17 Burst results for "Steve Paulsen"

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Near niagara falls my today's standards i guess it was pretty tame i remember a wooden roller coaster called the silver comet and a ferris wheel and my favorite and jake ganic slide as tall as a building you climbed up to the top you sat on a burlap sack and then you slid about fifty miles an hour down was both terrifying and thrilling i bet you have memories like that too and some wonderland full of noise and the smell of butter pink cotton candy coney island six flags pacific park when you're a kid they're all magical but amusement parks have also shaped america in some profound ways historian lauren rabinovitz says they helped modernize the country she tells steve paulsen they introduced americans to the wonders of technology one hundred years ago you wouldn't have seen the roller coasters that we think of now we think of an amusement park back then they were scenic railways and they about twenty miles an hour the technology had not been developed yet but you'd see a lot of different rides that would take people into darkness and the big centerpiece of the park would actually be the shoots ride which is akin to what we would have is a waterslide today that was actually the fastest ride at the park and generally the most popular so the impression that i'm getting is that at a place like coney island just all of new york would come out to see them i mean this is a place people wanted to go especially on a weekend absolutely it was the place to go especially for the working class on weekends and i think what most people don't realize is that there over fifteen hundred parts in the united states.

niagara falls pacific park america lauren rabinovitz coney island new york united states jake ganic steve paulsen one hundred years
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And p r x mm one of the most stunning new pieces of climate fiction is from lydia yukanovich the speculative novel called the book of joan sat in a disturbingly nearfuture earth is decimated radiation exposure has altered the bodies of the few survivors who orbit are huska planet a hacked together spaceship steve paulsen recently got together with lydia yukanovich to talk about some of the ideas on the book and also to see if she still has any faith in humanities future through the wall sized windu i can see a distant navient it's gasses and hip hypnotic accused make me hold my breath i can also see the dying ball of dirt burst circa twenty forty nine are former home it looks sludge didn't cps a firm christian the window catches my well what used to be a firm i never had a green thumb even those long years ago when i lived on earth this firm as mostly as sad little curve of stick it's photosynthesis is entirely artificial if it were allowed the sun we've got now with the absence of adequate ozone layers it would instantly rats and remains we are far enough from the sun to exist in and habitable zone and yet so close one wrong move and where incinerated worthy aftermath the first place.

joan steve paulsen lydia yukanovich
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Keys to an incredibly powerful monitoring system does our culture respect women in a way that it makes us feel like these kinds of systems would not be abused in sexist ways there have been lawsuits against casinos for the employs using cctv for ogling women police have been in trouble for the same thing the nsa even has a word called love int it's the love intel it's the abuse of their systems to look up exlover's and contract people down how there is another creepy wear to called purves valence prevail its which is the use of all these cameras in monitoring devices for ogling and sexual gratification and voyeurism how much to set gandhi thank more than we realise i hate to say it but you know a lot of people working behind the desks in these security jobs are young men in the board and they sit there all day and they do unfortunately what a lot of young men do which is kind of of checked by women and the guided by the machine that allows them to do it there's been research that shows this was back in the 1990s in europe a researcher showed that the surveillance cameras that were put into i think it was in a shopping mall were being used more for sexual gratification ogling than they were four security wow and so if he could actually look over the shoulder of big brother and see what he was looking at you'd probably be pretty disturbed kind of makes you want to go home turn off everything electronic and pull the shades doesn't it randolph lewis tells more stories about how we're be watched in a book called under surveillance i'll be watching you now that we're all feeling insecure it's probably a good time for a quick lesson in online privacy how to protect yourself and your phone from hackers trolls and scammers and for that steve paulsen called lilley hey newman the staff writer who covers security for wire what are some of the risks that having a smartphone carries well it's just like the capabilities of smart homes of ice or a smart assistant but sort of even more expanded it has listening capabilities read it has a microphone potentially mel where or spyware on the device could see everything that you're doing everything that your typing harvest passwords.

cctv exlover gandhi researcher randolph lewis steve paulsen lilley staff writer intel europe
"steve paulsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Trai and thaddeus yeah the man yes van der it is oh it's all gave his song that ardian all would have grown up with our garfunkel treatment of tommy edwards 1958 hit before that more ganic king's treatment of lenny welsh is since i felt for you paul cavalcante here 939 fm wnyc on this week's on the media the man who supervised the in writing of the pentagon papers says the wars in iraq and afghanistan proves that american policy makers have never read them we jumped into them without knowing staffs this dams essential message of the pentagon papers don't miss this week's on the media from wnyc tomorrow morning at ten on 939 fm wnyc supporters include in the body of the world the new play written in performed by events ler creator of the vagina monologues the author performer at activist brings this personal work to life on stage at manhatten theatre club through march 25th wnyc is a media partner of the new york academy of sciences presenting the lecture a touch of all crafting meaning from the wonder of the cosmos february seventh moderated by steve paulsen host of to the best of our knowledge details at n y a s dot org this is wnyc 939 fm.

Trai tommy edwards lenny welsh paul cavalcante iraq manhatten theatre club partner pentagon afghanistan new york academy of sciences steve paulsen wnyc
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New korea law more your normal join me owlry no who boehner coop go there you go yeah who cares kong coup if you try to imagine what the ancient world looks like what comes to mind gladiators in the coliseum roman emperors reclining and togas being fed flamingo tongues or maybe something more along the lines of monty python life of bryon but you might be surprised to learn that there was a sophisticated culture a thousand years before all of that stretching from egypt two babylon a globalised world of trade and diplomacy and that world known as the late bronze age is what archeologists eric klein studies he says we would be amazed by how contemporary it feels and also that we are now facing some of the same challenges they face which led to their ruin klein and we stop by our studio to talk with steve paulsen eric you've done something rather audacious you've come up with an actual date for when civilization collapsed in the ancient world eleven seventy seven b c what happened then well and eleven seventy seven loosely most of the known world in the aegean and the eastern mediterranean collapsed came to an end was the eighth year of ramsey's the third the fair of egypt but i do have to say that that's just a shorthand for the overall collapse just like we say for seventy six is when the roman empire collapsed and we know would actually took about one hundred years same thing here and you're you're talking about the collapse of what we've come to know as the bronze age as the late bronze age absolutely so when we talk about the collapse of civilizations were talking mycenaean summon no one's from greece were talking about the hittites in turkey sipri separates in cyprus canaanite soon what is now israel lebanon syria a syrian babylon in what is now iran and iraq we've got about eight or nine civilizations that are all interacting and they all go down at the same time like a set of domino's and an end to put this in perspective the brands h flourish for nearly two thousand years of across this vast expanse of land but you say there was a global economy going on here there was now you know put that in context is not global like us today but it was global further time i would say from italy.

bryon egypt ramsey greece syria domino global economy korea eric klein steve paulsen israel lebanon iran iraq italy two thousand years one hundred years thousand years
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the last time that's the epigraph to engage emerson's novel the fifth season the first book in her broken earth trilogy at is one of the best science fiction and fantasy series of the past decade and it set in a futuristic world grappling with power racism and oppression with a dash of magic thrown in as nar jemison told steve paulsen the story is rooted in the historical moment we're living in right now and it was a black woman living in a modernday american society of course i've got lots of questions about validity and and exploitation muckler's matter and against this book were born out of the same frustration of the same anger of the same pain i was a sitting at home and kind of writing parts of this book as i was watching ferguson unfold on twitter and we started to see again and again the names of people who had been x drew judicially murdered then you start to realise also it's not so much the murderers but it's the fact that those murders then went unpunished so you're talking about systemic oppression here would choose one of the themes of of these books uh systemic oppression ya systemic racism i drew inspiration from a lot of different oppressive situations at one point one of the protagonists has lived her life as a woman in hiding effectively similar to the closeted queer person so yes systems that are exploitative towards oppressed groups for specific reasons the you have done a lot of world building in these books i mean you have quakes in volcanoes that have devastating impacts there's also magic there is this oppressive so order man i know all this as complicated but for the uninitiated can you give us a brief outline of the world that you've agreement that's going to be fun all right well basically it is a world unlike our own there is a single supercontinent here called the stillness looks a lot like our own world except periodically every two or three hundred years there is a seismic event powerful enough to kick off something that the locals call a fifth season that is a seismic winter or some kind of disaster related worldwide massive phenomenon that often comes paired with famine in the breakdown of.

emerson nar jemison ferguson steve paulsen twitter three hundred years
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This socially produce so if we were to socialize part of the shares of every company through these kinds of depositry and heavy universal basic dividend and increase the proportion of the shares that are commonly own two then we have a trust fund for the masses but for that to happen something must happen politically so we're back to where we started how might that happens so that you would remove some of the power from these technology companies and so that they were actually have to put aside this pot of money for the welfare of all when we need to copy donald trump don't unproved that you can't than against establishment and win we progressives have to become and bishops like donald trump was known to do the opposite of what trump is doing good people in the silicon valley understand power so they see a progressive movement izing up and at the same time realized that the way we are now proceeding is grain to create a slump in demand because the masses will not have the money to purchase that goodies and they're apps and their mob iphones and all that the combination of their own selfinterest and the push of a progressive political movement that he's winning power that is the only scenario i can see that will deliver the developments in the future that's yannis farah faculties the former agree finance minister who's talking with steve paulsen about his memoir called adults in the room you're listening to that it's tempting to think this whole capitalists liberal democratic thing and just is working should there be another way coming up the story of how one small family owned bank took the fall for the mortgage crisis and what we can learn from it enhanced rain chance here to the best of our knowledge of wisconsin public radio.

technology companies donald trump steve paulsen yannis farah finance minister wisconsin
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Woo mom donald the bye bring core if you're looking to improve your life there's no shortage of selfhelp book so that you can turn to the secret the 7 habits of highly effective people the 7 habits of highly productive public radio producers heroins very popular around our office but then brinkman thinks we need less selfhelp and more anti selfhelp brinkman is the author of an anti selfhelp book called stand firm it was an overnight sensation in his homeland of denmark steve paulsen sat down with brinkman to find out more spend the the subtitle of your book stand firm is resisting the self improvement crazy so so let me start by asking what's wrong with selfimprovement nothing is wrong with self improvement as such if we know why were improving ourselves if we know why it's valuable to improve ourselves in a certain direction then it's all right it's fine you know all children should be educated they should learn they should develop themselves and become mature adults autonomous decision makers and all that that's all fine the problem is that selfdevelopment self optimization has become a duty it has become a burden throughout our lives which means that we are never good enough we should always improve always perform better and i think this is really weighing us down it's creating a lot of problems for us in a related to stress and anxiety and depression and other mental health problems so my book is about the need for us to learn to stand firm.

steve paulsen donald selfhelp brinkman denmark depression
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Craig federighi one of the most famous scientific experiments of the 20th century was a series of pioneering fields studies of the great apes many studies were all done by women there was jane goodall studying chimpanzees diane fossey was mountain gorillas and brutal galdikas with a rang at hands and these three women the so called trimbe aides were personally chosen by the legendary paleo anthropologist louis leakey and leaguie had a theory he thought that if we could get really detailed field studies of the animals most closely related to us we might discover and how our own ancestors evolved he also had another theory it should be women not men who did the research steve paulsen as our story today jane goodall is one of the world's most famous scientists showed us that chimpanzees like humans have very different personalities and she made several revolutionary discoveries she found that chimps are toolmakers she observed them hunting other animals and she also southern wage war on rival groups of chimps but what may be the most surprising piece of the story is that when could all started her field study 1960 she had no scientific training n had any nonly was at school left school at eighteen i got a course of training as a secretary got a job in london with documentary films and then decided i had to get to africa when i was invited by friend so left my job in london which didn't pay very well when tone worked as a waitress saved up my wages of my tips gotta return fares were africa and there i met louis leakey well i have to say that is remarkable when you think about it had been back at 1960 you seem to be the most unlikely candidate to revolutionize our understanding of chimpanzees at wh why do you think loosely keep picked you to do this field study lee told me later afterwards that he deliberately pick.

Craig federighi steve paulsen jane goodall secretary lee diane fossey trimbe louis leakey leaguie london africa
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Major stars of the european seeing and one of the most important pioneers in bridging elettronica and jazz and housemusic in jazz in the nineties and he's his playing has never been stronger than already there in the when he ends twitter then shared the front in this spent and then there is joined klis listen on drums who who also played in the legendary cortec with keith jarrett's yang of onyx so he's really of of the link there to keith jarrett's and to the incredible inspiring catalogue of jarrett all these details aside there is the swim writing the willingness to to take the leap of faith to to really go for its two to cherish beauty and two at the same time have this follow the scene burge to be here and now to to have the rawness of emotional intensity here now for instance men in the trek cold needy and why all which is one of my favorites on the album this yeah this is a gorgeous album nick jazz pianist toward gustafsen he recommends men calero's album bond apart one is the most celebrated musicians in jazz today is vigie iwr he's been downbeat magazine's artist of the year and also pianist of the year is a macarthur genius with a phd in music cognition to the questions that fascinated him a things like what news music and what does it do for us when vigil ire was in town recently steve paulsen caught up with him backstage they talked about jazz improvisation and the origins of music uh uh ready to do this road all over the jay from what i can see you straddle various different worlds you're a professor at harvard highprofile jazz musician you've a background and science peagw in the science of music cognition obviously a jazz musician but you go way beyond jazz i mean you go into other kinds of music classical music with indian and western hiphop electronic music is it part of your project to to break down these categories i don't know if it's parliament project it as part of my reality but i don't really see those categories is particularly meaningful because when you really get down to artists a collaboration or just here to.

twitter keith jarrett burge gustafsen calero jay professor downbeat magazine steve paulsen harvard highprofile
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're talking about artificial creativity in this hour and here's my question when a computer program john foul or improvisers a few bars of music activity even this alert is seen doing what humans programmed it to nato lays out wear a arcus is about mary at the forefront of artificial intelligence he currently leads goebbels machine intelligence group in seattle where he brings together artists and engineers steve paulsen that the newest deep learning models really can go beyond what they've been taught yes i think the what's wrong pasta is that they start off as these disorganized neural networks so a bunch of muddle neurons wired up in a need then they learn from example and as you teach examples they do develop kgb to develop understanding of some sort john i think that i that that one can use that term in the legitimate sense um and you know i'm not by any means saying that their conscious or that they you know how does or that they are but i am definitely saying that prize is possible with a system like that you talking about i mean if we come back to the world of arth thing you're talking about the capacity to create a new kind of art that that humans could never dream up because i don't know there is a different kind of logic when it comes to machinelearning that's true when we see some of the things that gets generated or who enormous uh you know it's a reality and we are kind of art and it's not not something that i've seen any person paint yeah it is it is new interface in some sense that's totally fascinating have you seen you might have a total abdou kind of our because of machine towel yes i'm sure that's the case this is it and now you've been talking about social aberrations between computers and humans but what if we get rid of the nc are men after the after the you know the original ragged programmings dynamics is this other generation of of machine learning are you're you're talking about i mean that in.

artificial intelligence seattle nc john goebbels steve paulsen
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Libertarians view of what the government should do there are only three things it can ensure the national defence enforce the rule of law and guarantee social order just those three things anything more than that is unacceptable to them an illegitimate so that's why i think this cause is so frightening and so radical because basically it is taking aim at the entire model of twentieth century citizendriven government so many republicans have been disciplined by this caused that his basically may aid turn one of our major political parties in two eight leninist libertarian party i don't use that phrase lightly the charles coke in one of the people he funded in the 1970s we're reading lenin to think about how a minority could affect a radical transformation and they have built this leninist style discipline into the republican party where people are afraid not to toe the line historian nancy mclane talking with steve paulsen her book is called democracy in chains so that's kind of a depressing view of contemporary politics secret agendas left and rightwing levels polarization everywhere you look set before we go let's remember that it wasn't all that long ago that liberals and conservatives could be friends i went to parties together drank together sometimes eytan slap together jeannie safer and richard brooke haiser met during those good old days she is a lifelong liberal he's senior editor for the conservative national review when they finally married from within thirty five years ooh ramona singing group i had that a member of it for a couple of years in then rick join we sang renaissance religious music on street corners and hear wonderful voice and so to treat that she had a great layoff i am recognized how wonderful he saying he was a trimming talk of a guy and i asked him what he did and he said he was a writer in that was great and they're than answer he wrote for and he said there were in buckley at national review which was less great event i'm a conservative republican i want to an ivy league school so i was already used to being among people who were mostly not of my views well it was different from yemen first of all i and where rubin i went didn't know anybody reich rick i didn't know anybody who was conservative i the conservatives from me with a john birch society so i got an education and i found.

lenin republican party senior editor writer buckley national review yemen rubin john birch society steve paulsen richard brooke haiser rick ivy league thirty five years
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Got a lot of blow back your job is to defend the conservative no matter what and i realize that that i was definitely cross ways with the audience as it turned out in november eddie twenty nine on the morning of march twenty i was a rightwing talk radio hack by eleven o'clock that morning i was one of the deepest thinkers in america nepad and today is the liberals new favorite concern charlie sykes spent more than two decades hosting a popular conservative talk radio show he railed against the clintons and alabama and he helped push paul ryan and scott walk around in a national stage and now plays a frequent guest on msnbc he explain that's why in a book called how the right lost its mind intel steve paulsen there's some lines you don't cross i understand and respect the people who made the binary choice on an issue like for example judicial appointments but there's some moments we go look if you fundamentally believe that someone is unfit to be the president someone who is a serial liar con man who marks the disabled and women who lacks both that the temperament and the character to be president you don't change that simply because he wins a nomination he's fit to be president or he's not fit and as a moral choice that you have to make and i think that donald trump taints both the republican party and can serve it is and what i'm most concerned about what i really address in this book is not so much critique of donald trump as what his embraces unto us that one point near book you you say and i'm quoting here for years we ignored the birther is the racist the truth errs and other conspiracy theorists who indulge fantasies of obama's secret muslim plot to subvert christendom or who peddled tales of hillary clinton's murder victims so i guess the question is why fiji you and.

nepad charlie sykes clintons paul ryan scott msnbc steve paulsen president republican party donald trump obama hillary clinton america alabama intel murder two decades
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To somehow understand what's happening in science what's happening in music what's happening in richard literature and i started to do exactly the same but i hit donning visual arts with these ought to our farms i've accord with its architects in the studio i would go to scientists to visit the lab who cooked meats composers the better think i mean both will be mean actually to curate not only are afoot to puree in a maul interdisciplinary way at he tweeted than that i somehow all of a sudden came across the argument i was probably about any my other chinese an and realized that he is he going to be to me had actually started out to be a curator of painting to be a curate off of visual arts exhibition but then had his idea of of bringing all the odds frost gadot and for these reasons founded in ninety no nine the rally at loose of that's for me both a you chaffee the suddenly thinking maybe von could do such a thing for our time maybe i could curate our prime aby exhibitions rival mobilize not only be sure about this but also compose us also architects and that it's something you know i've tried to to ever seen seen in lots of different situations hohns over iq over his is a curator at the serpentine gallery in london he talked with steve paulsen coming up wrap your head around this i went to the woods because i wish to live deliberately new front only the essential facts of life and not when i came to die discovered that i had not lin henry david throws walden pond the video game it's to the best of our knowledge from wisconsin public radio and p r axe.

steve paulsen walden pond london lin henry david wisconsin
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Only thing were three writing about is the human heart in conflict with itself and i think that you know war is a place where you can you really see that laid bare thou shalt not kill is pretty fundamental to being a civilized human being and this is the one endeavour where there is sanctioned killing sanctioning your heart to be your civilized heart to be in conflict with its savage heart i don't like to say that you never escape war because it sounds so limiting by that experience gave me a fundamental understanding of what it means to be human being and i'm always writing about the human experience and my understanding of the human experience is informed by war elliot ackermann's novel is called green on blue he served five tours of duty in iraq and afghanistan his the recipient of the silver star the brand staff and the purple heart raymond tai chi talked with him so it can be tempting to think that war is inevitable the human beings are just too violent or two aggressive we just basically suck too much to maintain any kind of lasting peace cilliers an argument on the other side back in two thousand three there was a civil war going on in liberia remember it was a war that had gone on seemingly forever there were unspeakable atrocities on both sides science and then a woman named lima bali basically stood up and said enough she gathered the women of liberia together in a nonviolent protest and it ended the civil war not only did her efforts made to the ouster and the imprisonment as a dictator charles taylor she also won the nobel peace prize in two thousand eleven though he told steve paulsen that wartorn liberia had gotten so bad that she just felt like she had to take matters into her own hands liberia had gone from bad to worse to ridiculous that is how bad.

elliot ackermann iraq civil war lima bali liberia steve paulsen afghanistan charles taylor
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i was walking back to my room and the university when i look for martial older and suddenly i saw this sort of strange sort of finger extracting from a cloud it was coming within down directly at me you know other people was sort of huddling against our door under mourning the loss dora remember there wouldn't be much shelter for me that so i hung around the corner managed to find the little balcony to shelter under it was a tornado people have been thought through the door many had been therapy her i think dozens were killed and it was a disaster seemed like i've never oversee thorough lead who is strong the only tornado in the recorded history of daily and i happen to be there on that road day just the butler and that is a true story about the storm that nearly killed amitav ghosh think of all the great novels the world would have messed see of poppies glass palace the goche has been thinking about that storm lightly and about all the other weird freakish whenever seeing because he's trying to figure out how to write about climate change as a novelist he makes the case for climate as a crisis of imagination in his new book the great derangement climate change and the unthinkable steve paulsen talked with him so when you look back at that experience all those years ago what do you make of it well it's a very strange thing after that for many years i did try to right about that experience and are you know i'm a novelist are novelists liked to put stuff like this than their books and i've often tried but threat yet i was never able to do it as simply because the very on in light came as the bizarreness of the experience the very improbability of it was such that it was a really impossible to put from abukar mmhmm snow are how'd you write the novel which has its own conventions of.

climate change steve paulsen abukar mmhmm snow amitav ghosh
"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"steve paulsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So we started this hour talking about the saint louis arch as a metaphor about gateway moments personal and collective and would come full circle backed him bricks and mortar and stone and steel bob has been is a professor of architecture end of social justice and really when he teaches is border crossings yesterday he took our staff on a tour at not of the arch or forest park where the mississippi river but of what he calls the other st louis welcome plays bob hans and our own steve paulsen what will take me back to your own story so you had been this up and coming artist selling your work for a lot of money and at a certain point that wasn't working for you know no if his round the time i was started working with the kids and the projects peabody and at that point a lately changed my idea about what art mike before if i could use art to help these kids in the projects set of field about themselves that was good i just couldn't do it myself anymore it was these i just couldn't couldn't justify doing drawings for people to hang on their walls when these by kids downtown were dying so this was a rough neighborhood it was very robert was murdered the first week i was down there it was mostly blood's encrypt most blood or blood than crips in europe is also teaching.

social justice mississippi river steve paulsen robert europe saint louis arch professor of architecture bob hans