35 Burst results for "Steve case"

Residents of senior living facilities are turning to internet radio to connect during lockdown

Dave Ramsey

00:43 sec | 4 d ago

Residents of senior living facilities are turning to internet radio to connect during lockdown

"Because of the Corona virus. Some senior citizens have taken to the airwaves. And so is our Steve case. It's on the Internet. Hello, already a recliner Listeners a radio station with DJs from senior living centers. Now my deejay ski. Mitch Bennett launched it at bridge living facilities in 14 states, and now he's getting requests from all over the country. There's something about old time dedication radio that really resonates with these residents Leave Flynn outside. Atlanta is in a place where social distancing is enforced people here and it's like a haunted house. So these folks play music on and connect

Mitch Bennett Flynn Steve Atlanta
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
NFL to spend $250 million on social justice initiatives

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:38 sec | Last month

NFL to spend $250 million on social justice initiatives

"The NFL making a financial commitment to issues players have been speaking out about the NFL is committing two hundred fifty million dollars over the next decade to social justice initiatives targeting systemic racism that includes about forty four million raised by the league's inspire change program the NFL says it wants to work with players to support programs that address criminal justice reform police reforms and economic and educational advancement there is some distrust San Francisco cornerback Richard Sherman says they tried to throw money behind it for a long time it takes more than that Steve case and CBS

NFL Richard Sherman CBS San Francisco Steve
"steve case" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"steve case" Discussed on WTOP

"I'm Steve case in a northern New Jersey an outpouring of emotion today in Houston for George floor end of enormous trouble maker I always seen him as talking to the young folks know kind of telling you know stop the bottoms and try to help them stay on the right Pat Pam Robinson grew up with Floyd his death in police custody is shaken the nation with protests and calls for change reporter Dennis Spellman in Houston today is the public's opportunity to say goodbye to Floyd a six hour visitation in the city where he grew up Floyd's body arrived three hours before the event so many people are expected that shuttle buses are needed the large parking lot of the found appraise funeral home is not large enough for the thousands of people were expected for this visitation in Washington Democrats in Congress took a need to honor George Floyd for eight minutes forty six seconds house speaker Pelosi used it to punctuate a new bill with police reforms we cannot settle for anything less than three transformative structural change I'm Stephen Portnoy at the White House with the president meets today with a law enforcement roundtable he's been tweeting in all caps law and order and says he wants police to be well paid well the claims Democrats want to quote the fund and abandon them the president is eager to paint Joe Biden as a champion of that cost but a Biden campaign spokesman says the former VP stance instead for reform and quote does not believe that police should be defined there's fallout from Floyd's death overseas CBS's Vicky Barker's at the foreign desk France's security chief has just announced police chokeholds will be banned in the country there's been massive public outrage in France after phone footage emerged that showed white Paris police officers kneeling on the neck of a black suspect three days after George Floyd's death New York City mayor bill de Blasio with a big salute today is phase one of a corona virus re opening takes place all new Yorkers should be proud that you've got us to this day this was a lot of hard work everyone has stayed home everyone is socially distance everyone of on this face coverings the justice department once Great Britain to question prince Andrew in the Jeffrey up scene investigation CBS's Pat Milton the request made by prosecutors under the mutual legal assistance treaty is similar to a subpoena for Andrew's testimony Epstein died by suicide last August while awaiting trial the Associated Press reports Major League Baseball teams have made a new offer to start the season a seventy six game regular season guaranteeing.

France Baseball Pat Milton prince Andrew New York City Paris VP reporter Steve Associated Press Epstein Jeffrey Britain bill de Blasio New Jersey Vicky Barker CBS Joe Biden
Universities still waiting for promised emergency aid for students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Universities still waiting for promised emergency aid for students

"The trump administration is setting new limits for emergency aid for college students education secretary Betsy to boss is out with new restrictions that bar most international students and those who entered the US illegally from getting emergency college grants in the virus rescue package that was passed last month earlier information suggested universities would have leeway in handing out the money which is targeted for unexpected costs related to the upheaval caused by the pandemic many university leaders and immigration groups have blasted the change saying the boss is imposing new limits that were not included in Congress's legislation Steve case then CBS

Betsy United States Congress CBS Secretary Steve
Biden on wife blocking protester: 'Whoa, you don't screw around with a Philly girl'

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Biden on wife blocking protester: 'Whoa, you don't screw around with a Philly girl'

"A candidate's wife is trending on social media the day after super Tuesday CBS's Steve case and tells us why it happened when Joe Biden was revving up his supporters in Los Angeles protester with a light deanery dis sign then another were both grab and hustled off stage with some help from the candidate's wife Jill Biden an image of her grabbing and body blocking the second protesters winning raves on social media don't mess with Jill Biden some have posted some of more seriously said it's time for secret service protection for the former vice

CBS Steve Case Joe Biden Jill Biden Los Angeles
"steve case" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:41 min | 5 months ago

"steve case" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"By mass mutual good morning I'm Steve case and the World Health Organization warns today the corona virus outbreak has pandemic potential and economic concerns seem to be spreading faster than the virus itself we are on track to have the worst week for stocks performance in percentage terms since the financial crisis since October of two thousand eight business analyst Jill Slazenger says yesterday's nearly twelve hundred point plunge by the Dow Jones industrial average was the largest single day point drop ever what investors are somewhat concerned about is as the news emerges of more virus infections in different parts of the world the global growth could slow down the corporate earnings could take a hit that that could curtail some consumer spending there are more than eighty two thousand cases of the corona virus in fifty two countries health officials in California want to get more answers about the patient who had no link to overseas travel or apparently anyone else with the virus that person sought care at several facilities there were multiple health care personnel who were exposed to the individual some of them are under isolation some of them will be under quarantine Dr Bela Macias is public health officer outside Sacramento eighty four hundred people in California are being monitored for the virus and CBS's Carter Evans says the health and Human Services whistleblower has spoken up the complaint says those who monitor people at two military bases were improperly deployed and did not have the necessary training or equipment some work without a full protective gear one even eventually took a commercial flight once the work was done now one of the Air Force bases where this apparently happened is in the same county where that patient here became infected the number of U. S. labs the contest for the virus is expected to top ninety by early next week CBS news health contributor Dr David agus what we're going to see very soon or quarantines it's not if but it's when and where companies say Hey what's a work from home part C. bit where that your children may have to take school from home get a week of dry food in your house not a South Carolina tomorrow's primary day for the democratic presidential candidates CBS's ed o'keefe says the long time front runner in that state is hoping to stop Bernie Sanders early momentum this nation isn't looking for a revolution as looking for results former vice president Joe Biden is poised to win his first contest of the twenty twenty campaign as he travels through South Carolina he's touting a familiar talking points he's close work with former president Obama vowing to build on the affordable Care Act please leave here isn't stopping opponents from raising concerns about whether he has what it takes to go the distance I don't believe that Joe can beat trump when people learn that he voted for the war in Iraq I'm Jim crystal in Florence South Carolina the economy will be on Vivian broads mind when she votes in Saturday's democratic presidential primary brown says yes more people have jobs but it went back to work but they went back to work at McDonald's brown who remains undecided about a democratic presidential candidate says health care and climate change are also big concerts and Alison Keyes in Charleston eighteen year old Aubree brown as a freshman with high expectations for Democrats I want to hear what you gonna do for us the minorities as well as the college students in a disenfranchised class president Giovanni airs points at the all white slate a lot of their issues they're talking about and now my issues her number one concern after American mortality rate and women and is at an all time high and we're living in the twenty first century her second is student loan debt there's little time for the candidates to regroup after the primary super.

Steve case World Health Organization
Trump complains "Parasite" won best picture Oscar

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Trump complains "Parasite" won best picture Oscar

"This next story about president trump goes well with popcorn CBS's Steve case that explains that a Colorado campaign rally last night president trump took a swipe at Oscar winning actor Brad Pitt and offered up a review of the Best Picture and the one what the hell was we got problems with South Korea with trade on top of it they give them the best movie of the year was a good job the US distributor for parasite shot back saying the president's comment on the subtitled movie was quote understandable he can't read Steve case then CBS

Donald Trump CBS Oscar Brad Pitt South Korea President Trump Steve Colorado United States
New Hampshire voters cast ballots for nation's first primary

Newell Normand

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

New Hampshire voters cast ballots for nation's first primary

"Democrats are duking it out in their first primary CBS's Steve case then begins our team coverage CBS news update optimism from people to judge in New Hampshire successive feels like it's shaping up well he's shaking hands as voters cast ballots in the first in the nation presidential primary polls get Bernie Sanders the edge Elizabeth Warren making the rounds to it's a what kind of a country this should be assisting Dorsey tells us Joe Biden isn't going to wait around for the results still

CBS New Hampshire Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Dorsey Joe Biden Steve
Federal Agents Recover Stolen 500-Year-Old Copy Of Letter Christopher Columbus Wrote Describing Voyage To Americas

WBBM Late Morning News

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Federal Agents Recover Stolen 500-Year-Old Copy Of Letter Christopher Columbus Wrote Describing Voyage To Americas

"It was in Delaware where federal investigators found a more than five hundred year old copy of a letter written by Christopher Columbus one of the few authentic reprints which was hand written in Spanish back in fourteen ninety three this copy vanished from an Italian library decades ago Steve case in CBS

Delaware Christopher Columbus CBS Steve
"steve case" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:14 min | 7 months ago

"steve case" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Almost ports paid Sunday's conference round of the NFL playoffs and with previews correspondent Steve case and the NFC title game is a rematch I mean like that last game was a long time ago it was in November when the San Francisco forty Niners wallop coach Matt will floors Green Bay Packers we know we have to do I mean it's it's gonna be a great challenge the teams in the AFC championship met during the season to Andy Reid's Kansas City Chiefs lost to Tennessee in a close one for this challenge a plan Titans we know echo football team the home team's Kansas city and San Francisco are solid favorites to advance to the Superbowl Steve case then CBS news earn in the match of democratic presidential hopefuls Joe Biden is calling for Bernie Sanders campaign disown what he calls a doctored video at some Sander supporters say shows the former vice president endorsing Republican calls to cut social security and Medicare Tom Foley CBS news CBS news radio honored with the prestigious when you go to CBS news radio Carlos Ghosn is now a fugitive in exile here his legal options I'm Geoff Colvin of fortune magazine with inside business gold is the former CEO of Nissan Mitsubishi and Reno who recently escaped from house arrest in Japan where he's charged with financial fraud in a cloak and dagger operation worthy of a Hollywood thriller he got to Lebanon where he's a national hero of course Japan wants him extradited so what now gone as a citizen of three nations Lebanon France and Brazil all of which have a policy of never extraditing their citizens so as long as he restricts his travel to those countries he's probably safe but gold is accustomed to traveling the world and would undoubtedly like to visit places from which he could be extradited experts in international law say that's why he's publicly charging that the prosecution in Japan was motivated by politics that he can't get a fair trial there and that his incarceration was in humane all three of those arguments are enshrined in human rights conventions governing most of the countries were going could potentially be apprehended he could use those arguments to lower the chances he'll be detained when visiting one of those countries or if he is detained to avoid extradition still Japan is surely making its own plans to get going back this Hollywood thriller is far from over inside business I'm Geoff Colvin for CBS news I'm Vicki Barker in London where bricks are digesting the news that their beloved prince Harry is giving up his royal title and his military commitments for the woman he loves will fit well in every eight eight side but let's let's hope for a happy ending royal correspondent Robert Hardman now Harry and Megan will have to make their own way and their own money in a manner that isn't seen as cheapening the brand of the royal family on demand in in your hand CBS news radio and CBS news radio dot com compact but loaded with luxury this is Jeff with a car chronicles test drive for say the small.

Steve case NFC NFL
Takata Airbag Recall 2020: Another 10 Million Cars Recalled Over Defective Airbag Inflators

WBBM Morning News

00:34 sec | 7 months ago

Takata Airbag Recall 2020: Another 10 Million Cars Recalled Over Defective Airbag Inflators

"There's another airbag recall that could affect millions of vehicle owners CBS's Steve case into condos recalling ten million additional air bag inflators sold to fourteen different auto makers it's the last phase of the company's twenty fifteen agreement with federal safety regulators to recall some seventy million of the devices they can explode with too much force sending shrapnel flying they've been blamed in more than twenty deaths owners can put their seventeen digit vehicle ID into the national highway traffic safety administration website to see if they have to take action

CBS Steve
Half of all homeless people may have had traumatic brain injury

WBBM Morning News

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Half of all homeless people may have had traumatic brain injury

"New research on covers findings about homeless people a new study of the homeless in the U. S. and five other countries finds fifty three percent of suffered some kind of traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives that's up to four times the rate of the general population lancet researchers say it could be that the injury is a consequence or even a contributing cause of their homelessness those injuries can lead to neurological or psychiatric disorders that may go untreated Steve case and CBS

CBS Steve Fifty Three Percent
Drew Brees defends making video backed by anti-LGBTQ group

WBBM Morning News

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Drew Brees defends making video backed by anti-LGBTQ group

"Field star NFL quarterback drew Brees has had to fight off pass rushers now he's pushing back against critics video he was part of was put out by a conservative Christian group focus on the family that's been linked with anti gay messages and conversion therapy by on the video recently that was encouraging kids to bring their bibles to school for national bring your Bible to school day it was a simple as that brie is says he believes in respecting and accepting all Steve case and

NFL Brees Brie Steve
Spotify reveals its 3 most-streamed songs of the summer

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Spotify reveals its 3 most-streamed songs of the summer

"Hit bad guy is number three on Spotify's most streamed list I don't care by ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber number two tops with five hundred sixty five million streams by Shawn Mendes and Camila Kobe Steve case and CBS news the words old town road it's been a great one whole summer well evidently what have you done will be like engine number one yeah they don Mendez and coming

Spotify Ed Sheeran Shawn Mendes Camila Kobe Steve Justin Bieber CBS Don Mendez
"steve case" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Real reporting I'm Steve case in a few words from president trump shook up the G. seven summit when asked about the trade war with China White House correspondent Stephen Portnoy over breakfast with the British prime minister who said he's more in favor of trade peace than a trade war president trump was asked if he's had any second thoughts about the terrorists he's imposed on Chinese imports yeah sure one might as well might as well asked again Mr trump said he always has second thoughts but a spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham claimed her bosses answer had been greatly misinterpreted Mr trump's only regret she claims not raising the tariffs higher Stephen Portnoy's CBS news of the G. seven summit in France in the trade battle with China's casting a cloud over the economy here at home a majority of Americans feels that the American consumer will end up paying for these tariffs and the president gets lower marks on handling trade policy with China then he does for handling the economy overall CBS news director of surveys Anthony Salvado says new polling indicates thirty eight percent are optimistic thirty five percent are pessimistic about the economy a former Illinois congressman is now a conservative talk show host will challenge president trump for the Republican presidential nomination Joe Walsh's book critical of the president for months calling him a bully who is unfit for office he was on ABC's this week I'm gonna do whatever I can I don't want him to win the country cannot afford to have him win if I'm not successful I'm not voting form former Massachusetts governor William weld is also seeking the GOP nomination a new round of violent protests today in Hong Kong BBC reporter Stephen McDonell in the thick of it as demonstrators mixed up with police.

ABC reporter Hong Kong GOP William weld Massachusetts Illinois CBS China White House Steve Stephen McDonell Stephen Portnoy Joe Walsh congressman Anthony Salvado director president China France
All charges dismissed against man accused of stealing Frances McDormand's Oscar

Jim Bohannon

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

All charges dismissed against man accused of stealing Frances McDormand's Oscar

"The suspect Terry Brian posted video of him parading around women wearing a tuxedo on social media Bryant's Grand Theft trial was due to start yesterday but the case was dismissed LA prosecutors said they couldn't move ahead McDormand who got the statue back it always told police she wasn't interested in any prosecution Steve case and CBS

Terry Brian Bryant Mcdormand Steve Case CBS Theft LA
Toni Morrison, Towering Novelist of the Black Experience, Dies at 88

Rob Pratte

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison, Towering Novelist of the Black Experience, Dies at 88

"Author Toni Morrison died last night at a hospital in New York Morrison was eighty eight the first African American woman to receive the Nobel Prize for literature here CBS's Steve case and Toni Morrison won a Nobel Prize a Pulitzer Prize in shelves full of other literary awards for her novels books like the bluest eyes song of Solomon and beloved which was turned into a nineteen ninety eight movie one of the server accessible so we just got back from carnival in beloved an escaped slave loves her children so much she's willing to kill them rather than see them re captured even Morrison would admit all kind of our greatest love is but it was those stories which hoped readers Steve case and CBS

Toni Morrison New York Morrison Nobel Prize CBS Steve Case Pulitzer Prize Solomon
Ex-NFL star opens up about the cancer he links to weed killer

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-NFL star opens up about the cancer he links to weed killer

"Of former sports star has joined a lawsuit against the maker of a controversial weed killer here's CBS news man Steve case and with the story Monsanto is being sued by former NFL running back Merrill Hodge the X. Pittsburgh Steeler claims the weed killer roundup because the non Hodgkin's lymphoma he beat more than a decade ago the thing that's probably most concerning and disturbing is that chemical still exists on our store shelves hajj says he came in contact with it when he worked on farms as a teenager Monsanto facing other suits to says studies indicate the key chemical does not cause cancer Steve case and

Steve Case Monsanto NFL Merrill Hodge Pittsburgh Steeler Hodgkin CBS
Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

KYW 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

"Well it's time to be changing some of your viewers Netflix has removed the graphic suicide scene from an episode in season one of the hit show thirteen reasons why still these don't kill yourself posters up on the wall they weren't up before mental health experts expressed concern the scene glorified suicide since its launch thirteen reasons why has drawn praise and condemnation the show's season three launches later on this summer Steve case and CBS

Netflix CBS Steve
Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

KYW 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

"Thing Netflix has edited a graphic suicide scene out of an episode of the first season of thirteen reasons why still they don't kill yourself posters up on the wall they weren't up before mental health experts expressed concern the scene glorified suicide since its launch thirteen reasons why has drawn praise and condemnation the show's season three launches later on this summer Steve case and

Netflix Steve
Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

Pat Farnack

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Netflix deletes suicide scene from "13 Reasons Why"

"This is of a controversial TV show of taken action after several groups spoke out about the scene in an old episode here CBS correspondent Steve Caton Netflix has removed a graphic suicide scene from an episode in season one of the hit show thirteen reasons why you still there don't kill yourself posters up on the wall they weren't up before mental health experts expressed concern the scene glorified suicide since its launch thirteen reasons why has drawn praise and condemnation the show's season three launches later on this summer Steve case and CBS

CBS Steve Caton
"steve case" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Entrepreneurs everywhere in helping to scale these these, these companies, but the biggest issue for entrepreneurs capitalists for those of us who are successful is, if someone is only going to be paid by the hour, they're only going to be paid by the hour, and they're always going to fall behind and income distribution. Is disparity is going to get wider and why we as entrepreneurs have got to make a point to give stock to everybody that works for us period. End of story. No exceptions. Because that's the only way people are going to get any type of equity appreciation otherwise. It's partout to that. It's our responsibility. Right. Capitalism isn't bad. It's when capitalists don't pay attention. It's like running a business. Our country is a lot like running a business that some people might like to say that, but you can't just look at the short term in the media aspect. You've got to look at the long-term, and if we don't start recognizing that the more disadvantaged people become the greater the disparity, where risk it's social unrest. Because when social unrest, you get a Fergus. Then asked what happened to the businesses in Ferguson, right? They get torched. Right. And degraded, the disparity, the more people rebel. And so it's our responsibility. And when I try to do with my shark tank companies is in terms of diversity. Here's why it makes sense. Here's why you hire people. They do things and understand habit perspective. You don't have. Here's why you want all your employees have stock. Why, why is that so difficult in terms of share? I mean like look Hoover is going public, the drivers or striking Lubar and lift today because they don't have pieces of it. Now I know it's complex. I've heard I've heard the speeches from both CEOs on why they cannot complex. Yeah. Well we every employee had. All the for example, the drivers this summer, part time summer, not part time trickier, with the gut. Workforce like that. That's true. Would that be something you would say like drivers who contributed to her and lift for me, if it was my company for sure? Right. Scooter said the same thing earlier fucking Lutely. Right. And if it was up to me, if all your employees didn't have stock all your, your capital gains from your stocks would be we taxed as regular income, if all your employees had that. Thank you, my one person, but especially in this crowd. But. We want to keep all the money or we're going to carried interest. Rebellion. Right. Exactly. I do agree with you. I was saying something that someone in Silicon Valley, if you need to start paying everyone in getting people more equal pay, or you can pay to armor, plate your Tesla's. That's exactly right. Or pay everybody in cash, and let them buy stock if that's what they wanna do. Right. Because then the disparity would decline as well. But there's another piece that we're on the topic. Some other data points just to get make sure but he knows that I mentioned the seventy five percent of venture gobble going to three states last year in this country over ninety percent of venture capital went to men, we're gonna get last year less than one percent went to African Americans, so it's a great entre nation. I'm proud of it. I think it's still the most innovative entrepreneurial country in the world. I'm proud of that. But the data does say it does matter where you live. It does matter what you look like it does matter who, you know, whether if you have an idea you have shot, and that is not fair, but it's also stupid for us as investors..

Hoover Scooter Tesla Ferguson Lubar seventy five percent ninety percent one percent
"steve case" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Come to work, right? And we get the job done. And so it really matter and the whole promise of the internet. You know, back in the mid nineties was connect, everybody anywhere. And so it never even dawned on me that I should be in Silicon Valley or to move. And in fact, it was so much more friction free being Dallas. It made it a lot easier. Also a little history lesson Swisher. Thank the first wave of the internet super distributed. Mark was in Texas. Sprint was in Kansas City. City. Hayes, the big modem company was Atlanta CompuServe. The online service was in Columbus, Ohio prodigy with White Plains. New York, IBM's PC operations were in Boca Raton. We were outside of Washington DC. Microsoft, actually started in Albuquerque. Right and moved to Seattle. I could give you a dozen other exam. And if you go before that, even member, there was weighing in digital. One twenty eight the twenty eight outside of Boston. Right. And so all you had it Silicon Valley back in the early days PC's, and networking was HP an apples, but it's still is the fifty percent of the venturing money goes there. What how do you shift that out? I mean, it didn't happen that way coalesced in one place coalesced in the second way, when it became software, Silicon Valley ruse to rose to prominence. Arguably dominance, point is the first way that was not the case, the third way I do not believe it would be the case. The reason for that is a lot of the domain expertise, it's going to be critical. A third way the partnerships are gonna be critical and the third way are in the middle of country, healthcare, for example, shirts. Stanford does some awesome things, but MD Anderson and Texas Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, mayo and a soda Johns Hopkins in, in Maryland. Baltimore those are the centers of excellent the big healthcare plans or United health and and, and. In minnesota. A bunch of companies in Nashville in farming, egg tech. You know, the big companies are like Monsanto headquartered in Saint Louis. Louisville Lincoln Nebraska. That's where the expertise is. So there's an opportunity because that domain experts going to matter more partnerships are going to matter, more to build up these, these sectors in these in these cities. But it's not gonna happen, if all the money somewhere else as a result we've seen several decades. I'm sure it's true with people here. Family members been a massive brain, drain the people grew up in a lot of these places left. Because the money was there the opportunity was there is a lot different now, I think, in terms of capital invested. Yes, the percentages are absolutely correct. But in terms of number of businesses started shifting dramatically. Yeah. Because over the last ten years, you don't need a laptop and a connection, a broadband connection, which is more prevalent, and, you know, a cloud account AWS or whatever. And now with AI it's even more. So when you're in those concentrated areas, you're competing for resources. Whereas, you know, hey I is based in Silicon Valley. You know, the best, the best technologists are coming out of Montreal Boston, Pittsburgh Austin, Silicon Valley can be their own little world. And it's an open opportunity for us, and I'll give you three examples from last week because we did rise. Rest tour in Florida in Orlando and mazing things happening around interactive entertainment. Obviously Disney's there. But also electron of out of the thousand people there that university created a program around interactive entertainment booming space, coast, that the years ago, inspired us all Apollo eleven there's a ton of space tech startups in that in that space coast area..

Silicon Valley Ohio Boston Dallas Kansas City Boca Raton Swisher Seattle CompuServe Disney Microsoft Texas Baltimore Nashville minnesota HP Sprint Florida IBM Louisville
"steve case" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"And today, we have a very exciting program. All of you out there who are entrepreneurs. Or maybe have a great idea for a new company or you're just out of money. They'll still know how to get your ideal off the ground. So every time I talked to an entrepreneur a audio, but got no money. And so this program is for you. And I think it's a timely program is much needed for many, many Guls, you know, from socially conscious to being aware. And and being aware of all the changes that are going on the world today and make sure the air participating in the changes are not being wiped out by the changes comments, Kim. Well, I'm very excited about today's show, and we're gonna get started right away. Because you know, we've often said that one of the solutions to the whole economic. Problems is entrepeneurship. And there needs to be more. Entrepreneurs more small startups taking the lead and our guest is very very well known. He is the co founder of AOL Steve case, and he is now the chairman and CEO of revolution. And we're gonna talk about what revolution is. And it's all about creating entrepreneurs from areas that most people don't think entrepreneurs come from. And he's really giving them a shot to get a start. Very proud. Steve is fellow Hawaiian Kim graduated from your rose to your way. And I'm I grew up little tone co Hilo Hawaii where Steve's parents or from understand, but you can become an entrepreneur even from Hawaii. That's what we're trying to say. So stay welcome to the program..

chairman and CEO Steve Hilo Hawaii Kim AOL
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"The capital they need to start and scale, their company is harder to get. If you're in these, what some call flyover country. And as a result, there's a huge brain drain where people who grow up in those places end up leaving. So how do we slow that brain drain? So keep more people are able to stay where they want to stay and and even how to trigger boomerang people left now, feel like maybe it's time to come back. Maybe it's time to come home when you look at your entire career and then where you are now. How do you personally define success? I think it's about impact and and I do have a desire to have a broad impact. And so trying to kind of reach more people more places, whether it be with the internet or more recently with the rise rested, it's trying to have the broadest possible impact. And I wanted try to. Maximize the impact I have. And so I tend to pick bigger problems and try to have kind of a bigger impact. I recognize when you do that, they are also bigger risks. Some of the things we try to do not be successful. I understand that. But I think you know for me, it's how do you make sure you are doing everything can to make the world a better place and try to you kind of looked up as many people and communities as possible, and you spent years mentoring entrepreneurs, it's something that you still regularly do, but is there maybe a Goto piece of advice that you would give to someone who just wants to have a career like yours. Ultimately comes down to people and teams that entrepreneurship is a is a team sport. It's not about any one person that you know the founding CEO tends to get most of the attention, but it really is a team effort that certainly the case with a also case with all the companies that were involved in as investors. So recognizing that team dynamic and trying to make sure you have the right mix of skills and perspectives on the team is important and the other related point, and there's an African proverb, I, I love what you want to go quickly. You can go alone. You wanna go far, you must go together and going far going together means partnerships. And so that partnership, our intention, I think is very important. It's all about relationships. It's ultimately comes down to people whether the individual people on your team or the people you need to work with the stabbing partnerships or the people you need to increasingly work with in the third wave that are going to impact policy regulators, other folks. If you get the people right. I think you know almost anything is possible if you don't get the people. Right. I'd argue nothing is possible. Well, thank you very much. Thank you. Great. To be with you. Thanks for listening to this is success from business inside and our shows produced by Animas Iraqis and Sarah Wyman dam. Bob cough is our executive producer. I'm rich fluid before you go, we've got a glimpse at who Steve case may have been. Had he pursued a different passion. I almost went into the music business. If I hadn't gone into the, you know, the technology business is really quite smitten in my high school and some college years. And you know, did some concert promotion other other sorts of things. So I I could have gone into that. Were you in a band? I was in a band, although I, it was not a particularly successful. Dan, what kind of music was with two different bands? One was called the and the other was called the vans, and I was the the, the low is pretty good name. And I was the lead singer, but couldn't really sing. So I decided that was not a great career move next week on the show. We've got refinery twenty nine CEO Christine barberie. Initially, the idea of building a media startup sounded like the last thing she'd want to do, but she decided to hear a pitch from her soon to be co founders over drinks. I literally left those Margaritas with Philip in Justin, and I was like, oh my God, I have to do this subscribe to. This is success in apple podcasts or wherever you listen to catch that episode and explore are archived. Please leave us a rating and writer review. It helps others find the show. This is success is a production of insider audio..

CEO Bob cough Christine barberie apple Sarah Wyman Philip writer Steve Dan executive producer Justin
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"It does require making sure that that you really are trying to make sure that you have a diverse mix of entrepreneurs, you're you're engaged with their. There have been audiences as travel around the country where I've looked out and it's one hundred percent white guys last year over ninety percent of venture capital went to men less than ten percent to women last year, less than one percent went to African Americans. So this is a great entrepreneurs and we should be proud of it. But the data suggests it does matter where you live, it does matter what you look like. Does matter who you know, whether if you have an idea, you know, you really can turn into a company and really have a real shot at the American dream. So we have to figure out ways to kind of level that playing field and be more more inclusive. It's kind of like rethinking the concept of entrepreneur. Ship in America basically. Yeah, no entrepreneurship takes many forms. And the small business sector is obviously important accounts for a lot of jobs. Some of those small businesses could end up being big businesses, you know, every fortune five hundred companies starts the startup. So some of those small businesses, if they are, you know, kinda have access to capital or mentoring or partnerships, or other ways to accelerate their growth could be big. You mentioned being with us in Chattanooga, the winner of our pitch competition there. Freightways was basically building a Bloomberg data system for the trucking industry, and I didn't know this, do I got there? But you know, you saw chattanooga's actually of like the Silicon Valley trucking. A lot of big trucking companies happened to be in Chattanooga. So they're building a data platform for the trucking industry doesn't make sense to be in Chattanooga, where people understand trucking and the big customers. The big partners are kind of right around the corner. Seems like that's an. An advantage to Chattanooga, and we're seeing this and other cities as we as going around the country that they're building on their unique skills. And so it is happening with need to tell those stories and and get more people, you know, understanding what's happening in these communities and backing these entrepreneurs, including the investors because.

Chattanooga Freightways America Bloomberg one hundred percent ninety percent one percent ten percent
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"But it definitely the whole idea of, you know, bus tours and the rise arrest, you know, sort of was motivated by a recognition that right now, it does matter where you live in terms of whether you have an opportunity to pursue the American dream that it's crazy to me that seventy five percent of venture capital goes to just three states, California, New York, Massachusetts, and the other forty seven states are fighting over the other twenty five percent. These are big states like Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, each get less than one percent of venture capital last year. And California's got. Fifty percent. So that doesn't make any sense. There was a fairness aspect to it, but also just, you know, kind of opportunity aspect to it. How do you make sure that that we really are. Love him the playing field and and we really are trying to back onto everywhere, you know, across the country across many sectors of the economy so that we can continue to be the most innovative entrepreneur in the world. And we can, you know, try to create jobs everywhere, not just in in a few places. It's really become a really big movement that has some of the top investors in the country involved in visited what like it's thirty three cities. Thirty eight over thirty eight thirty eight cities at this point throughout the country. Are you motivated by wanting to be at the forefront of a new era? Like as you say that third wave, is this what's driving you? What is some of that? I want to be involved in that, and I think there's something I could do to help drive that. I because of my done in the past, I have a voice and a platform and I want to do something constructive with it. I wanna make sure I'm doing everything I can. You know, be helpful. And so that's a key reason. You know why I do it. I recognize that American self was a startup. You know, two hundred fifty years ago. It was just a start up. It was just an idea. This country led the way in the agriculture revolution and led the way and the industrial revolution and more recently lead the way and the technology revolution that we've gone from this fragile startup nation, the leader of the free world. I want to do what I can to make sure we continue to lead and we're gonna not going to be able to do that unless we continue to innovate the internet. Now, of course, we take for granted but knows early days. Most people didn't believe that ever would be a phenomenon. So what are the other ideas out there that some entrepreneur has somewhere in this country that could not only create an interesting company but help create a whole new industry that that this country can kind of lead the way on. So that's a critical part of this. And you know, they, I've seen with jobs and you know, Vatian entrepreneurship that is one area where you. Can bring people together and kind of Ford's a consensus and find some common ground. So for all those reasons, it's something I'm super passionate about. I joined you on the rise. If the rest were Chattanooga, Tennessee in Louisville, Kentucky. When you're investing in places like this throughout the country. I would imagine that some of the challenge in terms of both pitching it to a city and just bringing in that inclusivity would be when you think of startup jobs, you would think typically people who already have some money who maybe are highly educated. How do you find ways that it actually does benefit an entire city doesn't just create like a new basically benefit the elite class of that city? Well, there's a number of facets to it. First of all, when we talk about backing startups, we're not just talking tech startups. Obviously, there are many tech startups, but we'd back nearly one hundred companies and a whole variety of different sectors, food, Cubbies, clothing companies, all kinds of things, not just tech companies. So that's the first point. The second is to recognize that the startups aren't just creating jobs directly within those companies. That data suggestive every startup John, there's five other jobs created. It could be, you know, construction jobs where people building homes or could be, you know, kind of service. Economy, restaurants, other kinds of things. So they have a kind of a flywheel effect and they create other jobs in the community are critically important at the same time. And we've said this and really every city we visited, it does require intentional..

California Chattanooga Michigan Ford Massachusetts Ohio John Pennsylvania Vatian New York Louisville Kentucky Tennessee two hundred fifty years seventy five percent twenty five percent Fifty percent one percent
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"And so it really came down to trust and Canada was not a common vision that the team embraced in was aligned around and had seen the success available really was having that clear vision and having a team that was kind of very lined on passionate about it. Instead of running it as one company really was run as independent divisions. Each were doing their their own thing, and there was a more of a a bias towards playing defense to protect what was there and make the near term kind of numbers work and the less than playing offense to kind of seize the opportunity. So I think that that was a difficult chapter and certainly a difficult for me personally. But having watched that having been part of that, I realized that you know, vision without execution as lucid nation and realize, ultimately, it came down to, you know, people and therefore the the efforts in tried to be focused on in the last decade or so, whether it be policy issues working on the, you know, the jobs act. If I were six years ago, jumpstarting our business startups act or more recently being advocate for the investing and Opportunity Act and a lot of time talking to Democrats and Republicans and trying to build relate. Into trying to build goodwill, trying to build trust. So there is more of a willingness to at least listen and perhaps kind of, you know, buy into things and in this period to you've, you've noted before how like in in two thousand Vanity, Fair named you the number one person in their newest avalanche, -ment of like movers and shakers, and then just a couple years after that the media had kind of turned on you blaming any struggles within Time Warner like mostly on you. What did that feel like? How did you recover from that when it seemed as if public opinion had kinda shifted against you? I didn't enjoy there was I think it was hard to deal with that and the the Vanity Fair thing was particularly odd because it was two years running. I was like, number one on their less, and then suddenly it was off the list. Altogether kinda went from being this kind of important person in the in the world of being cut of irrelevant. And I understood that kind of goes with the territory that I it just it's. The nature of how these things work and terms of the merger itself. I have mixed views on I was the architect of the merger was my idea. I proposed to Jerry Levin who was then CEO of Time Warner. So the idea of merging and Time Warner I'm completely responsible for and I own that completely the execution of that merger. I have a somewhat different view on I, I was the chairman of company, but I did step down as CEO. And so none of the businesses including AOL reported to me and we had, you know, some big fights in the boardroom about, you know what to do and you know, the decision was to go in a different direction, which is why ultimately I decided to step down as chairman and leave the board. So I share some of the frustrations around how the the merger execute. I think there was enormous missed opportunities and I accept some of that responsibility, but not all of it because I was not really on point kinda running it day to day. I certainly accept the response. For the idea of the verger because it wasn't my idea when you've left a wall and you resigned from the board at a Time Warner that was back in five like you could have done a much more traditional path like maybe go on some board start another company or just have even a more standard venture capital firm. But like with revolution, you if became something where you're traveling the country in a bus, like investing in all of these different cities that are usually overlooked. Like we're you just like trying to make things more difficult for yourself. Now it took a little while after I stepped down to figure out exactly what I wanna do, but I spent some time with too much mercy started making some investments and enjoyed that. Just sort of mentoring kind of the next generation of entrepreneurs and learning about other sectors of the economy. Things that I hadn't necessarily focused on when I was running AL and then started ramping that up..

Time Warner CEO Canada chairman Jerry Levin AL AOL six years two years
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"We're back a few years into his tenure at AO. Well, Seve case was leading the digital revolution. It's something I had been thinking about for for many years, and by the time it really took off, it'd been fifteen plus years from the point where I became curious about this and you know, nine thousand nine hundred seventy eight seventy nine to the point where in the mid nineties, things really started to take off in the late nineties when things really accelerated. But in some of those early years wasn't just the partnership with apple. We had many other challenges where we have to go through layoffs and their times where didn't look like the company was going to survive. So there was near death experiences. So when AOL became a behemoth like by the end of the nineties, what led to the decision to merge with Time Warner in two thousand one, it was a bunch of things, some kind of offensive. Some defensive. We really did believe that the. The next wave of the inert what's going to be broadband? Of course now that's taken for granted, but in nineteen ninety nine it was we were the leader always the leader by far in was then to dial up narrow band world, and the market was beginning to transition to higher speed broadband access, and we need to be well positioned for broadband and so that was part of was to make sure we we're as well positioned in the broadband world as we were on the narrow band world. Other reason was more of a financial diversification point today. AOL stock had soared in the nineteen ninety s and from going public and in nineteen ninety two seventy million market cap. By the end of the decade. Seven, eight years later is one hundred sixty billion dollars best performing stock. The decade I think was up something like eleven thousand percent. And so by merging with Time Warner and our shareholders ended up with a majority of the combined company, you know, instead of having one hundred percent ownership of a company, they'll alone. I think it was five billion of revenue and one. Billion of prophet. The combined company with Time Warner was more like, you know, forty billion of revenue and ten billion profit. And so that was, you know, more diversified Knicks of businesses also was something we thought was important to kind of protect us on the on the downside. So strategically the main low sense. I think the challenge there, the reason that it struggled and really failed as a merger was not the strategic potential which was certainly there, but the execution. And I've, you know, cited this quote from Thomas Edison, he said it over a century ago, that vision without execution is hallucinations. You know, having a good ideas important, but being able to execute ideas even more important and that comes down to people and priorities. And you know, we were unable with a combined time wear company to get that side of it, right? They assets where there, but we didn't get the people in priorities. Right. So were there their lessons around execution that. Stuck with you that you implement even today? Yeah, I think one of their many, many lessons. Some of it was also the timing that just right after we did the merger, the market crash and most dinner companies went out of business and was in, you know, doc was in free fall and so that that was the timing of it. You know, kind of played into it as well. But I think a lot of it was sort of a culture clash that people coming from the AL side of things, reviewing the internet as a great opportunity people coming from the Time Warner side. We're viewing a little bit more as a threat that they're worried this internet would cannibalize some of their their business in, of course, there was risk of that, but that led to different kind of approaches..

Time Warner AOL Time Warner side Seve Thomas Edison Knicks apple one hundred sixty billion doll eleven thousand percent one hundred percent eight years
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"So the even though the startup was a failure, the, you know, the some of the relationships I forged there and some of the insights we be gleaned their ended up helping in terms of the creation of an arc online. When we started AOL nineteen, five, only three percent of people are online and their online an hour a week. And so it was the concept. The reality is people weren't online. Most people didn't think anybody would want to bother getting on my like, why would somebody go the trouble buying a personal computer so they can like type message on a keyboard somebody when you know they pick up the phone, call somebody, I get why that's not gonna ever work and that skepticism was there for more than a decade. If finally idea the internet, you know, kinda took up and thankfully at that point AOL as well positioned and kind of got a got America Online at our peak about half of all the internet traffic, the United States went through through a well, but for a decade. Most people didn't believe I have that similar sense that deja-vu sounds while I'm talking about the rise arrest. I recognize a lot of people are skeptical, but we hope to prove them wrong. We will prove them wrong and the and maybe there's some part of my personality that would have you know when people say it can't be done. That's sort of the challenge and okay. Well, we'll see about that head of AOL when you're at a quantum computer services. This was your first tech company that you're helping build up. You're saying how that didn't work out. Well, you were working with apple, but there was a lot of bumps along the way. Just looking at that experience. What did it teach you ahead of AOL. How did it prepare you for building a company that became huge? Well, the early days of we started what's now known as AOL well in nineteen eighty five. Initially, the name was quantum computer. Services and the initial strategy, and it was true for the first several years was essentially to partner with personal computer manufacturers to create custom, almost private label online services for each of them. So that really was our strategy. We didn't weren't able to raise much capital. I think our initial venture capital raise with about one million dollars at the time. There is a company called prodigy backed by IBM and Sears, and they committed one billion dollars to launch prodigy. So are one million dollars was not going to, you know, beat the prodigy, one billion dollars. So rather than try to compete head to head, we decided to kind of have this strategy of partnerships. And so for the first several years, that was how we built the the company was on the back of these these partnerships. And so they actually worked quite well and took us from this start up to actually being a real company. But one of the key partnerships was with apple with licensed their brand name to create this apple Inc service and. Not long after launching it, they decided they didn't really like the idea of kind of having some other company used their brand. They had licensed their brand anybody else before. I'm not sure they have since. So it's frustrating and and kind of scary because you know, we, we thought that was going to be a big part of our growth for the next few years. But it was clear that apple is firm about that. And so we negotiated kind of settlement to go our separate ways. And since we couldn't call it apple Inc anymore. We said, okay, we need to call it something and you know, little internal contest and it ended up being America Online was the the winning brands. So the challenges of that partnership with apple and kind of let us to have to kind of relaunch as America Online. And then over time, you know, that service really gotten traction and we ended up, you know, kind of changing the company name and you know a couple of years later taken the company public. So you know the lesson was those partnerships were critically important to get us going. We would not have been successful without them, but. There was a point where we kind of had kind of stand their own two feet and move away from being so reliant on these core partnerships..

AOL apple apple Inc America United States partner IBM Sears one billion dollars one million dollars three percent two feet
"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Is Success

"This is success is brought to you by try human resources that know your business. Steve case, this is success. It's how do you make sure you doing everything you can to make the world a better place and try to kind of lift up people in communities as possible from business insider. I'm rich, baloney when case was in college. He read a book that said, a digital revolution was coming. It seemed like a ridiculous idea at the time, but it stuck with him a little over a decade later. He helped bring about that new age as the founding CEO of America Online left AOL in two thousand five, but his career was far from over now. He's focused on driving what he calls the third wave of the internet and through his venture capital firm revolution. He's betting on companies outside of Silicon Valley to make it happen. He's calling it the rise of the rest. It's a massive undertaking that echoes some of the vision he had back in the eighties as a fledgling tech entrepreneur. One of the things I was really passionate about. With those early days in the eighties nineties, and trying to basically make the internet part of everyday life was leveling the playing field in terms of access to information. When I was growing up, there was basically three TV networks and maybe in in your town. There's one sometimes two newspapers, but there weren't a lot of diversity voices and you didn't have a way to of get your voice out there. I didn't think that was helpful. And similarly, it was harder to compete with some of the bigger brands and the in the shop commerce, you know space. So the idea of the internet was kind of leveling the playing field and giving everybody access, information, education, commerce, reviews, whatever, whatever it might be that we felt was tremendously empowering the rise rest of similar now it's leveling the playing field in terms of opportunity. How do you make sure everybody really has a shot. And so even though they're very different ideas and they're separated by more than three decades. To me, they are kind of similar convince the little bit full circle. So as an entrepreneur, who has his passion for high growth start ups, are you one of those people who is through and through an entrepreneur like you knew that from the point you were kid? Yeah, pretty much I didn't. I was a kid. I didn't know what entrepreneur was heard of the word, but I the idea of starting a little businesses and and trying to create new things and see new possibilities, and, and you know, got wall was intrigued me. And so I guess I was wired, you know, it'd be more entrepreneurial. It's kind of a little bit unusual because my family is was not particularly entrepreneurial. Father was a lawyer work for the same law firm for sixty years. My mom was a teacher, and so when I was pursuing some of these entrepreneurial ventures, particularly in the early days of ALL when it didn't look like we necessarily going to make it I, they're, they're fairly anxious about that. And. You know. So it's a, but it said something about it that intrigued me. So you came from a background where it was more like maybe this is a bad idea like, why don't you just go like a traditional path and five. Some of that. Some of that, I'd say, grew up in Hawaii and who I like many parts of the country is a wonderful place, but tends to be a little cautious, a little risk averse that fearlessness that sense of possibility that does exist in place like Silicon Valley doesn't exist in many parts of the country and didn't certainly exist where I was grown up. So some of it may have been just a broader cultural, you know, kind of dynamic, but also Inc in terms of family, and it was more of a comfort zone was more kind of working for more traditional, you know, company than I actually did when I, when I graduated from college in nineteen eighty, I already decided I wanted to get into this internet thing because I read some things in the late seventies about, you know, kind of teletext videotex interactive TV and in online services and bunch of people were trying different different things out and sort of early versions of interactive services..

Steve case Silicon Valley America Online Hawaii CEO three decades sixty years
"steve case" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"steve case" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Product called to market that was actually yet it was a projects that came out about all and if you're well had actually uh agreed to put some funding into this project when these guys left apple 'cause apple wasn't gonna funded anymore and so uh steve case had actually been working with steve jobs on some stuff at apple that was kind of you know around this project but it was actually still owned by by apple at the time but anyway so i'm sitting here in their office and having lunch with these three got eyes you know had no idea really what allow was and steve case was down in our office and the southern guy ted leonsis said you know it was basically you know five guys like sitting around and they heard about pal i add uh help break the business plan for this thing called the airport channel which is now cnn in airports and had worked at cnn doing that and uh and so they will ally okay we'll do you have any other questions about our business and i'm like how are we going to make money and i remember ted leonsis looking at these guys that worked at apple and he's like this is the person that you want on your team i mean somewhat joking but somewhat like okay how you gotta zach surely gonna make this thing work and uh you know the reality is that they didn't really know how to get that the concept was to get uh shopping in ecommerce catalogue offers to put their stocks.

apple cnn ted leonsis steve case
"steve case" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"steve case" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Just a wild shot maybe aajit pie do you think time will still exist as a magazine am i i wonder because meredith is such a lifestyle brand if time in fortune and those guys door exist i dunno why would you spend a lot of money to buy it if you would didn't want to continue to publish it steve case has created a new fund called the rise of the rest i would call it the flyover fund did he do this like five or six years i swear to god's case has been travelling middle america for a decade right and he's rainsy money from bazars and a lot of other people to a fund startups bays us eric schmidt starbucks chairman howard schultz tori birch the fashion designer the the henry kravice of kk in are all michael milken john door the walton's the coakes the pritzker is sean parker ted leonsis they're all a put money into this fund to foster startups in middle america who i am i'm almost one hundred percent sure he's done this before you it seems like that's not really i mean uh there's lots of reasons why startups happen and where they happen but just because you decide that geopolitically fueled i could should be somewhere doesn't make that happen even if you throw a lot of money a i it's in you know what i'd like to see him do throw money at make spaces yep put that money were early with check dropped going under a deadly gases are probably important result tech shop was the first four prophet make most baker spaces are like yours a benicia maker space a nonprofit but textbased they want they thought we could make this a business is was that did that f go under just because you couldn't or because there were some structural problems well i.

meredith steve case america bazars chairman henry kravice michael milken eric schmidt howard schultz ted leonsis benicia one hundred percent six years
"steve case" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"steve case" Discussed on Acquired

"Well believe it or not guys i'm gonna wrap this up i'm let's let's it the the i promised twenty minutes i'm wade beyond that at this point the deal is announced january ten two 2000 it's the merger of a hundred and sixty four billion dollar aol with eighty three billion dollar time warner the deal it's announces a merger but the reality is ails shareholders controlled fifty six percent of the merged company and time warner shareholders 44 percent so it's an acquisition in all but name and you know i actually remember very vividly this happening and in my memory i forgot to look this up there like jerry levin and steve case or on charlie rose that night like they were every rose via steve case vowed that one day aoltime warner would have one hundred billion dollars in revenue would be the world's first trillion dollar market kept company there is a quote from roger mac the me the venture capitalists who says quote let's be clear this is the single most transformative event i've ever seen in my career care swisher has a quote from our book where she says quote in one major move the two companies had seemingly address both of their weaknesses and intensified their strength i won't deny that i really believe that as did many others many of whom now pretend they never did so i mean this is january two thousand this is the height of the bubble was also happening around this time the microsoft antitrust trial has come to an end it looks like microsoft's about to be broken up who looks like that is the new king of the technology hill it's aol of all people what happens is so the the deal is announced in january of two thousand on four days later the dow jones industrial average peaks at a level that it would not return to for more than six years on march tenths 2000 the nasdaq peaks and at a level that it would not reach again until march of 2015.

the deal aol jerry levin steve case aoltime warner roger mac venture capitalists swisher microsoft warner dow jones nasdaq eighty three billion dollar one hundred billion dollars sixty four billion dollar fifty six percent trillion dollar twenty minutes 44 percent four days six years one day