40 Burst results for "Steve inskeep"

Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:42 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

"News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning this year, 2020 began with the dramatic attack by the United States that killed in Iranian general. We now approach the end of the year with news of another killing. Iran says someone attacked and killed a man described as an eminent Iranian scientist and not just any scientist. Israel has in the past identified. This man is the head of Iran's nuclear program. We should emphasize. We do not know who conducted the attack and that Iran is the only source of information So far, NPR's Peter Kenyon is tracking what is known from Istanbul. Hi there, Peter. Steve, what more can you say about the man who was targeted? Well, Dr Mohsen Fuck. Rosati was an important figure in Iran's nuclear program, Hey was once described as the man who would be known as the father of the Iranian bomb if Tehran had ever succeeded in creating a nuclear weapon. Fuck Rosati has been targeted before on that doesn't make him unique. Several Iranian nuclear scientists have been four were killed between 2010 and 2012 in a series of shooting a bomb attacks blamed on Israel. Blamed on Israel. How does Iran's say this attack was conducted again, emphasizing We only have Iranian sources at this point. Yes, And they are freely saying these were Israeli assassins who were using explosives and bullets to attack the car that the scientist was riding in outside of Tehran. So he's inside Iran. He's attacked inside Iran, and it's some kind of face to face attack, at least according to Iranian sources, and Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister is also making a comment leaning toward Israel. But his Israel saying anything at this point there is the United States saying anything. Israel and the U. S. Are denying all comment as you mentioned Mohammed Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, put out on Twitter quote, Terrorist murdered an eminent Iranian scientist today, this cowardice with serious indications, he says of Israeli roll shows. Desperate warmongering. Zarif goes on to call on the international community, especially the European Union, to what he says and their shameful double standards and condemn this act of state terror. Okay, so it's very early here. We're just getting information. But let's try to put it into context if we can. This is a momentous moment in the United States because we're in the middle of a presidential transition. What does that transition mean for Iran? And what are the implications of an assassination in the middle of that? Well, you bring up a good point, and I should say there's elections on both in both countries coming up. I mean this well. There just was one in the US and there's one coming up in Iran. But the Trump administration has already said that it intended to take some sort of actions before the term ends. And of course we're in the very early stage of this. We don't know who's responsible we're waiting from were confirmed information. But obviously both Israel and the U. S have been involved in past attacks. So it's not surprising that Iran is blaming them and the new president, the incoming president, Joe Biden, was part of the Obama administration that worked out a nuclear deal with Iran, which President Trump Backed out of all the other nations have tried to keep it. I suppose one of the questions for Joe Biden is going to be. How does he approach Iran and one of the issues maybe an assassination like this Well, and it seems clear from the comments that have been coming out of Washington and the Trump administration that they would like nothing better than to leave the U. S situation with Iran in such a fraud, antagonistic state. That Biden would not find it very easy to get back into the nuclear deal or find other kinds of rapprochement. Okay, a little bit of context, then for the apparent assassination of Iranian nuclear scientist inside Iran. NPR's Peter Kenyon, Thanks so much. Thanks, Steve. Let's continue our coverage. Now by looking at a battle many years past 70 years ago today began the brutal battle of the chosen reservoir. It was a turning point in the Korean War. Made this year's commemorations. NPR's Anthony Kuhn looks at its legacy for Koreans. Korean War veterans and politicians gathered and sold in advance of the anniversary. U. S ambassador to South Korea, Harry Harris saluted US veterans who fought in the conflict. They answered.

Fuck Rosati Israel Scientist United States Mohammed Javad Zarif Steve Inskeep NPR Peter Kenyon Joe Biden Tehran Dr Mohsen Fuck David Greene President Trump Istanbul South Korea European Union Twitter
Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:38 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

"The most of the pandemic era education. Nine o'clock on forum and then a 10. We'll talk with Jacob Goldstein, host of NPR's planet money. Podcast about the origin of money and how it shapes our lives. He's the author of Money. The True Story of a Made Up Thing Forum, starting at nine o'clock this morning on KQED Public radio. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning this year, 2020 began with the dramatic attack by the United States that killed in Iranian general. We now approach the end of the year with news of another killing. Iran says someone attacked and killed a man described as an eminent Iranian scientist and not just any scientist. Israel has in the past identified. This man is the head of Iran's nuclear program. We should emphasize. We do not know who conducted the attack and that Iran is the only source of information So far, NPR's Peter Kenyon is tracking what is known for his damn bull. Hi there, Peter. State. What more can you say about the man who was targeted? Well, doctor most. In fact, Rosati was an important figure in Iran's nuclear program, hey was once described as the man who would be known as the father of the Iranian bomb if Tehran had ever succeeded in creating a nuclear weapon. Fockers. Adi has been targeted before on that doesn't make him unique. Several Iranian nuclear scientists have been for were killed between 2010 and 2012 in a series of shooting a bomb attacks blamed on Israel. Blamed on Israel. How does Iran say this attack was conducted again? Emphasizing We only have Iranian sources at this point? Yes, and they are freely saying these were Israeli assassins who were using explosives and bullets to attack the car that the scientist was riding in outside of Tehran. So he's inside Iran. He's attacked inside Iran, and it's some kind of face to face attack, at least according to Iranian sources, and Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister is also making a comment leaning toward Israel. But his Israel saying anything at this point is the United States, saying anything. Israel and the U. S. Are denying all comment as you mentioned Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, put out on Twitter quote, Terrorist murdered an eminent Iranian scientist today, this cowardice with serious indications, he says of Israeli roll shows. Desperate warmongering. Zarif goes on to call on the international community, especially the European Union, to what he says and their shameful double standards and condemn this act of state terror. Okay, so it's very early here. We're just getting information. But let's try to put it into context if we can. This is a momentous moment in the United States because we're in the middle of a presidential transition. What does that transition mean for Iran? And what are the implications of an assassination in the middle of that? Well, you bring up a good point, and I should say there's elections on both in both countries coming up. I mean, this was there just was one in the US and there's one coming up in Iran, but the Trump administration has already said that it intended To take some sort of actions before the term ends. And of course we're in the very early stage of this. We don't know who's responsible we're waiting from were confirmed information. But obviously both Israel and the U. S have been involved in past attacks. So it's not surprising that Iran is blaming them and the new president, the incoming president, Joe Biden, was part of the Obama administration that worked out a nuclear deal with Iran, which President Trump Backed out of all the other nations have tried to keep it. I suppose one of the questions for Joe Biden is going to be. How does he approach Iran and one of the issues maybe an assassination like this? Well, And it seems clear from the comments that have been coming out of Washington and the Trump administration that they would like nothing better than to leave the U. S situation with Iran in such a fraud, antagonistic state that Biden would not find it very easy to get back into the nuclear deal or find other kinds of rapprochement. Okay, a little bit of context, then for the parent assassination of Iranian nuclear scientist inside Iran. NPR's Peter Kenyon, Thanks so much. Thanks, Steve. Let's continue our coverage. Now by looking at a battle many years past 70 years ago today began the brutal battle of the chosen reservoir. It was a turning point in the Korean War. Made this year's commemorations. NPR's Anthony Kuhn looks at its legacy for Koreans. Korean War veterans and politicians gathered in sold in advance of the anniversary. U. S ambassador to South Korea, Harry Harris saluted US veterans who fought in the conflict. They answered a call to defend their country.

Iran Israel Scientist United States NPR Mohammad Javad Zarif Peter Kenyon Joe Biden Npr News Tehran Steve Inskeep Jacob Goldstein Kqed David Greene President Trump South Korea European Union
Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:45 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "steve inskeep" discussed on Morning Edition

"Administration may take a new approach to civil rights. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. The Trump Administration CUTBACK. Federal oversight of police departments advocates want the Biden administration to restore it. Also the man who apparently heads Iran's nuclear program, has been assassinated. His country's Defense Ministry confirmed the attack inside Iran. We have the latest on what's known It is Friday, November 27th Caroline Kennedy is 63 years old today. The news is next. Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst. Iran's Defense Ministry says one of its top nuclear scientists has been killed in Tehran reportedly by Israeli assassins. The Fars news agency says motion Focker Azadeh was killed in a bomb and shooting attack on his car outside Tehran. Israel has long been suspected of carrying out a Syriza targeted killings of Iranian nuclear scientists nearly a decade ago, but never acknowledged responsibility and had no immediate comment on the killing of Aqazadeh. Iran is following of revenge. Although President Trump is still angry about the election results, he says he will travel to Georgia to support Republican Senate candidates in the January 5th runoff races. MPR's Franco Ordonez has more. The White House says President Trump will travel to Georgia for a rally on Saturday, December 5th. Maybe I'll go twice. That's very important that we win those races. These air two great people. No both very well. They're both great people. This is the first time that Trump says he's going to spend time campaigning in Georgia on behalf of Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue. This is all significant because there are concerns that Trump's obsession with baseless claims of fraud had become a distraction and will hurt Republican chances in Georgia. The outcome will determine control of the Senate. Franco or Dona is NPR news. Slower foot traffic it stores unless physical cash in pockets has led the Salvation Army to take its Red Kettle donation campaign online for the first time. National Commander Commissioner Kenneth Hotter says normally they raise around $126 million in their Christmas kettle campaign. Our current projection is that we will see a 50% decline in that figure. So we're trying to find ways by which we can find the missing $60 million. He also says they expect a 155% increase in the number of people seeking help this Christmas. And the holiday shopping season is here this year. Despite the pandemic, retailers are forecasting record setting sales. MPR's Alina Sell You pass more. The National Retail Federation says on average shoppers, they're planning to spend almost $1000 on gift food, decorations and other holiday things. That's only a little bit less than last year when the economy looked very different. So although a lot of families are struggling financially, many also seemed to be saying they want to feel special and celebrate. The retail trade group says people are cutting back on extra things they might normally throw in the basket for themselves, but they're going all in on gifts and decorations for the homes where they're spending so much time. This year holiday sales began as far back as October, so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping done. Plan to keep going. Alina Salyut NPR news Wall Street is trading higher at this hour. The dollar's up, 64 points a 29,937 the NASDAQ is up 131 points. Yes, it P 500 is up, 12. You're listening to NPR news. Six American oil executives detained in Venezuela for the past three years have been found guilty of corruption and sentenced to more than eight years in prison. Attorneys and relatives of the so called Citgo six say the men were wrongly convicted. They're employees of the Houston based Sicko Refining company, which is owned by Venezuela's state oil company and were allegedly Leard to the country for a business meeting and then arrested. Case plays out amid broken relations between Caracas and Washington. Food additive is at the center of a messy fight among legislators on the island of Taiwan. Ah, January, 1st, Taiwan will begin allowing imports of American poor containing the additive racked, opening, which is banned in the U. S and China. Appears only Fang reports on how the move has divided Taiwanese politicians. American pork is at the center of a free trade deal between the U. S in Taiwan, but Taiwan's main opposition party is opposed to allowing ractopamine lace port in on food safety grounds. Food additive enhances Leanness and meat but is linked to health problems. Opposition politicians had been preventing Taiwan's premiere from speaking as protest today they threw pig guts at him and the legislative chamber, prompting brief fistfights. Only thing. NPR NEWS Beijing In India Thousands of angry farmers faced tear gas and riot police today is they resumed their march to the capital, protesting new laws they fear will give more power to corporations. And reduce their earnings. Wall Street is trading higher again. At this hour. The Dow was up 64 the NASDAQ Up 132..

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Fresh "Steve inskeep" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:38 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh "Steve inskeep" from Morning Edition

"Just a little pocket of heavy traffic before and after that it's flying along. Solano County Crash West Idiot. Dixon's still there, but no impact on traffic. No bridge backups. The weather's fine little wind in the Altamont. That's it. Joe McConnell for KQED. Thank you, Joe. Travis. Support comes from good eggs and this morning on forum. Rebroadcasts and well here on early innovator of online learning. Sal Kahn, founder of Khan Academy, He'll offer advice for educators and students on making the most of the pandemic era education and we'll talk with Jake Jacob Goldstein. He's the host of NPR's planet money podcast. About the origin of money and how it shapes our lives. He's the author of Money. The True Story of a made up Thing That's coming up this morning at Forum that's 9 to 11 here on KQED. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. On the surface. A Supreme Court ruling just before the holiday changed nothing at all. The court struck down pandemic safety measures that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo applied to houses of worship. Cuomo had already removed those restrictions. So the ruling tells him to stop doing something that he had already stopped doing yet An expanded conservative majority on the Supreme Court felt passionately. That it was important to speak now, and the passion comes through when they're multiple opinions on religious freedom, The Constitution and public safety Robin Fretwell Wilson is with us to discuss this. She is director of the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. Would you just remind us one of the basics of this case in New York? Well, I mean, you've opened it really? Well. The basics are that there is an executive order from the governor that had been put in place. We're almost 10 months into the shuttering of parts of the economy that Order ultimately gets back walked. But the court is very, very concerned about the fact that it is the most restrictive that has come before the court. There were two proceeding cases before this newly recomposed court, one out of California and another out of Nevada, where the limits were not nearly so extreme and every Person writing on the court acknowledges that fact that this talk most extreme. Yeah, we're talking about the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn Couple of Orthodox Jewish synagogues who said Wait a minute. These restrictions for awhile, said that we could only have religious services with. I think, 10 people and later it was 25 people. And these are institutions that are accustomed to having hundreds and rather large. Cathedrals and synagogues that could hold hundreds or even even more than that, yet it seemed when I read the 33 pages of opinions. To be a narrowed difference. These religious institutions didn't claim a total exemption from health regulations. They said. They just wanted to be treated equally. Governor Andrew Cuomo didn't even maintain the rules. They're gone, at least for the moment. But They wrote, the justices wrote like this is a big case. What made it feel like a big case? Well, I think it made it feel like a big case because it seems like the government went nuclear on churches and churches alone. That's the claim that runs across these pages, you know, So there's a lot of discussion about acupuncture and campgrounds and microelectronic plant chipmakers, and they're allowed to basically stay open, either because they're a central, which had no cap. Unlike churches and red zones, as you said, we're captain 10 people. Or even when they were non essential. So these orange zones where churches were limited to 25 only 25 in some instances and non essential an essential businesses. Both had no cap whatsoever. This is this is an interesting part of the argument, though, isn't it? It's like Where do you put religious institutions? What do you compare them to? I believe it was justice. Gorsuch seemed particularly Offended that secular institutions like liquor stores didn't seem to have a limit on yet churches had a limit, of course, the way the state of New York saw this was that there were certain essential businesses where customers might come and go. Any number of customers might come and go. They were banning gatherings. You couldn't have a concert anymore. But you could have a religious service with a small number of people. Fair point. I mean, I think there's a big question of the Comparator. But you know, you can shop in Nordstrom's for hours bumping into people here, and they're, um so you know, I think there is a question of the Comparator. There's also a procedural question here. The fact that there was Request for an emergency restraining order and one of the things that seems very motivating, especially for Gorsuch, but also for the majority of the unsigned opinion is what happens is the court can't act fast enough if it waits and can't act fast enough. Oh, because the question was Should the court rule now even though the rule has been taken away and tell the governor that he can't put it back in the future? Um, what do you make of the conflict? Between Justice Gorsuch and John Roberts, the chief justice of the court, who was on the losing end here, who said. Essentially, this is the wrong time to wade into this or some of the other, more liberal justices. Who said, Why are we as justices? Overruling the best public health judgments of public health officials. You have actually, a lot of heat shimmering off of these pages. It seems to have gotten very personal between Gore sick and the chief justice. The chief justice says that Gore, six concurrence takes direct aim at him. So you have this piece of it. Some of it is simply on academic argument about how to go through the test for in a junction. Which is partly resting on is there irreparable injury to people, and Gorsuch says, You know, we don't cut the constitution loose in a crisis. We shouldn't be sheltering in place when the Constitution's under attack, and the chief justice says we're not doing that. We're just looking at this looking at two threads of constitutional law one Jacobson, which is the case about vaccination on Diz rested very heavily on by the chief justice to say that we have to support governors as they're working this through. You know, the descent say that New York had a clear, workable rule. But again, everyone agrees that these were extreme. The most extreme provisions in front of the court to date. What they're really fighting about between between them in these pages is do we wait and hope for the best and hope the court can jump if it comes back to us, like if you get moved back to the red zone. You know, there's a phrase in one of the opinions about the Constitution should not take a sabbatical in a crisis. It's interesting that that's raised because if you look at American history, sometimes the Constitution has the constitution has been violated. Another crises the Civil War, World War two and People regretted that later. Is that the central question now how far should we allow authorities to go in a pandemic to protect public health when there's still personal freedom? Well, I think they're resting on the fact that they have a lot more experience, and they had a maid when they decided to California case against Newsome and more experienced than they had in July when they decided the Nevada case. So I think they're saying that we can't afford people to have to lose, Thies writes as we've had more information about how to maintain safety during the pandemic, Robin Fretwell Wilson of the University of Illinois Thanks so much. Thank you. For Children. The last eight months have been well. A lot of things may be fun at first, when school closing felt like a snow day, But for many, that fun turned to anxiety, Maybe even some fear. Back. In February, we aired a story that was made just for kids. We wanted to explain the coronavirus. And help them manage all those feelings will now with so much of our world changed. Here's NPR's Cory Turner with an update. Year, kids. The last time we talked, I told you to wash your hands. And if you wipe a booger on something, well, that's just gross. I'm here again because a lot has changed. So let's start with a little science lesson from a grown up who is super smart about the coronavirus. I asked him to talk directly to you. My name is Ashish Drama Doctor and I'm a public health. It's right. This is actually harder than What's a good way to describe me? Doctor just says one of the biggest things we've learned about the Corona virus and kids is actually good news. Kids generally don't get very sick from this virus for most kids, he says. It's almost like a cold. We've all had one of those, but you still need to make sure you don't spread it. And scientists know now that washing your hands is important. But maybe the most important thing we can do. Is wear a mask. When you talk when you breathe when you cough, Basically, the air that comes out of your mouth can have the virus in it. See your mouth works Kind of like a can of bug spray. Now, imagine what happens if you put a mask over it sort of a funny idea, putting a mask on a bug spray..

Justice Gorsuch New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Supreme Court Kqed Robin Fretwell Wilson Steve Inskeep Joe Mcconnell NPR Solano County University Of Illinois California Npr News Nevada Rebroadcasts Dixon Travis Khan Academy
Fresh "Steve inskeep" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:38 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh "Steve inskeep" from Morning Edition

"Need to high speed Internet at home. More at California, Comcast dot com. We'll have gusty conditions for today and clear skies Continuing through tonight. Temperature is going to be around 60 degrees in Sacramento, and we're looking highs today. Upper fifties to mid sixties here in the Bay Area and Lake Tahoe area sunny with highs, reaching their 36 to 46 degrees. Support for NPR comes from we brute offering home anti virus solutions for protecting personal devices against fishing and other cyber attacks while working remotely. Learn more about we brute and open text company had we brute dot com Capital, one offering capital, one shopping, a downloadable browser extension that searches various sites for shoppers. What's in your wallet more at capital one shopping dot com. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Much of this nation's debate over police conduct turns on how officers deal with mentally ill individuals. It's a debate that centers on stories like this next one, which we should warn, will last about four minutes and may not be appropriate for all listeners. In September, police responded to a 911 call in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Police shot and killed a man who ran toward them with a knife. That.

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World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

Morning Edition

02:49 min | Last month

World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

"This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the United Nations World Food Program. The Norwegian Nobel Committe honored the agency that fights hunger and that has tried to prevent the use of hunger is a weapon of war. NPR's Rob Schmitz is with us and rob for those who don't know what's the World Food program Do The world for program is the UN's largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security last year provided assistance to more than 97 million people in 88 countries. I think what stands out about this program is it's one of the few U. N agencies that has the ability to enter Countries that are extremely difficult to enter places like Syria, North Korea, Yemen, and its goal is literally to save the lives of those who are starving due to poor governance, Armed conflicts, you name it, Okay, so I see the connection to war in peace. But why give them this award during a pandemic? Well, Nobel Peace Prize Committee chair buried Reese Anderson made an interesting connection between the Corona virus pandemic in the World Food programs mission. Here's what she said. The world is in danger off experiencing hunger crisis off inconceivable proportions if the World food programme On other food assistance organizations do not receive the financial support they have requested. So Steve. She's hinting here that financial support for this agency could be in question due to the pandemics impact on the economies of the developed world, and that's a big problem. You know this past summer, you Steve Inskeep interviewed the head of the World Food Programme, David Beasley, and he said the pandemic is having a big impact on world hunger. Here's what he said. Before Cove it I had been given speeches that 2020 was weren't going to be the worst humanitarian crisis years since war, too, because of Covad. We are now looking at an additional 130 million people that will be knocking on the door of starvation and Steve Nobel Committee chair buried. Reese Anderson mentioned the fact that this year the pandemic has exposed a lack of global cooperation. This idea that the world needs to unite to combat the biggest threats to humanity. Here's what she said. Multilateral corporation is absolutely necessary to combat global challenges. And multilateralism seems tohave. Lack of respect these days. Steve, you can hear how she stumbles over her words here. She's obviously trying to put this in the most diplomatic way possible. But it's clear with the rise of populist leaders throughout the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee deemed it necessary to send a message that in the end, joining together is sorely needed in a world facing both the enormous threat of a global pandemic, but also global hunger.

Reese Anderson Nobel Peace Prize Committee Steve Nobel Steve UN Steve Inskeep David Beasley Rob Schmitz NPR Covad Multilateral Corporation Cove Syria North Korea Yemen
Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 4 months ago

Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

"Rice is one of a handful of women on Joe Biden's short list for a running mate. She told us she is the right fit for the job. Yes, I think I could bring my experience of almost now. 20 years in the senior levels of the executive branch to bear to help tackle the most pressing problems we face. And while this would be the first time she would campaign for herself Ambassador Reiss told our co host Steve Inskeep that she's ready for him. Regardless of your experience in government, a big part of the vice presidency or seeking the vice presidency is campaigning, of course, which is not something that you've had a lot of experience doing. Do you have any eagerness to to campaign? Well, Steve. Yes, I've not run for office on my own behalf, but I've run for office on other people's behalf, where I did actually quite a bit of retail politics and speaking to groups of people. But I think unfortunately, in the current context with the pandemic, this will be quite an unusual campaign. If you were in office, you would face the fundamental problem of trust in government or lack of trust in government that is playing out. Now, Many people are refusing to wear facemasks. It seems evident from surveys that many people would think the same way about a vaccine once it's available. What would you do about that? Well, I think that's a huge challenge. And we have had vaccines many in many stages in our history. Still, today, Children need certain vaccines to be able to go to school. And I think that we're gonna have to take a similar approach that you know for kids to be able to go back to school and in Whatever jurisdiction they ought to be vaccinated and the localities ought to consider also requiring the people in the household with the Children to be vaccinated for the very reason that's obvious that this is You know, something that affects the entirety of the community. I want to ask about a couple of foreign policy problems that any administration would face on January 20th 2021 1 of them is deteriorating U. S relations with China. Now I know you've been critical of the way that President Trump is approached China. But at the same time, there are foreign policy experts across the spectrum, who said China's a problem? We don't know how to confront China. Maybe it's time for a confrontation with China. Would you want to roll back U. S relations with China to the way they were in 2016? Steve. No. I don't think you can roll back the clock on any critical issue to 2016. The world has changed and we have to deal with the world as it is. But having said that my criticism is Based predominantly on the fact that we have approached the challenge the China poses economically and strategically in isolation rather than in partnership with our allies in Asia and Europe. You know, instead of, for example, approaching our concerns about trade and economic policy, collectively with our European and Asian partners, who share many of those same concerns, and who Joining with us could add to our collective pressure on China to change its policies and approaches. We started separate trade battles with our closest allies. If you've got more partners behind you, is there some value in a confrontation with China? Well, if by confrontation you mean is it smart for us to start a hot war? I think absolutely not. No. But what about in other ways, diplomatically or otherwise? Well, diplomatically. Sure. First. What we don't need to seek confrontation for its own sake. We need to be strong and smart in how we compete with China. And push back on China's policies on the economic and the security front that threaten our interests. We also should be speaking up vocally and and forcefully about China's egregious human rights abuses from How it treats the Uighurs to the people of Hong Kong. It's common to say that a lot of the divisions of the last few years are merely highlighting what was already there. You could say that President Trump talks the way that a lot of Americans talk and believes what a lot of Americans believe, which is why millions of people voted for him. For example, it is often said that the pandemic Has struck the most vulnerable communities because they were vulnerable over a long period of time that we're just having American society exposed in a different way. Do you believe that? Well, I believe that What the pandemic has done is show how much disparity there is among Americans from a socioeconomic point of view and to a large extent of racial and ethnic point of view, And you know if it wasn't obvious to people before it, it ought to be now. But I don't think that that is the same thing is the first part of your question, which is To suggest that you know, all Donald Trump has done is shined a spotlight on some of the underbelly of our society. I don't think that's right. I think Americans at the end of the day Are not people who like to hate and to fear one another. Do you feel that you understand the roughly 40% of Americans who approve of the job the president is doing. I do think I have a good understanding. Maybe not a perfect understanding in part, Steve, because, as I write in my book, I have a 23 year old son whom I love dearly, whose politics are very, very different from my own, and from the rest of our family. Talk more about that. What are his politics? Ah, you know, I have a very conservative son in a very progressive daughter. They're both wonderful, intelligent. Passionate, committed kids. My son and I will have some robust disagreements are over some matters of policy. Not all. And yet at the end of the day. I love him dearly, and he loves me. As there have been an issue where he is almost persuaded you that maybe you're wrong. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure there is And you know the thing is, and I read about this in in the book. In the last chapter. I write about the areas where we agree. And the areas where we disagree, So we agree, for example. On the importance of the United States, playing a responsible principle leadership role in the world. We agree on the importance of having strong alliances. You know, we disagree. On things like, Ah, choice. I'm pro choice. He's pro life. That's the kind of difference that we oughta be able to respect. Ambassador Susan Rice. It's a pleasure to talk with. Thank you, Steve

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How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

All Things Considered

06:50 min | 5 months ago

How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

"Rahman Rahman and and Colin Colin Furred. Furred. Mattis Mattis were were kids kids from from immigrant families who made good both graduates of prestigious law schools. She represented tenants in Housing Court. He was an associate at a corporate firm in Manhattan. Now they face life in prison in one of the government's highest profile cases against protesters. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team reports. The night of May 29th in Brooklyn was chaos as curfew Jew near police in riot gear began to make arrests. Protesters started throwing water bottles and bricks. The NYPD tried to break up the crowd with pepper spray in swinging batons being excessively aggressive with this crowd here, and it is inappropriate. 70 woman Diana purchased and I'm an elected official, and they just pepper sprayed me for no reason. Rouge Rahmon was there to local journalist stopped her for an interview. Her face was covered with the scarf. She was wearing a black T shirt that read. The struggle continues. This protest is a long time coming. I think that the mayor Should have pulled their his police department back. The way that the mayor and Minneapolis But the part of the interview that ricocheted around the Internet was this. Won't ever stop unless we Take it all down. And that's why the anger is being Express tonight. In this way, prosecutors say in NYPD surveillance camera captured images of Rockman a short time later, she was writing in the passenger seat of a van. Her friend Colin for Mattis was driving. What allegedly happened next defense attorney Shipman says is the basis for the charges against them. It's alleges that a rouge threw a Molotov cocktail into a police car and empty police car. Essentially abandoned police car police car that had been previously vandalized. Two police officers were across the street They gave Chase and Rouge and Colin were arrested. The NYPD video apparently shows it all Rothman and that T shirt. Beige van slowing as it neared the police vehicle. The lighting of a toilet paper fuse the arc of a beer bottle as it crashed under the cruiser's dashboard. The whole episode lasted just seconds. Rahman and Mattis now face seven felonies in federal court. The charges include the use of explosives, arson conspiracy, the use of a destructive device, civil disobedience and the use of a destructive device in the furtherance of a crime of violence. This last charge alone, known as 9 24 C of the criminal code carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 30 years in prison. Add that to the other charges against them, and they could face life behind bars. Attorney Paul Shechtman represents a rouge Rockman and he says his client's case has been singled out ever since. It's been taken federally it has been treated with a seriousness. Ah, harshness unlike any I've ever seen. NPR reviewed 47 Molotov cocktail in arson cases filed across the country. That involved the destruction of police property. And this case to which prosecutors added 1/3 person, Rahman Mattis say they don't know is the only instance in which that 30 year mandatory minimum charge appears. Molotov cocktail cases are usually charged his property crimes in state courts. A spokesman for the U. S Attorney's office declined to discuss the case or they're charging decisions. Attorney General William Barr has been saying for weeks that extremists plotted the violence that erupted during the protests. And he said as much to NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview last week when we arrest people in charge them at this stage anyway. We don't charge them for being a member of Antifa. We charge him for throwing a Molotov cocktail or we charge them for possession of a gun or possession of gasoline and things to make bombs with. Those are the kinds of charges that are filed. And while prosecutors haven't offered any evidence that Rothman and Madison, part of an extremist group You wouldn't know it from the way they were charged. Good afternoon. Your Honor, This is David Kessler. I'm in the U. S attorney in the Eastern District of New York. The harshness and the Rothman and Mattis case went beyond the charges. Prosecutors also fought their release on bail even though it was supported by two different judges. 56 former federal prosecutors found the government's position so alarming. They filed an amicus brief with the court. A panel of judges heard arguments last Tuesday and because of the Corona virus, all this happened over the phone. This is how it began. The District court's order releasing the defendant on bond should be reversed. And when I want to focus on here is the core issue the danger to the community government attorney David Kessler. This is not a case about a youthful indiscretion or crimes passion. It's about a calculated Dangerous crime committed by adults who risked the lives of innocent civilian first responders. Their crime is so serious, Kessler argued. It negates any mitigating factors that came before it. To throw that Molotov cocktail, he said, required essentially a fundamental change in mindset about for them. That's really what the core of the cases, Shenkman told the judges. Thie entire evening was an aberration. Here's their exchange. You can't imagine what a soldering event this arrest was. Mr Shipman. I can imagine how these people did what they're shown on video to have done. I find the whole case unimaginable. But having during that happened once I'm I'm wondering why it is so unimaginable that it wouldn't happen again. I think because that night Wass really unique. It was young people not just used to people out to protest police violence who saw more of it. Right one. Khun lose one sense on an evening like this. That argument appears to have convinced two of the three judges that Rockman and Mattis aren't a danger to the community. The judges said in an opinion yesterday that they agreed with the lower court that the pair could be safely released on bail. Rahman and Mattis were allowed to go home last night. In the months ahead, they have more than just the government charges to fight. They also have to battle the suggestion that they're mixed up in what theater knee general is called. A witches brew of extremists. Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS New York

Mattis Mattis Rahman Rahman Attorney Colin Colin Furred Nypd NPR Rothman Molotov David Kessler Arson Rockman Dina Temple Raston Mr Shipman Housing Court Npr News Rouge Rahmon District Court
Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

All of It

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

"A day before his bombshell memoir hits the bookshelves former national security adviser John Bolton's giving some detailed scathing assessments about the White House before he and president trump parted ways on less than cordial terms one involves Chinese leader xi jin ping and peers Frank or Donia says that according to Bolton trump and she spoke often about the president's reelection prospects in that both lamented the Donald Trump could not serve more than two terms according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep Boehm said his seventeen months in the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead planned to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would identify later Franco or doing as

John Bolton White House President Trump Donald Trump Ching United States NPR Steve Inskeep Boehm Joe Biden Franco Frank Donia
Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

"Former national security adviser John Bolton says president trump and his Chinese counterpart spoke frequently about trump's reelection prospects and beers Frank or don't yes reports the two leaders lamented that trump could not serve more than two terms as US president according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep bone said his seventeen months of the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead plan to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would

John Bolton United States Ching Donald Trump NPR Steve Inskeep Bone President Trump Joe Biden Frank
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 6 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve Inskeep today is June fourth the day in nineteen eighty nine when China sent its military against protesters Chinese troops massacred many people as they cleared Tiananmen Square commemorating this massacre is forbidden in mainland China but Hong Kong has held huge rallies every year to remember the victims until this year when police band of that activity although organizers say they're going ahead and peers Emily Fang is covering the story from Beijing either Emily Hey Steve why is this anniversary so important in Hong Kong well that you're thirty one years ago ninety nine hung was still a British colony and this all these protests in Beijing as a parallel of their own struggle at that point the other you can train it already agreed that in the future nineteen ninety seven Hong Kong will be returned to Chinese rule so the idea was if protesters in Beijing could create a democratic China then democracy might finally arrive in Hong Kong as well which we know didn't happen but after the military crackdown on June fourth Hong Kong served another purpose if you came this important town factual of what China could have been with some limited civil rights here's Joe from saw an activist who now lives in New Jersey but in nineteen eighty nine he was one of the student leaders and gentlemen I think out of Hong Kong show the odds are stacked up chime in spirit off the people yes this condo at the beach you hi it's represented to lawful street the ninety people that China could be different but in some ways nineteen eighty nine also sealed Hong Kong's fate that your Beijing and Hong Kong were drafting the conditions under which China would govern Hong Kong and Beijing after the Saudis tenement protests effectively took control of writing those conditions may include more stringent language on national security and the version that you see them citing today the lack of that candlelight vigil that Jones was just talking about in Hong Kong feels particularly existential this year because Hong Kong is now coming under threat from Beijing's control yeah and and of course the the very fact that they were able to hold this vigil at all this memorial for Tiananmen square over the years suggests that there has been greater freedom in Hong Kong what's happening now that the government the central government's cracking down that could disappear quickly there's this proposed national security law which would effectively criminalize all forms of dissent in Hong Kong that will likely be passed this month by Beijing and then today Hong Kong's own legislature passed a national anthem law which criminalizes people who make fun of China's national anthem that could maybe three years in prison now or a hefty fine lawmakers try to block that vote one was dragged out of the chamber the bill passed anyways so now we have this anniversary which has been marked for generations for decades anyway and in Hong Kong and that that that that commemoration is banned water people going to do after this behind the rally said tonight they're still going to congregate they're going to risk arrest and fines churches which has more the way when it comes to corona virus related social distancing guidelines say that they're going to hold some smaller private events across Hong Kong and people are encouraging other individuals to light candles in their home if they don't want to come to a public space so events are still going to go forward now other countries are trying to put pressure on Beijing to not pass this national security law US White House has said they'll revoke Hong Kong's trade privileges if the laws passed but Beijing will likely bear that cost and the United Kingdom the former colonial power that ruled Hong Kong actually set this week to open a path for citizenship for about three million Hong Kongers if the national security laws passed.

Steve Inskeep China
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 7 months ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 8 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin good morning maybe you saw those pictures last week of all the voters in Wisconsin standing in long lines attempting to social distance while casting their ballots in the state's primary well today we have got the results as expected Joe Biden won in the democratic presidential primary but there were some down ballot surprises my Jaan silver of member station W. W. M. joins us now to talk about them high man hi good morning good morning so the biggest upset of the night actually came in a state Supreme Court race what happened there yes the liberal backed candidate Jill Karofsky beat the trump endorsed incumbent Daniel Kelly she held a socially distant victory party it was just Karofsky in her two kids and she thank her team and supporters but she also had a copy at look we should never had election on Tuesday and for many many people they had to decide between whether or not they were going to risk their own health or the health of people they love or their lives or the lives of people that they loved in order to vote it wasn't on tenable decision the GOP controlled legislature and the conservative majority in the state Supreme Court had fought hard to hold the election date in place despite calls to postpone or change to all male and so this was a big defeat for them a lot of Democrats had said they were worried that holding an election under the circumstances a mode amounted to voter suppression of looking at the results is there any evidence of that Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez had called this election voter suppression on steroids and in larger cities voters reported waits an average of one to two hours up to four hours some voters just couldn't wait that long or didn't want to brave the polls and risk their health nearly ten thousand voters requested mail in ballots on time and didn't get them and there were post office problems and postmark problems so there were voters who were disenfranchised and will never know just what turned out would have been if it hadn't been for coronavirus but all in all one point one million mail in ballots were requested and returned that makes the total vote count right in line or even higher than previous state Supreme Court races and also on par with other presidential primaries so Wisconsin made this huge transition from being a state where a majority of voters cast ballots in person on election day to a majority mailing in their ballots so just briefly is that what's going to happen in the fall well so based on Republicans opposition to proposals for all mail in election this time around it's possible we could get a replay of the long lines and and few polling places but it's possible that their opinions could change after this election seeing that mailing turned out very high among both Republicans and Democrats so it's not just something Democrats do it also depends on where we are with corona virus right exactly my own silver of W. you W. M. in Milwaukee we appreciate it thank you thank you so much the Wisconsin when it is not a good for Joe Biden but even more significant news for his campaign yesterday getting the endorsement of one Bernie Sanders today I am asking all Americans I'm asking every Democrat I'm asking every independent I'm asking a lot of Republicans to come together in this campaign to support your candidacy now try in dos to make certain that we defeat somebody who I believe from speaking just for myself now what is the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country but Biden has been struggling to hold on to attention and reach voters amid the corona virus pandemic Karen Finney as a democratic strategist she was senior spokesperson for Hillary Clinton's two thousand sixteen campaign and he is on the line with us now to talk about what is really become an unprecedented campaign Karen hi hi good morning well could this thing get anymore historic so what did you make of Sanders endorsement I mean how does it compare specifically to when he endorsed Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen well it was very strong and I'll tell you one of the most important things and I give us senator Sanders a lot of credit for this he ran a tremendous race and he gave us a really full throated endorsement of Joe Biden and recognizing the gap in the number of delegates then that he couldn't really make that up he stepped forward early and doing it long but you know before we are at convention because as you may recall in twenty sixteen there were some calm I know right into the convention it was Maranda sticky right and this is a nice way to put it well not good it was it was not good however what it means now is that the full Democratic Party enter progressive allies can be focused a hundred percent on how to defeat Donald Trump but also as you know if you're just talking about with Wisconsin we know that voting in November we have to prepare for that as well that's definitely a real issue top of mind are Bernie Sanders supporters going to show up for Joe Biden do you think what kind of concessions might bite and have to make well I think you know certainly when it comes to it's it's complicated right because I think certainly when it comes to thinking about where the economy is going to be in the kind of recovery were going to be needing to be thinking about obviously vice president Biden has been through that when he and president Obama took office in two thousand nine so he has some ideas I'm sure senator Sanders as we know has some very specific ideas and I think you've seen vice president Biden start to move towards some of those ideas I know Medicare for all is one that senator Sanders is going to keep pushing I don't see bite in doing that I would say I think he will stick to our expanding obamacare which you know again in the middle of this covert crisis a lot of these ideas I think now seem much more reasonable to people who are doubting these ideas sometime ago because it's laying bare are some of these do you know just huge fissures in our economy and our health care system so I could see those being the two key areas where they'll have conversation just briefly in seconds remaining you're a strategist how do you advise Joe Biden in this moment when he can't go have rallies he can't go get it you know lock eyes with a voter put his hands on their shoulders as he doesn't communicate his message he's got to be offered to all yeah you know what by being virtual though I mean tech just be the contrast to the kind of note down that sort of daily unhinged meltdown we see coming out of the White House that doesn't make many people it doesn't make us feel more confident or comfortable or trustworthy be the guy who just show up on me the guy who shows com and has a plan and shows okay all democratic strategist Karen Finney thing scared we.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Wisconsin
The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

Morning Edition

03:00 min | 9 months ago

The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

"This next story features some of the most powerful moments of the conversations that team had in those words Steve Inskeep and Sarah McCammon found a deep divide this division is not quite the same as the red and blue partisan divide it's different from the gaps between races our incomes our generations the truth is it's bigger than all those divisions and it embraces all of them it's the divide between the city and the surrounding countryside in metro Charlotte we met urban and rural voters on the same day now we've heard their differing views on this program in past days today we hear what some think of each other I visited a predominantly black church in Charlotte it was within sight of the big skyscrapers downtown and there I met with local activists and I told them that you Steve had been talking with mostly white suburban and rural voters many of whom support president trump what do you think of I guess our neighbours and away who voted so differently from I K. said in church that's willing Fleming he's sixty three African American a long time activist in Charlotte I think anybody to anybody it did both the trump has to have the same school of thought a trump passed and as racism that I just don't believe in it I don't Sadam Vangelis preacher can stand up and have to give trump player than he does what he's talking about there is the way many white evangelical leaders have supported the president even after he admitted to paying off a porn star even through his impeachment we had this long conversation about politics in the state of the country and Karan mac because the local NWC P. president told me she feels like many white people just don't see their own racism what I've learned is this that black people do not seem to have the same level of work in this country our lives don't have worked in this country and it's been that way since the beginning of time to sixteen nineteen let's put it that way she's referring there to the years slavery started in the United States other voters described rural trump supporters as low information voters who don't understand how they rely on government programs like social security or farm subsidies Collette all sin is president of the African American caucus for the county Democratic Party I am going to say that a lot of people are just aren't educated they don't understand the system and the process and at the end of the day once that's understood I don't think that would have been a lot of people that would have voted for him but a lot of people are voting on a motion and fear and whatever so these voters feel marginalized by some of their white suburban and rural neighbors in the Charlotte area and they also feel like some of those neighbors just aren't seeing the big picture Schering your voters were not wrong there to talk about people voting on fear because some people do fear cities at the same day that you were in central Charlotte I was the far edge of the metro and went to a cafe in the small town called kings mountain and had breakfast in the corner with Tracy Stewart his mom Linda Stewart

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 10 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David green I'm Steve Inskeep what does the president want to do to disability benefits in America the administration budget proposes changes in requirements to go on disability this affects a lot of people across the country so let's check the facts and the implications of something we heard on this program this week White House budget director Russell vote said there is a chance to save money on disability there's about seven billion dollars in improper payments in the program so we obviously want to read those out but in general we want to get people back to work in labor force right now the inability to speak English is a qualifying factor that allow you to get disability we think that's not how the program is meant to work and so that's an example of one of the reforms that we have within the disability program so much to dig into their an NPR Selena Simmons stuff and is in our studios to help us do that good morning my name first seven billion dollars in improper payments is that much money available to be saved well I asked on the for the source of that figure and they sent me a report that shows the seven billion dollars in improper payments across disability programs in fiscal year twenty eighteen but here is an important point that is out of hundreds of billions in payments to beneficiaries OMB puts the rate of improper payments at about four percent other estimates say it's closer to one percent that is decimal dust according to a source I talk to about this and another important point vote says route out but most of these improper payments are because of inefficiencies or administrative issues not because of fraud people trying to game the system in some way okay first decimal dust as of yet is I'm gonna say from very much I appreciate that second he said the thing about speaking English that if you don't speak English well you can get disability and you didn't see the president doesn't seem to like that is that correct kind of you cannot get disability benefits just because you don't speak English you have to first have a serious medical condition that prevents you from working if you do language skills might be considered along with other things it's like agent education level the thinking is say you have a physical conditioning can to manual label labor for instance but you could work in a desk job you don't have the education or work is going to language skills to do that all of that might be taken into consideration although for talking about language it sounds like a measure here to target immigrants at some but it sounds like that's not necessarily what's going on here this is not is not just about immigrants claiming disability right it's part of this really complex grade of considerations and the trump administration tells me it's close to final finalizing a new regulation to remove that consideration out of the grid and some experts I talked to said that that process does need to be modernized but English language consideration would not be the place that would start it's a pretty small piece of the pie okay Russell vote also said that the administration wants to ask people much more often if they really are qualified for disability let's hear that we want to have ongoing disability reviews instead of having a root disability review every seven years we want you to have it every two or three years what's the story there okay part of what he's saying is not quite right to seven years is the very outer limit between what are called continuing disability reviews this is for people who have really serious conditions like an intellectual disability down syndrome might be an example there is a recent proposal from the trump administration on this but it would not change reviews from seven years to two years we make some other changes to the frequency of these reviews on these changes aren't final yet the disability advocates have been sounding the alarm and some people told me that the frequency is not the issue it's that there isn't enough staffing or funding for these field offices in order to actually check up on people regardless of the time exactly Selena thanks so much for coming by thank you NPR's.

David green Steve Inskeep president America
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:07 min | 10 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve Inskeep and I know will king people who graduated from historically black or predominantly Hispanic colleges might be paying more to borrow money because of where they went to school that's according to a new report from a financial watchdog group and here's Chris Arnold got an advance copy of that report a lot more people these days are getting loans from a new breed of lenders known as Finn tax or financial technology firms add some of these lenders factor in where you went to college a really racing alarm flags cat well back as the civil rights council the nonprofit student bar were protection center her group decided to run a test they chose a fintech lender called upstart you get a loan offer off its website and they applied for dozens of loans online at posing as a twenty four year old man they said he lives in New York makes fifty grand a year the only difference was where he went to school they applied as if he went to and why you in New York a bunch of other schools and Howard University one of the most famous historically black colleges and universities in this country and we looked at what would a bar where from Howard what with a swimmer if they see if they apply for this type of loan and then they compare and they found that if you went to and why you versus Howard for a thirty thousand dollar personal loan with a five year term they found you pay about thirty five hundred dollars more in interest in fees if you went to Howard a historically black college there's no other difference between these two borrowers other than the fact that one attended it and why year in one attended Howard the group found you'd also pay more if you went to New Mexico state which has a high percentage of Hispanic students in a new report called educational redlining the group says lenders it may be discriminating based on what college you attended we reached out to Dave Girard the CEO of upstart we definitely appreciate the intent Gerard it used to be a senior executive at Google and found it up start he says to use technology to make credit more available upstart he says goes way beyond looking at your credit score there are more than a thousand factors I mean we're a company that your entire mission the reason you know we get out of bed every morning is to improve access to affordable credit so we are actually supportive of the intent that credit should be biased unfair anyway Hey but you're right says basically the test the nonprofit group ran it doesn't prove that using education as a factor it leads to discrimination using you know hypothetical contrived applicants for loans who are real people and was but you know both anecdotal and and not reflective of the real world and you know we're a company that has tested for fairness and bias over millions of applicants and that's our approach to ensuring that our platform isn't biased against anybody still the report raised the eyebrows of some legal experts and tied Baker teaches a course on fintech at Columbia university's law school he says that the traditional credit score approach to landing has its own problems and biases and at some fintech landers alternative approaches can help using alternative data can be highly beneficial but also has dangers and we need to be very vigilant that we don't recreate some of the problematic practices of the past unintentionally advocates are increasingly worried the casting such a wide net for data to make decisions introduces biases in new and different ways well back says her group is pushing for better oversight and more transparency from fin tech companies Chris Arnold NPR news Iowa the first state to vote is looking last in vote counting we're still waiting for a final tally on the twenty twenty Iowa caucuses the state Democratic Party chairman has promised a full investigation and already there are calls for Iowa to lose its status NPR's don Gonyea reports new technology was supposed to make the twenty twenty Iowa caucuses a smoother running operation it didn't work out that way Monday night passed and then Tuesday morning with no results reported then just after four PM yesterday partial but not complete vote totals were posted online showing Bernie Sanders and people to judge battling for first place by now all of the ideal candidates were off in New Hampshire leaving the spotlight to Iowa Democratic Party chairman try price good afternoon thank you all so much for taking a little time today to to chat a little bit about what happened last night price held a short news conference starting with a mea culpa he said the problems tabulating results are unacceptable as chair of the party I apologize deeply for this he said an investigation would be thorough and transparent but he also stressed that the use of voting cards this year that's a new thing for the caucuses means there's a paper trail and that there will be an accurate final count eventually during Q. NA price said there were no indications of problems during testing of the new app used to transmit results from caucus sites he didn't say when a complete vote count would be released and he was asked if having such a major problem could lead to Ireland losing its spot as the first to vote the fact is is that this is a conversation that happens every four years there's no doubt that that conversation will take place again in fact it's already been a hot topic on local television news in Iowa here's KCCI channel eight in the morning hafu is of course increasing calls nationwide and I was first in the nation status in the presidential election process in the past the debate has focused on whether Iowa is to world to white into one like the nation as a whole to occupy the privilege first spot on the election calendar it has so far always weathered such arguments but the very public very embarrassing problems of this week gave I was critics a boost according to Drake University political scientist Dennis gold for the twenty twenty caucus was a pretty much of a nightmare scenario he says the push to give another stated turn or to even make it rotating position with the new first state each election cycle will now get a more serious look those wanting to change the nomination procedure to move or just place the Iowa caucuses have gained a lot of ammunition in the meantime Iowa Democrats will need to show that they fix the problems of this week more difficult might be proving to voters especially those disappointed with the results that fairness is carried the day don Gonyea NPR news des Moines this is NPR news John McConnell with the San Jose traffic.

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:40 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on Amanpour

"For joining me there on the wrong side of history. That's me Daniel Radcliffe can steeper semi dark ages of Miracle Work Permits January twenty eighth at ten thirty nine thirty central on. TBS turning out to another contentious election year eighteen fifty six in imperfect the union the CO host of NPR's morning edition. Steve inskeep tells the story of America's first political power couple. John and Jessie Fremont Fremont was the first I ever Republican nominee and the campaign was dominated by immigration race and political demagogy. Does that sound familiar. Steve inskeep joins always me now from Washington. I can see you smiling because I recognized a train. How is it possible that these things just last and last first and last that is the nature of democracy there are politicians who said of democracy that in our politics nothing is ever over and you understand why we have new generations? We have new people entering the political system every single time. We have the same essentially political system with that. We've had for centuries now and and as a result. Christiane what I'm able to do here by going into these years before the American civil war is find the backdrop to the discussion. You've just been having we're in this time of extreme politics in which a Lotta people fear not just losing election but that their side will lose for all time forever you have. Republicans concerned about the demographic change in the country. Democrats are confident that demographic changes in their favor over time but they are also so now worried about being shoved out of power forever by President they see as an authoritarian. So there's a lot of anxiety in the air and in the eighteen forties and fifties It was similar. The United States was divided between the North and south free states and slave states and there was a big demographic change going on causing the free states to be far more populous which the south found really really threatening and in my story. I traced the story of an ambitious couple Bowl Jesse and John Fremont as they He was a western explorer. She helped promote his experiences and they ended up so famous that John ran for president in aged fifty six and this brutal election. So tell me about it because I'm fascinated I mean first of all. It is the first Republican nominee. So I don't know whether everybody knows that. The Republican Party was so news right then and then also. His wife was so impact but important. Explain the dynamics between Republicans and the other party and then the role of women now okay. We've Seen Hillary Clinton really powerful first lady and then in her own right. Michelle Obama really powerful first lady but then it wasn't so much not at all women of course had gender roles that were much more limited but the emergence of Jesse as a character and in of women more generally at that time and the creation of the Republican party are connected In the early years of American politics slavery did exist in a bunch of states. It's in the south and if you wanted to have a national political party that was viable you needed to accommodate what was called the slave power you needed to be pro slavery or at least keep your mouth shut. The Republican Party was founded in the eighteen fifties on the idea that the north had become so populous that they might be able to win a presidential the election with northern votes alone which meant they could be anti slavery. They weren't actually for abolition at the beginning. That was considered extreme but they were against the expansion of slavery and so they captured a lot of the energy in the country in eighteen. Fifty six when they ran their first presidential candidate. Women had not been allowed to be in politics up to now but they were allowed to take on what was called Benevolent. Cause and a lot of women took that opportunity grabbed that loophole in order to to speak up against slavery they were a big part of the Anti Slavery Movement and win. The Republican Party nominated John C Fremont as their first candidate. Jessie Fremont who was prominent herself. The daughter of a United States senator was taken up as a kind of symbol of there. 'cause she was a southerner from a slave owning family whose mother had turned against slavery and had translated her views to Jesse and in a way that was unprecedented. At the the time people would go to the Fremont House by the thousands and demand to see the candidate that asked him to come to the balcony but when he came and waved and went away again they weren't satisfied aside and they would shout for Jesse to come out to let me read this passage from your book where you say. It was no coincidence that his career began to soar a few months often. They eloped when he was twenty-eight and she was seventeen I thought as many others did said one of their critics that Jessie Benton Fremont was the better man of the the two. Well there's a compliment in eighteen fifty six. Yeah the guy who said that may have actually been trying to diss John Fremont and away by saying that his wife overshadowed him but he was also in many ways telling the truth she was a young woman who had grown up very close to her father in some ways you could say that she wanted to be a man by which I mean that she wanted to do things that were supposed to be limited to men. She couldn't really do that but she was able to operate through her husband and he explored the American West in the eighteen forties and fifties went out in these dramatic. Expeditions even took part in the United States. Conquest of California from Mexico was considered a huge hero but as an explorer. He didn't actually discover that much. That was new. What he did was come back east and write these dramatic accounts of his adventures and also make great maps which were intended to promote the American settlement of the West Promotion was the point which is one of the ways? This is a really early modern story and Jesse helped him with that. She was his secretary as he wrote sometimes his editor sometimes his CO author Sir occasionally even his ghostwriter she was his political adviser someone who had grown up around senators and even presidents and was entirely confident. Even there's a young woman telling President her opinion even when she knew they did not agree. With that opinion. She was a remarkable figure who even before this campaign of eighteen fifty six had begun to develop public profile of her own now. It's not unprecedented. That women in Washington in the early days of this country were influential. There were a bunch launch of influential women in that time but it was unusual that a woman would becomes so public and so publicly associated with her husband's policies and when he did run for president she was also viciously attacked as a woman for being so forward. Yeah that hasn't changed has it Let me ask you this though if if John was the first Republican nominee president trump or candidate trump in September. Two Thousand Sixteen just before the election. said that he might be the last Republican nominee. Because of the situation of demographics. You're just talking about now and how you know immigration then and now is still obviously a a major issue and and used by demagogues really this is what president trump said about why Americans should vote for him. I think this will be the last asked election that the Republicans have a chance of winning. Because you're gonNA have people flowing across the border you're going to have illegal immigrants coming in and they're going to be legalized and they're going to be able to vote. And once that happens you can forget it. So Steve I mean look you know clearly politicians being pointing the finger and pointing the the fear at the other. It's happened for hundreds of years. I mean is there any way you can see a society. Changing political campaigns campaigns would be less like that in the future or is this just something this country and many others are going to be living with well let me say two seemingly contradictory things I Christiane one is what I said before. Nothing is ever over. There will always be new voices in the political system there will always be people entering the political arena. And they may well start with certain views that have to be argued over again and again and again there is a similarity between right now and the eighteen fifties because there was a demographic change that people found to be threatening In modern times you know. The elite of the Republican Party tried to deal with that demographic change by shifting Republican Party policies to be more welcoming specifically Latinos a huge growing population in this country. But they found out that their electorate had a different set of concerns. And I'm sure that many people watching this who voted for president trump would say I'm not against immigrants but what they did did want was a reduction in immigration. They did want less illegal immigration as well they did want a wall or some kind of border security. These were things that people voted for more explicitly. It wasn't just a metaphor to them that has been profoundly divisive but the other thing to realize is that America gets passed asked these faces phases and changes and the people that we worry about assimilating end up fitting into America just fine in the eighteen forties and fifties John. Charles Fremont running for president was revealed to be the illegitimate son of immigrant which was true and then the opposition press has turned him into an immigrant. said he'd been born outside the United States there were burgers in eighteen fifty six. He was also accused in a way that can sound familiar to us a being a member of this dangerous alien religion. We talk about Islam today or some of us do in that way. In those days the dangerous religion religion was Catholicism and there was a great deal of paranoia that Catholics would be used by the Pope or by European forces to take over the country. It was a very very real fear in a lot of people's minds in a very big thing driving the anti-immigrant sentiment in the fear of change in the country. But one thing about looking back in history is that we can see how our fears of the moment. Turn out over time and as we know very well. There is a very large Catholic population in the United States today and they fit into America just fine and there was a Catholic president. Of course John F. Kennedy. I had to go through that as well. Look we're talking on the anniversary of Dr King's birthday a federal holiday and we're in the middle of a presidential election race. There's not a single candidate of color left in the Democratic race and obviously not on the Republican side either Ah But but there are women and the New York Times has come out and endorsed two women running for the Democratic Nomination Elizabeth with Warren and Amy Klobuchar two senators who will be sitting in on the impeachment trial. Of Course A. What does that say to you? You're not just an author your a host of a morning newscast which is massively successful. What does that say to you and did you see that coming? I didn't see the joint endorsement coming but it would be hard not to know about the conflict at the time chose with this endorsement to illustrate they explicitly said let's pick somebody that we like from the more progressive wing of the party..

Republican Party President United States Bowl Jesse John C Fremont John president America Steve inskeep Jessie Benton Fremont Jessie Fremont Fremont Washington Christiane trump Daniel Radcliffe Fremont House NPR TBS John F. Kennedy Hillary Clinton
"steve inskeep" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

16:22 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to on for. Here's what's coming up. You solemnly swear in Washington. Senators prepare for jury duty in president. Trump's impeachment trials while he flies off to join world leaders in Davos Switzerland. We ask where the Putin's Russia is making hay out of this DC dysfunction plus imperfect union. NPR's Stephen Steve inskeep tells me about his new book on America's first power couple and impeachments passed. Then I would show up at the major holidays. Right get some friends together together. We go to this then. I God I was proud to be Jewish. Full the White House. speechwriters Sara Horowitz says signing up for an intro to Judaism led to her own spiritual awakening. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane on four in.

Stephen Steve inskeep Sara Horowitz Trump Davos Switzerland Putin Christiane NPR president Russia Washington White House. America
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who should host Steve Inskeep joins us to talk about covering president trump's impeachment then we'll hear about his new book in perfect union it tells the story of political activists Jesse and John Fremont a couple who explored and mapped the American west of the eighteen hundreds then at ten fifty seven Cisco forty Niners are one game away from the Super Bowl they compete with the Green Bay Packers in their first NFC championship game in seven years we'll talk with the chronicles and killing about this year's team and their chances going into Sunday's game that's all next after this new live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying the U. S. Senate has accepted the articles of impeachment of president trump and peers quality grease Alice reports this move triggers a start of trump's trial after he was accused of leveraging hundreds of millions in military aid to Ukraine to pressure the U. S. ally to help him politically Adam Schiff the chairman of the house intelligence committee led the impeachment manager team in presenting the articles to the Senate using the powers of his I. office president trump solicited the interference of a foreign government Ukraine in the twenty twenty United States presidential election the Chief Justice of the United States is being sworn end and will in turn swear in the full chamber of senators who will act as jurors the senators must sit in silence and without their electronic devices for the duration of the trial the proceedings are slated to start on Tuesday could last several weeks cloudy salicin peer news the capitol meanwhile Ukrainian police have announced they are investigating whether a US ambassador was under illegal surveillance last spring before the trump administration remove her from a post over Ukraine says its position is not to interfere in the US is internal political affairs the president's marking national religious freedom day with a reminder the public school students have constitutional rights to prayer and they could risk losing federal funds if those rights are not protected and peers record on yes reports the White House says it's not changing existing laws were plans to update those already on the books president trump will host a group of Christian Jewish and Muslim students who say they face discrimination at school in an exclusive interview with NPR the director of the White House domestic policy council Joe Grogan said provisions that protects student prayer have been eroded over time by hostility toward religion or trying across the board to invite religious institutions and people of faith back into the public square and say look your views are just as valid as anybody else's and by the way they're protected by the first amendment to the constitution the event comes as trump works to boost support among evangelical Christians before the twenty twenty election Franco or Dona as NPR news the White House the US Senate has overwhelmingly approved an updated trade agreement with Mexico and Canada and peers gun Horsley reports of vote follows passage in the house last month the vote in the Senate was broad and bi partisan with eighty nine senators voting in favor of the updated trade deal and just ten senators voting no that similar to the lopsided tally that the U. S. M. C. A. one in the house last month at ten P. R. Scott Horsley reporting the retail sectors coming off what one analyst called the healthy holiday season the national retail federation reporting holiday sales of twenty nineteen were more than four percent higher than the year before the retail group partly credits online sales which fared better than several major brick and mortar stores the Dow was up one hundred sixty five points this is NPR live from KQED news online Tiffany cam high twenty nineteen was the second hottest year on record according to a new report from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration here's KQ.

Steve Inskeep trump president
"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

11:24 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"It was made they were making economic arguments about slavery was not. It's not a free white guy. This was this was not a human rights argument lots of racists that were being made here and that it's very similar to me the immigration debate that takes place in the Republican Party. Today you have the business of the party we need these immigrants. Yeah but at the same time they might not be the most open to wanting them as neighbors there was a the and there's a crazy circumstance in that the Republican Party was arguably the most progressive major-party of its time And I say that almost in a modern sense of wanting running a more open and inclusive country but they also were aware that this was a time of profound racial prejudice and that they needed to attract or or at least neutralize the danger of Anti immigrant voters and they didn't want to be stained too much with the hatred of immigrants but they they also didn't want to turn off natives. They wanted nativist votes because they wanted to win. And that was necessary to them then and I find it entirely possible. Symbol that we if we were able to very very privately have a drink with With one lawmaker many lawmakers. We might find a lot who say that they take this position that they don't actually feel the way that they say about immigration but they know that a lot of their voters do and they need to appeal to those people in order to do things they find more important and it was it. It is amazing. How often when you hear this I mean all of these founders of California whether you WanNa talk about Mark Hopkins are all these guys? They all came about their anti-slavery Mindset all through business yes yeah and they're asking questions like Should a man won't be allowed a white man be allowed to come to California bringing one hundred African slaves and dig for gold and get all the gold. Is that unfair to white people who are prospecting getting in the same place. It's it's remarkable but true that a lot of anti slavery sentiment at that time was about white people and its effect on white people and in fact a lot of the resistance to freeing slaves was also about white people who didn't WanNa live around free black people one of the the things that I think makes your book. Even more unique here is that I think you introduce a character that maybe deserves more Attention and that is Jesse. Yeah would you put her. Should she be in the likes of Susan. B. Anthony should be seen as somebody I mean here was somebody who is pushing the envelope elope for women in politics and you. She was very out front. Outspoken people liked her she popular. How much should she be revisited? As as one of the great Feminists and women's rights activists of her. She should be revisited as a character is very different from someone like Susan B. Anthony Anthony or Elizabeth Cady Stanton And here's what I mean by that. She wasn't an overt activist. She was someone who acted on a personal level to accomplish everything that she could given the strictures on women of her time. I've been listening to those really cool. podcasts about Dolly Pardon I don't know if you've been following pretty amazing and Dolly Parton has a complicated relationship with the word feminist. Doesn't seem to like to be called a feminist but is admired by feminists administered by all kinds of women for the way that she made a career herself and not only has been a singer but has been the boss of other people and she has tried tried to accomplish things on that level without overtly being some kind of feminist activist. Jessie Benton Fremont in the period that I focus on the eighteen forties and fifties didn't even seem to favor the women's right to vote. There was a movement that was beginning to she was she wasn't necessarily there in fact there's a moment later when Elizabeth Elizabeth Cady Stanton comes and says can you contribute some money to our cause of women's suffrage and Jessie Benton Fremont says. I'm not sure I want to do that. I feel that women in their present present position management better which is not a sentiment that a lot of people would buy into today. But that's the thing that she said. She eventually got there but what she was doing was on a personal level she as a child. Her father Senator Benton had wanted a son had wanted to name the sun after his father turned out to be a daughter so she jesse Jesse aimed at named after his father anyway My wife was supposed to be the boy in her name's Christian. Hey Sorry Christian no matter what this beautiful and this must happen a lot trae and it happened to her and she slipped into the role of a son according according to traditional gender her father took her hunting for example her father took her onto talking. About why you have tried to pose as a poses a man that yes the there. There are instances in which she She did that Two in particular was at a wedding where she put on men's clothes and tried to persuade people that that she was a man but there was another more significant one where she went to one of her friends weddings as a teenager. And she's like high Washington Society egner teenage classmate is getting married to the Russian ambassador. And it's this over the top wedding senators and and cabinet secretaries and she found the whole thing gross and went and cut off her hair and went to her father. And said I just WanNa live my life as your assistant. She is effectively saying without quite saying it. I want to live a man's life I WanNa do things that are restricted attracted to men and at this point. Her father had been so supportive of her education and so Close to her and brought her everywhere. Said this is now gone too far. It's time for you to be woman. Now grow your hair back get with it. be a woman and so what she ended up doing. Instead of being his assistant formerly she married a man who effectively became came his assistant in trying to settle the west and she was a powerful support to both of those men and operated through those men. I don't want to get through these days. I love how you talk about. How he t that Fremont viewed himself as truly as somebody who was an expeditious and that he would if he saw new new new plant life that he'd never seen before he went? I mean he was truly had an explorers mindset and I have to admit I was just like what would it be like to draw a map freak level and so I was just trying to put like to to make a map the way they had to make maps back anyway. Just I've I found myself very intrigued by that aspect. I will send you a link. Chuck there is Used but you can find that Fremont's map portfolio right it's been printed rented and there's like five huge maps that you unfold but yeah he he was not a trained scientist he was not a trained cartographer. He was not a trained soldier. Sure he was not a trained anything. He was an intrepid amateur. who found out how much could get away with? And he made lovely maps that are mostly accurate Not In every case but but pretty good maps he was determined. This is a great thing for journalists to think about. He was determined only to map those areas he had seen himself. I wrote that in that I was like. Yeah yeah by the way. How else do you drop? Well W back then you withdraw trauma based on the accounts of other people and some guy you know. There might be a Florida in fifteen something and it basically Florida's peninsula just looks. Looks like a juts out. I mean it's Kinda there but it's almost shaped more like south. America like a mini South America and you might have a fur trapper that came after walking thousands of miles and you would get his best guess about how far away was a mountain that he had seen. How toll was it? And you'd stick it on the map Fremont Fremont wouldn't do that. His map would be blank. Except for this line across the map that he himself explored and maybe a few miles on either side just so listeners. Here Fremont I've heard Fremont Nebraska in Fremont it's all after him yes. All the Fremont's in America are named after this Fremont California Three Months Street in Las Vegas. The Fremont neighborhood in Seattle Seattle Fremont New Hampshire Fremont New York. There are a lot of Fremont counties. It's all over the place Fremont mountains as well. Why what what? How did he get on your radar? What made this interesting? I got this great platform and I want to. I want to write this book. I first encountered John Fremont and Jessie Fremont as a kid. My parents got me those time life books where I remember those right and those kinds of books and the freemont appear in books about the old West and appear in books about about the civil war as well which I was obsessed with as a kid and you never hear their full story. You very rarely hear their full story but you get them referred to as ambitious and super famous vein variety of things about them and their various episodes Navy Crockett with with the way you felt like those books back then. I think that that's yeah. That's that's a fair comparison That although not folk heroes in quite the way the Davy Crockett was they. Were somehow a little different. But it didn't focus on them various celebrity Fokker which is different is a little different But then as a grownup as a historian if I can call myself myself that I wrote a book about Andrew Jackson the Cherokees which gets you into the early phase of what got you manifest destiny. You're talking about westward. Expansion and this book imperfect Perfect Union takes it to the next phase of America moving west and they were really interesting characters to me and I wanted to focus on on them and I wanted explicitly to focus on both of them. Because that gave me a chance to explore gender roles of the dime it gave me a chance simply to explore or a marriage which I was interested in doing and also to explore these themes of ambition and celebrity and everything else. That's in this book. Are you Andrew Jackson he space. Oh where where am I you know what I mean. By the consequential president everybody agrees with net positive. Negative to complicate it but no no no I. I think that I think that Andrew Jackson is all right if you pair them with the guy that it into the book John Ross. A Cherokee chief Jackson was a hero of American democracy who participated in opening up the American political system to greater numbers of people and there was enormous turnout relative earlier elections in his time he was also a slave owner and obvious racist slave owner. Come on He was a lawbreaker. He was a law in to himself. He believed in his own authority. Much more than you did the law. Aw didn't think much of Congress did anything much congress The Senate voted to censure him. Once upon a time and the there were there were many battles there he he was a profoundly consequential figure but the way that I think you can understand him and not totally reject him because of his many flaws is when you look at the contribution of John Ross. Is this Cherokee. who fought him? Not on the battlefield but in the democratic political system for more than twenty years. And you had an it's up. It's a success. Yes said it took place exactly that that that that that he held off John. Ross held off the demands for Cherokees to give up their land in the East for more than twenty years did that through the political GEICO system.

Jessie Benton Fremont Fremont Fremont Fremont Andrew Jackson Susan B. Anthony Anthony Fremont mountains John Fremont America jesse Jesse California Elizabeth Elizabeth Cady Stant Republican Party Fremont Nebraska John Ross Dolly Parton Navy Crockett Florida Mark Hopkins
"steve inskeep" Discussed on The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

13:20 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

"Politics before the first ever impeachment. How do you like that tees? That is what's coming up next next crazy American politics before we ever started impeaching. President Steve INSKEEP. Hey It's Chris Hayes. Sometimes it's good to just take a step back from the day to day onslaught of news and take our broader. Look at the issues. That's what I'm doing each week. Amai podcast why is this happening. Were exploring topics ranging from school segregation to climate change. Well the way that I think of it is climate change will be to the twentieth century. What maternity west us the nineteenth century? It'll be the central subject of questions about economic justice. Everything you care about in the world will be affected by climate and digging deep with guests uniquely qualified to analyze was issues from mass incarceration to race relations as you know for the first time in our history at the national level whites are on the verge of losing their majority status in twenty years. And I think it's no coincidence that our politics are getting more tribal. Join me for. Why is this happening? New episodes every Tuesday. Wherever you get your podcasts joining me now is Steve inskeep this a real treat for me host of NPR's morning edition? His latest book is called Imperfect Union. How Jesse and John Fremont map the west best invented celebrity and helped cause the civil war? It's newly out this week. It has some interesting historical parallels today. And I'll just be honest Steve. I'm in the middle reading about Leland Leland Stanford is so it really scratched my h. Let's graphic timing. I just I felt a dearth of lack of knowledge of the American West. And now I feel like between the book I'm meaning on Stanford in this. I am in much better shape. A treat for me to be here. By the way chuck And Yeah Leland Stanford this guy. What was founder of California founder of the Central Pacific Living Railroad Governor of California? All these important things John Charles Fremont one of the main characters of this book is also ineffective founder of California. He's he's the guy who claimed credit it's a little more complicated reality. But claimed credit conqueror of California do we also because he was the first nominee for president of a fledgling third party called the Republican Lucan Party. Yeah do economists founder of the Republican Party or not I would. I would go there but I would be careful about it. Because he someone they reached out and grabbed as a a symbol of their movement. He had not been. This is a party that was founded to oppose the spread of slavery. He'd not been a major anti-slavery thinker he'd not been a major anti anti slavery activists in fact he had to go and Polish his anti slavery. Credentials a little bit to fit the moment but he was. Somebody was considered this great national hero of the Mexican war of the Mexican war and of the exploration of the West and was considered to be this just really brave guy guy with great fortitude and judgment who would bring the different parts of the coalition Together. Help bring people mean the best part that I like about reading any the the best books in yours. Does this really well about reading any about anybody. That's more than one hundred years old is setting the scene. Yeah of America. What's it like to be there? It's so remarkable to me to remind people that it is only only been. It's been less than two hundred years that the West essentially became America. Yes all right this was loosely a Mexican territory but did they fully. Nobody really controlled. It was territory. Yes this belong to native peoples. We're we're talking here about what what. The Mexicans called Alta California which was actually California Nevada Arizona parts of some other states and enormous an empire of itself and their various native nations out there. And there's really a few thousand I think maybe the number was eight thousand Mexican colonists who had taken over little parts of it and we're trying to control it and the United States understood how loosely it was held and reached out to grab it. We had three competing things happening. All at the same time. Right there was. There was always a movement in the country of manifest any. Yes then there was the discovery of gold and it seemed to accelerate everything and when does it accelerate Fremont it made him rich. This is a guy who with the aid of his wife is a huge part of the story. As I'm sure we'll discuss US Went to Mexican controlled. California began the process of taking it over. Just as the Mexican war was beginning The war between which between the United States and Mexico is beginning. He didn't even know it at the time. Because of bad communications he became this huge hero. He also obtained real estate as Congress tend to do and honoring wondering land. Somehow they end up owning some of the land and then how do they decide that they own the land clubbing. I love as multiple people would have claims on these pieces of land. It was totally true. And in this case you had a Mexican former governor who realized his side was on the way out and he had a somewhat dubious claim to a vague vague but immense chunk of California something larger than the island of Manhattan and he sold it to John Fremont for three thousand dollars and then in eighteen forty nine Fremont allowed some Mexican migrants to go dig for gold on the land because the gold rush had begun and they made him fantastically tactically wealthy without him having to do very much of anything and that became yet another part of the fame of this incredibly famous person that he was a hero. Ro He was here. ROIC that had such great fortitude that he was involved in the westward expansion of the country and he was also involved in the wealth of the country and got some of it for himself. So so in a setting up here. Because you explain how it happened. How why why did he become the celebrity? There's plenty of people who could have been celebrity by. That's totally in California in that period of time. Why damn that's totally true? There were a lot of people who were involved in the exploration of the West and we should be clear what we mean by that the white expiration of the West or the American. If you WANNA say man okay I sure as opposed to that the natives and other people who were there Mexican certainly explored it as well certainly true. In fact a lot of the West West was known but it had not been codified. It had not been as well mapped as it could have been and it needed to be promoted and this is the thing that is really modern about this story. Chuck to me one of the things. John Charles Fremont was acting at the behest of his father-in-law a powerful senator who wanted to take over the west who wanted to take over Oregon which was disputed territory with Britain and he believed that the way that Americans took over territory was by settling it not by seizing it in a war necessarily just by putting people there until it was in the Middle East that I've heard people people bring up this this This analogy Quite a lot and and that's you can certainly have a big argument about that. I will refrain for the moment but in any case people do try had to make that comparison. And this is what Thomas Hart Benton. The senator believed about Oregon and he understood that the way to get people to settle it was to promote the idea. Jeff settling it and so he got his son in law who was an army officer assigned to two missions along the Oregon trail to map it so that it was better understood To write these reports which became like guides on how to settle in the West and they were also really evocatively written really powerfully written with beautiful full descriptions and they would be excerpted all over the country newspapers and published as popular books and he became in effect a best selling writer after two. Who is promoting this idea of Oregon? You paint this wonderful picture in Saint Louis that I can't you know th there's a reason it was the gateway to the West. I know now people go Saint Louis Gateway to the West you know. They think that it's like middle of the country it. Yeah it was the city United States at one time and like I put it this way. You do such a job of painting a picture and I guess these came from these letters in some cases race and this is where Fremont's wife life and the daughter of the senator coming. Yeah absolutely. Jessie Benton Fremont is connected with Saint Louis connected with Virginia where her mother's family came. I'm from and above all connected with Washington DC. Her father was one of the first two United States senators from the brand new state of Missouri which became a state in eighteen twenty anyone he then remained in the US Senate for thirty years and took it upon himself to effectively represent the entire American West. There was this whole area the Louisiana purchase the rest of it beyond Missouri that had not been formed in the states or territories and he he just owned it effectively and said it's mine. I represented all all and I want it all settled and he wanted he had this wild ambition which is another way that this story is so modern. He had this ambition that he was going to make Saint Louis which we yes the middle of the country into an absolute center of Global Commerce. Because he was going to create a trade route over the rocky mountains onto the Pacific and onward to Asia and he believed that if there was a good trade route with an American seaport on the Pacific that that would be a better and safer route to canton John which was the trading port of China then the British had for example and so he had this parochial idea that was also this vast globalizing idea. He's anticipating supporting the enormous trade with China that we have to this day yes. I'm trying to picture eight two thousand mile like city in Saint Louis to have stretch it sport abroad. What do you know he envisioned a trail? There are other people who had this idea. Thomas Jefferson had an idea. There must be some waterway. That would take people out with look for what was called the northwest passage up in the Arctic but Thomas Hart Benton was the guy who was going to do it all right. You didn't write this book though to give us the interesting tale of of John and Jessie Fremont just because it's an interesting tale there are some parallels to now and this is where a lot a lot of political junkies as an historians world trying to figure out. Where are we? Yeah in the American story and are we. We all assume we are repeating history are we are we you know you look at President. Trump been the idea of America. I it's like I remember that version of the Republican Party's in the twenties and thirties We look at the disruption of the nineteen fifties and fake news and the McCarthy era that feels similar similar. I've heard this argument about eighteen fifties in the pre-civil war and this is the argument. You're making what is it about this era. That you believe is so connective in in some way to what we're experiencing today and what are we. What should we learn from this? I want to be careful and you know this already chuck. We don't want to overdo these analogies. Nothing is exactly the same. I do focus a lot on the eighteen fifty six presidential election And in making that comparison with twenty twenty. I don't WanNa say we're just a few years from a civil war. I don't know what we're a few years from. But if we look at the eighteen forties and fifties we see a period in which the national identity. We're now arguing. Over was being formed and the very shape ape of America was being formed. We just described the conquest of California that created the border that we're now arguing. Globalization argument was globalization argument. You realize when you think think about it that the United States became part of Latin America by taking over the northern portion of it and that became part of our identity even though our predecessors is at that time many of them were uncomfortable. Didn't know what it meant. There was a huge argument about race in those days because of slavery there was a huge argument about whether even free African Americans were citizens or would be considered desirable at all by their white neighbors. There was a huge argument about immigration. There was a massive movement movement a nativist movement against immigrants that was reshaping politics that destroyed one of the major political parties called the whigs. And you had these secret societies that no nothing no. Nothing's as what they were called. Because they were supposedly they would tell if asked about their organizations they would say I know nothing I I learned in my research that some of these orders were so secretive that some of the members didn't actually know things like the more junior members wouldn't even be told the name of the organization his Asia until they got more senior but they became more and more influential and gradually more public and they were arguing in favor of what they called. NATIVE AMERICANS AMERICA NHS by which they didn't mean India not the way we described native American white people who had been born in the United States and who wanted to press against immigrants and they had some impulsive who themselves within a generation. Yes but there's A. There's a lot of impulses here that will feel familiar. They were particularly concerned. -cerned about immigrants voting. There were lots of proposals to make immigrants. Wait twenty one years before they After they got fascinating about it. And I've felt this way I mean one of my favorite nuggets gets about the Garfield presidential election about immigration and about Chinese immigrants. Yes you know. What the Chinese Electoral Votes California? Where we're decided on that on that issue hugh what it is the? What's interesting? Is this new Republican Party. And this is where it's even more familiar with the current Republican Party. This new Republican Party. It was formed as an abolitionist movement. But it wasn't because.

California John Charles Fremont United States Leland Leland Stanford America Steve INSKEEP president Republican Party Jessie Benton Fremont Saint Louis Oregon Thomas Hart Benton senator Fremont Asia founder
"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

13:20 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"Politics before the first ever impeachment. How do you like that tees? That is what's coming up next next crazy American politics before we ever started impeaching. President Steve INSKEEP. Hey It's Chris Hayes. Sometimes it's good to just take a step back from the day to day onslaught of news and take our broader. Look at the issues. That's what I'm doing each week. Amai podcast why is this happening. Were exploring topics ranging from school segregation to climate change. Well the way that I think of it is climate change will be to the twentieth century. What maternity west us the nineteenth century? It'll be the central subject of questions about economic justice. Everything you care about in the world will be affected by climate and digging deep with guests uniquely qualified to analyze ause issues from mass incarceration to race relations as you know for the first time in our history at the national level whites are on the verge of losing their majority status in twenty years. And I think it's no coincidence that our politics are getting more tribal. Join me for. Why is this happening? New episodes every Tuesday. Wherever you get your podcasts joining me now is Steve? INSKEEP is a real treat for me host of NPR's morning edition. His latest book is called Imperfect Union. How Jesse and John Fremont map the west best invented celebrity and helped cause the civil war? It's newly out this week. It has some interesting historical parallels today. And I'll just be honest Steve. I'm in the middle reading about Leland Leland Stanford is so it really scratched my h. Let's graphic timing. I just I felt a dearth of lack of knowledge of the American West. And now I feel like between the book I'm meaning on Stanford in this. I am in much better shape. A treat for me to be here. By the way chuck And Yeah Leland Stanford this guy. What was founder of California founder of the Central Pacific? Civic Railroad Governor of California all these important things John Charles Fremont one of the main characters of this book is also ineffective founder of California. He's he's the guy who claimed credit it's a little more complicated reality. But claimed credit conqueror of California do we also because he was the first nominee for president of a fledgling third party called the Republican Lucan Party. Yeah do economists founder of the Republican Party or not I would. I would go there but I would be careful about it. Because he someone they reached out and grabbed as a a symbol of their movement. He had not been. This is a party that was founded to oppose the spread of slavery. He'd not been a major anti-slavery thinker he'd not been a major anti anti slavery activists in fact he had to go and Polish his anti slavery. Credentials a little bit to fit the moment but he was. Somebody was considered this great national hero of the Mexican war of the Mexican war and of the exploration of the West and was considered to be this just really brave guy guy with great fortitude and judgment who would bring the different parts of the coalition Together. Help bring people mean the best part that I like about reading any the the best books in yours. Does this really well about reading any about anybody. That's more than one hundred years old is setting the scene. Yeah of America. What's it like to be there? It's so remarkable to me to remind people that it is only only been. It's been less than two hundred years that the West essentially became America. Yes all right this was loosely a Mexican territory but did they fully. Nobody really controlled. It was territory. Yes this belong to native peoples. We're we're talking here about what what. The Mexicans called Alta California which was actually California Nevada Arizona parts of some other states and enormous an empire of itself and their various native nations out there. And there's really a few thousand I think maybe the number was eight thousand Mexican colonists who had taken over little parts of it and we're trying to control it and the United States understood how loosely it was held and reached out to grab it. We had three competing things happening. All at the same time. Right there was. There was always a movement in the country of manifest any. Yes then there was the discovery of gold and it seemed to accelerate everything and when does it accelerate Fremont it made him rich. This is a guy who with the aid of his wife is a huge part of the story. As I'm sure we'll discuss US Went to Mexican controlled. California began the process of taking it over. Just as the Mexican war was beginning The war between which between the United States and Mexico is beginning. He didn't even know it at the time. Because of bad communications he became this huge hero. He also obtained real estate as Congress tend to do and honoring wondering land. Somehow they end up owning some of the land and then how do they decide that they own the land clubbing. I love as multiple people would have claims on these pieces of land. It was totally true. And in this case you had a Mexican former governor who realized his side was on the way out and he had a somewhat dubious claim to a vague vague but immense chunk of California something larger than the island of Manhattan and he sold it to John Fremont for three thousand dollars and then in eighteen forty nine Fremont allowed some Mexican migrants to go dig for gold on the land because the gold rush had begun and they made him fantastically tactically wealthy without him having to do very much of anything and that became yet another part of the fame of this incredibly famous person that he was a hero. Ro He was here. ROIC that had such great fortitude that he was involved in the westward expansion of the country and he was also involved in the wealth of the country and got some of it for himself. So so in a setting up here. Because you explain how it happened. How why why did he become the celebrity? There's plenty of people who could have been celebrity by. That's totally in California in that period of time. Why damn that's totally true? There were a lot of people who were involved in the exploration of the West and we should be clear what we mean by that the white expiration of the West or the American. If you WANNA say man okay I sure as opposed to that the natives and other people who were there Mexican certainly explored it as well certainly true. In fact a lot of the West West was known but it had not been codified. It had not been as well mapped as it could have been and it needed to be promoted and this is the thing that is really modern about this story. Chuck to me one of the things. John Charles Fremont was acting at the behest of his father-in-law a powerful senator who wanted to take over the west who wanted to take over Oregon which was disputed territory with Britain and he believed that the way that Americans took over territory was by settling it not by seizing it in a war necessarily just by putting people there until it was in the Middle East that I've heard people people bring up this this This analogy Quite a lot and and that's you can certainly have a big argument about that. I will refrain for the moment but in any case people do try had to make that comparison. And this is what Thomas Hart Benton. The senator believed about Oregon and he understood that the way to get people to settle it was to promote the idea. Jeff settling it and so he got his son in law who was an army officer assigned to two missions along the Oregon trail to map it so that it was better understood To write these reports which became like guides on how to settle in the West and they were also really evocatively written really powerfully written with beautiful full descriptions and they would be excerpted all over the country newspapers and published as popular books and he became in effect a best selling writer after two. Who is promoting this idea of Oregon? You paint this wonderful picture in Saint Louis that I can't you know th there's a reason it was the gateway to the West. I know now people go Saint Louis Gateway to the West you know. They think that it's like middle of the country it. Yeah it was the city United States at one time and like I put it this way. You do such a job of painting a picture and I guess these came from these letters in some cases race and this is where Fremont's wife life and the daughter of the senator coming. Yeah absolutely. Jessie Benton Fremont is connected with a Saint Louis connected with Virginia where her mother's family came. I'm from and above all connected with Washington DC. Her father was one of the first two United States senators from the brand new state of Missouri which became a state in eighteen twenty anyone he then remained in the US Senate for thirty years and took it upon himself to effectively represent the entire American West. There was this whole area the Louisiana purchase the rest of it beyond Missouri that had not been formed in the states or territories and he he just owned it effectively and said it's mine. I represented all all and I want it all settled and he wanted he had this wild ambition which is another way that this story is so modern. He had this ambition that he was going to make Saint Louis which we yes the middle of the country into an absolute center of Global Commerce. Because he was going to create a trade route over the rocky mountains onto the Pacific and onward to Asia and he believed that if there was a good trade route with an American seaport on the Pacific that that would be a better and safer route to canton John which was the trading port of China then the British had for example and so he had this parochial idea that was also this vast globalizing idea. He's anticipating supporting the enormous trade with China that we have to this day yes. I'm trying to picture eight two thousand mile like city in Saint Louis to have stretch it sport abroad. What do you know he envisioned a trail? There are other people who had this idea. Thomas Jefferson had an idea. There must be some waterway. That would take people out with look for what was called the northwest passage up in the Arctic but Thomas Hart Benton was the guy who was going to do it all right. You didn't write this book though to give us the interesting tale of of John and Jessie Fremont just because it's an interesting tale there are some parallels to now and this is where a lot a lot of political junkies as an historians world trying to figure out. Where are we? Yeah in the American story and are we. We all assume we are repeating history are we are we you know you look at President. Trump been the idea of America. I it's like I remember that version of the Republican Party's in the twenties and thirties We look at the disruption of the nineteen fifties and fake news and the McCarthy era that feels similar similar. I've heard this argument about eighteen fifties in the pre-civil war and this is the argument. You're making what is it about this era. That you believe is so connective in in some way to what we're experiencing today and what are we. What should we learn from this? I want to be careful and you know this already chuck. We don't want to overdo these analogies. Nothing is exactly the same. I do focus a lot on the eighteen fifty six presidential election And in making that comparison with twenty twenty. I don't WanNa say we're just a few years from a civil war. I don't know what we're a few years from. But if we look at the eighteen forties and fifties we see a period in which the national identity. We're now arguing. Over was being formed and the very shape ape of America was being formed. We just described the conquest of California that created the border that we're now arguing. Globalization argument was globalization argument. You realize when you think think about it that the United States became part of Latin America by taking over the northern portion of it and that became part of our identity even though our predecessors is at that time many of them were uncomfortable. Didn't know what it meant. There was a huge argument about race in those days because of slavery there was a huge argument about whether even free African Americans were citizens or would be considered desirable at all by their white neighbors. There was a huge argument about immigration. There was a massive movement movement a nativist movement against immigrants that was reshaping politics that destroyed one of the major political parties called the whigs. And you had these secret societies that no nothing no. Nothing's as what they were called because they were supposedly they would tell if asked about their organizations they would say I know nothing I I learned in my research that some of these orders were so secretive that some of the members didn't actually know things like the more junior members wouldn't even be told the name of the organization his Asia until they got more senior but they became more and more influential and gradually more public and they were arguing in favor of what they called. Native Americans Americans by which they didn't mean India not the way we described native American white people who had been born in the United States and who wanted to press against immigrants and they had some impulsive who themselves within a generation. Yes but there's A. There's a lot of impulses here that will feel familiar. They were particularly concerned. -cerned about immigrants voting. There were lots of proposals to make immigrants. Wait twenty one years before they After they got fascinating about it. And I've felt this way I mean one of my favorite nuggets gets about the Garfield presidential election about immigration and about Chinese immigrants. Yes you know. What the Chinese Electoral Votes California? Where we're decided on that on that issue hugh what it is the? What's interesting? Is this new Republican Party. And this is where it's even more familiar with the current Republican Party. This new Republican Party. It was formed as an abolitionist movement. But it wasn't because.

California John Charles Fremont United States Leland Leland Stanford America president Steve INSKEEP Republican Party Jessie Benton Fremont Saint Louis Oregon Thomas Hart Benton senator Fremont Asia founder
"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:45 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"Take a break. Let's face it. Most New Year's resolutions are hard to keep get more exercise. Save more money. Here's a resolution that's easy to keep don't waste time. I'm going to the post office. YOU STAMPS DOT com instead. STAMPS DOT COM brings all the services of the post office to you PLUS STAMPS DOT com. Gives you something you can't get at the post office big discounts on postage like five cents off every first class stamp and up to forty percents off priority mail print official. US postage from your computer for or any letter package or class of male once. Your meal is ready just handed to your mail carrier a drop it in the mailbox. No wonder over seven hundred thousand. Small businesses already used stamps. RAMS DOT COM. You can get a special offer that includes a four week. Trial Plus Free Postage and digital scale with no long term commitments and no risk had to stamps dot com the click on the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in code. NBC Stamps Dot Com Promo Code NBC STAMPS DOT Com. Never go go to the post office again. Hey Guys Willie geist here. This week on the Sunday. Sit down. PODCAST I get together with Ed Harris to talk about his prolific career. It from the right stuff to westworld and now to kill a mockingbird on Broadway get our conversation now for free wherever you download your podcasts. Hi everyone it's Nicole. Wallace hosted deadline Whitehouse on. MSNBC did you know you can listen to deadline and all your favorite MSNBC shows as podcast. You can catch up on morning. Joe All in with Chris Hayes. The last word with Lawrence O'Donnell k.. CDC and more anytime on the go search for your favourite MSNBC shows IOS wherever..

"steve inskeep" Discussed on The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

11:30 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

"Good afternoon I'm Chuck Todd and this is the chuck todd cast so today being being Wednesday if you're listening to this Immediately or later down the road a couple days from now but either way. We are taping Wednesday just after the House has formally approved. It's Impeachment Schmidt managers the articles of impeachment. I'll getting sent to the Senate. The trial is actually gonNA happen. There's so much odd choreography that goes with this part of me thinks it and hey maybe this one could be modernized. Do we need to have the only thing missing. I think is incense that gets taken from one side of the chamber to the other. But we'll have this formal formal thing trials going to begin Tuesday. We have presidential campaign where we saw last at a debate on Tuesday night. What is life going to be like when impeachment and the presidential campaign Converge Verge especially with jurors stuck in Washington not not in Iowa later in the show by the way I'm going to be joined by Steve inskeep host of NPR's morning edition so you will re recognize the voice? Trust me But we're going to look back in time. When America was even more divided? Stephen I will discuss his fascinating book. Imperfect Union about political power our couple Jesse and John Fremont who in his mind and it makes the case who helped cause the civil war at least have an influence on it. John Fremont of course was the first ever nominee for president for a third party called the Republican Party. He was the one before Lincoln. But I I pulled great reporters off of Capitol Hill for a few minutes to give the latest this on the impeachment boats the upcoming processional to deliver the impeachment articles It's our own capitol. Hill correspondent here. NBC News Leeann Caldwell and Washington Post senior congressional correspondent. Paul Kane Leeann Paul. Hi Part of me. Has You here because apparently the United States Senate it's GonNa make it impossible for reporters to actually cover this impeachment Peterman trial. I'm so glad you brought that up. The biggest controversy happening now. We're kind of insider here in the bowels. But we're trying to cover an impeachment pitchman trial and the rules are making it impossible. The and in Paul for you guys to cover an impeachment trial explain extremely restrictive so for the audience. The rules come from a committee. He called the rules. Committee and the Republicans are in charge and they've created all these guidelines and all these restrictions of movement so how we normally cover Capitol Hills we stand in the hallways we stand in the basements. We wait for senators to walk by and we ask them questions now. They are trying to limit all of that. Having hardly any access s to the senators by putting us in pins not being able to walk with senators though during the jury just being a little circle but I mean it sounds sounds like that's the mentality. I mean restrictions on photographers reporting everything. It's becoming a problem. So Paul you've served on some of these media committees right fighting fighting the Senate over the years I believe never formally I I'm not really a joiner for you but I've always always always hesitated saying yesterday those things and we always had somebody else did it. You never wanted to be the White House. Car Signed Association Guy. You know there's a lot of lot of lot of operations. It's extra work. What are you doing John? I talked to Giancarlo after he accepted this term. And I just thought. Look look if you don't have cable channel it's a lot easier for John. Carr Ah yes joking. That was directed Disney plus so there look during the cavenaugh confirmation. Fight the everything. got kind of out of control Not really on the reporter side of it. Though there were activists more activists that were in the Senate office buildings chanting Yowling at senators sometimes kind of blocking their path to elevators and things so senators and there were mostly Republicans as they were the target. Get of a lot of the activists but also some Democrats just. We're a little bit freaked out over that whole experience and some of what they're doing now. I think isn't attempt tempt to fix that problem. But they're not. They're fixing the wrong problem. The problem isn't the reporters talking to the key. Swing votes over in in in the Capitol Complex self so your your listeners. Understand I mean there's the Capitol building and then there are these underground little subways that take them over over two three office buildings across the street and those three office. Buildings are are where you go to see your senators as constituents and activists anybody can walk in there. You just magnetometer. Yeah Yeah and that you know they want to not be harassed there The other part of this is the senators themselves are forbidden from bringing electronics onto the Senate floor during this trial. They can't play a little APP Games if they're bored. The exact and I think one of the things that we were pushing for was to try to allow reporters to have computers or at least phones that they would silence so so that we could file stories from the gallery as the trial is happening as we did a month ago during the house. Impeachment of They don't WanNa do that. And I think it comes down to. They just like if they're not going to have their phones. Why shouldn't they anyone else? I as much as I want to get more into. The weeds are fights for press access Let's let's move to a little more of the substance Lianne so here we are on the eve of the beginning of the trial and we perhaps have more evidence and the the reason I say perhaps is that it felt like a good old fashioned document dump that the House got left. Part is one of the one of the. I don't know what you call these guys the the one. That's a nice way of putting it. I guess it's an accurate. Its technical definition associates. Have Giuliani. Who I guess? We're helping him. Navigate Your Crean politics politics in the quotes there. He is flipped. Now that you know nothing like the southern district of New York to bring the bring a bring the hammer down on on you and he has what I can't figure out. Is this everything or is he just dripping out in the house. Democrats decided we'll drip it out as well. What is this yeah? I don't know there's going to be more. It seems like there's going to be more But big picture this is this plays into house. Democrats who say that. The Senate needs to hold an investigation into a trial taking out more evidence than and what was discussed just in the house portion. You know McConnell said we're going to discuss what the house presents to us. We're not going to go deeper than this accents. It's not outta real trial because at trials there is new evidence and a judge. Decide sometimes. Okay that's admissible that's not admissible. But it's perfectly reasonable to have you know new witnesses. This is show up at a during even after your initial grand jury indictment investigation right but Republicans response to that is House of Representatives. That was your choice to to close this quickly. Try to get this vote before Christmas. And so they're at an an incredible impasse on how this moves forward McConnell is now I I feel like he's changed his tone in the past week trying to put on the air of he's going to run this very fair trial Put it to his members Looks like you know he's going to have the opening. Statements have the question answer period and then we'll see about witnesses smiling rope-a-dope yeah I mean. McConnell always has tricks up his sleeve gate wants to look like they're going to have a vote on on witnesses. I'm willing to have a vote on witnesses. Yes that's all he's saying well on witnesses. Yes that's exactly. That's that's all these saying. And so really it's GonNa come down to where his members stand but his members are also going to be heavily whipped by McConnell throughout this process. Spoken to get a lot of pressure. I'm sure from the White House There's GonNa be a lot of behind the scenes efforts to try to make sure that this wraps up really quickly. So how how this plays out on. The role of the witnesses in new documents is completely unclear right now so what happens with this new information from love partners. We don't know it. Might I just go into the ether. Might be talked about in the media but we don't know yet that it's going to be brought up in central other than maybe from the house impeachment managers. Paul what do you make at these Impeachment Manager List. I I am. I am surprised. I'll say this in a weird pleasantly surprised that it didn't get that they didn't get out of hand that it didn't get to. What the Republicans did you get an impeachment manager slot and you get an impeachment posed? Did Not do that. This wasn't a lemme appease everybody. Yeah it's the surprising. Part heart is the democratic politics policy. Politics always argue for a bigger table. A bigger table and me to meet me three four five six my my group This was very very narrowly. Condensed look I think she worked with Adam. Schiff throughout This I look at her as the general manager of this team and Adam Schiff is the day to day coach manager and I think It was probably the two of them working together. On what size subgroup they wanted and I think seven is probably a look. They're gone for lucky numbers The Republicans took thirteen Across the capital title Twenty one years ago and then elected him no. So now they're going seven and they've covered enough of the geographic Ideological ideological and ethnic racial diversity. Well it's basically the four big states in Colorado. It's okay it's Florida Texas New York and California in Colorado. Yes I you're right. It coast stall because they were worried about a coastal impeachment. Probably from New York Calvin again if we're flirted Texas or not coastal. They do both border on. I know but as you know what I know. It's a pet peeve of mine but it's like ever coastal Americans are Americans too and you can be a coastal elitist and live in Colorado and you can be a person of the people and live on the coasts. That's okay but when they when. They announced a couple months ago when they announced an a step forward. On the impeachment process it was literally Pelosi and committee. Chairmen were from California and New York. So this gives them a little bit of divert. The and they've got a they've got freshman on their Garcia from Texas and and I like a couple of freshmen couple of of newer people. But then also Zoe lofgren. WHO's you know? Seen a couple of impeachment yes She was a staffer in seventy four. She was here in ninety eight for the Clinton impeachment. This is number three for her And most importantly she is about Out As close to Nancy Pelosi As anyone not named Anna issue as in Congress The day of the impeachment vote on December Eighteenth Pelosi. He spent the entire time on the floor sitting in a all by herself sitting in a third from the third row from the back and the only member that really went up to to her and spent any time with her. Any hours that I watched was Zoe lofgren. Okay let's take a quick pause there and we have sneaking break.

United States Senate Paul Kane Leeann Paul John Fremont McConnell New York Chuck Todd Zoe lofgren Capitol Complex Nancy Pelosi Capitol Hills America White House Steve inskeep Disney Stephen I NPR Washington
"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

11:30 min | 11 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"Good afternoon I'm Chuck Todd and this is the Chuck Todd cast so today being being Wednesday if you're listening to this Immediately or later down the road a couple days from now but either way. We are taping Wednesday just after the House has formally approved. It's Impeachment Schmidt managers the articles of impeachment. I'll getting sent to the Senate. The trial is actually gonNA happen. There's so much odd choreography that goes with this part of me thinks it and hey maybe this one could be modernized. Do we need to have the only thing missing. I think is incense that gets taken from one side of the chamber to the other. But we'll have this formal formal thing trials going to begin Tuesday. We have presidential campaign where we saw last at a debate on Tuesday night. What is life going to be like when impeachment and the presidential campaign Converge Verge especially with jurors stuck in Washington not not in Iowa later in the show by the way I'm going to be joined by Steve inskeep host of NPR's morning edition so you will re recognize the voice? Trust me But we're going to look back in time. When America was even more divided? Stephen I will discuss his fascinating book. Imperfect Union about political power our couple Jesse and John Fremont who in his mind and it makes the case who helped cause the civil war at least have an influence on it. John Fremont of course was the first ever nominee for president for a third party called the Republican Party. He was the one before Lincoln. But I I pulled great reporters off of Capitol Hill for a few minutes to give the latest this on the impeachment boats the upcoming processional to deliver the impeachment articles It's our own capitol. Hill correspondent here. NBC News Leeann Caldwell and Washington Post senior congressional correspondent. Paul Kane Leeann Paul. Hi Part of me. Has You here because apparently the United States Senate it's GonNa make it impossible for reporters to actually cover this impeachment Peterman trial. I'm so glad you brought that up. The biggest controversy happening now. We're kind of insider here in the bowels. But we're trying to cover an impeachment pitchman trial and the rules are making it impossible. The and in Paul for you guys to cover an impeachment trial explain extremely restrictive so for the audience. The rules come from a committee. Eighty called the rules committee and the Republicans are in charge and they've created all these guidelines and all these restrictions of movement so how we normally cover Capitol Hills we stand in the hallways we stand in the basements. We wait for senators to walk by and we ask them questions now. They are trying to limit all of that. Having hardly any access s to the senators by putting us in pins not being able to walk with senators though during the jury just being a little circle but I mean it sounds sounds like that's the mentality. I mean restrictions on photographers reporting everything. It's becoming a problem. So Paul you've served on some of these media committees right fighting fighting the Senate over the years I believe never formally I I'm not really a joiner for you but I've always always always hesitated saying yesterday those things and we always had somebody else did it. You never wanted to be the White House. Car Signed Association Guy. You know there's a lot of lot of lot of operations. It's extra work. What are you doing John? I talked to Giancarlo after he accepted this term. And I just thought. Look look if you don't have cable channel it's a lot easier for John. Carr Ah yes joking. That was directed Disney plus so there look during the cavenaugh confirmation. Fight the everything. got kind of out of control Not really on the reporter side of it. Though there were activists more activists that were in the Senate office buildings chanting Yowling at senators sometimes kind of blocking their path to elevators and things so senators and there were mostly Republicans as they were the target. Get of a lot of the activists but also some Democrats just. We're a little bit freaked out over that whole experience and some of what they're doing now. I think isn't attempt tempt to fix that problem. But they're not. They're fixing the wrong problem. The problem isn't the reporters talking to the key. Swing votes over in in in the Capitol Complex self so your your listeners. Understand I mean there's the Capitol building and then there are these underground little subways that take them over over two three office buildings across the street and those three office. Buildings are are where you go to see your senators as constituents and activists anybody can walk in there. You just magnetometer. Yeah Yeah and that you know they want to not be harassed there The other part of this is the senators themselves are forbidden from bringing electronics onto the Senate floor during this trial. They can't play a little APP Games if they're bored. The exact and I think one of the things that we were pushing for was to try to allow reporters to have computers or at least phones that they would silence so so that we could file stories from the gallery as the trial is happening as we did a month ago during the house. Impeachment of They don't WanNa do that. And I think it comes down to. They just like if they're not going to have their phones. Why shouldn't they anyone else? I as much as I want to get more into. The weeds are fights for press access Let's let's move to a little more of the substance Lianne so here we are on the eve of the beginning of the trial and we perhaps have more evidence and the the reason I say perhaps is that it felt like a good old fashioned document dump that the House got left. Part is one of the one of the. I don't know what you call these guys the the one. That's a nice way of putting it. I guess it's an accurate. Its technical definition associates. Have Giuliani. Who I guess? We're helping him. Navigate Your Crean politics politics in the quotes there. He is flipped. Now that you know nothing like the southern district of New York to bring the bring a bring the hammer down on on you and he has what I can't figure out. Is this everything or is he just dripping out in the house. Democrats decided we'll drip it out as well. What is this yeah? I don't know there's going to be more. It seems like there's going to be more But big picture this is this plays into house. Democrats who say that. The Senate needs to hold an investigation into a trial taking out more evidence than and what was discussed just in the house portion. You know McConnell said we're going to discuss what the house presents to us. We're not going to go deeper than this accents. It's not outta real trial because at trials there is new evidence and a judge. Decide sometimes. Okay that's admissible that's not admissible. But it's perfectly reasonable to have you know new witnesses. This is show up at a during even after your initial grand jury indictment investigation right but Republicans response to that is House of Representatives. That was your choice to to close this quickly. Try to get this vote before Christmas. And so they're at an an incredible impasse on how this moves forward McConnell is now I I feel like he's changed his tone in the past week trying to put on the air of he's going to run this very fair trial Put it to his members Looks like you know he's going to have the opening. Statements have the question answer period and then we'll see about witnesses smiling rope-a-dope yeah I mean. McConnell always has tricks up his sleeve gate wants to look like they're going to have a vote on on witnesses. I'm willing to have a vote on witnesses. Yes that's all he's saying well on witnesses. Yes that's exactly. That's that's all these saying. And so really it's GonNa come down to where his members stand but his members are also going to be heavily whipped by McConnell throughout this process. Spoken to get a lot of pressure. I'm sure from the White House There's GonNa be a lot of behind the scenes efforts to try to make sure that this wraps up really quickly. So how how this plays out on. The role of the witnesses in new documents is completely unclear right now so what happens with this new information from love partners. We don't know it. Might I just go into the ether. Might be talked about in the media but we don't know yet that it's going to be brought up in central other than maybe from the house impeachment managers. Paul what do you make at these Impeachment Manager List. I I am. I am surprised. I'll say this in a weird pleasantly surprised that it didn't get that they didn't get out of hand that it didn't get to. What the Republicans did you get an impeachment manager slot and you get an impeachment posed? Did Not do that. This wasn't a lemme appease everybody. Yeah it's the surprising. Part heart is the democratic politics policy. Politics always argue for a bigger table. A bigger table and me to meet me three four five six my my group This was very very narrowly. Condensed look I think she worked with Adam. Schiff throughout This I look at her as the general manager of this team and Adam Schiff is the day to day coach manager and I think It was probably the two of them working together. On what size subgroup they wanted and I think seven is probably a look. They're gone for lucky numbers The Republicans took thirteen Across the capital title Twenty one years ago and then elected him no. So now they're going seven and they've covered enough of the geographic Ideological ideological and ethnic racial diversity. Well it's basically the four big states in Colorado. It's okay it's Florida Texas New York and California in Colorado. Yes I you're right. It coast stall because they were worried about a coastal impeachment. Probably from New York Calvin again if we're flirted Texas or not coastal. They do both border on. I know but as you know what I know. It's a pet peeve of mine but it's like ever coastal Americans are Americans too and you can be a coastal elitist and live in Colorado and you can be a person of the people and live on the coasts. That's okay but when they when. They announced a couple months ago when they announced an a step forward. On the impeachment process it was literally Pelosi and committee. Chairmen were from California and New York. So this gives them a little bit of divert. The and they've got a they've got freshman on their Garcia from Texas and and I like a couple of freshmen couple of of newer people. But then also Zoe lofgren. WHO's you know? Seen a couple of impeachment yes sir. She was a staffer in seventy four. She was here in ninety eight for the Clinton impeachment. This is number three for her And most importantly she is about Out As close to Nancy Pelosi As anyone not named Anna issue as in Congress The day of the impeachment vote on December Eighteenth Pelosi. He spent the entire time on the floor sitting in a all by herself sitting in a third from the third row from the back and the only member that really went up to to her and spent any time with her. Any hours that I watched was Zoe lofgren. Okay let's take a quick pause there and we have sneaking break.

United States Senate Paul Kane Leeann Paul John Fremont McConnell New York Chuck Todd Zoe lofgren Colorado Capitol Complex Nancy Pelosi Capitol Hills America White House Steve inskeep Disney Stephen I NPR
Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

Morning Edition

07:43 min | 1 year ago

Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

"How is the White House going to defend itself against an on going impeachment inquiry some White House officials and people connected to the White House have declared a congressional investigation to be unconstitutional of said they will not cooperate Rudy guiliani the president's personal lawyer says he does not have to comply with subpoenas his lawyer wrote a letter saying the impeachment inquiry was unconstitutional and baseless vice president pence has issued a more nuanced statement suggesting that he may be able to provide some documents in some circumstances the White House counsel's office has said there is no need to cooperate with an illegitimate inquiry and yet witnesses connected with the administration continue to appear before a house impeachment inquiry so what's going on Stephen groves is on the line he has a special assistant to the president until recently was in the White House counsel's office and is now deputy press secretary Mister gross good morning morning Steve thank you ever probably Neil I I want to begin with Rudy Giuliani's statement the statement made by his lawyer saying it was unconstitutional and baseless to to investigate in this way and saying that he doesn't have to provide documents for various reasons really direct question because you're a lawyer in the United States can someone decide to ignore a subpoena okay ignore or not comply with subpoenas you know if they are asking for materials that the person issuing a subpoena art and title to like for example if someone subpoenaed you and said I want all the communications between you Steve Inskeep and your lawyer you don't have to necessarily comply with that subpoena I mean you might you might have to litigate and have a judge decide whether your attorney client privilege can be overcome by the subpoena but the subpoena a lone it is not something that can not be child in the United States in other words you can say sue me you can order the person issuing subpoena can realize I'm asking for attorney client privileged material here maybe I'll pursue other documents that are covered by privilege well I want to understand Julie on his position and I recognize that he's outside the White House you don't directly speak for him but you have to have some understanding of this Giuliani has publicly said in the last couple of days I don't care if people look into my business dealings in Ukraine and of course Giuliani had business dealings in Ukraine while also representing the president of the United States in seeking an investigation of people connected with Joe Biden and Joe Biden himself he said I don't care if people look into my business dealings they can look into it all they want but then his lawyer drops this letter saying that we won't cooperate if there is nothing to hide why not cooperate well you're you're quite right that as a private citizen not working in the US government I don't speak for Rudy Giuliani and the more the point the the letter that you referenced in the opening issued by the White House counsel no that that doesn't apply to people you know outside of the administration I think that there may be some things that were subpoenaed from Giuliani that touch on attorney client privilege if they were communications that he had with the president but otherwise you know it's up to Giuliani to decide whether he's going to be complying with a congressional subpoena would you urge him to cooperate and comply with legitimate subpoena definitely not my place to urge him about complying with the subpoena that some that he added that he retains another lawyer as you pointed out they'll have to decide that were or deal with Congress in their own way or I have to go to court if the subpoena is going to be enforced or if Congress tries to hold him in contempt these are all decisions that Giuliani will have to make I'm trying to understand the White House is specifically the white house's strategy here as well because the White House counsel as you know for whom you'll work until recently has taken what to a layman seems like the same here this is an illegitimate inquiry we don't have to comply with anything and yet people who are in the administration still are testifying showing up complying with subpoenas producing documents when asked are it is the White House doing anything to try to stop them the White House has been clear on on its position that you know in the past when impeachment Cory's I have been opened there's been certain processes that everyone it has agreed to whether it was Nixon with a Democrat Congress or Clinton with a Republican Congress others been up for vote opening a formal inquiry and then most importantly in both cases minimum the minimum due process rights reported to both president Nixon and to quit but let's not because we have discussed this but you're in a situation now where you've said the house is being unfair we don't have to cooperate and yet people are cooperating are you trying to stop them in anyway I believe without getting into anything that like internally delivered of that witnesses have been informed about executive privilege and informed about classified information and they have gone and and participated or worse that for depositions or interviews hopefully they you know are you know know what their obligations are as current or former employees of the federal government vis a vis a revealing executive privilege revealing classified information but you know we're going to go forward with this inquiry as as best we can given the Democrats you know lack of transparency lack of formality and you know we'll see how this thing pans out the end but right now the White House is clear that it's not going to participate in an illegitimate sham process which is really what this is but you're only going so far and stopping other people who are working for the U. S. government from participating when you say we're going to go forward as best we can that's what I hear you saying that's what seems to be happening we don't want people to be hurt we don't want people to be held in contempt you know the Democrats are are issuing subpoenas like hot cakes and you know we have an obligation to protect classified information in the sector privileged information and and we'll go forward in this thing at you know as best we can and we we intend to go forward and not dissipate Mister gross thanks for your insights really appreciate it thank you Steve Stephen gross is a special assistant to the president of the United States NPR White House correspondent Frank or don yes has been listening along with us and Franco what do you hear there well I mean he's following administration line is talking about you know that the administration is you know it's not going to cooperate with what it sees as a sham investigation criticizing closing in democratic leadership of giving out subpoenas like hot cakes but I found it interesting that you know he you know said that the administration will cooperate or at least the White House will be quote cooperate but as you pointed out we're finding out that many members of the administration are sitting down for these interviews and the White House is all is only going so far to try to stop them we haven't had court battles over the testimony of various US diplomats for example know exactly I mean this is this been for it's very fascinating particularly you know we have someone coming up we just had Volker we just had we have McKinley coming tomorrow for me today it's you know the next few days are going to continue to be very interesting NPR's of Franco done yes thanks so much thank

White House Rudy Guiliani President Trump
US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

03:09 min | 1 year ago

US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

"Since pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear deal the US has reimposed and stiffened economic sanctions against Iran the US goal being hit Iran's oil exports exports that produce a huge part of the country's wealth in a few minutes we're going to hear from NPR Steve Inskeep who's in Tehran reporting on how the sanctions are affecting Iranians but we begin our coverage at the United Nations where secretary of state Mike Pompeii trying to rally support today for US efforts to isolate Iran since the United States declared our intention to bring already nor purchases zero in April the Ayatollah has gone all in on a campaign of extortion diplomacy and here is Michele Kelemen has been following pump has remarks to the UN security council and she joins me now Hey Michelle hi there also so what exactly does secretary Pompeia want countries to do about Iran well for one stop buying oil from Iran which uses only fuels Iran's bad behavior he also wants more countries to join a maritime security initiative to protect shipping in the strait of her moves the U. K. and Bahrain are part of it there's a lot of skepticism though from countries that really don't want to be drawn into a conflict with Iran and you know countries that are you supportive still of the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with Iran so is Pompeii are going to get this party once well in the security council today actually heard a lot of concern about the U. S. approach you heard representatives of Germany France in the U. K. all saying they don't see any alternative to the nuclear deal they were involved in the negotiations and don't want to see it unravel China's ambassador said his country is opposed to power politics and bowling and then Russia's ambassador said that he went through all of Pompeii is remarks word for word and found only words like threats regime conflict and no mention of dialogue he says the only time palm bay spoke about cooperation was to call for a coalition against Iraq well the US pulled out of the nuclear deal soon after compare became secretary of state that was over a year ago what's your sense at this point is this maximum pressure campaign working the way the trump administration had hoped has it made a run change its behavior well Pompeii is is is working in the one example he always gives is that a round doesn't have as much money to give the groups like Hezbollah and Hamas but also if you look at the whole list of U. S. demand you'll see that Iran is moving in the opposite directions on many of these friends around still holding American prisoners it shot down a U. S. drone it captured and it's still holding a British vessel and as Pompey himself pointed out in the security council Iran has been ramping up its nuclear program recently and that's what he was called extortion diplomacy he's telling people not to cave to that kind of pressure that that is that the sanctions will pay off eventually because it's the only way to pressure Iran back back to the negotiating table as NPR's Michele Kelemen thanks Michelle

United States Iran
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Steve Inskeep basketball football and baseball may draw big crowds and score prime time television spots but knew each sports are tracking some interest in money sports like corn hole and axe throwing and even professional arm wrestling so get ready elbow on the table get a good grip here are Stacey Vanik Smith and selling her ships from NPR's daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money what is it about these last traditional sports that's attractive to sponsors like Johnsonville sausage and I mean nothing against corn hole or acts during when you know basketball or hockey what people know about don't you don't play at like eight year old birthday party for breast cutting off a lamb and finally how do the sports get on TV in this case ESPN you know I think you have to remember that the E. N. E. S. P. N. stands for entertainment start Rosner is academic director of the sports management program at Columbia so just because it's on ESPN doesn't make it a sport to wit poker has been a fixture of their efforts for a very long time popularity can actually represent an unusual perk for a broadcaster just over three point five billion viewers watch the World Cup in twenty eighteen for the bears in the world axe throwing league says its World Championship got hundreds of thousands of years last year on TV that makes acts going what they call an evergreen property meaning that you can put on the air any time you have a gap in your scheduling but there's also another possibly more important reason that the sports are getting on ESPN you're not paying them if your ESPN they're paying you that is true many new sports by time on the airwaves because there are profits to be made the American choral organization have been streaming videos on Facebook but it is almost two million views and it decided the time was right and it launched its own digital streaming network last year which brings us to another question what is it about these sports that's attractive to sponsors the companies that are sponsoring are looking for really highly targeted audience this is an opportunity for smaller companies the kind you can't afford to advertise during an NBA game or during the Superbowl but in order for a starter support to get big enough to cut a deal to get on TV that support needs financial backing to begin with and the question why would you want to buy a team who played corn or through axes Scott says buying a team even a small one in a more obscure sport can have some perks as well including just being you know straight up a really good financial investment they all have a jury they all have the dream that they can be the next the NBA or Major League Baseball or National Football League Major League Soccer that they can.

baseball Steve Inskeep eight year
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"No well king and I'm Steve Inskeep Instagram is slowly testing out a big change the social media company is starting to hide the number of lakes that posts in stories get when they're put on that platform Sam Sanders host of the NPR podcast it's been a minute is an Instagram fanatic so he's here with analysis either Sam Hey how are you for people aren't on Instagram I guess you're you're putting up pictures and you can see that five people like that are five hundred people liked it what's happening to that feature now exactly so in the same way that on Facebook you can see how many people like your grandma's post about someone's birthday it's like that on Instagram as well but that social award that we all get for making Instagram post to get a bunch of lakes it's become a popularity contest Instagram says and they want less of that so in may Instagram began to experiment with removing the ability to see how many likes views other folks post received just in Canada at first and not all Canadian users just some and this week Instagram rolled that out to Australia and Brazil and Ireland Italy Japan and New Zealand so now some folks in those countries won't be able to see the light view counts on other people's posts but they can still see the tallies on their own posts wait a minute I can still have that addictive feature of looking to see if anybody likes my thing but I don't have to feel bad that somebody else got five thousand likes on theirs yes so at this well this conference in April Adam miss area the head of Instagram he said he wants users to spend a little more time quote connecting with the people they care about not wrapped up in popularity contest with strangers and that kind of statement maybe Instagram responding to a recent trend especially with younger users they want a social media experience that feels a bit more private and personal not so public informative so they basically are moving towards a more walled off social media just for folks that they actually like or at least now and of course this is also a moments the full of negative headlines about all of the social media apps how they affect our emotional health fears about what kind of data they collect on us and over Instagram dislike test allows the company to possibly get a few days of positive headlines and it may make it seem like this big tech company really cares about us there certainly are big issues on the table as you've just suggested and there are studies suggesting that people can be more or less depressed to based on how they use social media for example but is this week and I guess it sounds more like a tweak than a huge change really going to change the experience and make it more healthy well I was thinking about it I use Instagram a lot all the time and I said to myself even if I don't see the light count on Instagram for other people I will still see all those pretty people on the beach with ABS and pretty friends in cute dogs living a life that looks better than mine the photos in the videos of a picture perfect life are still out there so that intense comparison it can still be there even without me seeing a light count and I talk with Karen north she's a professor of digital social media at USC's Annenberg school and she told me sometimes that like function on Instagram is not a bad thing they may be trading one problem for another people say if I get X. number of like donate you know a service dog to a vet or had planted tree or do some other because we cannot join together anymore to promote this causes or even have that sense that we've come together with other people we could lose the next ice bucket challenge to look in the village to galvanize and unite folks on Instagram around good things through the like and to that I say Steve who would actually like that I'm pressing the like button on this interview Sam thanks so much thank you so much that's in pure Sam Sanders and you can hear more of him on the news of the week by listening to his podcast it's been a minute NPR this is NPR news and you are listening to KCRW KCRW sponsors.

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning critics are saying a new asylum rule from the trump administration is illegal the rule is meant to discourage people from seeking refuge at the U. S. Mexico border and it means they would likely be denied asylum if they didn't already apply for it in another country along the way legal learned as a lawyer with the ACLU they say they'll sue to block the policy and he's on the line from New York morning morning alright so you're saying this is illegal what your argument our argument is that this violates the laws Congress has passed ultimately this is an end run around Congress decision to provide for asylum regardless of whether you transited through another country at the end of the day this is a separation of powers issue Congress makes the laws about asylum this administration doesn't like those laws so it decided to rewrite them but he cannot rewrite them unilaterally can you lay out logistically what this role would be in for people who want asylum in this country right so what it says is if you've gone through any other country and arrived at our southern border you're not going to be allowed to apply for asylum unless you applied in another country so that means everyone other than Mexicans coming from Mexico and so not just central Americans but anybody who is transmitted through another country will not be allowed to apply for asylum yeah essentially it's an end to asylum at the southern border the United States and Canada have this so called safe third country agreement which means asylum seekers have to apply to the first of either of those countries that they set foot in why is it wrong for the trump administration to do the same for Central America yes I'm glad you asked about that because it's an important point at a you know a few things first of all we do not have a formal third party agreement with any other country in Central America so we don't so if if the masters was you were going to go down that route we would have to have an actual formal written bilateral agreement that those countries would provide asylum but but the second point is just having an agreement is not enough those countries have to be able to provide a safe meeting for efficient asylum process so that people can actually get asylum in those countries and Guatemala for example is not equipped to provide asylum to all the people that would be sent there but we don't even get to that point because there is no formal agreement with the administration's basically saying is try your luck somewhere else but they know very well that those countries would not be safe for people to wait and it would not be able to provide a fair and efficient and safe asylum process the ACLU is challenging another one of the administration's asylum policies it's called remain in Mexico and it means migrants have to wait in Mexico while the US deals with their asylum claims a fiddle a federal appeals court said the administration could keep enforcing that policy for now does that concern you we are we are definitely concerned about it because there are thousands of people now including families and young children waiting in Mexico who are in real danger have been suffering have a some for assaults are living in no no I mean to say yes we we have reported it but does it concern you with respect to this new suit that you plan to file well I think we're all two million a profound that suit but but regardless I think this raises very different issues we believe that the current law that was the current rule that was passed yesterday it is violating the immigration laws directly and so whatever ultimately happens with that case we hopefully will prevail in this one because we believe it's directly contradictory to what Congress is done with the asylum laws legal learned his deputy director of the ACLU immigrants rights project thanks thank you president trump rephrased some racist remarks without changing the meaning he said that for lawmakers should go back where they came from and then said if they don't like America they can leave the lawmakers for the record are Americans elected by Americans and NPR's tovia Smith visited the district of one I Anna Presley of Massachusetts as president trump was dismissing criticism of what he said he was also insisting that quote a lot of people love it but in deep blue Massachusetts not so much aces the psychotic destroying democracy DL Polanski wears a deport trump in an all state in a gritty neighbourhood of Boston that's represented by African American Congress woman a Jana Presley and anti trump political cartoonist Polanski says he's offended by the president's latest comments but not surprised he sees it as a deliberate political stunt meant to rally trump space you just trying to distract these just gas lighting and he's just a disruptor around the corner at a neighborhood bar bartender Serra leaves as trump has hit a new low again is dragging down the public discourse she says jacking up resentment among white Americans take the.

Steve Inskeep
ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 1 year ago

ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning critics are saying a new asylum rule from the trump administration is illegal the rule is meant to discourage people from seeking refuge at the U. S. Mexico border and it means they would likely be denied asylum if they didn't already apply for it in another country along the way legal learned as a lawyer with the ACLU they say they'll sue to block the policy and he's on the line from New York morning morning alright so you're saying this is illegal what your argument our argument is that this violates the laws Congress has passed ultimately this is an end run around Congress decision to provide for asylum regardless of whether you transited through another country at the end of the day this is a separation of powers issue Congress makes the laws about asylum this administration doesn't like those laws so it decided to rewrite them but it cannot rewrite them unilaterally can you lay out logistically what this role would be in for people who want asylum in this country right so what it says is if you've gone through any other country and arrived at our southern border you're not gonna be allowed to apply for asylum unless you applied in another country so that means everyone other than Mexicans coming from Mexico and so not just central Americans but anybody who is transmitted through another country will not be allowed to apply for asylum yeah essentially it's an end to asylum at the southern border the United States and Canada have this so called safe third country agreement which means asylum seekers have to apply to the first of either of those countries that they set foot in why is it wrong for the trump administration to do the same for Central America yes our I'm glad you asked about that because it's an important point at a you know a few things first of all we do not have a formal third party agreement with any other country in Central America so we don't so if if the ministers was even gonna go down that route we would have to have an actual formal written bilateral agreement that those countries would provide asylum but but the second point is just having an agreement is not enough those countries have to be able to provide a safe meaning for efficient asylum process so that people can actually get asylum in those countries and Guatemala for example is not equipped to provide asylum to all the people that would be sent there but we don't even get to that point because there is no formal agreement with the administration's basically saying is try your luck somewhere else but they know very well that those countries would not be safe for people to wait in I would not be able to provide a fair and efficient and safe asylum process the ACLU is challenging another one of the administration's asylum policies it's called remain in Mexico and it means migrants have to wait in Mexico while the US deals with their asylum claims a fiddle a federal appeals court said the administration could keep enforcing that policy for now does that concern you we are we are definitely concerned about it because there are thousands of people now including families and young children waiting in Mexico who are in real danger has been suffering have suffered assaults are living in no no I mean to say yes we we have a report on that but does it concern you with respect to this new suit that you plan to file well I think we're all two million a profound that suit but but regardless I think this raises very different issues we believe that the current law that was the current rule that was passed yesterday it is violating the immigration laws directly and so whatever ultimately happens with that case we hopefully will prevail in this one because we believe it's directly contradictory to what Congress is done with the asylum laws legal learned his deputy director of the ACLU immigrants rights project thanks

Steve Inskeep NPR
Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

Up First

08:19 min | 1 year ago

Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

"Like behavior what to Democrats do as the president claims victory. I'm Steve Inskeep with David green. And this is up. I from NPR news. Democrats have lines of inquiry. They wanna hear from this, man. The president was frustrated and angered by his seer belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency. What questions do they have for the attorney general also protesters finally forced Sudan's president from power, but their protests have not stopped. What are they want next? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. The bottom line findings are the Muller report allowed President Trump to claim victory. He does not face criminal charges. Many details. Give critics a lot of room for questions a heavily redacted four hundred and forty eight page document was released with the president legal team describing this report as a total victory. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway claim this was quote, really the best day since he got elected. And then this very accepting apologies today to for anybody who feels the grace in offering them. Now, Democrats have a very very different take on. This report. Here is House Judiciary committee chairman Jerry Nadler, the special counsel made clear that he did not exonerate the president and the responsibility now falls to congress to hold the president accountable for his action to vastly different narrative. So what does the report actually say? And what are the implications of these findings? We have a team that's been digging through the document, including NPR Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Who's here either? Very good morning, Steve. So if the president is not charged. What would there be in this report to hold the president accountable forty used Jerrold Nadler's phrase? Well, there's this team the investigators actually wrote that after the thorough investigation. They conducted if they had confidence the president clearly did not commit obstruction of Justice, they'd say, so, but they were not able to say that there are a number of what investigators describe as disturbing incidents ten or more involving the president's attempts alleged attempts to obstruct Justice to try to jam up the special counsel probe to fire. The attorney general Jeff Sessions to fire Robert Mueller, the special counsel himself and to try to get people to change their stories before they spoke with the media or or other people including trying to dangle carrots or sticks in front of people who were thinking about cooperating with Robert Muller's. Well, I'm just thinking about one particular example of the many in this report it involves Don Mcgann was then the White House counsel. Let me if I get this wrong in any way, carry the president tells Mcgann in so many words to get rid of Robert Muller. And the reason that this act is not taken which might have been seen as catastrophic by the president's critics, and even his allies the reason this is not taken it's only because mcken refused and and threatened to resign. Instead is that correct? That's exactly right. That's just one of a number of incidents where the president directed people in the White House to do things in often, Steve they actually blew him off which turns out to be a good thing for their legal liability moving, I guess Mcgann. According to the report again as you put it blew off the president in another way because the president when this was reported when this was revealed by the New York Times that the president told Mcgann to get rid of Muller. Trump told Mcgann to deny that story and Mcgann said I'm not going to falsely deny it because it's true. Yeah. I make an told investigators apparently he felt threatened by the president that the president was trying to test his metal now attorney general bar is going to face some questions after having been the man who redacted this reporter oversaw. Aw, the redaction I should say. And who then described it in a press conference yesterday? The attorney general set to testify on may first and may second in front of the Senate and the house he's gonna have a harder time in house, which is controlled by Democrats, many of whom have already described a crisis of confidence at the Justice department. They say because the way that bar has handled. This report they think he's played down the findings and basically protected President Trump at the expense of this investigation. Are there also internal investigations within the department of Justice? There are Steve the Justice department is investigating. The inspector general is investigating the launch of this investigation. The Fiso warrants in the first place as well as twelve ongoing investigations, we don't know anything about the special counsel has referred to other US attorney's offices. Everyone's talking about the Faisal warrants. I guess we should be clear on that part. This refers to I guess, we could say the Republican narrative of the Republican view of this investigation. Which is that it never made any sense. It never had a good basis, and they are questioning why. Some of the surveillance warrants were approved in the key in this investigation. Yes, the inspector general is investigating the investigators both in the US and some of the sources they were on overseas. Carry thanks for your reporting on this occasion, and many others over the past couple of years. My pleasure. Okay. So how's this report being viewed among members of congress, and what further lines of inquiry if any Democrats intend to pursue NPR's? Tim Mack has been taking a look at this. Tim, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Okay. Democrats have been focused on the question of obstruction of Justice by the president William bar didn't think that the evidence reached that level and Muller himself did not make that conclusion. Even though he didn't clear the president. What does that mean for Democrats will it likely means that in the house of representatives impeachment is off the table, the chair the house intelligence committee? Adam Schiff told NPR's all things considered this yesterday. The evidence would have to be graphic and spark a bipartisan consensus that it warrants the president's removal, given the fact that the public is a congressman on willing to stand up this president in any respect it's hard to see that changing here. But Democrats did signal that they intend to continue their aggressive investigations of the president's finances. His administration and the various episodes revealed by the Muller. Port and they're going to be keeping their demand that the full unredacted version of that Muller report is released ten when I was reading the report you get to the black sections, and there's usually a little tag an explanation for why something has taken out. It's either part of an ongoing matter or it grand jury material, which is supposed to be kept secret in virtually all cases, how likely is it. The Democrats are going to be getting those blackened areas removed. Well, a small group of house members, particularly those related to a DOJ oversight are gonna be able to see a less redacted version of the Miller report. But it's hard to say when the public would be able to see if ever it's going to be a long drawn out legal fight for a fuller version of that Muller report. Okay. Let me ask about what happens in congress over the next year and a half. I know the presidential campaign is well underway. But you know, there's congress and there are problems in the country and the president in his state of the union speech, essentially gave lawmakers choice as the president sought. You're either. Have warned investigation or peace, and and legislation is there any inclination in congress to actually legislate, what Republicans are echoing the president's line. They're saying, no collusion. Nope. -struction? They think all of these investigations are baseless Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell yesterday focused on what he views as Democrats is latest line of attack. That's on attorney general Bill bar Atrush. Bill bar other issue rather laughable, shade turn their guns on him. But that that's all they're left with frankly is to go after him Democrats say that they're doing oversight on a number of important issues. The characterize that there are a lot of troubling developments in the Trump administration and in the world of Trump's finances. They say it's a fundamental part of their responsibilities as a check on the executive branch, and they won't be stopping their investigations. Now, just because the mall report in that investigation is over Tim. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Okay. Those were key things you need to know. From the redacted Muller report. But of course, there is much more that we learned in those four hundred pages if you scroll back through your up, I feed you're gonna find that the NPR politics podcast published a special episode. We dropped just for you, deep diving on everything we learned.

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Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

"Unclear. The salient was on a police watchlist flagged as Patel. Essentially radicalized Strasbourg came to the European Union's parliament remained on down overnight and residents have been warned to stay vigilant. France's interior ministry says police had attempted and failed to arrest. The gunman earlier on Tuesday for an attempted murder. And that this may have triggered the attack for NPR news. I miss me Nicholson in Berlin. You're listening to NPR news. There's been a moderate earthquake in Tennessee this morning. The US Geological Survey says the tremors magnitude was four point four, and it was centered in eastern, Tennessee. It could be felt in Atlanta. The first quake was followed. A few minutes later by three point three magnitude aftershock, the final version of Congress's farm. Bill is out and it legalizes industrial hemp harvest public media's Esther honing explains that will bring stability to farmers and states that are already growing the crop thirty nine states already allow for the cultivation of hemp, and there's currently more than twenty five thousand acres devoted to the crop. In the US federal legalization is a boon for producers of CBD oil, which is derived from hemp and used from additional purposes, Kristen Kuna gross hemp in Colorado and says federal legalization gives her and her husband the confidence to invest in their farm. We just feel a little bit safer that we are going into a legitimate business. And there is going gonna be room to grow and to do what we've always been wanting to do the farm Bill would allow each state to oversee local hemp cultivation for NPR news. I'm Esther Hoenig in Greeley, Colorado. A Canadian court has granted bail to Chinese business executive mung Joe of ten million dollars. She and her company while we technologies are suspected of selling equipment to Iran in violation of US sanctions American. Authorities would like to have her extradited to the US separately an international think tank reports one of its officials a former Canadian diplomat has been detained in China. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include L, D, entertainment and roadside attractions with Banus back starring Julia Roberts as a mother whose son unexpectedly returns home Christmas. Also with Lucas hedges. Now in select theaters expands December fourteenth. Steve Inskeep is going to speak with Trump supporter. Chris Buskirk Buskirk runs. The conservative publication American greatness. And the conversation will be about President Trump possibly being linked to a film of campaign finance violations that story just ahead on morning edition also had an Alabama policeman. As you may know recently killed a young black man is he ran away from shooting in a mall. The was legally armed but police figuring out who the quote, unquote, good guy is in chaotic situations can be difficult. A closer look is coming up on morning edition.

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MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

"In baseball. If the bombers pull off an upset over the Boston, you bang in Harvard, having donkey buying L wives. I mean, the Red Sox it'll break hearts all over New England. The best kind of New York win. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's recall a supreme court battle before the one we're living through now. Judge bread Kavanagh's. Contentious Senate hearing last week recalled some earlier ones, including a nineteen eighty-seven showdown between democratic senators and then federal appeals court judge Robert Bork who been nominated to the supreme court Senator Ted Kennedy led the attack in Robert Bork's, America. There is no room at the end for blacks and no place in the constitution for women and in our America. There

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Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

"Sex crimes prosecutor, I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. How can the Trump administration pressure? Other nations to stop buying Iranian oil will question the State Department's Iran onboard the south also Boston educators, look to close the achievement gap between kids of different backgrounds,

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"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Steve Inskeep. Now, scientists say that the warming climate makes a storm like Florence bigger and stronger and. Wetter in San Francisco, where we're going next government officials from around the world or making new pledges to cut the carbon emissions that drive climate change. They're trying to counter the Trump administration's rollbacks on climate protections. Here's Lauren summer of our member station. K Q E D. The message from this summit states and cities are moving forward tackling climate change with or without Washington DC today, we can say we're fighting. We're not just talking. We're acting. That's mary. Ann idel. Go of Paris. A city that plans to ban internal combustion engines mayors from twenty six other cities around the world announced their carbon emissions had peaked and we're going down. Then came the governor's like Washington's Jay Inslee. The American people understand science and an optimistic future of clean energies, Washington. Fifteen other states and Puerto Rico formed climate alliance when President Trump announced he would pull the US out of the international Paris climate treaty to make sure that the rest of the world understood that there is intelligent life in the United States, and no one likes to make that point more than California governor Jerry Brown emphatically pounding on the table can Trump if he stays his president is. Reelected Jenista, Burton sabotage. You Betty can in the is. That's why it's versus Trump Brown. Tried to take the lead on the international stage. Sending the message that at least parts of the US would uphold their agreement to cut carbon emissions people from all over America. All over the world will will get to the goal you. A question is will get through so late that people will die in trillions of dollars will be unnecessarily spent that is the big question, whether the pledges of these cities and states add up to enough I.

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No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 2 years ago

No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

"There's new CBS chairman and CEO, les Moonves is leaving NPR's. Steve inskeep. Talks to the New Yorker magazine. Reporter this morning about the newest allegations against moma's CBS says there's no severance package worked out from this pending the results of the investigation, and for CBS the departure has bearing on an ownership battle for the corporate structure of CBS. Marketplace. Nancy Marshall genzer who was Moonves fighting with on the CBS board. He was in a battle with Sherry Redstone over a possible sale of CBS Redstone heads a company called national amusements. She's the daughter of Sumner Redstone Sumner Redstone had controlled CBS. And Viacom they were under one roof. But he split them up Sherri Redstone wanted to reunite them. But Moonves thought that was a bad idea, and why was Moonves against that? Well, Viacom is struggling it owns some cable TV channels that aren't doing well comedy central and MTV moon. Moonves didn't want Viacom to drag down CBS, which has been doing been doing. Well, CBS actually sued the red stones and national amusements national amusements filed a countersuit and on that score. What happens now both sides have dropped their lawsuits. The CBS board has been we shaped with six members stepping down and being quickly replaced share Sherry Redstone in national amusements have promised to wait at least two years before proposing. Merger between CBS and

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NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"Demonstrators. Is demanding jobs and public services also set fire to a main government building NPR's? Jane Arraf has details. Witnesses say protesters set fire to the provincial government building in Basra and blocked the entrance to Iraq's main port security forces have tried to disperse the crowds firing lie them munition Iraq's prime minister, flew to Basra and ordered an investigation after several protesters were killed earlier this week port officials said the demonstrations blocked, the main entrance to the port of Kassir and set up roadblocks on the highway from Basra to Baghdad. The protests have continued all summer in Iraq's second biggest city demanding steady electricity, clean water and

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Coffee giant Starbucks opening in Italy, the home of espresso

Morning Edition

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Coffee giant Starbucks opening in Italy, the home of espresso

"Tomorrow. Starbucks will open its first store in Italy the country that considers itself, coffee, spiritual home, NPR's, Sylvia. Pohjola knows coffee, and she knows Italy. And she says the company has set itself up for challenge. The company's press. Release describes the Milan store is the crown jewel of Starbucks global retail footprint. It opens thirty five years after founder Howard Schultz visited the city that inspired

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Scientists Find a Strange New Cell in Human Brains: The 'Rosehip Neuron'

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 2 years ago

Scientists Find a Strange New Cell in Human Brains: The 'Rosehip Neuron'

"Scientists have taken one more small step toward understanding what makes. The human brain unique as NPR's John Hamilton reports they've identified a type of brain cell that exists in people but not in rodents the cells are called rose hip. Neurons and, they were first. Described by scientists. In Hungary named Gabor Thomas Ed. Lean of the institute, for brain science, in Seattle says Thomas was recording electrical signals from cells taken from two human brains in the course of doing these recordings he started. To notice a very distinctive type of cell that's to him, have the shape of, a rose after the pedals have fallen off so he called them they rose upsell meanwhile lean. And other scientists at the Allen institute had also run across these unusual neurons while doing genetic analysis, of the brain cells so the researchers combined with they had learned and lean says their conclusion was remarkable, this particular type of so head properties that had never actually been described in another species today the findings suggest that the human brain is. More than just a big mouse brain at some point it acquired at least one kind of cell mouse doesn't have scientists aren't, sure exactly what these cells do though they seem to be, involved in controlling the. Flow of information in the brain and, lean says their existence has big implications for researchers it throws. Some Doubt on the ability to use the mouse then, to study a certain elements of human function and disease rose hip cells are a type of inhibitory neuron. They act like the brakes in a car telling other brain cells when to slow down and lean says it's possible they play a role. In mental illness these, types of cells, are extremely important and dysfunction of them can actually directly be linked to different types of neuropsychiatric disease like schizophrenia rose hip cells are. Involved in brain disorders it could help explain why so many, brain drugs that work, in mice don't work in people Josh Gordon directs the National Institute of mental health which helped. Fund the research it may be that in order to fully understand psychiatric disorders we need to get, access to these special types of neurons that exist only in humans Gordon says this study is part of, a larger effort by the national institutes of health to identify every type of cell found in the brains of mice monkeys and people we. Don't know how How the brain works if. We don't know all of its parts so in order to describe how the brain produces behavior. We want to know what are the different parts in the brain and then. How they work together new genetic techniques are rapidly improving scientists, ability to detect new types of brain cells and Gordon expects that researchers will find more. Cells that, exist in people but not animals I think it's very very likely that this is the tip of the iceberg the new research appears in the, journal nature

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