long term health of the institutions that they are that they are charged with preserving for another generation that matters a lot more then then the next election even if they feel differently in their particular situation. And of course you're right. It was Andrew Johnson Not Jackson misspoke. But but what are you hoping to see all expecting to see a news person regarding evidence you just heard Evelyn Farkas and and Dimitri Simes talking about certain emails and texts that I have not been released relating to this Situation the this impeachment trial. What are you looking for as a journalist? I am just watching the statements of the handful and full of Republican senators. Who could make the difference here? Mitch McConnell and setting up this trial didn't say no witnesses. He said we'll decide a little bit later on witnesses even though he's made made his personal view clear that there shouldn't be any witnesses but they're reserving the actual decision for later and there are a few statements now from senators like Susan Collins of Maine as as evidence has come out just in the last few days that maybe we need to think about witnesses. Now critics of Collins will point out that she doesn't always follow through and that sort of thing but it seems there's an open question. Yup Indeed Steve inskeep thank you so much for joining us today. Delighted to be here now. America is celebrating as we said. Martin Luther King in day which shines a light on the importance of equality and unity in these divisive times. Our next guest asks what Judaism. Teach US Sara. Horowitz was a white White House speech writer for President Barack Obama and then for first lady. Michelle Obama her book. Here all along is about waking up to the faith that she was born into she told Michelle. Martin talk a little bit about how you grew up. I mean he were born into a family that identified NFL. Jewish right. And you did all the things in the things but what was your impression of it then yes we went to services twice here at the major holidays if your Rochas Sonya Poor Hanukkah party I went to Hebrew school and my impression as a kid who is that it was mainly kind of boring right. The services were long they they were a lot of Hebrew sitting down and standing up. And what after I had my just thought you know. I just don't think there's much see here right when you talk to your parents about what it was four and why we're doing these things. What did they say? I don't know if I actually inquire deeply with me about it. I think it was just a sense like we're Jewish and this is what we do like. We're we're proud identity. We want to be part of the Jewish community and I think it was sentenced to the synagogue twice a year we go to the Hebrew school. We have the Hanukkah party like. That's just what we do as Jews. I don't know if I ever had a deep conversation with them about what it meant for them. So after you about Mitzvah for those who don't know about this is what it is a coming of age ceremony whereby by you become meal Bar Mitzvah means son or daughter of the commandments. And that's when you're sort of considered to be responsible for trying to observe Jewish law as an adult so about Mr happens when you're wet twelve or thirteen tradition and then you went so you go. Do the things you went to college. You went to law school. You become big time speechwriter for Breath Hillary Clinton first and then for Brcko than for Michelle Obama during all this time. What what was your sort of sense of your spiritual life did did you? Did you ever think about it. Because the OBAMAS talked about those things a lot ted he did and you know it's really funny. I had a vague sense that something was missing right. I have a vague sense of like Kasha Really Nice. I would talk to people who had a deep faith and there was something that they had that I didn't. I don't know if I could articulate particularly clearly but there was just something going on that I didn't have access to and so for me I would show up at the major holidays right. Get some friends together. We'd go to synagogue. I I was proud to be Jewish but that was it you know. I think if you'd said well what do you think about God. I would have said if it's or maybe you know agnostic. Who knows just just didn't think much about it? Because I was so busy and I had a lot going on that was fulfilling. You know when every minute of your life in the White House you're rushing to do something something you're scrambling you're thinking you're working. There isn't a lot of space for other stuff. And so then the day came when you decided to dig defer. You're just described that you didn't quite get hit with a bullet wasn't that I mean not culturally inappropriate it with something. I know people want that story right there like you. This moment of crisis the honest to God truth I was dating a guy I broke up with him and I was lonely and bored anxious. I suddenly had a lot of time on my hands and I happened to get an email from the local Jewish community center about an intruder Judaism class and I swear I signed up just because I just thought I need something I do intro to Julius Judaism it could have been an intro to photography karate ceramics. I probably would have taken it. I don't look if it had been intro to Christianity. What I've taken it? I don't know but Inter Judy is just not you know I know nothing about Judaism. Some might say that the universe since you they might say that and I I don't know if I would say that but some might say it and I just thought you know what I should learn something about my heritage so we're up so I went into this classroom. Standard class in the class itself was not unusual but we started studying these ancient Jewish texts about Jewish ethical wisdom about how to be a good person different theologies different Jewish approaches to God the real thinking behind all these Jewish holidays and rituals and I was blown away. This was so deep an edgy and wise and radical and counter cultural and insightful in a way that secular society he just isn't and I just wear. has this been all my life early. Where is this new? It's like you show up twice a year for the synagogue services and you do a Seder and you do the Hanukkah party and it can be meaningful but Judaism is much more than that. This is four thousand years of people crowdsource wisdom from millions of people about what it means to be human and suddenly it was all there before me. I just thought like I cannot believe this has been here and I didn't do you remember. What is it about that class? That's so griff you even then it just that first meeting do you remember you know over the chorus of various classes. I just thought wait a second this this this is extraordinarily like I remember. I remember calling my dad. After one of the classes. We'd studied a text that said basically build a fence around the Torah and what Torres Judaism's Chore Sacred Texts Like the Koran or whatever and the idea of building a fence around it means you know what just be extra careful about observing law and I called my dad and I said that this is what you always said to us about right and wrong about when something is right you go a little further necessary to make sure you're doing the right thing and you know I said this is a Jewish idea. I think it'd probably my dad would probably learned that in Hebrew school or from his parents and we hadn't necessarily realized like Oh. This is actually a key Jewish teaching and I just thought there's so many moments like that and I just thought okay. I need to learn more. Look what else for example and things you also say in the book. Is that you. You found that you didn't need need Judaism to be a good person but you did need Judaism to be a great person. Factly another example of that you know look I. I think I'm a good person. I don't don't lie cheat or steal. I follow the letter of American law. I try to be kind to others. That is a low bar. I mean American law is designed to ensure that I don't to physically assault people or take their property or infringe on their rights is not designed to ensure that I am honest generous loving kind fair. That's not and good. I don't want American law in doing that. But in studying Jewish lots like there's all this Jewish thinking about speech about gossip about shaming people. An studying I just I felt busted. I thought it was like they were saying like Sarah. We saw you do this last week. And don't do it right. There was just so many little things about how I'm so casually cruel with my speech every day. I don't even think about it and casually cool. Yeah usually cruel. Yeah you know there are these moments comments where okay I think an example. If we're colleagues we get into an argument furious at you. I go out and I just held bunch of friends. Michelle's the worst. She's the worship worship that she's not smart she's better job she's dishonest. I really got it so angry. I'm back the next day. We apologized. This is news misunderstanding. I just told a bunch of people some pretty tough things about you and maybe they tell other people maybe a month from now. You're playing for a job at a company company that one of those people who owns and they say remember something about that woman some remember initial issues with this thoughtless speech. I there's a real cruelty I've I've actually done real harm to your reputation. I didn't even think about it and that was sobering to me. You know that that that ethic of being really careful with your words ironic. But as a speechwriter. I had not been so thoughtful about the words I personally spoke so now I still mess it up one hundred times a day but I used to mess it up one hundred fifty times a day. So I'm I'm getting a little better with. How is that different from ethics? How is that different from ethics or manners even told me what's what is the difference? I think what's different. Is Specificity specificity of it you know when you just say we'll speak kindly don't gossip okay. What what's what can I say something? That's true if it's true but it's not hurt. You can really get down into the weeds here and I. There's a lot of things I can say. Well that's not really gossip that's not really shaming that Judaism actually doesn't let you get away with that right. The more you study these Jewish wish laws you think. Oh well okay. This isn't really gossip and then they say oh no yes it is right. I think. Just don't gossip. It's just not memorable to me whereas you know you study these Jewish stories. There's one very famous one about a man who goes around saying nasty things about his. Rabbi he then kills badly ghost the rabbi admits what he's done and that says okay. I'll forgive you but I you have to take a feather pillow and cut it open and scatter the feathers to the winds guy. Thinks this this is very weird but says okay does it comes back and he says am I forgiven and the rabbi says sure but I you have to gather up all those feathers. I think about that now right. That is a very sticky with gossip does it spreads we can't get you can't get it back right and that's just different. Different than manners are ethics. Right that that is it's it's deeper. It's more the court you know at the core of for some people particularly people who see themselves as rational the problem that they have not just with Judaism with really the most faith. Traditions is the idea that you're GONNA go someplace bad if you don't do what the demand manses right. So how did you confront this whole notion of what it means to be faithful. Yeah and to be obedient said interesting. I- I rejected acted that as a twelve year old and I even more vehemently rejected now. Because I think once you go down that road of there is a God that can who controls everything and rewards and punishes you as you deserve things very hard to explain. It's like okay well. What about the Holocaust well but people have free well so people did the Holocaust? Not God. It's it's like okay. So what is God doing all day. Well it's complicated like I feel like there's a lot of mental gymnastics necessary to justify something that I just see disproven every hour of every day so I actually I reject the idea that there is a being who rewards and punishes us as we deserve. I mean that is. That's a really tough theology. I just can't can't buy it. I reject it and that is not the that's not. The Jewish God is not a man in the sky rewards and punishes right. There's a lot of Jewish concepts of the divine nine and once I was aware of that. Then things got interesting right then. I felt like I could finally develop an adult spirituality. I could make an argument that you chose. You chose to Z.. Jewish maybe you didn't choose to be born into Judaism but you chose. I chose to be Jewish and I think you hear sort of old phrase the chosen people which I've a complicated relationship with but I I think we're very much the choosing people today but jeans ING choosing people. I think we choose to be Jewish. I've chosen actively to be Jewish and I think the way relate eight to these ancient holidays interpret them for modern times right you. They have to be interpreted. We're an interpretive tradition. Jews no more live by the original version of the Torah which which is twenty five hundred years old that Americans live by the original version of the constitution. Thank God both. Those documents allowed slavery. I'm sorry the epitome of evil right treating people as property is the epitome of evil yet. We've reinterpreted than we've reimagined them to get rid of something. That was clearly evil so I think about Johanna holiday like Hanukkah and I think about well okay what is what does this holiday mean rate it has I think it has lessons about being thoughtful about assimilation and not not assimilation. I think it also has lessons about having enough right. It's like the you know. They thought they had enough oil for one night of temple but it was actually for eight nights I think sometimes. Can you feel like you don't have enough in your life. It's two Little Yorkshire realize that you do and I think there's a real lesson about about gratitude there. That is very important so now I have to interpret these for modern times. How you mentioned slavery? So how do you relate to what some would argue you are the. I don't know what we're to use. Respectfully the scars of the difficult parts of the genocides found matters. You know You Know Daniel blowing the trumpet and bringing the walls out. That's genocide I mean. How did he relate to these aspects of the texts that seemed to warrant the the wiping out of people? Because they're in your way. We Ito Lake the Constitution. You have to reinterpret them. I mean the the Torah clearly says I I for an eye is that. That's that's the clear meeting however two thousand years ago ancient rabbis said No. No No. This actually means that if you put up someone's I you have to monetarily. Compensate them. Not what the text says. They interpreted it right. We don't it says to stone people working on Chabad we got. We don't do that rate. You have to reinterpret Herbert these texts and that just like with our Constitution. We've reinterpreted to outlaw slavery to allow women to vote. We continue to do this now. I'm right here getting to a real problem. These are human human systems. took us a long time to outlaw slavery that evil went on for a really really long time. So if you're going to try to make me say well. This is a perfect assistant. It's foolproof and it's me no it's not rate. These rely on US using our humans hearts and minds to interpret these documents and kind and loving indecent way but to me you you. I think that the core ideals of America have a lot to do with equality with liberty with freedom things like that and if the if our laws aren't being interpreted with those in in light of those core ideals we are failing and we need to reinterpret are documents same thing with Judaism. How has your life changed Since you have been on this path breath yeah. Having developed an adult spirituality with jude through Judaism I am so much more open and grateful and joyful will and filled with wonder and my daily life and those towns sort of cheesier weird but like I just. I'm just more more grateful for small things I know this is silly like I was in a hotel room the other night and I just thought such a lovely hotel room is quiet is so clean and beautiful and I just felt such a sense of delayed eight and like gratitude for the incredible privilege which and how is that Jewish so how is it uniquely and specifically Jewish wishes. You know every you know urges but I think are connected to your. Yeah how's that connected my faith Judaism places a huge premium on gratitude. which you know now? It's like everyone's got the gratitude journal and we're all into gratitude. For centuries traditionally observant Jews the first words they say when they wake up in the morning are Moda Komodo on the depending on your gender which means I am thankful. That's literally the first words out of your mouth when you wake up in the morning. The first words of the morning prayers are. I'm I'm I'm thankful. And you're basically saying a prayer of gratitude for your life of gratitude for your existence. Just think you know understanding that emphasis to me. I try to feel a lot more gratitude attitude for my daily existence. You've talked about the fact that you always identified as Jewish even when you were not practicing. We're observing in the way that you you do now. What do you make of of president? Trump's executive order on anti Semitism. I mean it's caused a huge reaction and has some favorable which of it not What what is your take on as a person who worked at that level? Yeah you know to be honest my first reaction Shen at seeing this gets so much news attention just a sense of of dismay because I think so often what I'm seeing in the news. Is this narrative that win. Judaism you this sort of narrative. The news about Judaism is Israel. Plus anti-semitism Equals Judaism and this executive order dealt with both right it dealt with antisemitism awesome and with kind of anti Zionism. Is that anti-semitism. So I just felt a sense of like oh here we go again another. This is another could mark in which another moment which that equation regime is kind of playing out in the media so I just felt a little bit of just dismay like we're doing this again. I think the order is actually really complicated to be honest. I think it's Komo. I think why it's complicated into something. That haven't really heard a lot of people talking about is Judaism race nationality. We're not at this ity. Jews are of every race ethnicity and nationality. That's just a fact. nores Judaism just a religion right. I can reject every tenant Jewish religion and I'm still Jewish. So okay what is it it. It's a people which you you're either born into or you. Choose to become part of through conversion. There's no legal category for people hood and so I think we we kind of have this this clumsy thing where we're trying to find the right category for Judaism and it's just it's not there so I think you know and I just I'm a little frustrated with the divisiveness of the debates around these things but at the same time I also understand that when this is coming from administration with the president who has been repeating antisemitic sentiments and people are understandably suspicious and I can understand the kind of vehemence of the response though it's complicated. Have you shared your book with the OBAMAS. I have I did when I haven't talked to them about the book yet but when my book came out Mrs Obama send the most beautiful tweet like every time I read it I I start crying I mean it was just so kind and loving and back when I first holder at the end of the administration that I want to write this book she was just so excited base you so so proud and I think she saw passionate about it and she was like go do it. This is Great Sara Hurwitz. Thank you so much for so much. Thank you for having me and finally as we said of course it is Martin Luther King Junior Day a federal holiday that honors the slain civil rights activists this use schoolchildren pay a tribute to his legacy in a speech contest in which they were asked the question. What would Dr King's vision for Twenty Twenty America? Be If he were alive today. One one fifth grader from Dallas Texas Colin Harris while the judges with his message of love and freedom and equality take a listen. Dr Dr King's vision for society. What have been for us to move forward and allow people to live their lives? Despite the racial backgrounds in order to meet that vision we would have to listen to one another have compassion for each other. Oh and who doesn't I want to listen to more from column showing wisdom beyond his years or maybe because of his years Collins says the only way to move forward is by listening to each other a message that we could only apply to our lives today so in the words of the famous stevie wonder song written especially for him thirty nine years ago. We say Happy Birthday Dr King and that is it for now. Thanks for watching and goodbye from Neil. The data are you interested in learning. How Enterprise scale companies drive organic traffic to increase their online visibility than download? The voices of search podcast from the heart of Silicon Valley elite here search. Metrics Inc's CEO George Cooney this. He delivers actionable. Insights into how data to navigate the ever changing landscape of Google Apple Amazon and the voices of search podcast arm search engine marketers and business analysts with the latest news and insight. They need to get the ever changing landscape of search engine optimization Asian and content. Are you ready to learn how to use search data defined strategic insights about your competition and your industry as a whole and search for voices of search wherever you download your cast. That's three simple words voices of search to learn the secrets of search engine and content marketing.

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Jordanian Prime Minister On The Future Of The West Bank

NPR's World Story of the Day

06:39 min | 4 months ago

Jordanian Prime Minister On The Future Of The West Bank

"The head of Jordan's government has warning for Israel and for its ally. The United States Jordan's prime minister spoke with Steve Inskeep Omar Ras is a longtime Jordanian political figure who is now the top official beneath Jordan's King. Abdullah. Jordan exists in a very tough neighborhood and it's the snowbirds been tough for. Decades, Jordan borders, Syria and Iraq, and also Israel. If you look at a map, you see Jordan touches the occupied West Bank, which is called that because it is the West Bank of the Jordan River, the West Bank is territory the Jordan controlled until Israeli troops took it in one, thousand, nine, Sixty, seven, Jordan is one of the few. Arab. Countries that have since made A. A peace treaty with Israel, but it is watching with alarm. Is Prime Minister Benjamin. Netanyahu, promises to annex portions of the West Bank. Israel maintains that it has both security needs and historic ties to that land. While the Palestinians long lived. There wanted for future state. What happens if Israel begins annexing territory in the occupied West Bank is the Prime Minister Netanyahu has promised to do. Well. We hope it won't happen because Jordan and His Majesty. The king. We have been four a just and peaceful settlement in the region, which includes two state solution with the Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital. Any unilateral action undermines that and puts the whole region and I. If I might say, the world an dicey situation, this is not in anybody's interests frankly at all and. And, if the two state solution becomes not viable because of this annexation, then my question is what is alternative what his other option to the Israelis is it thinking of a one St Democracy for two people or is it going to be a state of apartheid which the world was glad to not have an its membership since the end of the South African apartheid state? What happens if this annexation goes ahead, is Jordan, a position of saying we will advocate a one state solution in which Palestinians would seek their rights within the Israeli state. Well Jordan has historically been committed to a two-state solution, and it is still a viable solution. If Israel does not go ahead with annexation, if it does, it's creating new facts on the grounds that will undermine the two state solution, and by undermining the two states' solution, we need to know what is the plan that does not undermine long-term peace and stability in the region and I. Don't think there is one. Prime Minister is you probably know some figures on the Israeli. Right have been asked when you take land in the occupied West. Bank what happens to the people? Do you end up with stateless people? As you mentioned an apartheid state and one answer given by figures on the Israeli bright is well, the Palestinians can become Jordanian citizens with Jordanian passports, and in fact, they once did that Would you accept them? that's pipe-dream. That's wishful thinking. That's not gonNA. Happen the whole. Jordanian. Society from starting from His Majesty the King to the government to the people are steadfast about this. Jordan will not be Palestine. Palestine. Is a state that needs to be on territory and Palestinians. So we are unified with the Palestinians on fully ejecting the idea of of transfer. Do. You think the trump administration is hearing your concerns. Jordan's relationship with the US is strategic and we communicate all the time and there's a common understanding of all constraints and their constraints and an understanding of where Jordan stance on this issue. So the strategic nature of that relationship allows us to coordinate express out of us and have agreements and differences every now. But do you think they hear your concerns specifically about annexation? Israel's promise to annex parts of the West Bank. Yes His Majesty. The king has expressed his concerns about annexation unilateral action in every international forum that anything short of a two state solution. Will. Send. You know what it would do. It will close the whatever hope prospect for hope, there still is, and when hope disappears frustration and anger and that tends to and has in the past led to extremism, and we've seen extremism in that region, and as also we've seen around the world extremism also becomes global. So everybody will pay the price of this. Do you think you're being taken seriously by the United States. Steve. I think I've answered your question We've made our views very clear, and that's what we do in every setting with our strategic. One of the things I want to ask about the trump administration. Has attempted various moves against foreign students, international students in the United States. The trump administration has also made moves to reduce legal immigration setting. Aside, illegal immigration. They've moved against legal immigration and I'd like people to know that you were educated in the United States, which is true of a lot of people who've risen to senior positions in countries around the world. What did you get out of your US education? Well. My own individual experience was it was studying in the United States was a huge benefit for me because it was a context in which students from all over the world were there. We learned a lot from each other about each other, but also it was a great opportunity for American students who had a chance to meet students from the world and learn. About the world. So that's My own experience. Prime Minister has thank you very much for the time. Thank you Steve He is the head of government under Jordan's King. Abdullah.

Jordan prime minister Israel West Bank United States Jordan River Abdullah West Bank Steve Inskeep Omar Ras Netanyahu Syria Jerusalem Steve He Palestine Iraq official Steve
Thursday, September 10, 2020

Up First

13:22 min | 3 months ago

Thursday, September 10, 2020

"On Asked blocking the sun lifted orange red glow in the sky. It's a sign of destruction on the ground in California, Oregon and Washington whole child has gone how to safely shelter those who flee I'm Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep, and this is up first from NPR news. The President says he knew the coronavirus was far worse than flu. Why did he tell the public? It was less deadly than the flu it's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle will disappear in a new book by Bob Woodward the President himself says he played down the threat. Also government whistleblower says he was ordered to make intelligence on white supremacists seen quote less severe. What information did the administration keep from the public stay with us we'll give you the news you need to start your day. Support. For this NPR podcast and the following message come from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors specializing in isolation depression, stress and anxiety visit better help dot com slash up first to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. An orange glow filled the sky over San Francisco yesterday one of many signs of fire across the West extreme heat and fifty mile per hour wind gusts are fueling the fires in Oregon more than three dozen wildfires are affecting every region of that state Governor Kate Brown called it a once in a generation event, the fires all but destroyed five small towns on Wednesday. At least three people are reported dead emily. Carrington is the Central Oregon Bureau chief for Oregon Public Broadcasting, and his following all of this from Bend Oregon Good Morning Good. Morning Steve. Could you just describe what the last twenty four hours of been like in Oregon? State officials are calling the destruction seen so far unprecedented as of yesterday, afternoon fires are burning on more than five hundred square miles of the state. Communities located hundreds of miles apart have been substantially destroyed. This includes Detroit Blue River Vita. Phoenix and Talent Oregon at a press conference yesterday Organ Governor Kate Brown told organs to brace for a death toll. Here's Brown. This could be the greatest loss of human lives and property due to wildfire in our state's history Brown sent a letter yesterday to President Donald Trump requesting a federal emergency declaration to free up more state resources for things like search and rescue shelter food and mortuary assistance. Granting that we're early here and the numbers will change. How can we measure the death and destruction? Three people are confirmed dead as of Wednesday. This includes a thirteen year old boy and his grandmother and more deaths are expected search and rescue operations in burned areas have been slowed by the dangerous windy conditions over the last three days and resources being stretched. Then as these evacuations continue as for property early reports indicate at least hundreds of homes in central and southern Oregon have burned my colleague Dirk. Vander heart spoke to Dennis Maalim yesterday in Salem Maalim House burned down near the Sanam River in the community of gates pretty much the whole town has gone. There isn't much left Ursel worst part of it is we're hearing from my son up into malaria, his home Bernie row last night to for context there the son's home is fifty miles from Lum's on on a different river and adding to the disaster. Nearly fifty thousand people are without electricity this morning. Then there's smoke blanketing much of western Oregon making the air unhealthy to breathe. That's especially bad news for vulnerable people and with covid nineteen while how do people protect themselves from the pandemic while also protecting themselves from the fire The red. Cross has set up temporary evacuation points around the state and these aren't like shelters of the past. I mean they're essentially parking lots where evacuees can come to stay in and around their vehicles while volunteers try to meet their needs. Red Cross spokesman Chad Carter told me that people who need shelter are being handled on a case by case basis. But when someone shows up and they do need shelter, we're prioritizing based on the size and scope of the disaster hotel rooms. That's the safest place for folks to be because of covid nineteen that said, there just aren't enough available hotel rooms near the evacuated community and some more traditional shelters are being set up. What fire managers expecting today very briefly hopefully, weaker wins. The forecast is changing and We are told that as a hopeful change in weather conditions where we might be able to pivot from survival mode to containment. Emily thanks so much. You're welcome Steve Emily Cureton of Oregon Public Broadcasting. President, trump provided two very different assessments of the pandemic off camera. He knew it was serious far more deadly than the flu on camera. He told you that it would go away and was far less deadly than the flu. This is not the first inside account to offer damaging revelations about the president's in this case, though the source of the information is the president he spoke with journalist Bob Woodward for a new book called rage we're going to hear some of his remarks in the order they happened on. February seventh. The president told Woodward that he had learned just how dangerous the virus was here's audio from the Washington Post it goes through Bob. That's always tougher than the touch the touch you don't have to touch things but the air you breathe the air, that's how it's passed. And so that's a very tricky one. That's a very delicate one It's also more deadly. Then your you know your even your strenuous flus later, that same month, the stock market plunged over fears of the pandemic and the president began saying the virus was far less deadly than the flu it's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle it will disappear by March. Ten he had known for more than a month. It was far more deadly than the flu, but here's what he told the nation that day. Were Twenty six deaths. And if you look at the flu the flu, this year we're. We're we're looking at eight thousand deaths and. Hundreds of thousands of cases eight thousand. Eight thousand versus twenty six tests at this. What to make of all this NPR White House correspondent Franken. Joins US now Franko, Good Morning Good Morning Steve What were the president's original sources of information that the pandemic was really serious. Well I mean two key sources whereas top national security advisers. One was his national security adviser, Robert O'Brien who told trump that the virus will be the biggest national security threat that he would face in his presidency. Another was another national security adviser for that region who compared this to the nine, thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen Spanish flu which killed as many as fifty million people. But President. Trump was also talking with Chinese President Xi Jingping about the significance of the virus and early February and all that time he was talking publicly about how this virus would go what seems to have prompted him to speak falsely that way. Well, you know the president trump says that he did not want to create a panic he wanted to instead show confidence, but the reality is there was already a lot of fear around the world by mid February the virus had spread rapidly from China. Also South Korea and Italy and those fears included economic concerns. As Rachel noted, international markets took a major hit. Amid fears of prolonged global economic slowdown. House the President Defending himself now that the book is out. Well. He's arguing now that there was not much of a discrepancy between what he said and the book but I was at the White House yesterday and asked the president whether he was misleading the public. He told me he didn't want to scare people. We don't want to run around screaming, shouting Oh look at this look at this, we have to show leadership. And leadership is all about confidence and confidence is confidence in our country. You know the president said, he saw his role as being one of a cheerleader and that was something that he had set throughout the crisis. All others cheerleading there's optimism and they're saying things that are not true. How does Democratic rival Joe Biden deal with the truth here well, he wasted no time attacking trump on this and accused trump of life and death betrayal of the American people he knowingly and willingly lied the threat posed to the country for months. He had the information. He knew how dangerous it was. All this deadly disease ripped through our nation. He failed to do his job on purpose he said trump slow response cost lives. Franko. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's Franko on us. Now, we have another story about the Gulf between what the administration knew and what it was willing to say. A government whistleblower contends that the administration wanted intelligence that matched the president's politics. The whistle blower is Brian Murphy he led the intelligence. Branch. The Department of Homeland Security he says, he was asked to stop reporting on the threat of Russian interference to the election. He was supposed to emphasize the threat from China instead he was also told to downplay the threat from white supremacists but highlight the threat of ANTIFA and other leftist groups all to please the President Mr Murphy says he lost his job for speaking up NPR national security correspondent. Hena alarm is here to focus on one of the allegations either Han hi there which allegation. Focusing on where Brian Murphy describes what he calls attempts to influence intelligence on domestic terrorism, and the upshot there is Murphy says his bosses the top T H S officials told him in no uncertain terms on different occasions to play down the threat to white supremacists and to play up the threat of ANTIFA and other militant leftists and he says, he was told to do this. So That D. H. S. intelligence assessments were in line with what president trump says publicly and trump frequently in Rony Asli, we should. Say. PORTRAYS ANTIFA is an equal or even greater threat than the exponentially deadlier extreme right This is something I've discussed with Seth Jones at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He has a long background counterterrorism work. He he and other researchers say White House assertions of widespread violence from the left are baseless. The far left simply does not present the same threat that the far right does incapabilities in plots attacks or in fatalities none of those, and we should note we've heard the same thing from other. Officials on the record on this program. How does Murphy described campaign to get him to change his findings? Or he talks about being asked by the top leaders to soften in a report on white supremacy to make quote less severe and at the same time he says, he was being asked to include more information on the far left and he talks about antiphon anarchists in particular there the White House has dismissed the allegations as false and defamatory. They Call Murphy Disgruntled Employees was removed from the Intel posts last month under criticism about his office. Gathering information on protesters and journalists. But yes, as you said, he's not the first to raise these concerns. We've heard former officials say this we've heard it from researchers who work closely with the government on policy policy making and I mean we hear it ourselves in the markedly different ways. The president speaks about attacks, the perpetrators, right wing ideologue versus say a leftist or a Muslim. So then what does this whistle blower complaint add to what we knew It takes up a notch in terms of you know here's an insider alleging that political appointees attempted to manipulate actual intelligence, and so it's one more account. The trump administration look the other way violent white supremacists and other doctors got more organized, better funded, and now we're seeing some of those groups show up at protest intimidate people and launch attacks. and. Thanks for the analysis. Really appreciate it. Thank you. That's NPR's alum. I for this Thursday September. Tenth I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin come back tomorrow we will be right here you can subscribe to US wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also rate US reviews on Apple podcasts and when you're ready for more NPR news turn on the radio NPR's morning edition is on your NPR station and for podcasts local news in the latest headlines take NPR everywhere with the NPR one APP which is in your APP store. I Lisa Hagen and I'm Chris Axel we're the host of no compromise. NPR's new podcast exploring one families mission to reconstruct America using too powerful tools, guns, and facebook new episodes. Drop every Tuesday join us for the no compromise podcast from NPR.

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Friday, November 1st, 2019

Up First

14:25 min | 1 year ago

Friday, November 1st, 2019

"On a House vote on impeachment is not the end but a beginning. I'm David Greene with Steve inskeep and this is the first from NPR news president trump but Avila de Mieres Alinsky of Ukraine who is the leader who took a famous phone state stay with us we will give you the news you need to start your day you'll co two emissions and more and more experts agree learn more at energy factor the manhunt and investigation listened with a free thirty day trial audible dot com quarry is entering a new much more public face it's a sad day because nobody active after learning president trump sought to have a political rival investigated in Ukraine for investigations but some have insisted he did nothing wrong while others have criticized asa sham NPR senior political editor Domenico Montanaro joins us now domenico good morning how the inquiry will be conducted going forward and part of that framework means formerly here Adam for two staffers as well to ask questions Republicans can request witnesses president's lawyers will have the right to evidence presented against him they'll get to also ask questions against well yeah the Democrats who voted with Republicans are two from some of the more conservative districts these were held by Republicans and we have to realize that that means that most of those you have Democrats who are presumably vulnerable in twenty twenty a large number of them deciding moved in their favor where you have independence having shifted in the last few weeks to say that they at the play out in these committees in the next several weeks we want to see how things may play out in the next several Atkin that's GonNa be a big problem for them dimicco thanks so much you're so welcome that's NPR's Domenico triggered the impeachment inquiry the record shows president trump saying I would like you to do us a favor I anti urged Ukraine's leader to meet trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani David's actor who really delved into politics it's amazing to think about seven he has the small frame he sort of reminds me of Steve Carell from the office talk the president of Ukraine he was on TV playing the president of Ukraine vote against the incumbent Petro Poor Shankar who was seen as as part of the old corrupt guard Gosh Twenty three years old he actually went to work on Dolinsky campaign as an advisor that made it to the tough neighborhoods talking about it's the working class manufacturing city the country and that's where often the languages in Russian people have cultural ties to Moscow Ukraine but you can also communicate these messages about democracy in a way that doesn't really come across trine he says Alinsky really is the first politician he can remember who is truly inspiring used housing handled all the attention to the US I mean he he clearly doesn't want to be here you just have on to be involved to democratic often when the world really wanted to hear house Alinsky felt about that call from trump and whether he felt pressured me yes no no I you know I mean it was just a moment where he was this as him handling incredibly impossible situation I'm now one striking thing about the Ukraine affair is how much information need we bring you a special report from NPR news we pull together the story of Chris is now debating I republican would need a boost reliably Red Mississippi well that's a pretty good question trump's enrolled jim hood and hood we should say the lone Democrat to hold statewide office in well it's the governor's race it's the most important race there is and that's why the president the Liberals Jim Hood Mississippi it's time to choose you know the screen there's yesterday reeves was sticking with that message that a vote for him is like vote reeves overall theme is that conservative policies work for the nation and for Mississippi will know me this is the territory where trump is headed tonight in fact his campaign now that shattering record and I think people make a decision based my path now hood has been the attorney general according Republicans asking them to step out of their comfort zone well he would need Republicans in a state there's just not a lot of deep enthusiasm coming I talked with LV eubanks would put a bad reflection on one of them and I don't to get tate reeves elected but you you hear how it's a tough job have Mississippi is term limited governor Phil Bryant. He remains very popular here Debbie. That's a first for this Friday November I I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm David Greene we've got a great service. Kenya young up I will be back next week and you can hear more from NPR seek out terrifying experiences turns out you might be wired that You can think about it together new episodes every Tuesday and Thursday listening subscribe to life kickball Ak- fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to.

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Wednesday, September 11th, 2019

Up First

13:08 min | 1 year ago

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019

"On the president's Third National Security Adviser is out John Bolton's priorities and policies. Don't wind up with the precedence. What did the president wants to do do the John Bolton did not and what happens now. I'm Rachel Martin along with Steve Inskeep and this is up I from NPR news and NPR. Here investigation reveals allegations of gross mismanagement at one time. Obey is something you couldn't make up unless you were the writers for the show or something like that how much money they do whistle blowers say is being wasted to keep the military prison and court running. Also Israeli prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu vows to annex specific parts of the West Bank. How can an election promise shift the landscape at the Middle East. Stay with us. We'll guide you through this. Day's news support for up first and the following message come from Michigan Economic Development Corporation Michigan is attracting top talent and top businesses by searching Michigan she can pure opportunity support also comes from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors specializing in issues including depression stress and ending Zaidi visit better help dot com slash up first to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. How does it change in White House. Personnel Affect the prospects for war or peace president trump fired his national security adviser yesterday they parted because of their very different views of the world. The president acknowledged these differences from the moment that he hired John Bolton back in two thousand seventeen he said Bolton was partial to taking a hard line against US adversaries John Boles. Absolutely Hawk is up to him. He'd take on the whole world at one time okay but that doesn't matter because I want both sides the president has wanted to pressure rivals but also cut deals with our White House correspondent Franko Don. Yes has been covering during the stories in a studios good morning good morning. What are some of the issues are parts of the world where their differences became apparent. Well there were several I talked with Fernando coots who served as a senior your director at the National Security Council until last year he said Bolton never fully bought into some of the president's key foreign policy issues North Korea. He was against a dialogue log with Kim Jong. Il On on Iran. He was the one advocating for the strike that the president pulled back from the last minute and most recently in Afghanistan Jason. He opposed the talks with the Taliban so so I think you see that. you know th they just weren't meshing. Wow that's a lot. Let's take those again. One by one he's against Bolton was against against dialogue with Kim Jong UN of North Korea right. I mean Bolton previously talked about overthrowing the North Korean leader's trump as we know wanted TV summits he wanted to meet with Kim Jong and it got so bad at the last time that they met Bolton was actually sent on a trip to Mongolia Code somewhere else in the world he he was also against the peace initiative peace talks with the Taliban yeah that may actually have been the last straw trump had invited and as we know and later disinvited the Taliban to come to Camp David to see if a peace deal could be reached in Afghanistan Bolton argued against this and the coverage kind of rankled trump and others and this could have been the thing that really pushed it over the your analyst also mentioned Iran yes. Iran was a big one on one hand. Trump and Bolton were kind of allied on getting out of the international nuclear deal but again bolt was more hawkish than trump was comfortable bulletin favored a strike on Iran in retaliation for some provocations such a shooting down a drone but trump trump instead cancelled that strikes and said he would even be willing to meet with the Iran leader under no preconditions so we can easily think of John Bolton as a hawk as they say a someone wants to take a hard line. Someone who's willing to use military force. We can easily think of president trump is someone wants to cut deals or make peace but is it really that simple wasn't that simple all the time not all all the time but look for a long time. Bolton was always a hardliner he pushed for the US invasion of Iraq when he was part of the George Bush administration trump on the other hand campaigned about getting eating out of endless wars did bold never prevail on many issues that were important to him. The answer is basically no but on some domestic issues he did he did did help with you know. President Trump in south Florida on some political issues pushing for votes in south Florida with G- after giving a very fiery speech on Venezuela Ella obviously they agreed on Iran on the nuclear pack deal particularly if he was losing most of the time though on substantive issues. Does it matter much that he's gone on well. I mean in some cases maybe not it is trump's presidency but also this could give you know a bit more power to the Secretary of State Mike Pompeo who is often at odds on some of these key foreign policy issues such as North Korea but we'll see who replaces them and in the end it really as you say it's about President trump. He's the one with the last word Brecqhou. Thanks so much thank you that's. NPR's Franko or a military court at Guantanamo Bay Cuba faces criticism criticism from the inside yet comes from a lawyer who worked there the United States built a court and a prison on a naval base in Cuba construction started after the nine eleven attacks which we should not happen eighteen years ago today. The prison was supposed to house terror suspects from around the world and in some cases put them on trial. NPR has learned learned the lawyer has filed a federal whistle blower complaints alleging gross waste of funds and gross mismanagement whistleblower spoke with Sasha pfeiffer of NPR's investigations. Investigations team is in our studio good morning good morning. WHO's this whistleblower. His name is Gary Brown. He's a retired air force colonel and he was a career military lawyer and from twenty seventeen into two thousand eighteen. He was legal adviser to the man who used to run Guantanamo's military court okay so this is a guy who was inside the system and what does he say about it he. He said that when he got there he was very surprised by the lack of progress in about eighteen years only one finalized conviction and the expense of the place. I mean over about seventeen eighteen years. It's it's been six billion dollars. He felt like a lot of that was waste. Here's what he has to say about what he saw spending. It's a lot of money. Half a billion dollars is a lot of money and if we're spending spending that much money year after year. We ought to see some results that figuring gave half a billion dollars. Is that an annual spending figure these in some years. The spending has been more than half a billion dollars correct on the military court and the prison there together. Where does that money go. You know it's a gigantic operation down there. They have many in many lawyers. They have translators. They have linguists. They have court reporters. Investigators expert witnesses tons of money spent on travel getting their back. They have to fly to Cuba every time they want to hearing construction housing vehicles. It's just a massive amount of money. Taxpayer funded charter planes there sometimes not that full because they have to get people down in back very quickly so it's a giant amount of money and it's just been going on for almost twenty have their own airline to service the government charter planes taking down in in court and so forth but there is another issue according to your reporting that actually got this guy fired. He says that is not just about money. Although it affects the cost but it's also about a question of life or death was yes so the issue is that some of these prisoners are facing the death penalty and Gary Brown believes that it's probably unlikely that prosecutors can get death penalty convictions or that they might be overturned and the other issue here is that even if there are convictions the appeals process is probably going to take fifteen years. He says and cost another one point five billion dollars now meanwhile if they are found not guilty at trial the government has said we can keep them locked up indefinitely definitely anyway so gary browns point is basically. Why are we doing this. Why don't we take the death penalty off the table have plead guilty in return for life in prison and then we can speed the process up and try to shut the military court down when he said that while he was inside the system what happened to him he did actually start plea negotiations. They were fired and he believes believes the reason they were fired. Because some government officials believe the death penalty or nothing for these alleged round tried to proceed without the death penalty and he was effectively overruled lost awesome. I've spoken to lawyers top lawyers all of these six death penalty defendants and they have said negotiations had been initiated but then they were fired. Pentagon say about this this complaint not a lot. I asked for the past month for some to speak with me on tape and they said they couldn't provide anyone. they've the numbers. They've given have changed over time. It's hard to get reliable numbers out of them so they haven't said much Sasha. Thanks so much luck that's. NPR SASHA PFEIFFER and you can find more on this story at Bureau Dot Org Israel's prime minister it has sharpened his promise to annex part of the West Bank. Yeah he is made this promise as he seeks reelection. A Netanyahu's talked about this before in his campaign. Now he's being more specific. Pacific those saying which land Israel would claim I the promise and resulting criticism come just before Israelis vote next week their second election of the year Benjamin Netanyahu once again trying to keep his job. NPR's Daniel Estrin is covering the story Daniel Good Morning Good morning to you. So what is the more specific promise well. He's saying that if he wins reelection Russian and forms a government Israel would immediately apply sovereignty over a long stretch of the West Bank of the Jordan Valley and the Northern Dead Sea area. That's about thirty thirty percent of the West Bank and Israelis will tell you this is a strategic area important to Israel's security and says this would establish a permanent eastern boarder for Israel and he's saying that with his close ties to trump. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity to do something like this so let's just recall this is land that Israel captured captured in a war in nineteen sixty seven the United Nations regards it as occupied land. has had an expectation for a long time that Israel would give it back in some way subject to the Gauthier asssociation so what would be the significance if Israel instead said a big chunk of the West Bank not all of it but a big chunk of it would just be part of Israel right well. I mean Israel does does already occupy the area but like you say this would declare that Israel's presence there is permanent and the possibility of a two state solution to this conflict having in Palestine Israel is already dwindling but this plan by Netanyahu could make it even trickier to achieve. You'd have Israeli territory completely surrounding the the rest of the West Bank. You'd have tens of thousands of Palestinians inside the area. The Netanyahu wants to annex and they'd need passageways in and out very complex and we're we're hearing lots of opposition already to this plan Jordan Saudi Arabia the U. N. Are Objecting the Palestinian leader saying if Netanyahu pulls this off that he would call off all existing agreements with Israel now like you say if Netanyahu actually does this. It would go against this position of the world. Most of the world that that the fate of the West Bank should be decided in peace talks. Would Netanyahu really go through with this last election promise. That's a very good question. It's it's days now before the election seven and last election last spring he gave the similar promise to start annexing Jewish settlements in the West Bank. His rivals are saying Netanyahu. You know you've been in office for ten years straight. Why wait with plan until a week before elections. You're just trying to attract right wing voters. That's what they're saying and Netanyahu who according to polls could once again failed to secure a majority in parliament so that could be fatal to his political career and making this kind of a promise is something that could help him. President trump has been very vocally supportive of prime minister. Netanyahu is the president supportive in this case very curious. Steve because the trump administration didn't reject Netanyahu's announcement. It didn't welcome it either and really have to wonder if trump would back such thing. The administration says there are about to present its peace is plan after Israeli elections and perhaps trump could say well. Here's my peace plan. Please hold off Israel and any unilateral moves Daniel. Thanks for the update really appreciated. Did you welcome that's. NPR's Daniel Estrin and that's I this Wednesday September eleventh. I'm Steve Steve INSKEEP and I'm Rachel Martin. Come back tomorrow we'll be right here and because the news doesn't stop when the podcast ends follow us on twitter at first daily roundup of the most important for your daily roundup of the must important stories of the day you can also get news on demand with the NPR one APP which brings you a mixture of local national and international news wherever you go and whenever you want it you can download NPR one at the APP store so you probably know a lot about former vice president Joe Biden but you might not know is how his faith was tested when his wife and daughter were killed in a car accident car Godoi I got really angry is a shout out. Why me why would he do this to me. How can be a God let this happen. Biden tells that story and explains his run for the presidency in an exclusive interview with the N._p._R. Politics podcast subscribe.

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Monday, May 20, 2019

Up First

13:57 min | 1 year ago

Monday, May 20, 2019

"Alabama lawmakers might have expected this reaction. Protesters answer a state ban on most abortions. The law was meant for courts to have their say. But what about voters? I'm new L king here with Steve Inskeep. This is up. I from NPR news. Unemployment is at its lowest in nearly fifty years. But what does full employment really feel like in this economy that have two jobs, and I'm still trying to make it also all men must die. It's a common phrase in game of thrones and it's also true that all shows must die game of thrones is no exception after eight years of dragon, fire and fury. What is the legacy of one of TV's most epoch series? Stay with us. We've got the news you need to start your day. Support for this podcast and the following message come from almond board of California trying to survive all the way through that Monday morning meeting. They have a tip, eat some moments and don't inadvertently does off when your boss unveils the big plan own your every day, every day with almonds support also comes from SimpliSafe home security. They're completely wireless system was built to protect every points of access to your home with no long term contracts. Get free shipping and a sixty day money back guarantee today at SimpliSafe dot com slash up. First. The following states have something in common Mississippi Ohio, Georgia, Iowa Alabama, Kentucky. Arkansas and Utah, all have recently passed laws that in various ways restrict, when a woman can have an abortion. Meanwhile, lumper's in Missouri and Louisiana have approved bills, but they haven't been signed into law yet. Each of them is more restrictive than the standards set by the supreme court in its Roe versus Wade decision, and that is not a coincidence, Republican controlled legislatures want the court to reconsider row. This is all happening in the run-up to a presidential election. To win the presidency. Must answer definitively where they stand on this issue. That is New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand. Who, of course, is one of the democratic presidential candidates. So how will Democrats answer, NPR political correspondents got detro- is covering the presidential campaign, Scott, good morning. Good morning. What is the proposal from Jila brand? Who's the candidate? We just heard issues. One of several candidates who've been focusing on this in the last few weeks in, in, in amidst, this increased focus, you're hearing a couple relatively new policies fr from gillibrand and other Democrats running for president, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, and others are talking specifically about passing federal laws codifying protections from Roe versus Wade. And other supreme court rulings there's a real concern from them that increasingly conservative federal courts, would overturn Roe v. Wade. You're also hearing Jila brand, and Bernie Sanders among other candidates being much more explicit than we've heard before about the role that abortion would play in their federal court appointments. Both are saying, I would not. Point a supreme court judge, or a federal judge who would not uphold Roe versus Wade. This is really interesting in the idea of legislation is interesting since one historic criticism of Roe versus Wade. Is that the courts made this change that it didn't go through the regular political process? And so now effectively, some Democrats are saying, let's run it through the process. What else are Democrats saying well in, I think the fact that they're explicit you saying that this would be a litmus test is another way that the Donald Trump has changed the way that people talk about how they would be president and how people would would act as president because this has been an implicit thing before I would likely do it. But no, I wouldn't have a direct conversation about it. Now, you have Jila Brandon Sanders saying, no, this is a key thing. And I would talk about it with my appointees, but you've had candidates going to states, like Georgia, and Alabama talking about this, urging their supporters to give donations to groups like Planned Parenthood, the NPR politics, podcast recently interviewed a south bend, Indiana. Mayor Pete Buddha, judge here's what he said about this. What you have here is an agenda. It is radical that is out of step with what most Americans even Americans in conservative states believe is the right thing to do. It's disturbing. I think it amounts to an assault on freedom. So you have the Democrats using these new laws to frame, the Republican party is being out of step with what the majority of Americans want. And you've seen some Republicans be a little uncomfortable with these new laws, Kevin McCarthy. The, the house minority leader says the Alabama lawn specific goes further than he believes over the weekend. President Trump implied that as well saying that he has an agenda that opposes abortion rights, but that he still supports exemptions for for cases of, of rape, or incest. The president tweeted, if we are foolish and do not stay United as one all of our hard fought gains for life can and will rapidly disappear. That's the president over the weekend, Scott. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR congressional correspondent, Scott detro-. Okay. The United States is at or near full employment. At least that's what economists call it the idea of zero unemployment, literally everyone working is very unlikely because people do change jobs. But the current rate of three point six percent is getting closer to that. It's the lowest level in nearly fifty years. So what are these numbers, really mean for people looking for jobs for people looking for raises NPR chief economic correspondent, Scott Horsely as here to tell us got good morning. Good morning, how tight is the labor market when the unemployment rate is three point six percent. Well, it's, it's pretty tight across the country with that rate, but it Steve's really tight in some places in Ames Iowa. For example, it's only one and a half percent. While NPR's Jim zarroli visited aims to find out how employers are coping there. And he spoke to restaurant manager Elizabeth Kopetski, who says it's a real struggle. We lashed your head a call from a restaurant down the street, asking if we had an extra staff that they could share. That's how bad it's. Getting what, what did you tell them? We didn't have enough ourselves wages are going up in Ames. But they are still having trouble attracting workers, even though I was a real nice place to live. Steve, they're just not many people moving there. We do find other parts of the country, though, where people are moving to take advantage of new opportunities. For example, places like Atlanta Tallahassee Charlotte North Carolina. Have all seen an influx of workers. Many of them coming from up north, looking for better jobs, more affordable housing for African Americans in particular. This is kind of a reversal of the great migration. We saw in the twentieth century NPR's. Danielle Danielle has low spent some time in North Carolina talking with African American workers, both newcomers and longtime residents, like Nicole mused Dennis use Dennis's a single mother of two whose working sixty five hours a week. She says she's just barely getting by what I call over employed. I have two jobs and I'm still trying to make it. The unemployment rate among African Americans is low by historical standards. But at six point seven percent. It's still nearly twice the national average. Also, we just heard someone say they're Scott, she's working two jobs and still just trying to make it with suggests the jobs are not paying quite so well compared to her expenses. How is it that employers are managing not to massively raise wages, and still finding people to hire one thing that is happening is that people who had been out of the job market, either by choice or otherwise are being lured back in by the near full employment. Magnet and employers are getting more creative about tapping into that hidden workforce, as a result of groups that had been on the margins in the past or also finding more opportunities people with disabilities. For example, or a prison record things that might have been disqualifying in the past are not anymore says Christopher Dickerson, I don't care what your background is. I don't care where you came from care, what color you are care as long as you come to work every single day. And give me everything. Gimme over the last couple of. Steve about seven in ten new people finding job were coming off the sidelines not from the ranks of the unemployed. But statistically, does this really mean higher wages for the people who already have jobs for much of this very long economic expansion wages, did not go up very much. But we are finally starting to see that wages accelerate a bit. And that's especially true for people at the bottom of the income ladder, which is encouraging. There's no question, workers have more negotiating power now. One thing we looked at is collective bargaining during the recession some unions, grudgingly, agreed to lower wages for new workers, and that created some friction on the factory floor, when you had people doing the same job for less money. We're finally starting to see that turnaround, I spoke with Courtney herring who works at the Kohler company in Wisconsin. They recently inked new contract that phases out. Two tiered wages you could tell there was a lot of happy people. A lot of them production went up people are wanting. To stay for more overtime because they know it's worth their time now. So they're actually able to go out and do more things or save up for something Scott. Thanks so much shit. You're welcome. We have a series of stories this week on full employment. More stories come throughout the week on the radio and an NPR dot org. Who won the game. The game of thrones. We now know at least a lot of people do I didn't stay up late the show wrapped last night after eight seasons and fans had a very strong reaction to the finale, which is not unexpected given the show's rabid fan base to tell us more about this moment is NPR TV critic Eric Duggan's, Eric, good morning. Good morning. Now, number four, we start we have to warn, we tried to keep you safe all season but we can't anymore, you're going to be hearing, some spoilers, I believe, well, is going to be sticking her fingers in her ears. Okay. So here's saying. Here you, but for those of us who are listening, what about the ending, okay? So once again, just like winter was coming on game of thrones spoilers coming here. I guess what I would say is that TV's most epic series failed to deliver on an epic ending for the record brand stark, a young man who lost the use of his legs when he's pushed out of a window and the first season became the king. He won the game of thrones. But big moments like the death of heroin turn despot the nearest Gary, and they happened quickly and they kind of seem anti-climactic now, let's remember last week's episode would deniro's used her dragging the burn down the town of king's landing even after its rendered, and then on Sundays episode her lover and supporter, John snow, had this argument with her adviser Tyrian, Lancaster, and they're back and forth. Kinda sounded like two fans arguing over whether that scene when the dragon attacks the town, I actually made any sense. So let's check it out. Tyrian is played by Peter English and he starts argument. The moment that gates fell the battle is over. She saw a friend beheaded. She still trucking so out of the burned down a city for it. Would you have done it? Now John knows he wouldn't have done it. So he decides that Danny is a dangerous tyrant who must be killed which he does. Well, maybe this really was an argument over the earlier episode that accident we got in the way that coffee Cup accidentally got into one of the ego. They exactly now I'm hearing you say what has been a common complaint about this season that there's just too much plot crowded into too few episodes. Yeah. I think part of the problem is that the last two seasons have had fewer episodes than the typical ten that they used to have and twenty seventeen the aired seven episodes. And then these final six came almost two years after that. So maybe it feels kinda rush because a setup episodes aired so long ago. And then we get the climax of the story now. I think people expected to see the story of this heroin rising the free the oppressed. And instead, they saw this story of a wreck. Rebel becoming a brutal dictator and getting killed. And that might have thrown fans off a little bit has this series in some fundamental way changed TV, I think it has. It's, it's brought movie epic level filmmaking television, and it proved that you could create a huge hit with it. Of course it's affected the culture and people haven't even watched the show like you, Steve know, these characters are, and it came along at a time with geek culture was taking over pop culture and row that trend to massive success. And so we've seen now you know shows about zombies and superheroes. And now sword and sorcery characters are among the most popular shows and movies out there and game of thrones, I think is the ultimate example of that in television will see if any other series follow their late now you can be show nerd now. And just get deeply deeply involved in extraordinarily complex plots. Of course. Eric, thanks so much. Oh as a pleasure. That's NPR critic, Eric Dagens. And that is up. I for this Monday may twentieth. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm no well king, we'd love it. If you start your day here with us tomorrow. And we know the news does not stop when this podcast NC you can follow us on Twitter at a first for a daily roundup of the most important stories of the day, you can also listen to NPR's morning edition. The radio show that no Alan David green, and Rachel Martin, and I host together fine morning edition on your NPR station at stations, NPR dot org. If you need to be reminded that we're all more connected than we realize, get the story core podcast and restore your faith in humanity. Uninterrupted conversations between real people about the things that matter most and this season in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the stonewall uprising were highlighting voices of LGBTQ, people across America stories from those who lived before stonewall today episodes are available every Tuesday.

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Friday, September 25, 2020

Up First

14:14 min | 2 months ago

Friday, September 25, 2020

"The US. Attorney seems to support the president strive to question US elections the president publicized nine discarded ballots. The prosecutor released supporting information that expert calls improper. What really happened I'm Noel King here with Steve Inskeep in this up I from NPR news. Some Kentucky political leaders want to see the evidence that did not result in charges for the death of Brianna, Taylor community was left in the dark leadership even. Darn. Two officers who fired into Taylor's apartment. Now face a departmental investigation when the public learn more also homelessness among veterans was declining until the pan-demic what's happening now we're getting more calls from people are unsure about where to go for help stay with his we'll give you the news you need to start. Your Day. For. This message comes from NPR sponsor three M working to improve lives through innovation and action. Learn how three M is helping. The world respond to covid nineteen at three am dot com slash Kovic three m science applied to life support also comes from NPR sponsor Twi- Leo a customer engagement platform trusted by millions of developers enabling you to reinvent how you connect with your customers whatever your use case Twi-. Leo has your back. It's time to build visit twitter dot com. The president spent part of yesterday promoting his narrative of an unfair election and the Justice Department backed him up in a way that one expert calls improper. Incident in one state and to be clear, we don't even know all the facts yet. We do know the president has been constantly questioning the ballots. We do know polls consistently show him trailing Joe Biden, the president has promoted ideas about fraudulent mail in ballots even though they've been used safely for years and he's been giving no evidence for why he's concerned and then yesterday on Fox News Radio, the president said he finally had something a few ballots in Pennsylvania appear to have. been thrown away their trump written on it, and there was running a garbage can This is what's going to happen. This is what's going to happen and We're investigating that the FBI I. and a US Attorney in. Pennsylvania. Then took the unusual step of releasing partial results of their investigation and that information seem to support the president's narrative. So what evidence do we have NPR White House correspondent Franko? Don. YESES here, Franco. Good Morning Good Morning. So what does this investigation about? Well. Steve investigators are looking into some military ballots that were already cast and it does appear that something did happen here and that those ballots were improperly opened by county election staff nine of them were found to have been thrown out and seven of those were not with their special envelope. All seven of them were cast for president trump local elections staff said that they were opened by mistake because they. Look a lot like other envelopes that need to be opened quickly. But this isn't an early stages. As Noel said, there are still a lot of unanswered questions and there are no charges filed yet or any official action and a small number of ballot a state where millions are likely to be cast. But what is the connection between these nine ballots in the larger election issues the president has been raising. Well the President says, this could be happening thousands of places by the fear that's really not substantiated. We have reported before that experts see little evidence of meaningful fraud due to mail in voting, but it's a case that feeds into his larger argument that mail and voting cannot be trusted. We WanNa make sure the election is honest and I'm not sure that it can be I don't I don't know that it can be with this whole. Situation unsolicited ballots. But as you know Steve, this is a year when we're expecting record mail in voting because of the coronavirus, the trump campaign jumped right on this saying it was an example of Democrats trying to steal the election in that Fox interview president also said, he would concede if the Supreme Court decided Joe Biden one but that short of a court decision, the vote count would amount amount to quote horror show. Okay. A few things to note here is already assuming it goes to the Supreme Court and hasn't decided by the people that is interesting. You said it was military ballots which have been mayland ballots for many years without trouble and he also mentioned unsolicited ballots in spite. Of the President's statements, most states do not send out unsolicited ballots they may send out unsolicited applications for ballots in most cases but then there's this FBI and US attorney statements about the case how unusual is it to have us attorney comment at this stage of an investigation? Well, it's very unusual. The investigation is just beginning my colleague Carrie Johnson interviewed Justin Levy professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles he said it was improper to announce partial facts and potential issues and he said it was grotesquely improper to announce whom the ballots were cast for since that really shouldn't matter in the investigation. The other issue is this is just as you noted before a very small number of ballots. Franko, thanks very much for the update. Really appreciated. Thank you. We'll continue following that story. NPR's Frank O. Done. Yes. We have more now in the aftermath of grand jury findings in the death of Brianna Taylor. For the second time this week protesters in Louisville who are demanding justice for Briana Taylor defied nine PM curfew police moved in last night Kentucky, State Representative Attica Scott was arrested along with other protesters WPRO reporter, Ryan. Van Velzen recorded the arrest. Of A police union spokesperson Scottish, charged with unlawful assembly and first degree rioting. That's a class. D Felony. Now, that is the same level felony as wanton endangerment. The only charge brought against one of the three officers involved in Taylor's death this for the record is why so many people are so angry Marcus read runs a barbecue joint near where Brianna Taylor was killed. If it was me I probably twenty years with. Police and he's not my skin color. They just a slap on the wrist. I'm an ally of member station W. F. Covering the story in Louisville, and is going to help us work through the questions that many people have in the aftermath of this story morning. Good morning let's start with this. There is one officer who is charged with wanton in danger men for firing bullets that went into a neighbor's apartment but the two officers who fired directly at Brianna Taylor are not accused even of endangerment much less a more serious offense. For the bullets that killed her why not? That's the same question family attorney. Anita. Baker has an you could understand why Taylor was unarmed and she was killed. So Baker wants to know why Taylor wasn't endangered by former detective Brett Hankinson or other officers actions. The attorney general said, the charges were based on the bullets hang blindly shot through covered window passing through the wall of Taylor's apartment into her neighbors and he said the other two officers weren't charged because they were found to be justified in shooting back in response to an alleged warning shot from Taylor's boyfriend. Okay. So the two officers were justified according to the grand jury because they were firing back at someone. The third officer is in trouble because he fired through a covered window without having any idea whereas bullets would go. Now there's the question of this. A grand jury says no charges for the death of Brianna Taylor and yet the city of Louisville agreed to pay twelve million dollars in a settlement of the family. How could that be? Louisville mayor, Greg Fischer said it was important for the city to begin the healing process and he said he thought it was the right decision at the time. But let's note that the city did not admit wrongdoing as part of that settlement. And there's a question of legal guilt and they're also a political or moral question. I suppose now lawmakers and lawyers for Taylor's family are asking for the grand jury evidence to be released to the public. No L. Heard that from Louisville State representative, Charles Booker yesterday. Let's listen throughout this process. Transparency was never there. The community was left in the dark leadership even elected leaders like myself. We were left in the dark. Okay. So that leads to another question will the Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron release evidence we don't know yet. He said it was his job to present the facts to the grand jury, but he didn't say what facts he presented and he didn't answer questions about whether the grand jury was presented with evidence. Or charges specific to the two other officers who shot. Taylor. Notably, they weren't charge. So Kentucky's governor and levels mayor have called on the Attorney General to release the evidence to the public. But at this point, it's not looking likely because he says it wouldn't be appropriate given other ongoing investigations one more question these two officers who were not charged to fired into Brianna Taylor's apartment. What if anything happens to them now? Well they're still on administrative leave they're still on the payroll. Now they're under another internal investigation. So the mayor says depending on what that investigation finds he may fire them or they might face other other repercussions or training aubanel law he of member station W. F. B. L. in Louisville. Thanks so much you're welcome. The pandemic and the economic crisis could be undoing a decade of progress for US military veterans. Over the past ten years or so the number of homeless vets in this country has dropped by about half. Now, a lot of hard work by the VA by community organizations went into that. So did a lot of government funding but now the National Coalition for homeless veterans says more of them are becoming vulnerable to homelessness NPR's quil Lawrence covers veterans and is here with more quilt good. Morning. Good Morning I guess it's intuitive that when the economy. GETS, bad more people end up on the streets but how specifically are veterans affected? We don't really have exact numbers yet. They do an official count every year in the winter. So this year's official count was done in January and when these numbers come out, you know they won't show any impact of the of the virus, but I've been calling charities that work on this around the country and in New Orleans. For example, five years ago I did a story on how they had essentially solved that homelessness. So I called up one of the outreach workers I've kept in touch with DEVAN. Phillips. We have a lady now she's living with kids and facing eviction. Because she lost her job coming into the program. Now, do he actually have an interview that's coming up the interview as forge our panelists but the kids are now virtual learning and many families don't have the support to do child care and has to pay for childcare. Okay. So I that's awful. Quayle second I want to note that the fact that you're paying sustained attention over years to the story is why we're able to tell that something is changing something going wrong here. So thank you for that. Hey, we're NPR way. Exactly. What's the federal government doing as this problem merges? Well and there were hundreds of millions of dollars in the cares act that I thrown virus stimulus bill back in March that will sustain a lot of these programs throughout the year and I've been told actually by some charities that the VA is making them whole I was told keeping this infrastructure in place it had made all this progress over the last decade a Steve Pack runs US vets in in L. A. in Los Angeles, which has the highest number of homeless vets in the country and he says His occupancy at the eleven housing communities, he runs his actually lower because many vets are avoiding these big group housing shelters but the the Va has been keeping his funding nonetheless at the same level as it seems like they're they're really planning to keep this infrastructure going for the future after the pandemic when they wanNA keep working on this but I peck says he's worried because a lot of the stimulus programs are going to expire next month this money is running out the costs aren't going to go away the pandemic won't be over in October. So we're not quite sure what's going to happen after that. So there are measures moving through Congress to expand support for veterans, but it seems that that help is is sort of a step behind the the pandemic, which continues you know we'll briefly what happens is the weather turns colder. Well some of the stimulus money which has the second order effects his running out eviction more therere ending and we're waiting for a second stimulus to get through congress. All of that has effects on homeless veterans. We'll have to wait and see but these advocates are worried. NPR's quil Lawrence. Thanks so much. Thanks Steve. I for this Friday September twenty fifth I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm will king up I is produced by Milton. Give our editors are simone pop rel and Mohamed Elkhart DC. Our music is composed by nick, dupree and Louis Weeks, and our executive producer is Kenya young and we are on twitter. Add Up. I remember up first comes to you on Saturday as well Lulu Garcia Navarro and Scott Simon after news in this feed or wherever you get your podcasts. Is only Spanish language podcast listen for stories. You won't hear anywhere else told by the voices that make Latin America come alive each week we bring you another remarkable story that will surprise in move you buy new episodes, every Tuesday listen and subscribe.

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Monday, April 15, 2019

Up First

14:00 min | 1 year ago

Monday, April 15, 2019

"The mayor of Oakland responds to a demand to drop off asylum seekers and cities like hers, not America. It is not democratic what triggered the president to promote an idea. Lawyers rejected that Steve Inskeep. I'm David drain. And this is up. I from NPR news. The White House. Also generated news coverage by promoting a fight with Minnesota member of congress. Find it what her comments to be absolutely disgraceful and unbefitting of a member of CONGRESS Republicans highlighted Ilhan Omar's remark about the aftermath of nine eleven Howard Democrats defending her and it's the beginning of the end for game of thrones. This is not a metaphor about the presidential campaign. Just a hit show. What's it's cultural legacy? Stay with us. We'll guy do through this day's news. Support for NPR and the following message. Come from panerabread. Ed Pinera records to go. No longer means to settle try their new maple glazed bacon, scrambled egg and cheese breakfast rack and new meta gas carbon nila cold brew Panera food as it should be support. Also comes from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors, specializing in issues, including depression, stress and anxiety. Visit better help dot com slash up. First to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. The history of a White House proposal for migrants suggests just how serious it is. Or is not news reports last week revealed. A Trump administration proposal that was made and rejected lawyers turned aside the plan to drop detained asylum-seekers in so-called sanctuary cities. Now, White House officials said this was no longer an idea under consideration. But as soon as it was generating conversation, President Trump extended the news coverage for days by claiming that he's really considering this White House spokesman HOGAN Gidley spoke with NPR's Michelle Martin yesterday, not political retribution if anything you you should consider it on the democrat side to be an olive branch NPR's Joel rose covers immigration and joins us now. Joe? Good morning. Hey, steve. Are there any details of this presidential proposal beyond his tweets, not not much? I mean, the president is talking about taking detained migrants who were apprehended at the southern border and transporting them to so called sanctuary cities which loosely are defined as jurisdictions that limit their. Cooperation with immigration authorities as you say the White House has sent spokespeople. I mean spokespeople have been out over the weekend. Talking up this idea arguing that there are huge numbers of migrants arriving at the border, which is true, we had more than one hundred thousand last month alone, which was the biggest monthly total in a decade. And the White House argues the communities along the border shouldn't be forced to bear the brunt of that as they put it Democrats. Meanwhile, are howling with outrage the reaction of Oakland, mayor Libby shaft pretty much sums up her party's response. Here's shaft speaking to NPR's weekend edition, an outrageous power the idea that you could use human beams families as instruments of political payback to exact retribution on your political enemies. This is not America. And we should be clear. The White House says this is an olive branch the way that this has been framed on social media over the last few days by the president's supporters. Is this is a way to get back at at Democrats setting aside the motivations though, would it be legal to do this. The president argues that it would be, but it's been reported that lawyers inside the department of homeland security had concerns about this proposal. And that's one of the reasons why it hasn't happened clearly the president's critics and opponents would challenge this move in court if he actually does move forward with this proposal. Well, let's say it was found to be legal is it in any way, practical to take a bunch of migrants on the border and just start dropping them off in San Francisco, or whatever city has policies, the White House doesn't like the fact is that it would be an enormous logistical challenge. Right. I mean, the border patrol and other immigration. Authorities have been saying loudly for months now that they are overwhelmed by these huge numbers of migrants, largely central Americans were fleeing from violence and poverty. You know? Authorities are barely managing to get these people to cities on the border right now, as it is never mind. Transporting them. You know, hundreds or even thousands of additional mile. All so it would be costly for sure that's one of the reasons immigration. Authorities reportedly pushed back on this idea when it was floated initially and also from an operational perspective. It's not really clear how much this proposal would achieve. I'm sure I'm sorry. What do you mean an operational perspective? So there's a reality at the border that this proposal seems to overlook which is that most of these migrants spend very little time in the cities where they're released by immigration authorities. Maybe forty eight hours something like that. The vast majority of these migrants have a connection in the US already like a friend or a relative some part of the country who can wire them the money for a bus ticket. And then they move on to Iowa or New York or LA or Virginia. And certainly this. The migrants are putting a strain on the nonprofit organizations that shelter and work with them near the border. But the idea that they remain there in these or would stay in these sanctuary cities. That's that's just not how we're seeing it work right now on the ground NPR's, Joel rose. Thanks so much. You're welcome. Minnesota congresswoman Ilhan Omar is saying she faces more death threat year comments come after the president shared a video on his Twitter feed on Friday. This video included recent comments, Omar made during a speech on civil liberties edited with graphic footage of the World Trade Center towers burning house speaker Nancy Pelosi has asked for a review of security measures intended to protect the congresswoman her family and her staff. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is following this is in our studios. Good morning. Good morning. Steve Moore death threats, meaning she was already receiving death threats. She has, you know, Minnesota congressman Ilhan, Omar. She is the one of the two I Muslim woman serving in congress. She is someone that has become rather familiar to a lot of people as a freshman lawmaker because she has already been the point of earlier controversies over comments, she has made and in the course of her short tenure in congress. She has drawn a lot of attention. And yes, a lot of threats some of the comments were about Israel. Now, she made these comments about the aftermath of nine eleven. And pressures that Muslims felt and at one point. There was a phrase in there. Some people did something which was taken his her description of of nine eleven how strong as the response been to that that reference. Well, it's interesting on the democratic side. Because in this instance, I think you see so many more of her colleagues in our party coming to her defense that the president and using these words and juxtaposing her image against the nine eleven attacks has in their words tempted to incite violence against her. And that her comments in the broader context of what she was saying was talking about overall, Muslim bigotry in the country following nine eleven, and that she sees herself as an activist against those forms of bigotry. You said the Democrats are publicly or or vociferiously defending her in this. They have they have been more quick to defend her here. Although it's interesting to see the the debate inside the party over they have been angry about who has been fastest to defend her and how quickly and how how fast, and I think you. I've seen Rashida to leave his a democrat from Michigan is the other Muslim woman in congress. And she had a really interesting response in which she called out democratic leaders for not doing enough and suggesting that they were tokenism women of color in the caucus where they're happy to use their images to promote diversity but not to fend them. And so the speaker when she was asked about it initially kind of deferred and said, she wasn't ready to comment although over the weekend, she obviously did call for the security review and call on the president to take down the video, which he has not as of now you've also go to appear from Alexandria Cossio Cortes, another freshman member of congress. Well, Democrats this is part of a more broader political strategy. And here's what she said we are getting so level where where this is an incitement against progressive women, our and incitement of violence in her point was that the Republican party uses images of people like her like Ilhan, Omar like Rashida to leave and are trying to paint a picture of a party that is extreme or holds political views that is not in line with the country. Well, let's make that clear the president by. By highlighting Ilan, Omar makes that the subject this is about deciding what we're going to talk about in the president determines that Democrats. Are are they embracing Ilhan Omar as the face of their party, given some of her past controversial comments about Israel, and so forth. Do they want her to be the face of their party? I don't think they see her as the face of the party. But I certainly think that they see an attempt by the president and the Republican party to make her that. And that is where you're going to see this debate going forward. Susan, thanks so much. You're welcome NPR. Susan davis. winter has been coming for the characters on game of thrones ever since the first season. Aired in two thousand eleven yell last night, the most expensive most watched and most accolade scripted drama series and HBO history came one step closer to its end the show aired the first episode of its eighth and final season NPR. Tv critic Eric Dagens has been up all night reflecting on. What was either Eric? I okay lot of hype going into last night. You were watching. I assume I was watching and I was enjoying it. I should I we should I deliver a spoiler alert 'cause I'm gonna talk a little bit about what happened on Sundays episode. But I thought it was one of those really good table setting episodes where they kind of put characters and plot in place that you know, we're going to happen later fans of the show know that game of thrones tends to do that with his first episode of the season. And we saw a lot of characters come together the head seen each other in a while. So there was a lot of. Tional kind of reunions and a lot of history playing out and characters that were one way when they met each other early in the season, and they were they had a very different dynamic later in the season. And of course, the hero. John snow found out that he's actually related to the woman that he's in love with. And he may have a really strong claim to the iron throne that rules, the seven kingdoms. So you know, there's that. Okay. You got that? So we're talking to two different strands of people here. Eric automatically people who are watching game of thrones. And people who have been told this is so complicated. That if you haven't started yet don't even bother starting because it's just too much for you possibly to understand. But help those who are in that ladder category. Why is this show? So important if you haven't been watching it, well, I would say it's the most popular high quality show on television. So it takes the production values of a major motion picture like lured of the rings. You know, sword and sorcery epic with lots of special effects, and it brings it to television. And you know, what also? Proved that has show with a really complex storyline. Astur a show that has a lot of characters with names that sound the same and this very convoluted sort of history of characters bouncing off each other that it could become really popular in a lot of shows that are this complex when they get to their six or seven season. They get so complex that even fans can't follow them anymore. But game of thrones has managed to keep people engaged keep everything. Interesting and exciting even after all the similar names even after taking off almost two years between the seven season and the eighth season, Eric I just want to note, we have house guests and their game of thrones people. And so we had to set up everything. So they could watch right at nine o'clock. And that was I realized. Wow. Like, right. Actual old appointment viewing the sort that people don't have to do anymore. This show is different. Yeah. Although there are some high-quality TV shows that also roll out once a week, you know, all the other shows on HBO and shows on Showtime. AMC and also hayme as tail and Hulu and stuff like that. But this idea of a show that is melting the worlds of film and television. I think that's where game of thrones really made an impact. And in fact, we see this more and more. Now, less of a distinction between TV and film, and the idea that they hit such high marker in terms of the acting and terms of the money that they spend on every episode the production in terms of the the complications of the story and the way that they challenge viewers, you know, game of thrones set the bar really high. And I think you know, there's a new height for every TV show to aim at now because game of thrones a stretched the possibility so much, and that's what we may miss a when this show finally ears. It's it's last episode of man. Okay. Eric, thanks so much. Thank you at preserved beggars. And that's up first for this Monday, April fifteenth tax day, by the way, I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm David Greene. Start your day with us back here tomorrow. And since the news does not stop. When this podcast is over follow us on Twitter at first and get a daily round up of all the most important stories of the day. You can find more indepth coverage of the stories. We talked about today and much more on NPR's morning edition, the radio show that David hosts with me and with Rachel Martin and Noel king you can find it at your NPR station. And if you need help finding that station go to stations that NPR dot org. Now that my says has lost all its territory what happens to the people ISIS left behind. She chose to take the she should study in Syria and what about their children? How it ends a new series on embedded. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from discover who alert you if they find your social security number on any one of thousands of risky websites. Alerts are free for card members just sign up online. Learn more at discover dot com slash free alerts. Limitations apply.

NPR president congresswoman Ilhan Omar White House congress Steve Inskeep Eric NPR Oakland Minnesota White House America Joel rose Twitter Republican party Howard Democrats NPR Israel CONGRESS
Wednesday, November 13th, 2019

Up First

13:11 min | 1 year ago

Wednesday, November 13th, 2019

"On public impeachment hearings force lawmakers to confront evidence. All of us are going to have to consult with our conscience our Constitution Russian and our constituents what impeachable offenses does the head of the investigation. See I'm David Drain with Steve INSKEEP and this is up I from NPR news President trump wants gave Turkey's president advice writing. Don't be a fool. Turkey's president ignored him. Sent troops into Syria. Now what are the two presidents discussed gus at a White House meeting today. Also people in Hong Kong say they're peaceful protests having gained them much and brought on violent. Crackdown it's like a police state. Unbelievable what happens is protesters feel justified in responding with violence of their own. Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. Uh support this podcast and the following message come from audible with Call Me God the untold story of the DC sniper investigation. The audible original snow retraces every step of the manhunt and investigation. Listen with a free thirty day trial at audible dot com slash untold story support also comes from capital one Walmart rewards card earned five percent back at Walmart online and two percent at Walmart in store restaurants and travel the capital one Walmart rewards card. What's in your wallet? Terms exclusions apply the constitution of the United States. Says an official may be impeached for a few things quote. Treason season bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors. That's the language in the law which gives house investigators power for the proceedings that go public today. A House Committee calls to witnesses before TV cameras. The hearings will also be heard live on. NPR and the head of this inquiry is deciding which of those offenses in the constitution might fit the president's efforts in Ukraine Adam Schiff of California does NPR. He is not looking to punish the president but to protect the country. The President gives every every impression that he believes that he is above the law that he can solicit foreign interference in our elections. He can do whatever He pleases. That anyone who calls is out. His corrupt behavior is a traitor. Or A spy. That's a very dangerous situation for the country. NPR's Tamra Keith is here to talk about today's hearings. Either temp morning. What is the behavior? That chairmanship describes is unacceptable essentially forcing or pressuring a foreign government to interfere in a US election and there are two witnesses. That will testify today. A Bill Taylor. And George can't both of these are men who are widely respected diplomats lifelong public servants who have Ukraine in their portfolios and in their private depositions. They both expressed grave concerns with this sort of shadow foreign policy toward Ukraine. That was being driven by the president's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani. They say it was running counter to US policy and the national security interests a little bit more about. The Taylor is best known as the person who sent the text message that said quote. I think it's crazy to withhold security assistance. Stints were help with a political campaign and Kent is someone who said that this effort to get Ukraine to launch investigations that would benefit president trump politically undermined us advocacy for rule of law. Democrats are going to use their testimony to make a case for why all of this matters. Ars well why all of this matters. Of course they also have to make a case for why all of this would-be impeachable. How does the Chairman Adam Schiff fit? The evidence gathered so far with those words we heard from the constitution. Well what what shift is saying. Is that when the president used the words do us a favor in that call. That is now an infamous call with the president of Ukraine in July that there was a sinister scheme there. Steve you asked shift this very question. About the words. In the constitution there are any number of potentially impeachable offenses including bribery including high crimes and misdemeanors. The basic allegations is a against the president or that he sought foreign interference in a US election that he conditioned official acts on the performance. Minutes of these political favors and Schiff is not being definite in our interview but saying that he could very well conclude that that amounts to bribery one of the words in the constitution. And of course that other phrase high crimes and misdemeanors leaves lots of room for other kinds of charges. So how are Republicans hammered going to defend the president. Republicans are saying that. President trump had a a justifiable skepticism of Ukraine and a reasonable concern about corruption in the country. And then they're going to try to draw that out in their questioning. They also I say that there was no pressure exerted in that now infamous July twenty fifth call between President Trump and Ukraine presidents Alinsky and they say that ultimately the foreign aid was delivered. The four hundred million dollars in aid was delivered without Ukraine launching these investigations that president trump wanted on it. How will each side make its case before the witnesses and draw things out of the witnesses? Today this is going to be unique. Each side is going to have forty five minutes to really really build a narrative and tell a story and then it'll bounce back and forth. This isn't going to be this sort of Staccato. Back and forth that you normally see in congressional hearings a little bit longer question and answer session. Tim thanks much you're welcome that's NPR's San Markeith okay. The judge by his twitter feed and in his public speeches. The president has been intently focused on the impeachment fight but he has a very different duty. Today that's right. The president hosting Turkey's president rigid type. Air To one at the White House today. The timing of this is fraught. It was just weeks ago. Let's remember the president trump moved. US troops out of the way of a Turkish incursion into Syria. Trump also wrote a letter to air to want appealing to him not to go too far a letter which Turkey's president openly ignored so now the leaders of these two NATO allies are going to meet face to face. NPR NPR national security correspondent. David Welna is trying to find out what each president wants David. Good Morning. Good morning and let's start with. What does he won well? I'm I'm pretty sure that while he'll be defending Turkey's incursion into Syria he'll also be seeking reassurances that the sanctions trump slapped on Turkey for doing that and then lifted a few days later. When a ceasefire was declared won't becoming back Turkey's also been demanding the extradition of Fatullah Glen? He's cleric who lives in Pennsylvania. Yeah who's accused of promoting the attempted coup against air too hot and three years ago and Turkey wants the US to drop charges brought last month against a state on Turkish bank. That's accused of violating highlighting the trade embargo with Iran. It's been caught up in the whole thing with Iran sanctions and going after Iran's nuclear program. What is president trump? Want from air to one. Well I think he wants. Turkey's declared ceasefire in Syria to be made permanent. Although even trump seems to question whether that's likely his other big ask would likely be about the Russian S. four hundred air-defense system that Turkey acquired this year despite being a member of NATO and even though that's prompted the US to kick Turkey out of the F thirty five Stealth fighter jet program the US S. wants assurances that Turkey won't use that Russian system but the trump administration seems to be sending mixed signals. It has yet to certify the Turkeys crossed the line by making making what's called a significant transaction with Russia which would trigger sanctions against Turkey last week in the Senate Democrat Bob Menendez introduced legislation to force administration situation to weigh in on this. And here's Menendez on the Senate floor. Administration is breaking the law by ignoring this provision and kowtowing to anchor according to U.. US Law Turkey must be sanctioned for the s four hundred system and it should happen today otherwise it will send a global message that we are not serious purpose about sanctioning significant transactions with the Russian military. David is we hear there. The president may be sending mixed signals to Turkey. But there's bipartisan partisan resistance Turkey and Congress there is indeed but I think that Turkey is counting on trump's close relationship with aired on a sort of a defense against anything that Congress might do and that's why today's meeting at the White House does seem to be like a gift to Turkey that might keep giving David thanks for the incites. You're welcome that's NPR's David Welna Do your one official put it. Hong and Kong is on the brink of a quote. Total breakdown right. Those are the words police are using amid some of the worst violence the city has seen since these protests began in June demonstrators caused disruption in the city for a third straight day in their actions caused some subway lines to shut down and now the authorities. There say they're going to cancel school tomorrow for safety reasons. NPR International correspondent. Julie McCarthy has been in Hong Kong covering the story. Hi Julie Steve Morning you know. These protests dramatic. They might be used to be a weekend affair and there were acts of violence but they were somewhat limited. What's changing well? First of all you had the death of a student Chelsea look. He's one trigger. He's become something of a hero to the protests. 'cause he he was found unconscious in a parking lot in circumstances that are kind of murky and that plays plays into the hands of anyone many protesters who want to blame the police who deny any involvement now directly on the heels of chows death last Friday. You had policemen shooting shooting a masked protestor Monday which enraged Hongkongers he's in serious condition. But here's the NUB protesters say they tried peaceful demonstrations -tations got nowhere and feel justified in using ever escalating violence on the other hand. Police feel justified in using harsher measures to counter that violence. And you have this loop of retaliation and a young woman who called herself. Carlos stood at the barricades of university where students clashed with police and said that she has not seen Senate anywhere near as bad as it is now. Wall is actually in the war inside as a wall in a graphic graphic illustration of this deep division is the man who was set on fire because he evidently opposed the protests. He's in critical condition. How's life from the city changing now that these weekend protests have become everyday protests? Well you know you. Things feel is certainly out in the midst of all of them. They feel more dangerous and protesters is will tell me about preparing themselves to die. They're tired the police are tired. which is when people overreact? Here's what the University Steve Are Starting to sound. Like which is new. Firing tear-gas on campuses again. A new development students in this one are at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. And they're still hold up to stop any police advance and as we speak students students are stockpiling supplies and other universities anticipating clashes. Now ask this expanded action you know on the weekdays you're paralyzed transit system in Hongkong Hong. You'll get people's attention and what protesters hope to do is to sober the minds of their fellow citizens to get them to think about what's at stake more democracy and curbing what the protesters see as police police abuse well. Where is the wider public? All of this well of course. Nobody likes their commute disrupted but nineteen year old. Cecilia Liu says the spiralling erling violence scares her is getting to violence because now we cannot go to school all causes are suspended spends it is getting all control other said. There's no requirement see in the violence of the protesters versus the police who have an arsenal. The protesters do not Julie. Thanks for your reporting. Please be safe thank you. NPR's McCarthy at home And that's a first for this Wednesday November thirteenth. I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm David Greene. We hope you come back here tomorrow. We'll be here if you'll be here and you can subscribe to US wherever you listen. Listen to your podcast and do us a favor. If you've got a few minutes rate US and review us on Apple podcasts you know we have some colleagues just down the hall here. Who Give you work for you to have a way to explore? The world of public radio shows and PODCASTS. It's called NPR one. It's an APP on your phone. You download it and it will shuffle all that content and bring you stories about your community and stories that matter to you based on what you like download. NPR One at the APP store The things that make us human. Why are we the way we are guy? Rise each week on N._p._R.'s Ted Radio Hour we dive into the incredible forces that shape our very existence listen now.

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Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Up First

13:25 min | 6 months ago

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

"Are. The president signs an executive order on policing today. He proposes a national database to track police misconduct and for social workers to go with police on some calls, but does the order have any teeth? I'm Steve Inskeep with Noel King and this is up I from NPR news. The president also talks pulling thousands of American troops out of Germany what lies behind his latest threat directed at a NATO ally and in California to black men were found dead in unusual circumstances, their deaths were ruled suicides, but their families and friends say that's nonsense. Somebody brought him here a this to. One case is being reopened after demand for more investigation. Stick with us. We've got the news. You need to start your day. This message comes from NPR sponsor facebook. It's a challenging time for small businesses across the country. FACEBOOK's business resource hug free tools to help manage your business and support, customers and employees learn more at facebook dot com slash resources. Support also comes from NPR sponsor capital. One capital one's assistant e-e-e-e-no sends alerts about credit card accounts visit capital, one dot com slash e-e-e-e-no capital one. What's in your wallet? President trump signed an executive order on policing today now he's been under pressure to act the nationwide protests after Minneapolis police officer killed George. Floyd included demonstrations outside the White House the president was asked yesterday about his goals for police reform, and he'd lead with a signature phrase, which is usually taken to mean police controlling the streets. We want autre and we want it done fairly justly. We want it done safely, but we want law daughter this about daughter, but it's about. It's about justice. Also administration officials have rejected the idea that police departments have a problem with systemic racism. NPR, White, house correspondent. Franco or DONAS has been talking with senior administration officials. Good Morning Franko Good Morning. What's in the president's executive, order? Well the package includes our focuses on three main areas. One creates a database to track police officers with misconduct complaints against them to it would use federal grants to incentivize departments to meet higher certification standards that means training on the escalation techniques and limiting the use of chokehold, except in extreme situations and third, it calls on departments to involve social workers on some of these calls that deal with things like homelessness mental illness and addiction. A senior administration official said the discussion today will include both police. Police, officers as well as families of people who were killed by police officers. The goal another official said is to quote have the discussion. The country needs to have so we can turn that answer in the country into action and hope okay, so police officers will be involved in these discussions. We knew Franco. That holding officers accountable can be very difficult because they have the protection of unions. There's been a lot of good reporting on that lately. Does the president's Executive Order Confront Unions at all? Yeah I posed that question to the officials, they did not address the unions directly with me. Instead I was told that there is accountability in the credentialing process. A second senior administration official charged that many police departments including in Minneapolis are operating using outdated standards and training materials. You know what's not expected to address this executive order concerns that police treat African Americans and people of color unfairly. The officials say the focus is on breaking down barriers and working with law enforcement, not demonizing the police given what we've learned about how many police departments they are in this country, the ways in which they all do things differently will an executive order from the president have any teeth. Question often the answer to that kind of thing here in Washington comes from whether there's money behind it, and the officials readily acknowledged there is not money or specific funding tied to this. A challenge is that police departments are generally run at the state and local level which makes widespread change difficult, but they argue that they can use federal grants to incentivize police departments to do the right thing, but they acknowledge they need the attorney general and Congress to provide funding to have a greater impact, NPR's Franko or Donas. Yes, thanks so much, thank you. All right president trump says the US is going to start cutting the number of its military personnel who were stationed in Germany. We are obliged to note that when the President says, something will happen. It often does not happen. It's not critical statement just to reality, but he did tell reporters yesterday. He wants only twenty five thousand troops to remain in Germany there. There are about thirty four and a half thousand now. The president did not appear to have consulted Germany. Other NATO allies are members of Congress about this. NPR International correspondent. Rob Schmitz has been covering this story from Berlin. Hey, rob good morning, so the President says he's doing this because Germany doesn't pay its NATO bills. That is not quite right, is it? No NATO doesn't send bills to its thirty member states in the mail, but President Trump and presidents before him have been frustrated by Germany's level of defense spending though trump has been much more belligerent about it. In two thousand fourteen NATO members agreed that by twenty twenty four, each member state would spend two percent of their GDP on defense Germany spins around one point three percent of its GDP. Now and says it's on its way to two percent, but that it won't be able to do that. Until two thousand thirty one and that's irked, president trump okay. The president comes out. He says this. What does the German government say in response? Well a German Defence Ministry spokesperson has given. US, NPR, a vague statement that says Germany in US have collaborated well over the years on missions in NATO exercises, and that it assumes this will continue to be the case in the future. When the news of this broke more than a week ago, German politicians had arranged reactions. Foreign Minister Heiko. Maas called US German relations complicated since trump became president, the far left Bharti celebrated the draw down saying the US should take all of its soldiers and its nuclear weapons out of Germany, the German ambassador to the US said that US troops are in Germany not to protect Germany, but for America's own security interests. It's worth asking us. Troops have been in Germany since the Nazi defeat in World War Two, they were a big part of Europe's defense during the Cold War, that's said collaboration. You're talking about but what? Troops doing Germany now. Well their mission has changed over the years, and they're no longer there to primarily protect Europe or Germany for that matter. They're there to give the US a strategic advantage, and it's conflicts in the middle. East and Central Asia Ramstein airbase in southern Germany is the largest airbase. The US Landstuhl Hospital is the largest US hospital outside the US. You know they've. They've been crucial for the wars in Afghanistan Iraq. And for the fight against Isis, and that's why so many troops there, where does this statement by President trump and this reaction by Germany leave the NATO alliance. Well the fact that President Trump did not bother to tell Germany or any other. NATO member state that he was going to do this shows how. The US has become about its allies in its international commitments. If this troop drawdown actually does happen, it will undoubtedly damage the cohesion of NATO and it'll send a message both to US allies as well as adversaries like Russia and China that America's commitment. NATO and its mission is wavering. Okay at this point still I. Guess a fairly big. If NPR's Rob Schmitz in Berlin Rod. Thanks so much thanks to. You want to warn you that this next story is a very disturbing one. Yeah, two black men were found dead in southern California, each of them hanging from a tree authorities I, said both deaths were suicides, but there were days a protest and the sheriff's department in Los. Angeles, county now says one of the deaths may not have been a suicide and they will investigate further emily. Elena Doug Dale of member station. KPCC has been following this story good morning emily. Good Morning. Tell me about the two men and what we do, know so far about their tax. Yeah, so on May thirty first thirty eight year old mandate, Malcolm harsh was found dead hanging from a tree near the city library in Victorville. California now that's about ninety minutes from La. That case was largely underreported until last Wednesday when twenty. Robert Fuller was also found hanging from a tree in a park in Palmdale California. That's only about fifty miles from where harsh was found now the families of both men think guts were lynchings, not suicides, boulders, family and friends say he didn't have any mental health issues, and that he was in the prime of his life and my colleague Josie Wong actually spoke to a woman named Tommy Anderson. Who was one of Fuller's close friends now, Anderson said fuller was ended about an upcoming group trip to Las. Vegas and the rising black lives matter movement Robert Di here. And that's what I want people to completely understand that he did not die here. He didn't come to this parking himself. Somebody brought him here at did this to him. Okay, so the sheriff's Office, which I said Mr Fuller's death was a suicide is now saying we don't actually know what happened to him? Guess so actually. They didn't present any new evidence at a press conference yesterday. They just explained that they initially thought it was likely suicide because there was no evidence of foul play. Here's what the county's medical examiner Jonathan Lucas said we felt better that we should look into more deeply and carefully just considering all the circumstances at play, so California Attorney General Hobby are Sarah, said his office will assist the sheriff's department in the Fuller Investigation and yesterday's press conference came after days of rallies that were. Were fuelled by anger over George. Floyd's killing many of the black residents in the area say they have a strange relationship with the sheriff's Department of for your investigation, starting in twenty eleven by the US Department of Justice found housing discrimination in Palmdale aided by the sheriff's department against black residents, and in recent weeks amidst nationwide black lives matter protests. There's been at least one shooting death of a black man at the hands of a sheriff deputy in the area. Okay, so Mr Fuller Steph will be. Be examined more carefully. The same is not true of Mr harshest death so far. How are people in that region in southern California reacting to all of this, yeah, so friends and family say no. It's not enough to just say it's not a suicide. They're calling for an independent investigation led by the California Attorney General not just supporting the sheriff's work. You know it's not like they just don't trust the local law enforcement. The community is very aware of the well documented history of Neo Nazi groups. Groups in the region and we've seen a rising trend actually in hate crimes that are linked the demographic shifts in the area from overwhelmingly white, two, more, black, and Brown, as people leave greater Los Angeles inserts for more affordable housing, so on Monday Civil Rights Activists Najah. Lee referred those trends at a press conference in downtown La find that very strange. They were hung within days of each other in Palmdale invective bill and the area that we know is frequented by skinhead in white nationalism. Definitely want to hang onto that white supremacy, so the momentum seems to be building around this cases, there are multiple demonstrations scheduled this week in bowl cities where the men were found dead Emily Elena, Doug Dale of KP. Thank you, emily, thank you. and. That's a first for Tuesday. June. Sixteenth I'm the king and I'm Steve INSKEEP. Join US here tomorrow. Subscribe to US wherever you listen to podcasts and rate and review us on Apple podcasts. We appreciate you waking up with NPR and you should know that your local NPR station makes up I possible every morning. You can support them and support this show at donate that NPR dot org slash up first. For James Bride, racism in this country, has been at disease, as been the cancer that has been killing us, and now we want to address the problem I mean you can't address the cancer until you know you have it. And these people are seeing the cancer author James McBride on protests, a pandemic and his new book listen to. It's been a minute from NPR.

president NPR President Trump NATO US Germany Germany California executive official Palmdale California Steve Inskeep NPR Emily Elena facebook La Elena Doug Dale Franco Franko Rob Schmitz
Friday, October 25th, 2019

Up First

13:26 min | 1 year ago

Friday, October 25th, 2019

"On a look back at the two thousand sixteen election has become a criminal probe the Justice Department is examining a matter of interest to the president the origins of an instigation of his campaign what's at stake is that investigation changes I'm David Greene with Steve INSKEEP and this is up I from NPR news it completely changed the way I saw race in America listen and subscribe to N._p._R.'S CODE SWITCH ABC campaign Durham is the US attorney for Connecticut he's widely respected attorney generals in both Republican and Democratic administrations have tapped him in the past the handle sensitive investing became a special council investigation that is now over but president trump has long wanted to investigate the investigators and administrative review is asking how his campaign the scene faster get free shipping on your system and a sixty day money back guarantee at simplisafe dot com slash. NPR is actually doing the president's bidding That said Durham was seen as an independent guy who would just focus on the facts okay so Durham has the reputation perhaps the Department of Justice has taken a potentially meaningful step it's a move in its investigation of the two thousand sixteen election we should be clear on just what this investigation is and trying to keep the president from going outside about we ask what role he played as the president pressed Ukraine also Iraqi police fired tear gas at Gatien's Democrats and former Justice Department folks though have been concerned about bars decision to look into this and whether he was to push forward here but it is still the Department of Justice investigating itself in a way that the president wants it to be doing are there any concerns really about that this is why we science support also comes from simply safe a wireless home security system with video verification technology that can help police get on so people can keep doing what's in their blood from advances in health to innovations in agriculture bear is advancing science for a better life at bear call it during the campaign the US discovered Russia's interference in the election the FBI I examined Russian links to president trump's campaign all that eventually Pacific evidence but said that he had concerns and so in May he appointed Durham to look into the origins of Russia probe whether the intelligence community violated any of its rules and surveillance of the relation of department rules or regulations that said in this instance it's unclear what potential crime they are investigating but with this being a criminal investigation the veteran PROC- Democrats have certainly expressed those concerns peers Ryan Lucas thanks so much thank you do there are no details on when that change was made or what prompted it what this means though is that the the they are investigating a potential crime not just a became a subject of interest and now NPR has confirmed that review has been upgraded to a criminal probe NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is following all this Ryan breath this message comes from NPR sponsor Bayer Bayer develops treatments for bleeding disorders like hemophilia sit back in April he said he had concerns about the Russian investigation he said he believed spine did occur on the trump campaign back in two thousand sixteen he acknowledged that he didn't have any versus the legal proceedings in question and they were all message every day okay so now Lindsey Graham becomes the latest of many trump supporters urging him to get better but Clinton look what he did what he did is he had a team that was organized had legal minds that could understand what was being said protesters how did

president Justice Department trump NPR Durham Ryan Lucas NPR Connecticut Steve INSKEEP US attorney David Greene Russia Clinton America attorney Lindsey Graham FBI Bayer Bayer US
Monday, April 13, 2020

Up First

12:37 min | 8 months ago

Monday, April 13, 2020

"Our public health experts are thinking about when to reopen the US. This has to be a data driven approach especially vital data would come from tracing the context of those infected. How would such a huge undertaking work? I'm Rachel Martin. Along with Steve Inskeep and this is I from NPR news. The president pledged national campaign of Screenings drive-thru sample collection and lab testing last month to fight the corona virus outbreak. Working very hard on this. We've made tremendous progress. How does that claim of progress? Measure against the facts plus a sign of hope in Spain that country eases its corona virus. Locked down some companies will be allowed to let workers return but is one of Europe's hardest hit countries really ready to relax restrictions. Stay with us. We've got the news you need to start your day support for up. First and the following message come from log Mehan powering remote work with videoconferencing virtual event and online collaboration software like the all new Goto meeting which helps people stay connected. Whenever and wherever more had GOTO MEETING DOT com slash up first Easter had been when president trump wanted to reopen the country? But that didn't happen and instead there were virtual church services and small Easter dinners instead of big ones. So how much longer do Americans stay at home on? Abc's this week FDA Commissioner Steven. Hahn held out some hope to reopen some things on. May First we see the incredible resiliency of the American people with respect to social distancing handwashing An all those mitigation factors. So that gives me great hope but I think it's just too early for us to say whether May I is that date But more to come on that as we learn more information and as our planning proceeds hope is one thing but widely cited computer models assumed that Americans must stay home longer than that to limit the spread because the virus will still be present. The government's own public health experts. Say they need a system to trace contain the disease before people can return to work safely all right so let's talk about what that system might look like with. Npr science correspondent. Jeff Brumfield. Hi Jeff. Good morning so we have heard this a lot lately contact tracing which is something that health officials are now saying. We need to have in place before we open up at all. Explain what that means contact tracing so basically it's just exactly what it sounds like when somebody tests positive for a disease can be any disease really public. Health officials call that person. The first thing they ask about is how they're doing whether they need more medical help but once they've done that they ask who they've been in contact with then they can call those contacts and ask them to go into quarantine to make sure they don't spread the disease if they've been infected. It's not exactly rocket science but it does require an awful lot of phone calls some follow ups it also requires trust right. There's no enforcement mechanism. You just hope that these people do self quarantine. How how would it work on a national scale well right now there's about a half million people in the US and that's just too many to contract trace all of them so first of all. We need to have this lockdown at needs to last long enough that the number of active cases goes down but assuming those cases do drop. You're absolutely right. Trust is essential. And that's why it's probably going to come down to state and local governments governments. That people work with everyday. Massachusetts for example is starting a statewide program to trace Cova nineteen patients in their contacts. And they're going to hire around a thousand people who can call people in you know. Make sure that they're they're doing the right things. They're going to start tracing as soon as they can but they need to be trained. I write so. Can we be ready in a matter of a month or even two months? It's going to be really tough. I mean first of all. We're nationwide. We're talking about hiring tens maybe even hundreds of thousands of people tracing doesn't require super specialized training. You can have people who've never done it before do it. But they do need to be plugged into some SORTA system that system needs to include widespread. And this is important rapid testing so that tracers know who to call and could call them before they make other people sick it needs to include a system you know like a computer database that allows them to do their jobs. And I mean you also need to be able to support people who you're asking to quarantine themselves. I mean if you're getting tell people not to go to the grocery store for fourteen days. You'd better have a plan to get them groceries if they need them medicine stuff like that. So you put all this together. You're talking about this huge national effort. Amine. It's like building the hoover dam or something but government should be able to do. That is their technology that can help. Yes we all carry these brilliant tracking devices known as cell phones and they should work to help but of course. There's a lot of privacy issues around that all right. Npr's Jeff Brumfield. We appreciate. Jeff thank you. Thank you so much so it was a month ago today. That president trump made this announcement about the corona virus to unleash the full power of the federal government for today. I am officially declaring a national emergency to very big words. It was march thirteen when the president spoke those two words promising to mobilize public and private resources. He pledged a sweeping national campaign of screening drive-thru sample collection lab testing although that would take a huge effort across a big country. Lives were in the balance with each passing day and one month later few of those promises are fulfilled and pears. Mac has been tracking those promises and joins US. Now hate him either. So what did the president say would happen and would happen. And then what has happened? We'll members of NPR's investigations team went through every promise. The president made on that March Thirteenth Rose Garden address. He promised that retailers would make drive through tests in critical locations but when we contacted the retailers who were there we found that discussions have not led to any wide-scale Implementation Walmart has opened to testing sites walgreens as open to in Chicago. Cvs has opened foresights target. Not Open any. In fact the company said that it had no formal partnerships with the federal government and suggested they were waiting for governments to take the lead so rather than a massive wave of testing at these retailers. We found a grand total of eight sites eight around the country. That's right well. There was also supposed to be this website that was going to coordinate screening testing and results. Right right the president and his team promised. Google was working on this website. That would integrate screening a nearby drive-thru testing location. And then send you back your results. All in one. It's going to be very quickly done. Unlike websites of the past to determine whether a test is warranted and to facilitate testing at a nearby convenient location. Well that never happened. Google was technically never the lead. A sister company to Google called vasarely owned by the same parent. Company has ruled out a pilot project primarily at the direction of the California state government. They now have six testing sites but they're only available to California residents in five counties in that state all right so those are examples of Public private collaborations or at least attempts at those collaborations What about promises that the federal government actually made well. The president promised to waive interest on student loans held by the government and relax certain healthcare regulations. And he did do that but on other issues. He was unable to fulfil his promises because he promised thanks. He didn't have the power to do unilaterally. Here's an example. The president said he would wave license requirements so that doctors could practice in different states but medical licensing is a state issue and the president does not have the authority to waive this. He said he would purchase large amounts of oil for the US strategic reserve but he has not yet secured funds from Congress to do so and Still hasn't so it never happened. So many promises left uncapped. What is the White House said? Well the White House did not formally respond on the record for the story. Although some agencies provided context ultimately last month that showed how many of these grand goal set out when the national emergency started. Haven't been met. Npr's Tim Mack. Thank you Tim. We appreciate it. Thank you so. Spain has been one of the countries hardest hit by the corona virus. And it's been on strict lockdown but today the government there is opening a door of sorts. The doors to some businesses some companies are allowed to go back in business including thousands of workers in sectors like construction and manufacturing. They're heading back to work. After two weeks of what many in Spain called hibernation the Spanish government is published safety guidelines for companies to follow although many health experts? Say this return to work as happening too soon. All right so is the hibernation over joining us from Spain. Lucia Hi Lucia. How's it going good ever you? I'm doing okay so why now. Why is the Spanish government moving to reopen some businesses now so the government is basically saying that the situation in Spain is contained enough to where more people heading to work won't were sold in Spike of infections? The spokesperson for the country's Health Emergency Coordination Center says she doesn't believe that the spread of infections will increase but in order to ensure safety as thousands of workers head back to work Police officers this morning began handing out ten million facemasks. Two people on board metro and buses and the Spanish government had to approve this measure. They did so on Monday but it was actually met with some opposition within lawmakers Some are criticizing the prime minister and his administration for putting economic interests above the health of its citizens well and it's not just lawmakers right as we said earlier it sounds like there's some health experts who worry this is happening soon. That's right. Yeah the Spanish government has been seeking advice over coronavirus measures from a team of health experts and one of them actually told Spanish media that they were not consulted. He expressed concern over this decision and said that the sensible thing would have been too for the shutdown to be extended And there are other health. Experts including from Spain's main institution for scientific research that said that these rollback measures are being taken prematurely. And they say it's important to roll back on these measures with mass testing and by isolating those who have tested positive and Spain isn't at that point yet. I mean we talk about Spain being one of the country's really in the world that's been hard as Ted. What's the data say right now about the rate of infections and deaths yet? Spain is the second or has the second highest number of cases after the US and the third number of deaths after the US and Italy but the number of new corona virus infections in beginning to slow down and on Sunday there were around forty one hundred new cases which was down six hundred sixty three from Saturday. The number of daily fatalities is also decreasing it peaked at nine hundred fifty deaths in twenty four hours on April second but since in the past week the numbers have stayed mostly under seven hundred. And you know we're a lot of hospitals have been lacking in equipment Which resulted in healthcare workers? Getting sick and now we're beginning to see more of the emotional and psychological toll on healthcare workers were showing symptoms of depression. All right we'll leave it there. Lucia Bellavia days reporting from the suburbs of Barcelona. Thank you thank you and that is a first for this Monday April thirteenth. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve. Inskeep join us here tomorrow and since the news does not stop when the podcast does follow us on twitter at first for your daily Roundup. The most important stories of the day and know this. We appreciate that you listen to up first and you can find more in depth coverage of the stories that we've talked about today and so much more on. Npr's morning edition. That is a radio. Show Steve hosted along with David Green and Noel King and meet you should check it out morning edition and NPR station at stations dot. Npr DOT COM

president government US Npr federal government Spain Spanish government Jeff Brumfield Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep NPR Spain Europe trump Google GOTO Abc
Thursday, June 11, 2020

Up First

13:47 min | 6 months ago

Thursday, June 11, 2020

"Oh Yeah Yeah. Pack. Alone you know that we have not hosted since like. Months Yeah for the first week of March. Maybe if we did, but that's crazy. I know it's been a long time and I have missed. The first seven months, the two thousand twenty presidential candidates will return to the campaign trail during a pandemic and wide unrest over police brutality. What is the case President Trump and Joe? Biden will make voters. I'm Rachel Martin along with Noel King and this is up I from NPR news. Amazon is pausing the use of their facial recognition technology by police. This follows IBM saying. It's ending a similar program altogether. Many civil rights groups have called the technology racially biased. Does the use of the stack have a future also four years ago in American Grad student was arrested in Iran and accused of spying for the United States in December. He was released and now he's talking about what happened. told me it's futile for you to resist stick with us. We've got the news. You need to start your day. Support for this NPR. PODCAST and the following message come from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors, specializing in isolation, depression, stress and anxiety visit better help dot com slash up first to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Integrative Therapeutics, for over thirty five years focused on manufacturing supplements with premium ingredients committed to helping people navigate their health journey. Integrative Therapeutics because confidence is healthy. President Trump and democratic nominee Joe Biden are going back on the campaign trail. Yeah, in only about one hundred and fifty days, voters will decide who they want to lead a nation in crisis, the USA's currently facing a pandemic, a recession and national upheaval over police, brutality and systemic racism. So how are the candidates making their case as they talked to voters NPR political correspondent Scott detro- has been looking into good morning Scott. They good morning, so it's been a while. Let's get ourselves centered with where the numbers are. What is polling saying well reelection campaigns? Campaigns are a referendum on the president and right now. President trump is a very tough spot. His approval ratings are down a new poll from Gallup yesterday showed eight ten point drop in a single month to thirty nine percent and our own polling last week found that two thirds of the country thinks that president trump has made race relations worse so at the same time Joe Biden, has substantial leads in a wave of new polls, and many of them are ten point leads, and as to the two thousand sixteen response that I can already hear listeners. Ears the here's the big difference. Joe Biden is over fifty percent in a lot of those polls, and that is a mark that Hillary Clinton very rarely got to makes the lead a lot more durable interesting. Let's talk about each of their responses. What is president trump doing to try and claw back some of his momentum? We have seen him focus on what he says is a recovery from the coronavirus. Pointing to last week's jobs report showing some jobs. Returning of course, the virus is still. Still, spreading including in Texas, where President Trump is headed to today to do, a recovery focused event at a Dallas Church. The president has also said that he's going to start resuming his big campaign rallies. The first one will be in Oklahoma next week that the state that was not hit as hard by Cova nineteen, and was very fast to reopen, but let's listen to the president. Lay Out the rally schedule We're going to be coming into Florida to big one in Florida one in Texas. They're all going to be big. We're going to Arizona going to North Carolina. Thirty appropriate and that shows president trump's political problem right there. These are all states he won, but that Biden is either up or very close in recent polls, we're used to hearing about campaigning in Florida and North, Carolina but. especially are not places. Republicans want to be having campaign in, and here's the thing. President trump is in political trouble because of a bigger ocean from independent voters especially turned off by his divisive approach, and rather than try to win them back. He's often going in the opposite direction. Recently, his campaign has ads mocking these protests that have widespread support. He's been promoting conspiracy theories at twitter lately and yesterday president. Trump said he would block efforts to rename military bases after confederate generals. This is on a day. THAT NASCAR ban the confederate flag a traces. How does Joe Biden and try to capitalize on things that you could argue president trump is doing wrong. We have seen a lot more democratic enthusiasm. That's still a challenge that Biden needs to address. We have seen him really. Lay Out several details of what he wants to see change in policing in broader structural changes to to address racism, talking a lot about the pandemic, but last night at a forum from the NWEA, CPI Biden faced a lot of skeptical questions about his role in the early nineteen nineties, pushing a lot of tough on crime bills, and over whether he would support reparations. A lot of people want to see him do that. He says he needs to see a study. I Scott. Tetra thanks thank you. Amazon is reconsidering its relationship with law enforcement after these widespread protests against police brutality. Right, the company is putting a one year moratorium on police use of its facial recognition. Technology researchers have long criticized this technology for producing inaccurate results for people with darker skin earlier this week IBM announced that it would end its work on facial recognition technology altogether tech reporter Bobby Allen has been looking into Zimbabwe. What was Amazon's technology exactly? Yes so Amazon for some time has had facial recognition programs. It's known as recognition spelled with a K. and in recent years they've been selling it to police, departments and police departments have been using it to identify potential suspects against this massive database that lives in the cloud, but then a bunch of studies have shown that the tool is really flawed has a harder time correctly. Correctly identifying many different types of people those with darker skin, women younger people then there are other concerns right, so you know. Police could potentially use this artificial intelligence software to secretly identify people in public like in the mass demonstrations. We've been seeing around the country. Joy Bulletin Weenie MIT researcher, who did one of the studies I just mentioned and here's her assessment ratio biases. Is even has age bias, but even if that bias wasn't there still the capacity or abuse, and most concerning Lee especially as we're seeing more people take to the streets, is the specter of using facial recognition or surveillance, so as you just heard, the protests across the country have really created intense concerned that authorities could be recording and storing the identities of demonstrators, and that fear about mass surveillance drove IBM to abandon its facial recognition business this week. Amazon hasn't gone that far. They're just pushing the pause button for now. Okay, so if they're pushing pause water police departments going to do in the meantime, so police departments are saying that they. They are going to work without it. I talked to one police department in Oregon in Washington County. That was one of the first in the country to use this technology and you know. They said they are going to suspend the program indefinitely and some police officers feel kind of betrayed by Amazon because Amazon four, a longtime has publicly defended this technology and has touted as successes, and now they're saying you know what we are going to suspend it and some rank and file police officers who have used that are pretty disappointed football. We did Amazon come right out and copter doing this because of these protests over police, brutality and racism. No no Amazon statement never mentioned George. Floyd name never mentioned anything about mass street demonstrations instead Amazon said. Pausing the software to give Washington lawmakers time to write facial recognition laws remember. This kind of software has gone for years completely unregulated. So that's what Amazon says, but it's hard not to think about the moment right. The deep reckoning America is having with its relationship with law enforcement and calls for police reform being heard across the country, so it's hard to separate Amazon's announcement from that of course. NPR's Bobby Bobby. Thank you. A. Now we have a story about three and a half years in prison in, Iran She Way Wong is telling his story in public for the very first time. He's an American scholar at Princeton University he was researching in Iranian archives when authorities there began questioning him in two thousand sixteen in an interview with NPR, he says government agents told him they were taking him to the airport to go home. Instead the men began driving him the opposite direction. One Guy quietly took my cell phone of my hands switched off and putting his pocket. And I was I could feel. My heart start beating very fast. I was truly truly. freaking out, he was accused of spying for the United States and sentenced to ten years in prison, Wong was freed in December of two thousand and nineteen. At the same time. The US released an Iranian. He took some time to recover and then this week. He told his story to our CO host. Steve INSKEEP and Steve Lemme start by asking. How did he get out? It was a kind of trade, no, and to hear Wong tell it. That was Iran's plan. From the beginning, he was studying histories of ethnic groups in Central Asia in Iranian. Iranian, archives in two thousand sixteen when he was picked up, they took him to evine prison, which is about the scariest address all of Iran. Now Iran is not made public to court records or evidence against him. So this is his version of events, but in his version he says the interrogators were really frank. They just wanted him to confess to spying. They didn't even seem to care what he supposedly was spying on didn't care that he denied it. They just wanted a confession. Let's listen. They told me it's futile for you to resist. We need a deal with America. And if you don't confess. we have no case. We have no case. We have no deal, so you'll stay. You'll go back to the solitary. Until confess, and then then they would trade you for some some Arabian in the United States. They were very straightforward about that. They said we want our money back from the United States. We want detainees back. Amazingly. They asked me to write down one sentence in Persian and English. One sentence I am a spy. For the United States. That's it though he says he did no spying, he signed that one sentence and he served as you said three and a half years before was released. What did he experience in? EVINE prison? As you said a very scary place in? Yeah, luckily, he got out before the pandemic. He says that after a period of solitary confinement, which was like torture for him, he was allowed to stay with other prisoners. He was allowed to call home to his family is allowed to read newspapers and other things in the prison library, but it was just this period of excruciating waiting until the day that he was in a common room with other prisoners and got some news and they announced. Announced the my name and they said you're being released. And our came as a huge surprise, an old prisoners. Can all the cells clubbing Congratulating me hugging me. You're going home good for him. It must have taken a lot of effort though to make this happen. Yeah, his wife New Jersey was lobbying for his release. She did interviews. She spoke with Rachel here NPR. She spoke with me. She spoke with trump administration officials and US diplomats eventually arranged this trade, and she way Wong is back in Princeton. Can tell you with his wife and his seven year old son, having missed three and a half years of the son's life so far and just quickly. How is he getting back to normal? He was able to teach some classes at Princeton University upon his return before the pandemic shuts and things down, he said that was an enormous help, and he's just spending time spending time with his family. He says he's still processing. Everything confesses. He's been rather grumpy. His wife and he says he's not even sure that he fully understands how this is affected him. Steve INSKEEP. Thanks for bringing us this one, but. And that's first. Thirsty June eleven time Noel King. And I'm Rachel Martin Start Your Day with us right back here tomorrow. Don't forget. You can subscribe to US wherever you listen to PODCASTS, and if you've got a second ratings and review us on Apple podcasts. We'd appreciate that if you want more news from NPR out the radio show morning edition you can find your local NPR station by going to stations that NPR dot org, and if you want podcast and breaking news, you can get those on the NPR one APP which is in the APP store. You may have noticed something at all. These protests over police violence. There are a lot more white people there than you'd expect. But how long will that last this awoken among White American voters? How far they really willing to go beyond dethroning trump Adam server on race and lessons from history listen subscribed to. It's been a minute from NPR.

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Thursday, July 30, 2020

Up First

13:31 min | 4 months ago

Thursday, July 30, 2020

"Economic numbers for the second quarter. Show this sharpest Straw in modern history the economy shrinking by thirty two, point, nine percent. We've never seen anything quite like it could the third quarter be any better. I'm David Greene with Steve INSKEEP, and this is up I from NPR news. Oregon's governor says, federal agents have agreed to step back. They'll reduce their presence on streets were they've been confronting protesters. What would it take to end weeks of civil unrest? Also, lawmakers questioned leaders of the tech industry about their unregulated power. I'm not concerned about others. I'm just asking you Mr Zuckerberg. Democrats said they stifled competitors. Republican. Said, they stifled conservative voices out of the corporate leaders, respond stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. We Now, have confirmation that shutting down the US economy for a good part of the second quarter was very bad for business and truth we knew that, of course, but a number from the government makes it clear just how bad. It's an estimate of economic growth or the lack of it. In the second quarter, April May and June, you will recall the country began shutting down in March and was pretty fully shutdown as close as it could be anyway by April first, NPR chief economics correspondent. Scott horsely with Scott Good, morning good. Morning. Steve wants the number you got. It's the sharpest contraction in postwar history Steve, thirty. Two point, nine percent. That's a little bit misleading GDP numbers are usually reported in annual rates as if the SH, the sharp contraction we saw in the second quarter was going to continue for a full year and we don't expect that to happen. Nevertheless, it is about four times the worst quarter. Quarter that we saw during the great recession more than a decade ago chief economist. Norman? Barabash of IHS market calls this a horrific GDP number. We've never seen anything quite like it. Now, this was led by a sharp drop in consumer spending. As you mentioned, restaurants and retailers closed their doors in a desperate fight to slow the spread of the virus. As sharp downturn was though it was also very short by the end of the quarter. We did begin to see a resumption of economic activity, but to be sure that recovery is fragile and incomplete, just as morning, we learned that another one point four million people applied for state unemployment benefits. Last week, that number was up slightly for that second week in a row claims for a special federal unemployment program, for folks who ordinarily are not eligible were down a bit well, that's sets the stage for now, we are in the third quarter now in July August September, whatever communists expect. A lot depends on what happens with the pandemic and some businesses are more vulnerable than others, bearish described kind of to speed recovery, and you can hear that in some of the folks I've been talking with this week restaurant owner. Cameron Mitchell. He likens this pandemic to a hurricane He says, what appeared to be a business rebound in? June. Turned out to be only the eye of the storm and now. Now. He's being buffeted again by gale force winds the most prolonged difficult operating environment. I've ever been a leader and I've been in this business for forty years. Mitchell operates restaurants in thirteen states, and he points to Florida's an example, his outlets. There were almost back to normal in early. June. But as infections took off business dropped again and that's true for a lot of businesses that depend on consumer traffic. which industries are doing well then. Factories are picking up steam again, construction crews are are are humming once more. So our dentists offices actually about four, hundred, fifty, thousand people went back to work in dental offices in May and June. Michigan hygienist Alexis Bailey says, at first, she was nervous about going back to work, but she got comfortable pretty quickly with the new safety precautions and to her surprise, a lot of patients. The office has been booked solid people. Clean. I WANNA catch up and I think people every time they come in and they say this was been nice to get out of the house and you feel safe and talk to somebody I. Get the impression though Scott that people are still categorizing things as essential and non essential, you gotta get to the dentist eventually, but maybe you don't need to go out to the movies and you might be more willing to put up with safety precautions in the dentist chair. Then you would be sitting at a sitting at a fancy restaurant. We do know that you know the spending has dropped. That is keeping a lid on economic activity and it was a decline in consumer spending that really. Really led to that sharp contraction in the economy. In the second quarter, it might have been even worse though, were it not for the huge amount of federal spending and relief payments that went out federal. Reserve. Chairman. Jerome. Powell said yesterday those twelve hundred dollar relief payments and the supplemental unemployment benefits have been an important lifeline keeping the economy afloat and abroad since it's been well spent, it's kept people in their homes. It's businesses and business, and that's all a good thing. Now, of course, those supplemental unemployment benefits are expiring tomorrow and Congress seems to be stuck as they try to figure out what kinds of additional support both families and businesses might need to keep the economy from sliding backwards again. Scott thanks so much. Really appreciate it. My Pleasure Steve. That's NPR's Scott horsely. What happens now, that federal agents are stepping back in Portland right. That's the question. Now, as Oregon's governor says, these agents will come off the streets after many days of confrontations with protesters, officers from various agencies were ordered to protect federal building from protesters but their actions. Appear to intensify long running protests over racial justice. Now, the plan is for Oregon State police to take over in hopes of de escalating. How's this supposed to work? Oregon, public broadcasting's Conrad. Wilson is on the line. Good. Morning. Steve, what's the plan. Well under the deal Oregon State, police will take over defending the federal courthouse. They said that they're going to work with federal law enforcement and the Portland please. The idea is to get federal law enforcement to leave also ensuring the safety of the courthouse and those who worked there. Sure. These federal officers don't generally do crowd control I mean, they've made some missteps that have really energized. What prior to their arrival were some pretty small protests at times fewer than one hundred people, for instance. A US marshal shot at peaceful protesters in the head with a crowd control device putting the person in the hospital and Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on homeland. Security. Officers. In military style uniforms using unmarked vehicles to arrest protesters, and you know this escalated what we're fairly small protests into thousands of people. We saw marching recent days. It also had people questioning the motives of the administration. What was the president doing? How did the administration end up agreeing to back off well? Well this week Governor. Brown spoke with Vice President Mike. Pence. And the governor pitched pence on this plan pens got the Department of Homeland Security involved. There were a number of high-ranking officials in Portland this week including the deputy director of the FBI before this agreement came together and was announced yesterday i. have to note that I heard I of this federal drawback from the state officials from the governor, what are federal officials saying about what they will actually do? Well Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad. Wolf says the surge of federal officers president trump sent to Portland is going to stay and see how things unfold the differences. They're not gonNA. Be Out there in the street and less state police can't protect the courthouse. Wolf pointed out in a news conference that many federal officers have been injured during the protests. The government has said they have at least one hundred and fourteen federal officers guarding the courthouse and conversations, my colleagues and I have had with law enforcement on the governor's staff. They say the idea is to return things to the normal level of federal law enforcement in the city Conrad. You've noted that the federal presence on the streets appeared to intensify the protests, is it possible to see what might happen as they back off? This is really knew. We don't know how protesters are gonNA react to those that's been discussed conceptually. No. Seen it in action and tonight is really we're GONNA see how this federal drawdown plays out. and. The administration has been playing up this kind of conflict. As we mentioned I mean, do we know how this might change the rhetoric on either side? Well, the trump administration has put forward. This narrative of Portland is a city under siege from protesters trump tweeted that if he hadn't deployed federal law enforcement quote, there would be no Portland, it would be burned and. And beaten to the ground in reality, the protests have mainly take place in an area downtown. The vast majority of protesters have been peaceful and focus on racial injustice and police violence. The hope is that federal agents stepping back with? Yes. Great things in return things to the conversations between community police and the Mayor Oregon Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson. Thanks so much. You're welcome. What are the lawmakers at a House hearing yesterday left? No doubt how we've used the Tech Industry David Sis Alenia. Rhode Island referred to the American Revolution. Our founders would not allow before king, nor should we bowed before the emperor's of the online economy? That is how the House Democrat referred to four tech CEOS who were on screens at the hearing. Amazon's Jeff bezos apple's. Apple's Tim Cook facebook's mark, Zuckerberg and Google. Soon. Darpa spent almost six hours fielding questions. We just want to note here that all of these companies are among NPR's financial supporters and here's Lena Seljuk was listening to the hours of questions with the reputed emperors of the Economy Either Alina Good Morning. What'd you learn? Right? So the House lawmakers who called the hearing have? have been investigating these companies for over a year now. So what we got was a bit of an first taste of what it is that they've learned from all the interviews documents, emails that they've collected, the hearing was pretty adversarial, but in a way was a tale of two hearings. One was the key focus how these companies may have grown at the expense of. Of Others, for example, lawmakers, grilled facebook about how it buys or replicates rivals that threatened to Lewitt's users like instagram. Washington. Democrat. pro-military Paul read off emails between soccer and other executives. Do you copy your competitors congressman? We've certainly adapted features. A that others have leaden as have others copied and adapted features that I'm not concerned about others. I'm just asking you Mr Zuckerberg. Similarly, Google has been accused by helping others of stealing restaurant reviews, other content. Some small sellers on Amazon have complained about feeling trapped and dealing with confusing ever changing rules APP. Developers of accused apple of unfairly charging them different fees all. As different versions of the same question about how they throw their weight around to push competitors out of the way were you said, this is a tale of two hearings. You've just described one. What was the other? So the point of this hearing was how tech companies deal with competition, but a big chunk had nothing to do with that several. Republicans. Particularly, the firebrand Jim Jordan from Ohio probe. The CEOS for Anti. Conservative, bias. Cook is the cancel culture mob dangerous Jordan demanded neutrality from Google in the upcoming election and asked if all the CEO's supported diversity of opinions, which actually prompted of an interesting moment. Bazo. Took a dig a discourse on social media calling social networks, nuance destruction machines. I. Wish we could see face at that moment, but the video stream did not show him. How much did the see goes really have to say for themselves. They had to say a lot, but they also have rejected the premise of the hearing that they're being big bullies they played up their humble beginnings, especially bezos the world's richest person they highlighted how much people value their products and how they still face plenty of competition. Overall, the four CEOS essentially argued that any bad episodes were outliers and that their entire goal is to make their users consumers happy, and now we wait to see what the committee things when they released the final findings of their investigation. Of Regulation here at some point lead I thank you very much. Thank you, NPR's lane to sell you. A. And that is up I. for this Thursday, July, thirtieth I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm David Greene, we hope you start your day with us here. Tomorrow you can subscribe to US wherever you listen to your podcasts, and if you've got a few minutes, do favor rate and review us on Apple podcasts. When you're ready for NPR news, we got a radio show for you NPR's morning edition, which is on your NPR station. You can find the station at stations that NPR, dot org and for podcasts local news latest headlines take NPR everywhere with the NPR one APP which is in your APP. Store. Until recently Edmund Hong says, he didn't speak out against racism because he was scared. Listen now on the codes which podcast from NPR.

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Friday, October 9th, 2020

Up First

13:39 min | 2 months ago

Friday, October 9th, 2020

"Are. Will the final presidential debates happen president trump refuses to debate Joe Biden virtually even though trump tested positive for covert last week, there was talk of changing dates Joe Biden said he won't agree to a delay. I'm Steve Inskeep with Noel King, and this is I from NPR news. What do we know about thirteen men facing charges in Michigan six are accused of plotting to kidnap the governor seven face charges that included providing material support for terrorist acts and authorities here in Washington DC say the CDC has to do contact tracing on people who attended an event in the White House Rose Garden in late September. I was shocked when I found out that. There weren't extensive contact tracing efforts underway. Why haven't those efforts started stick with us? We've got the news you need to start your. Own Support for NPR and the following message come from the podcast broken seeking justice from three uncanny four. Jeffrey Epstein is dead. But for his many victims, the search for justice is still alive. Listen to broken seeking justice wherever you get podcasts. Support also comes from simply safe home security with professional monitoring keeping watch day and night. You can set it up yourself and under an hour head to simplisafe dot com slash up first and get a free hd camera with the purchase of security system. Back in the spring far right militia members carrying guns protested at Michigan State Capitol. They demanded an and to corona virus restrictions that Governor Gretchen whitmer put in place at the time some observers worried that anti-government sentiment seemed to be growing, and now six men are facing federal charges that they plotted to kidnap the governor another seven who were linked to that plot face a range of state charges. Authorities have not said whether the men were motivated by the covid restrictions. Abigail send ski is a reporter with W. K. A. R. in East Lansing Michigan, Good Morning Abigail. Good Morning. So it is it is early there but what has it been like in the hours since these men were arrested? So, the capital has definitely been shellshocked shocked by these threats of violence against the governor people did show up with big block letters that said big gretch outside of the Capitol to support the governor. Last night and Republican leaders still spoke at a rally but people are still kind of processing what happened yesterday. You've been going these arm protests for the past few months to report on them. What if they been like? So, despite a majority of michigander supporting the job that the governor has been doing there have been thousands of people who came to the capital in April and armed protesters entering the capital in May, and if you were at those protests, you might not be surprised by this plan. There was a lot of anti whitmer and misogynists sentiment signs like tyrants get the rope comparisons to Nazi, Germany and graphic depictions of violence at one of the protests I covered a man brought a Barbie doll hanging from a noose and those tapered off the summer after are stay at home order ended but there's still resentment toward whitmer in the form of fledgling recall efforts and petition district the governor of her emergency powers. Okay, what else do we know about this alleged plot to kidnap her? So the criminal complaint that these men were allegedly incensed by her quote uncontrolled power right now, there's kind of two levels of anger at the bottom. You have these fringe extremist groups who protest at the capital and in the upper echelons of the Michigan state legislature you have leadership that are very angry with the governor's Covid nineteen response she's issued hundreds of executive orders without legislative input and state Republicans have been calling it a power grab for months. They've sued the governor and pass bills that would. Limit her emergency powers so they may not be calling her a tyrant, but they've mingle with protesters and boiling under the surface. They have a huge amount of contempt for her corona virus response lawmakers would mingle with the protesters. That's interesting is Governor Whitman still enforcing those covid nineteen restrictions. So in a shocking Supreme Court case, they up ended her emergency powers last Friday, and a lot of those are no longer being enforced, but they're stopgap measures being enforced by the public health department. Okay, Abigail since key that W K are in East Lansing. Thanks so much of course. Will there be another presidential debate or to this election season responses from the president are putting that in doubt you will recall that he attended the first presidential debate and just two evenings later, the president tested positive for corona virus and was soon in the hospital for safety. The commission that runs presidential debates has said the next meeting October fifteenth should be virtual. The president said no to that. He told Fox News He. Doesn't want to sit at a computer that his campaign said, hold a rally instead both campaigns yesterday talked about changing dates Joe, Biden's camp ultimately said, the president is being erotic and that he doesn't get dictate the schedule and since he's already backed out of that second debate Joe, Biden has moved on scheduled a town hall meeting on ABC with Biden alone for Tuesday, the very night that there would have been a debate. NPR's Frank O. or Donas has been following this morning Franco good morning where do things stand right now? Well, the dispute here about whether it's safe for everyone involved to meet in person at least that's what the presidential debate commission said in its announcement of a virtual debate. Here's the commission's Frank Farren Cough on. Fox. News yesterday too many questions as to whether or not. We could present this with many many people who are going to be president, Miami who would be? Vulnerable if they were going to catch something if we weren't comfortable. So we thought the best thing to do to make sure that the debate continued was to do it virtually. Released a statement last night citing a memo from Dr Sean Connolly. The president's doctor stating that the president should be able to safely return to public events beginning on Saturday there has been a lot of back and forth trump says he's not willing to participate virtually as you noted, he calls it a waste of time here. He is talking to Fox News Sean Hannity last night. No I'M NOT INTERESTED IN DOING A. Virtue I'm not Joe by not going to do a virtual debate, sit behind a computer screen and that gives them the answers Joe Biden. He was speaking to reporters and Phoenix. Here's what he said. We set the dates I'm sticking with the date I'm showing up I'll be there, and in fact, if he shows up, be doesn't fly, he says he'll be there but Biden has also Scheduled Town Hall on ABC for that night and trump. He says he might hold a rally that night. Let me go back to what you said about the President Dr Shawn Conley. He says the president should be able to safely return to public events beginning on Saturday, which would be like eight or nine ten days after the president was given the diagnosis that would seem to contradict what public health officials have said about the need to isolate for you know between ten and twenty days after being infected what do we know about the president's health right now? Yeah, that's that's right. I. Mean Dr. Conley says the president has completed his course of treatment for the coronavirus. He says that he's responded extremely well, and he says there's no sign of quote adverse therapeutic effects and he says he fully anticipates the president safe return to public engagements. You know the president said last night that he may actually hold a rally in Florida tomorrow night and possibly one in Pennsylvania on Monday. Okay. So what is all of this mean for president trump's attempt to be reelected? Well, the president is really eager to get back on the campaign trail. A final election push I mean it's really around the corner and they're just a weeks away Biden was in Arizona yesterday. That's an important target for Democrats and he's in Nevada today where the Latino population is especially key in the president meanwhile is behind in the polls. He really needs to shake things up and the White House is trying to say that he's out there and then he's fine but there's a lot of questions left. NPR White House correspondent Franco or has thanks right. Thank you. Here, is what the CDC has been saying about Corona virus for months. If you get the virus isolate until you don't have it anymore, and if you have been around someone who has the virus quarantine for at least fourteen days, just remember the timeline here the president tested positive. For Kovic last week we learned about just one week ago today his doctors will not say if he has tested negative at any point since then in appearances on Fox News last night. He could be heard coughing and clearing his throat, and yet we're hearing as Franko mentioned that the president is getting ready as soon as this weekend ahead out in public again, authorities in Washington DC including the mayor still have questions about the very recent past they want the government to conduct contact tracing on people who may have been exposed to the virus and White House event in late September NPR. Selena Simmons Duffin has been following this one good morning Selena can we? Noel. So the mayor of DC and a few other authorities sent out this public letter. What does it say exactly will the letters pretty simple it actually is an open call to White House staff and visitors and says, if you worked at the White House in the past two weeks or attended the Rose Garden ceremony on September twenty six or you had close contact with people who worked there attended the event then you need to get tested and it also notes. That a negative test is not mean you still don't have to quarantine for fourteen days you can test negative and have no symptoms and still be infectious and the letter notes that this call is happening because of the S- officials understanding that there's been limited contact tracing to date. So one of the really interesting things here is that the White House is in Washington DC proper, but it is considered federal land. So can the DC government require contact tracing in this case? The short answer is no. So even though there are reports of an increase in coronavirus tests in the district and there've been some high case numbers in the last few days, folks have been worried that these cases are linked to the outbreak of the White House the DC government can't control what happens at the White House. So the mayor sent a letter to the White House earlier this week suggesting that they coordinate on this and the DC health director apparently didn't make contact with the White House earlier this week. But now this open letter suggests that internal process wasn't satisfactory. So there is an entity. That could contact race an event like this that's really complicated with people who flew in from all over the country, and that is the CDC but it seems like the agency's role in this is really limited and here's what Dr Leana Wen told NPR. She's an emergency room physician who's also a medical analyst for CNN media I was shocked when I found out that there weren't extensive contact tracing efforts underway. This is what the CDC does. The CDC should be coordinating this effort with state and local health departments all over the country. So is the White House just not doing contact tracing at this point Yeah, they've said that it's actually too long before the president's diagnosis to be relevant central event exactly, and so the trump administration says the white. House medical unit is contact tracing but only cases they identify which makes it seemed like they might be contact tracing a small subset of people. So in the absence of a real robust transparent effort at this from the federal government this now, this open call from local health departments in the DC region kind of like a bat signal. If you work at the White House or you were at the Rose Garden on September twenty, six quarantine for fourteen days and get tested. NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin. Thank Selena. Thanks Noel. That's a first for Friday October ninth. I'm well King I'm Steve INSKEEP UP I is produced by Mark Rivers, our editors Jacob Conrad and Krista Capello's our technical director Brian Jarboe, and our executive producer is can young don't forget to subscribe to wherever you listen to podcasts, and if you like what you hear ratings and reviews on Apple podcast. In fact, if you don't like what you hear your also free to rate and review us on Apple podcasts, maybe we'll look. Up I of course, airs on Saturday to with Lucy Navarro and Scott Simon it'll be in this feed or you can find it wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Rodney Call Mike and Sending. On New podcast louder than a riot, we trace the collision of rhyme. Punishment in America. We will hunt Applebee's we literally physically you stand on the corner drug squad pull everybody. Knew, from NPR music. Listen to lower the ride.

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Rep. Adam Schiff: Trump's Potentially Impeachable Offenses Include Bribery

NPR's Story of the Day

06:57 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Adam Schiff: Trump's Potentially Impeachable Offenses Include Bribery

"This message comes from. NPR sponsor. Xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X.. By get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply the televised impeachment. Hearings begin tomorrow. We'll be gaveled in by Democratic Congressman. Adam Schiff as chair of the House Intelligence Committee. He's the one running. The inquiry chef has been thinking a lot about these hearings and a Senate trial that would follow if the House impeaches the president if it comes to impeachment There are really two. Juries is there is the jury that is the Senate and I would hope that those jurors would keep an open mind although it's clear that Several will not but the other. Juries American American people shift is a former prosecutor from California. He led the closed door interviews sessions that have produced thousands of pages of testimony. and He's been talking with Steve Inskeep of NPR's morning edition. WHO's here in the studio? Hi Steve Perry set the scene for us where is going to be posing as a huge committee room near the capital is slipped in and had a look today. They're already setting it up setting up the cables and the TV tripods and so forth. And it's through those cameras that shift. Who will be at the center of activity along with the witnesses? We'll be addressing both of those juries that he mentioned. So what was he doing today today before. This big hearing Pretty Frantic Day from what I could tell he rushed to see us from a meeting. Rushed away way to another meeting after the interview but in between he did settle down into a dark armchair for a talk that began with the Constitution's language on impeachment. The document says that an official can be impeached and removed for treason. Bribery high crimes and misdemeanors. which are these in your view? Well I don't think any decision has been made on ultimate question about whether articles of impeachment should be brought but on the basis of what the witnesses have had to say so far There are any number of potentially impeachable offenses including bribery including high crimes and misdemeanors the basic allegations ends against the president or that he sought foreign interference in a US election that he conditioned official acts on the performance armaments of these political favors and those official acts include a White House meeting that the president of Ukraine desperately sought with President trump as well as hundreds of millions aliens of dollars in taxpayer funded military assistance for country that is at war with Russia and a country that the United States has a deep national security interests to make sure it can defend itself. Explain for the layman. How those acts if everything happened as you suspect it did how those acts would be bribery? The word you used first of all As the founders understood bribery it was not as we understand it in law today it was much broader it. CA- noted the breach of the public trust roster away where you're offering official acts for some personal or political reason Not In the nation's interest here are you have the president the United States seeking help from Ukraine in his reelection campaign in the form of two investigations that he thought were politically advantageous ages including one of his primary rival. That's a payoff is what you're saying. That would be the payoff well. Bribery requires that you are soliciting. Something of value doesn't have to be cash. It can be something value and clearly. This was something of great value to the president but more than that high crimes and misdemeanors seniors also include things that are violations of the public trust. The public trust the president to be acting their interest not in the interest of their political campaign when it comes to conducting the nation's business having gathered thousands of pages of testimony. I did hear you say you haven't decided exactly what the articles of impeachment might be. But have you made up your mind that there is an impeachable offense. I want to reserve judgment until we've had a chance. Not only to a flesh out all all the facts of but also to have the debate within our caucus and within our country about whether the facts wentz established to require us to remove. The president impeachment was a mechanism not to punish but to protect the country. Going forward and one of the things that that I am deeply concerned about is the fact that the present engaged in some of this conduct on the very day after Bob Muller presented his findings to Congress. The president went gives every impression that he believes that he is above the law that he can solicit foreign interference in our elections. He can do whatever He pleases. That anyone who calls out his corrupt behavior is a traitor or a spy. That's a very dangerous situation for the country. You know Mr Chairman that Republicans lukens connect them all a report to this affair. A different way they will say Democrats tried with the Mullahs report to get this guy out of office. Didn't work out fizzled. And so now they're trying this instead had and they're convinced that you've always been looking for this opportunity. What do you say well that? Unfortunately that's at odds with the facts because my republican colleagues know. I've resisted stood Impeachment and did resist impeachment until this latest and most serious misconduct. You know that House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi spoke dimly of impeachment for a while she said it needed to be overwhelming. And bipartisan it. Sounds like you believe this is overwhelming. The feeling is not at all bipartisan. Haven't you fallen short of that standard. Here we can't let one party That has allowed itself to become a cult of the president who dictate whether a constitutional remedy can be employed. I would hope if not members of the house. Then members of the Senate will put their party aside will look to their constitutional duty booty and oath and ask themselves the question if it does come to trial in the Senate are we prepared to accept that a president of the United States can withhold taxpayer funds Diprivan ally have the ability to defend itself withhold official acts like a White House meeting with a foreign in leader and do so in order to get help in the presidential election. These are the tough questions that members on both sides are going to have to ask now in our talk are the chairman. He said he's thinking about restraining. The conduct of this president and also thinking about the warning that the house could issued a future presidents through impeachment. And we'll hear tomorrow on morning edition that he's thinking impeachment may send a useful signal even if the Senate never convicts this president. That's our colleague. Steve INSKEEP keep with congressman. Adam Schiff of California. Thank Steve Glad to do it. The public phase of the impeachment inquiry begins tomorrow. And you'll be able to listen live on many N._p._R. Stations.

president Senate bribery Steve Inskeep Adam Schiff United States official NPR White House President trump House Intelligence Committee Congressman California Steve Perry Ukraine Steve Nancy Pelosi
Thursday, February 6, 2020

Up First

13:02 min | 10 months ago

Thursday, February 6, 2020

"The what are the consequences of President Trump's acquittal. The president plans a statement today. One Republican senator says he voted his conscience instead of party and several Democrats risk their seats while voting for conviction. I'm well king. Here's Steve INSKEEP and this is up I from NPR News Iowa. The Democrats say they really truly are almost finished counting. We're GONNA take time we need. And when will that be when will that one hundred percent detri- when will that be. When will that one hundred percent send vitro? Do you have an estimate for one that will be. That's the State Party chairman on CNN. which candidates appear to be winning as Iowa lose also Venezuela's opposition leader appeared at the state needed the Union speech and also met with President trump? How does the White House plan to renew its efforts to back Juan Guido? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news support for this podcast and the following message come from salesforce. Customer Relationship Management Solution committed to to helping you deliver the personalized experiences that customers want salesforce bringing companies and customers together visit salesforce dot com mm slash learn more. Although the result was never in doubt you could feel the weight of history as senators cast their votes. Yesterday it is there fork work ordered and adjudged that said Donald John Trump be and he is hereby acquitted of the charges and said articles. The Senate acquitted the president on on both articles of impeachment abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The vote was almost entirely along partisan lines. But the vote of one senator who said he was guided by the fax ax and by his faith made it harder to dismiss as just a partisan proceeding. NPR Congressional correspondent. Susan Davis has been covering this impeachment drama and is in our studio Josue. Good Morning. Good Morning Steve. who was the one senator? Utah Republican senator. Mitt Romney a familiar name. The two thousand twelve nominee for president for the Republican Party and he gave a very emotional emotional speech on the floor at times. He seemed to get choked up with tears in which he explained that he just simply couldn't vote to acquit. The president were I to ignore the evidence that has been presented edited and disregard. What I believe my oath and the Constitution demands of me for the sake of partisan end it would I fear expose Mike character to histories rebuke and the center of my own conscience? It was a politically courageous vote because Mitt Romney will get no awards for this his will not be rewarded in any way shape or form if anything it's brought on a ton of attacks already including from the president himself and some calls to expel him from the Party although Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell was asked about that yesterday and he quite literally laughed it off. You know you have to assume that there would be some Republicans who would make the opposite calculation that my vote here you know would not make any difference anyway way and therefore I should just vote to equip the president easier thing to do. We've never going to affect the outcome. which we knew from the beginning is that the president was going to be acquitted? And you know he made this statement. Now there was some Democrats Kratz It would be easy for most Democrats to vote for conviction but went through some Democrats who faced a difficult vote of their own. I mean their their political consequences for the senators cast this vote especially for the ones that are also on the ballot this year and the one that took another politically risky vote is Doug Jones of Alabama. He's a Democrat and a Ruby Red State may be one of the states for Donald. Trump is his most popular bueller and there was a a question whether he would vote to acquit because that is more aligned with his constituents is home state so obviously voting to convict is something that I'm sure that Republicans are going to use against Jones. He's probably the most vulnerable incumbent in the Senate. I'm also thinking about Democrats such as Joe Manchin of West Virginia who spoke at one point during this week of going for censure of the president would sound like he was going to vote for acquittal but he voted for conviction right he did and he and another Democrat Carson Cinema Zona also comes from a state where the president is more popular. But they're Democrats who have the luxury of not being up for re election in twenty twenty and have a little bit more runway to explain this to their constituents so the next question Davis is how the president responds people have been asking. Willie quiet down calm down. Will he feel unleashed because Congress went after him with the biggest weapon they could and did not get him. What happens is the president now? Well I think if you watched the state of the Union address that safe to say that the president's feeling pretty confident right now. He's expected to give remarks this afternoon. What the White House is billing as a victory victory speech although it's important to remember that while he was acquitted the judgment on him from Republican? Senators was far more mixed. There was a I think. Believe eight to ten Republicans who said what the president it did was wrong was inappropriate and even Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell has never answered the question when asked if what he thinks. The president did was wrong at a press conference yesterday. Reporters tried three times to get McConnell to say. Is it wrong for a president to solicit intervention in an election and simply wouldn't answer the question which means he's also not saying that it's right right. I suppose we should mention exactly but the judgment on the president is still very mixed sue. Thanks for the update. Really appreciate it. You're welcome that's NPR. Congressional correspondent. Susan Davis in one of these days water these days we will learn the final results of Monday's Iowa Caucus. Yeah there's still no clear winner in Monday's voting. Even though around ninety seven percent of the results have been released. This whole delay started with a failure of technology. NPR's miles parks taking up residence presidents in Des Moines. This crisis is over miles. Good Morning. Good Morning I hope. That's not literally true that you're going to take up residence there. But what are the latest results so this race just continues. Just to tighten as we've gotten more and more results over the past twenty four hours a former South Bend mayor people to judge and Senator Bernie Sanders now essentially tied in state delegate equivalence with Buddha judge ahead by about a tenth of a percentage point. What's interesting is sanders has actually got a more sizable lead in the raw vote? Total he's up by about twenty twenty five hundred votes in that lead has continued to grow as more of the vote. Count has been coming in over the last few hours. I guess we should note. That's like the difference between the popular vote and the electoral electoral vote. That's a rough equivalent to what you're talking about in this hunt right delegates but it sounds like more or less tied both near the top. Which means Elizabeth Warren is farther back? Joe Biden is farther farther back. The other candidates are very far back. That seems to be the result. The candidates taken to New Hampshire now. What about the the actual meltdown itself? The failure alien technology is more information coming out about that. So we know it comes back to some sort of coating error within the reporting at that precinct leaders were using on Monday night. And it's meant at. The party has needed to go through this week. All of the paper records that caucus-goers filled out when they arrived on Monday. You can just imagine how labor intensive that processes assesses. I talked to Michelle Smith. WHO's the chair of Jasper County? Democrats she also led a precinct. She told me how deflating this whole thing has been specifically because her individual precinct actually went really smoothly on Monday. I was excited. Like we're not going to be here for ever. And and then it went downhill from there. She realized there was going to be a problem on Monday. When one of her friends who was also leading another precinct was bragging her saying she used the APP? It went so quickly. Come join us at the bar. Where already done caucusing? And then the state party calls Michelle because she's the county chair and asks for her friends results again. She's like Oh and you can kind imagine that same reaction happening at seven hundred different precincts across the state at different times Monday night. Okay so I just got mentioned miles. I don't want to embarrass your or anything but as this. This debacle unfolded. People began on twitter sharing a story by one miles parks along with Iowa. Public Radio's Kate Payne stories about problems with this APP. Before the Iowa caucuses. Why didn't they listen to you? Well we were talking about all the potential issues. I can't say with one hundred percents certainty that I knew this is GonNa Happen. We just said a lot of experts had a lot of questions and those questions weren't being answered and they're still not really being answered. A democratic chair troy price answered a few questions on Tuesday about some of the technology but he gave no timetable for the final results. He also repeated this this comment that top cyber experts nationally renowned announce cyber experts have looked at the APP but he has given no indication about who cyber experts worldwide companies they worked for and just yesterday a report came out for Propublica that cybersecurity firm day contract with took a look at the APP and found major security vulnerabilities basically saying this could have been hacked. Okay Miles thank you very much for the update. Update thank you Steve. That's NPR's miles parks still in Des Moines. Very pleasant place to be Okay for more than a year. You're now the White House has been looking for ways to push Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro out of power and yet they have not found one. But then this week president trump invited Venezuelan wayland opposition leader Juan Guido. To State of the Union address. Please take this message back that all Americans are united with the Venezuelan people in their righteous struggle for freedom. Thank you very much also at the White House yesterday. NPR White House correspondent Franko Dawn. Yes is covering the story. He's he's in a studio good morning. Sir Hello Steve. So how is the president trying to support a Venezuela's I guess they would say acting. President is the way the United States recognize his correct interim president as an interim person. He's you know. President trump is trying to show that Venezuela is still a priority. Even though it hasn't been as much in the headlines Kinda give Widodo a boost as he seeks to unseat Madero. You'll remember a year ago. Guido inspired these massive demonstrations and hope that he could lead an uprising but those hopes kind of dwindled title to bet so when Guido stood up during the state of the Union. You just played the clip. It really sent a message. It was a rare moment when both Republicans and Democrats stood and clapped. And and Gordo still here. He's making the rounds today meeting with the USA ID administrator and congressional leaders does the symbolism of this appearance matter this symbolism mm-hmm does matter bin accusations from current and former US officials that president trump was pulling away from Idaho. The White House says that's not true to a senior administration official told reporters that they still have a list of ways to increase the pressure on Madero that official said that trump has authorize new measures to be taken in the next thirty days. He didn't give details. But I will say I talked to Fernando Kuteesa former White House official. Who helped helped draft a roadmap of economic santions four zero? He had this to say I would say that Realistically speaking when you're thinking about options that we'll make an actual impact that aren't symbolic. The United States has used the vast majority of its options than the economic realm Now of course you know again you could go into a military Harry wrong but that is not something that I think is seriously being considered. I can't tell you. One strategy that the White House says it is not considering and that is negotiating with Madero. Enduro himself unless it's for his departure what the US seems mainly to have that is economic pressure to apply in Venezuela and. I'm just thinking. Economic pressure is not yet overturned the government government in Iran or North Korea. Just to give a couple of other examples. Does the White House any other tools at its disposal. Right you know. Experts say sanctions can be effective at pushing Russian countries to change their behavior. But it's not the best at leading to new leadership. I will say you know. Trump is motivated to keep the pressure up regardless. Look it's an election shen year. This is a very important issue for many Venezuelan and Cuban ex-pats particularly in south Florida. Florida is a key swing state but it is unclear. Unclear how they're going to do this beyond taking the symbolic steps. One option is against countries. That still back. Madero Robert the O'Brien. He's the national security adviser he basically told Russia and other supporters that they just need to knock it off Franco thanks for the update. Thank you that's NPR's Franko or Donas I for this Thursday February sixth. I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm Noel King. We would love it if you start your day here with us again. Tomorrow you can subscribe to US wherever you listen to podcasts. And you can rate up. I can give us a review on Apple podcast or just turn on the radio remember radio sure do ooh. They're amazing items. You can also livestream you can go to your local. NPR Station and your morning edition the program that Noel King and I co host with David Grain and Rachel Martin you can also take. NPR everywhere with the NPR one APP which is Women in America have long vied for the highest political office the presidency. Easy this week onto line. How things have changed and not for female presidential candidates throughout American history through line from N._p._R.? The podcast go back in time to understand the present.

president Donald John Trump White House Steve INSKEEP Iowa NPR Venezuela NPR Susan Davis Senate senator NPR Congress McConnell Juan Guido Madero Robert the O'Brien Des Moines United States State Party
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Up First

14:10 min | Last month

Thursday, October 22, 2020

"Hey there before we get started I, just want to mention one constant in a changing world whether it's a time of war or peace whether it's time elections or after an election pandemic no pandemic whatever happens NPR is here for you. The reason we can be here for you is because of your financial contributions to your local public radio station. So please give what you can today you can go to donate that NPR, dot org slash up first to get started and again thank you. Uh. Lueders Alaska and Florida reported receiving threatening emails intelligence officials say Iran and Russia are working to influence the election. These actions are desperate attempts by desperate adversaries I'M NOEL king here with Steve Inskeep and this is up I from NPR news. The President meets former Vice President Biden tonight for their last debate their only other meeting was most notable for the president's constant interruptions. Could this debate under different rules offer some substance also the Justice Department, announced an eight point three billion dollars settlement with Purdue Pharma is even that payoff large enough to compensate for the OPIOID crisis doesn't account but one hundred, thousand deaths of means of addiction caused by Purdue Pharma. Stay with his will give you the news you need to start your day. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from updating their hours to adding takeout and delivery information. Small businesses around the country are using three google tools to adapt learn how at Google dot com slash grow. Support also comes from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors specializing in isolation depression stress and anxiety visit better help dot com slash up first to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. We have some details of foreign interference in the twenty twenty election. The information comes from US intelligence agencies and the source is John Ratcliffe, the director of National Intelligence. He blames for an operation to identify American. Voters and then send them threatening emails. He says Iran used voter information that is either public or available for purchase. This data can be used by foreign actors to attempt to communicate false information to registered voters that they hope will cause confusion. So chaos and undermine your confidence in American democracy NPR's miles parks covers voting and election security joins. US miles good morning a Steve Good Morning. So if you were one of the recipients in a couple of different states of these emails, what what did you receive Chur I'll just read you one This was obtained by Alaska public radio in came from an email address that basically made it seem like it was coming from this far right extremist group proud boys. As a quote you are currently registered as a Democrat and we know this because we have gained access into the entire voting infrastructure you will vote for trump on election day or we will come after you. Change, your party affiliation to Republican to let us know you received our message and will comply and these messages included party registration data, and in some cases the also included people's addresses or phone numbers, which really gave people. The impression that someone actually was watching them Google says the emails were sent to about twenty five, thousand of its g mail users according to CNN but that spam blockers seemed to have blocked about ninety percent of those. Oh. Okay. So most of them did not reach the intended recipients but some did at least with the with the Google wants. Yes. All right. That's what the email said according to the US government what was actually going on so the US. Government's these emails actually came from Iran officials say cyber actors, access voter rolls, which again are generally public records, but they use them for nefarious purposes, and separately Iran. With circulating a video as well that seemed to indicate that foreign actors could somehow commit election fraud using mail ballots. So they were kind of pushing this false narrative while at the same time sending these emails to American voters all with an effort to kind of influence the minds of American voters. Okay. So this press conference by US officials focused mainly on Iran but we know rushing interfered in the two thousand sixteen election and the US officials have said Russia is added again. So what is the? Bigger picture here. Yeah. The bigger picture is that all of these American adversaries whether it's Russia Iran or China in some cases have an interest in trying to affect American elections and that's probably not going to change. It hasn't changed over the last four years. Election officials have basically said constantly that just because we aren't talking about it, the threat of election remains and that's because all of these adversaries see their status in the world is directly tied to the status of American democracy. You know if they can increase polarization in any way that's easy and efficient for them, they're going to do it because when we're divided basically they see their standing in the world has increased. Obviously, it's a free society. You're not going to necessarily stop people from sending threatening emails. So what can the United States do to counter this kind of information? Right this sort of messaging campaign. This press conference yesterday is basically all they can do since these sorts of attacks are notoriously so hard to investigate and prosecute the director of National Intelligence John? Ratcliffe said this much yesterday he. Said Basically, truth is their biggest weapon to fight back. The problem is they're putting these this information out there trying to combat some of the misinformation but some of these same narratives are some of the same narratives that president trump and other members of his administration have tried to push around voting. So we are getting kind of contradictory messages about the security of America's elections at this point. Miles, thanks for the update. Thanks Steve. That's NPR's miles parks. Those men contending for president this fall, I have a particular connection to a former president Joe Biden served as vice president to Barack Obama Donald trump rose to political prominence with false claims about Obama's birthplace last night in. Philadelphia Obama gave a speech in support of Biden and critical of trump. The thing is this is not a reality show. This is reality. And the rest of us have had to live. With the consequences of him. Proving himself incapable of taking the job series. Tonight, the current president gets the stage. He'll share it. Of course, with Joe Biden. The rules are different this time after president trump turned the last debate into an Omni shambles with his constant interruptions. Tonight, each candidate's microphone will sometimes be shut off while the other one is talking which the president said yesterday he does not like I think is very unfair. And I think it's very bad that they're not talking about aren't bears is NPR senior political editor Domenico Montanaro is with us. Hey there domestic. Oh Hey Steve. Why is this debate important because there are no more big events of this magnitude left really I mean there are no more opportunities for the candidates had talked directly to such a large audience until their victory or concession speeches on election night or beyond. Let's hope it's not too far beyond. After, this it's really all about getting out your voters and because of that their potential consequences for both candidates. I guess we should mention polling averages show the president pretty far behind at this point. Yeah. The certainly do but. President trump certainly tonight, this is his for him. His last best chance to try and claw back any momentum i. mean he had a disastrous first debate performance. It was chaos he constantly interrupted and didn't get into an actual debate and as a result note, he took a hit in the polls. Notably tonight because of that performance, the debate commission as you guys talked about has instituted new rule where at the beginning of the debate during opening statements that candidates will have two minutes uninterrupted and the other candidates microphone will be muted but that's to say nothing of the rest of the debate when you know when a candidate is down certainly, it can lead to desperation. And trump is expected to go after Biden and his son hunter in an effort to drag biden down. But he doesn't but Biden can't afford to get dragged into the quicksand. Let's put it that way. How is Biden been preparing? He's been out of sight for the last several days for the most part. Yeah. He's been off the campaign trail for days which is. Pretty traditional for a candidate to take a few days off to prepare for debate. That tells you how important that his team feels. This debate is you know he needs to close the deal we saw President Obama model some of what a closing argument can sound like in his speech in Philadelphia last night, which was a searing indictment of the trump presidency and by needs. To be able to handle the attacks, come at him, Perry them without getting flustered I to be able to get to focus on that closing argument you know all he needs to do is have a solid debate performance handle everything trump throws at him and seal the deal with wavering voters certainly, not the easiest tasks were you be looking for in the week afterward? Well. Look. We're in the final stretch one Republican strategist talked to this week. said that. This feedback loop during campaigns can really lend to a distortion of reality campaigns that are losing convinced themselves. They're going to win campaigns that are winning, tie themselves in anxious knots wondering if it's all a mirage and they're really gonNA lose and I think it's safe to say we're seeing a lot of that right now. NPR's Domenico. Montanaro, thanks you're welcome. Okay. The Justice Department announced an eight point three billion dollars settlement yesterday with Purdue Pharma. That company makes Oxycontin, which is one of the prescription drugs at the center of the overdose crisis that left hundreds of thousands of Americans dead and continues federal prosecutors say the deal shows that they are serious about holding the drug industry accountable for its role in the OPIOID epidemic. But does this deal actually go far enough NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is on the line either Brian Hey good morning Steve How's the settlement work? Well. If it's approved by federal bankruptcy judge produce farmers going GonNa Admit to three felony charges for criminal practices include a scheme to mislead doctors about the safety of these medications like Oxycontin over time, the company would then pay out billions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties and the sackler family become notorious because of this epidemic, they'll be forced to give up control of purdue. Now, that sounds like a lot. Steve but critics are pointing to the fact that Purdue Pharma was already in bankruptcy flooded with thousands of lawsuits tied to the improper marketing of opioids, and now under the steal, the sackler are going to walk away with most of their personal fortune intact by some estimates there worth as much as ten billion dollars because of opioid profits, the pay a fraction of that in penalties only about two, hundred and twenty-five. Out of their own pockets, no criminal charges against them and the sackler in this deal admit no personal wrongdoing while. But there are a three billion dollars going out as part of the settlement. Where does it go? Yeah. Well, this is another detail that sparking a lot of anger and outrage it turns out Purdue Pharma doesn't actually have enough money left to pay out the billions of dollars agreed to in the justice. Department. So. The plan is for the government to reorganized purdue into what's known as a public benefit company that means profits from future sales of opioids. oxy cotton would be used to pay for drug treatments and rehabilitation programs around the country a spoke yesterday with Gregg mcneal who lives in Ohio it's one of the states hit hardest. By the OPIOID epidemic he lost his son Sam to an overdose five years. Ago He says this idea of the government getting into the OPIOID business now after it's caused so much havoc he says, it just feels wrong. It just seems ill advised having the government enter into that business. Gosh. There's something about that. That just doesn't doesn't add up comedy at all. Yeah and a lot of state attorneys general. Agree Steve They signed a letter last week sent to Attorney General William. Arguing that this arrangement is ethically wrong. What can be done with whatever money is scraped up through the settlement. US attorneys say if this deal is finalized, it would mean extraordinary new resources for states and cities as well as tribal governments. Remember Steve they're desperate for money thousands of people are still dying every year from opioid overdoses but everyone NPR's talk to agrees this problem is so big affecting. So many Americans, eight billion dollars is really just a drop in the bucket. Brian thanks so much. Thank you. Steve Bryan Man NPR's addiction correspondent. And that's up I. For this Thursday October Twenty second I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Newell King We would love it. If you start your day here with us again tomorrow you can subscribe to up I wherever you normally listen to podcasts and it helps other people find the show if you rate us and give us a review on Apple podcasts and I wanNa let you know about this. Remarkable bid of technology that allows you to listen to NPR. Even if you do not have a smart speaker or found this other kind of device usable in places like cars or even in the home is a thing called a radio and on this radio, you can listen to NPR's morning edition on your NPR station. You can find that station by going to stations that NPR DOT org. tweet white male. This representative democracy, a new series about voting in America from NPR's through line. Listen now support for NPR in the following message come from USA facts from citizenship to voting rates to heart disease. When Americans know the facts, they can change their story and the story of the nation. See how at USA facts dot Org.

NPR NPR US Joe Biden Purdue Pharma President Google Steve Donald trump Iran President Obama president Steve Inskeep NPR vice president Alaska Steve Bryan Man NPR purdue John Ratcliffe
Thursday, March 26th, 2020

Up First

12:18 min | 9 months ago

Thursday, March 26th, 2020

"On the Senate passed a two trillion dollar emergency relief. Bill HELP IS ON THE WAY. This is the largest aid measure in US history. So who's going to get help? And how I'm Steve Inskeep with Noel King and this is up I from NPR news. The pandemic is put millions of people out of work. Experts have been predicting unprecedented numbers of unemployment assistance claims. In this morning we get some data. How bad is it? And the number of cove in one thousand nine cases in this country keeps going up but some places have much lower numbers than others. What is the best broad national strategy for dealing? Is Its social distancing. Is it testing everyone? Stick with us. We've got the news you need to start your day support for. Npr comes from Trello part of the Atlassian collaboration suite. During these uncertain times Trillo is here to help teams work together to solve big challenges with Trello. You can work with your team wherever you are. Try Trello for free and learn more at TRELLO DOT com. The Senate has passed a bill to inject around two trillion dollars of emergency relief into the US economy that vote brings Americans a little closer to receiving cash from the government some compensation for the economic disaster of fighting the pandemic here as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. There are millions of Americans watching US right now. At home on their televisions separated from friends and family fearful for their children in their livelihood unsure of when the time will come when all of our lives may return to normal. Let's tell them tonight. That help is on the way. How is that help going to work? Npr Congressional correspondent Kelsey. Snell is on Langham warning Kelsey. Good morning so when should people start to expect checks in the mail? And how much should they expect to be getting? Well the question of how much kind of depends on whether or not the IRS has already access to your bank account information because then they can do an electronic transfer. And that's something that Treasury Secretary Steven mnuchin could says could take place the next couple of weeks maybe three weeks now it comes to paper checks people who don't have that information on file we don't really know the answer to that and we're waiting for more information when it comes to how much now individuals earning less than seventy five thousand dollars would get a twelve hundred dollar check that goes for both parts of married couples over married couples making one hundred fifty thousand dollars. They would each get twelve hundred dollars and it would start to phase out after that and go away completely for people making under ninety nine thousand dollars and parents would get five hundred dollars per child. How could people see the money? And it sounds like what you're saying is there could be delays on when you see the money if the federal government doesn't already have your address on file if they don't have your bank account information because These electron transfers can be done more quickly than printing checks and sending them out to people directly and Kelsey. We should point out that this is not just about individuals right. This is also about businesses. Right this actually. The largest portion of this bill is focused on getting money to big businesses. And then there's another separate pot of money for small businesses when it comes to being businesses. The money is focused on loans primarily With some really interesting strings attached. There would not be an opportunity for large corporations to do stock buybacks for the entirety of alone plus one year if they accept money from the federal government that also there's a provision in here that prevents the president the Vice President Cabinet members and members of Congress from an accessing any funds from this relief package. Okay so some things. We learned from the financial crisis if you if you ask an economist about that Every senator that voted and there were ninety. Six of them right. Yeah so every. Senator who was present for this vote voted yes on. That isn't really important message. Because it will head over to the House with vote on Friday and it sends a message to house members that this is an effort that supersedes partisanship in a way that we haven't seen before if you think about a two trillion dollars is a massive piece of legislation and I have never seen a vote. This large on a spending bill of really of any size. When is the house expected to take up the bill? The House is scheduled to take that up on Friday and the expectation is that the White House could Receive at that day to possible that the president could sign it into law before the end of the week. The goal is to get the money out to people as quickly as possible. Npr Congressional correspondent. Kelsey SNELL Kelsey. Thanks so much thank you. We do not know exactly how many people have lost their jobs. Because of the corona virus but responsible estimates suggest it is millions of people in California alone more than one million people have filed for unemployment in less than two weeks. Today we get a national picture. The Labor Department releases the number of unemployment claims from last week which was a week in which large parts of America began to shutdown. Npr's Jim Zarroli has been watching this from New York City. Good Morning Jim. Good Morning. So what are you expecting when these numbers come out? Today I mean it's going to be A brutal we are going to see record. Numbers of people filing for unemployment the estimates from economists that we've seen so far are just enormous. I mean The Economic Policy Institute says as many as three point four million people filed for claimed last week. Just for comparison sick. I mean even during the worst weeks of the great recession the number never topped six hundred and sixty five thousand and in California alone. Last week we saw almost that many Six hundred thirty nine thousand jobs lost and that was just last week so the number of jobs lost overall in the country last week is just way more than we have ever seen before and of course that's just last week. We're going to continue to be losing jobs for a while. And we know him that. Some sectors of the economy are looking especially grant right right. Yeah I mean the losses will eventually affect every party the economy but a few industries have been really hard head like Transportation Airlines for instance energy restaurants hotels anything connected to tourism. I mean we're seeing places like Florida and Nevada that depend on tourism really heavily hit very hard because nobody wants to travel right now. A Trade Group for the hotel industry says it probably has lost a million jobs since the crisis began. Also seen a big drop in energy prices. So you know. Energy states like Texas where the oil and gas market is really important. I've seen a lot of layoffs but but we're seeing layoffs everywhere. One of the remarkable things here is how quickly this happened. I mean it. It might seem long because of how much coverage everyone has done. And how long? We've we feel like we've been stuck behind closed doors but it has not been that long compare where we are today to where we were say a month ago. Well you remember just before the virus struck we were still in the middle of a really strong job market. We had a three and a half percent unemployment rate in February now. The Saint Louis Fed estimated earlier this week that we see unemployment go above thirty percent in the next month or so although it should come down pretty quickly So a lot of people are just feeling whiplash right and I talked to a guy named Adam Hill from Worcester Massachusetts who recently until a graphic designer is a company that does traders and he says as recently as a weeks ago. The company was having a really good year. Then all of a sudden trade shows began to cancel one after another then within two weeks one hundred and fifty five shows cancelled so now he has been told he's going to be rehired once the economy rebounds he's now been laid off the company can afford to bring him back but no one knows when that will be a lot of people that will be waiting for that moment. Npr's Jim Zarroli. Thanks Jim. You're welcome all right. So what is the Truth About Cova? Nineteen testing there are almost seventy thousand confirmed cases of corona virus in this country. And we know that because I've expanded testing but there's also a lot we do not know again because of testing there is still a lot of confusion over this and NPR's Alison. Aubrey is here to try and help us. Some of it out. Hi Alison Good Morning. Okay so part of the confusion here. A big part of the confusion is that we are getting mixed messages. About testing at this point are tests widely available? Well we heard vice president pence last night. Say we're adding thousands of tests today? But he also said this week if he don't have symptoms don't get a test so for now priority is given to healthcare workers and people with symptoms such as fever cough shortness of breath. So when you hear my pen say if you don't have symptoms don't get a test that sounds like a suggestion but it sounds like what you're saying is there are actual restrictions on who can be tested. That's right that's the reality. Now and things are evolving quickly but decisions are being made with. How much data here? That's the downside of not having testing. I mean everyone in the country is being asked to hunker down because we know the viruses out there. But we don't know enough about coup. Has it where it's spreading one way to determine when and where to relax these social distancing measures and the lockdown is to do much more testing. I spoke to Erin Carroll. He's a professor at Indiana University. School of Medicine. We have to know who's infected. Who's not and there's too many people in the community who are infected and don't know it or who aren't showing symptoms. We have no idea who they aren't if we just lift the rules of shelter in place and let all those people go out. We'll just snap right back into the growing curve of where we were before. What is the best strategy then to get us out of this at this point well in really simplistic terms? There are two options here option a lift the restrictions go back to life as normal this way lots more people get infected. The upside we get to what scientists call herd immunity where many of us are exposed and then protected against the virus. We get there quickly downside. More people die. Hospitals could be overloaded or option B. Keep up the social distancing to flatten the curve. Fewer people get sick at any one time. It may take longer to get through this but fewer people die and the healthcare system won't be overloaded. Okay SO OPTION. B. Social distancing flattening the curve clearly a lot of leaders government leaders local and state are choosing that option. Is it possible? Then that will end up with a situation where some parts of the country will go back to normal sooner than other parts. Absolutely we heard Dr Deborah Burks of the Task Force articulate that. She says we are getting a better picture of where there's a lot of spread and where there's very little right now more than half of all. The cases are coming from the New York Metro area so the way forward for New York is going to look a lot different than the way forward and other cities I'm Indianapolis. We're not having the same kind of difficulties. That New York City is having a but right now everyone is sheltering in place in Indiana. Because we don't want to get there and we don't have a sense of where the infection is and and WHO's at risk you know. Testing can help solve the problem to help us figure this out. People who are positive could be quarantined and socially distance broader restrictions could be softened in other places where there's not a lot of virus spreading NPR's Alison. Aubrey Elson. Thanks so much for your reporting thank you. That's first Thursday march twenty sixth. I'm king and I'm Steve INSKEEP. Join US here tomorrow. And don't forget you can subscribe to US wherever you listen to podcasts. If you have a moment ratings and reviews on Apple podcasts and if you want more news from NPR there is a radio show for that you can find. Npr's morning edition on your NPR station. Good stations that NPR dot. Org If you want podcasts or local news or latest headlines You can find those on the NPR one APP which is in the APP store

Npr Kelsey SNELL Kelsey US Steve Inskeep NPR Senate Alison Good New York City Jim Zarroli Aubrey Elson Bill Trello president federal government IRS Noel King Economic Policy Institute senator Atlassian