35 Burst results for "Steve Mirsky"

Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

Science Talk

09:37 min | 1 year ago

Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

"This is scientific. American science talk posted on March. Twenty seven twenty twenty. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm going to let my guest introduce himself in a moment because he does a better job than I could. Midway through the following discussion. We'll take a break for a short segment sponsored by the Calveley prize with Caltech Planetary Astronomer. Michael Brown who has done groundbreaking work though solar system breaking work on the Kuyper belt and its largest members. His segment is not unrelated to what will be talking about now. It's not about corona virus. You'll find some parallels to how some people are reacting to corona virus. Buckle up so I'm Michael Marshall and I'm the project director of the good thinking society which is a charity based in the UK the whole purpose charities to promote science to challenge pseudoscience. So we'll do work Ford Science Education and then another PA the work that we do. The bulk of my work is to find ideas. That aren't backed by evidence and find people who are promoting those ideas find people who are buying into those ideas and to explore them and figure out if anything can be done to prevent people being confused by them Hound by the misled by them and those kinds of things. So I spent a lot of time looking at things like alternative cancer kills and the people who promote those and alternative medicine spent a lot my time going to see people who say they can talk dead. Oku can do faith healing and then another part of my time is spent token people who believe in unusual ideas and kind of proponents. And that's how I came across the flat. Earth world is through my slightly odd a hobby at the time before I was working. Fulltime as as a skeptic is a hobby of mine to be in rooms filled if he who disagree with me to just understand what brings people to ideas that. I would look at and say well. This can't be true. These kind of fringe and extreme and unusual beliefs. What brings people to believe them? And what what? What kind of path leave people there will? Evidence supports supports that position in their minds. And how do they engage with the world with that worldview and try and have conversations? Podcast where I talked to people who have kind of fringe beliefs and instead of having a conversation that a lot of people have if they are a skeptic about something and they're talking to believe where you shout at them and tell them never home and point out all the evidence and tell you gets into a volatile discussion sometimes instead of that. I've tried to have a civil and polite chat to try and explore the gap between us. So I don't believe in this idea of yours but I'm reading to figure out why I don't believe it. Why do so? Let's have a conversation? So have these kind of civil discussions and that's kind of how I came across That the flatter theory and the idea that there are people walking around today. Who think well this flat. This is really interesting and serendipitous that were sitting here because I knew that there were some flatter. Thor's out there and I just thought it was kind of strange and funny and about a week ago I discovered a friend of mine who is very well educated. She got a doctorate in biochemistry and She has a sister who's also very intelligent and very well educated and my friend told me that her sister is a flatter and that her sister is very indignant about the idea that We don't take them seriously and she said something to the effectiveness is hearsay. That we're getting for me right now. That will you know if you looked at the evidence. Then you'd know that what you've been told isn't true. So all of a sudden became fascinated with the flat earth people and then Just on twitter and I had I had been a follower verve yours until I saw this tweet that somebody I follow must've re tweeted that you had just given a talk in Edinburgh where I have been and So I reached out to you and it turns out you live in Liverpool and here I am in Liverpool today. So that's why we're here talking so tell me what do the flat Earth People Think and why do they think it so to your packet question that will bit because it's very easy for us to see the flat? Earth Movement is one singular cohesive movement and. That's how I I thought about it when I first came across in two thousand thirteen when I came across the flutter society in the UK. And so I had a conversation with the vice president of the Flat Earth Society and I assumed you probably have in your mind that people who believe the world is flat thing that the world's disk and in the center you've got the Arctic Circle then you've got all the continents of the world are splayed out to fill the circle. Antarctica is like the edge of disk. But I found out when I first spoke to flatter societies that not everyone in the world has that version of the world and the heads. Some do believe it's a disc but others believe that. Yes the Arctic Circle in the middle the landmasses around it and then on top Around the edge but instead of it being discreet disc some people believe in fact Antactica just on forever and all directions and so they believe that the earth is actually an infinite plane in all directions that bisects reality which is a really lovely idea. What does that mean by? Second three dollars so it will go on. North South East West go on forever and there is the above and the below. But there's no way of getting from the top to the bottom because it's just infinity of all ice in all directions forever so there's no way of getting below the earth and so this was when. I first came across the floor of moving in two thousand thirteen. This quite vociferous debate that was going on and the website of the three in the flat. Earthers yeah it was. It was quite a schism really and so they'd the society. The the time was largely a forum where they would bring forth that proofs of one version this theory or another and I also think there's another schism going on in the movement at the time Which is between one side which people who genuinely really believed the world was flat and the other side which after he did not believe it but enjoyed intellectual pursuit of arguing a position than you false and so they would find quite esoteric off the wall proofs that most people wouldn't think of and so when I first came across it in two thousand thirteen there are people waiting into these arguments who believe the world is round but had never thought about it the fall but just assumed innocent of arrogant way that they must know better than anybody who's thought about it and come to a different conclusion and so they were stumping into these arguments saying well what about photos of the earth from space and what about this and what about ships going with the rise in thinking. Well this is the Gotcha but not realizing that those are the first things they thought about that. They thought the world approved walls around. And therefore it's probably likely that people who think the world is flat had the same idea and yet they're still flat earth So at least in their mind they must have a good answer to that. The people believe the world was round in these arguments. Didn't have 'cause they'd never scrutinize the idea. They rejecting enough and so what was happening. Was I think to a degree? The part of the schism that were just having fun and move very well. The world wasn't flat but just enjoyed the pursuit of doing that. They will winning those arguments of people who are coming in and arrogantly assuming that they could answer everything and in winning those arguments they were really converting even more people who really believed it. And so you had this kind of effect where we saw spiral out of control a little bit. But I think it it wasn't viral in the way that in two thousand thirteen and a as a in the way that it was in two thousand sixteen in two thousand seventeen. I'm think PA that is because that ISA teric off wall version of proofs could be quite complicated to get your head around so for example if you have the disc version the world and the infinite plane version both muddles suffer from an inability to explain gravity. You don't have the spherical mass united central mass of a central point pulling it all two to one point So it's very difficult to explain. Gravity neither one models but these people who are doing kind of East Tarik arguments are saying well what gravity gravity and accelerate falls towards the ground. Think nine point. Eight meters per second. Squared accelerates downwards. They said that is identical to a world in which the ground accelerates upwards to meet you and so when you let go of something it isn't that it's accelerating downwards that it's the grounds accelerating up to meet it Sephora relativity and that's this is exactly where they come to you so people then say when if ground is if the earth is an infinite in all directions that by sex reality and is accelerating open at nine seconds and always has been since the dawn of time. You'd hit a problem which would be the speed of light. You can't go fast so people don't have a Gotcha for this. And so the people who were putting forth esoteric the wall trobisch arguments would say well look at Einstein's theory of relativity as you approach light speed time itself slows down and the mats in their head works back out again so yes beginning. Quick time getting slower and we can account for gravity in that way. And that's quite a complicated auditing Enron. And so I think the fact that these people were winning arguments was getting converting some people movement but the way in which they were winning them were keeping people away from the movement because they were quite complex ideas to you. Couldn't stick them on a mean as you can these days. Here's a picture of the earth. You couldn't explain all that stuff about the relatively proving gravitate infinite plane version of the world. So I think it was a limiting factor going on and that's why when I first came across the free movement it was probably still pretty small. Pretty unknown I've been given talks about pseudoscience for the last five six plus years and I've mentioned that I came across the Flat Earth. Moving and people would always say to me this. Nobody who actually believes that nobody actually doesn't really exist. That people having fun with stay quite small and then in. Twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen a couple of things happened that really ignited a movement and it was the publishing of two videos on Youtube video series on Youtube. One I believe was Eric. Debate tuned approves the Spinning Globe. And the other was mark sergeants. Fourteen videos in his letter clue series.

Flat Earth Society UK PA Arctic Circle Earth Movement Liverpool Steve Mirsky Michael Brown Caltech Planetary Astronomer Calveley Youtube Cancer OKU Ford Science Education Twitter Michael Marshall Thor Antarctica
Science News Briefs From Around the World

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs From Around the World

"Hi I'm scientific American. Podcast editor Steve. Mirsky and here's a short piece from the February. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine and the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article was titled Quick Hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by Assistant News editor. Sarah Lou Frazier from the US off. The California coast scientist measured a blue whales heart rate for the first time using a device attached to the animal skin by Suction Cup the heart likely weighing hundreds of pounds beats from the thirty seven down to two times per minute varying dramatically between diving feeding and surfacing from Peru researchers analyzing satellite. An imaging data have found one hundred. Forty three new Nazca lines. These are largely line drawings of humans animals and symbols etched into the Peruvian Landscape Millennia. Ago The drawings including humanoid figures sixteen feet across spotted by. Ibm's Watson AI system from Brazil despite the long dry spells in Brazil's Catchinga region. Scientists found the tree hyman a Conga era drizzles copious nectar from flowers to attract pollinating. Bats full-sized tree can release two hundred forty gallons of the stuff with thirty eight distinct sent compounds over a single dry season from Norway. Archaeologists ground piecing radar found a Viking era ship surrounded by a filled ditch lurking below the soil of a western Norway farm. The ship was once within a burial mound from Jordan. Researchers uncovered a two horned figure in early Islamic ruins that may be the earliest ever found the roughly thirteen hundred year old object matches a rook found in Iranian chess. Set from about four hundred years later and from Ethiopia microbes thrive in many of earth's harshest environments but researchers found no life at all in briny scorching civic pools near Ethiopia's Dalla volcano knowing the boundaries for life's adaptations helps to narrow the search for earth like life on other planets. That was quick hits by Sarah Lou

Sarah Lou Frazier Editor Ethiopia Norway Sarah Lou Twenty Twenty Brazil Mirsky Dalla Volcano Steve Assistant News California United States Peru IBM Scientist Catchinga
"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

"Welcome to scientific American Science talk posted on February twenty seventh twenty twenty. I'm Steve Mirsky on this episode. There appears to be where we call a missing microbiome and in those individuals with the missing microbiome there to be much higher risk for these autoimmune in these other immune diseases at present early in life. That's ben been weakened. He received a doctorate in physical chemistry from Harvard. You may have seen bumper stickers that say honk. If you pass Pecan we can just now the global head of the world without disease accelerator the WW DA at Janssen the pharmaceutical companies of Johnson and Johnson. Where he's involved in multiple efforts to prevent disease or identify in its earliest stages for more effective treatments. We spoke by phone. What.

Steve Mirsky Johnson scientific American Science Harvard global head Janssen
Science News Briefs From All Over

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs From All Over

"I have scientific American podcast editor. Steve Mirsky here's a short piece from the November. Two Thousand Nineteen issue of the magazine in the section uncalled advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some science and Technology Legiti stories from around the globe compiled by editorial intern Jennifer Leeman from Canada. In the famed Burgess Shale rock formation paleontologists alien technologists discovered hundreds of fossils of a horseshoe crab shaped Predator that lived in the ocean. Five hundred six million years ago it. It measured up to a foot long from Tanzania marine biologists discovered a colorful fish species dubbed the vibration eum ferry routes during go diversity assessment of largely unstudied deep reefs off Zanzibar is coast from Columbia. Scientists confirmed a destructive instructive. Fungus targeting. Banana plants has arrived in the country. No treatment is available so officials put potentially infected crops under quarantine to stop its spread from Mexico. Researchers of rationed electricity and cut temporary employees jobs. After Mexico's president lowered funding funding for federal institutions by thirty to fifty percent in certain budget items including those supported by the National Council of Science and technology and from Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. Scientists found that Goliath frogs which are earth's largest living frogs and can be longer than an American can football construct protected ponds for their young by pushing heavy rocks across streams. They live only in this region that was quick hits by Jennifer Lima.

Steve Mirsky Mexico Burgess Shale Jennifer Leeman Jennifer Lima Technology Legiti National Council Of Science Editor Equatorial Guinea Tanzania Zanzibar Earth Intern Canada President Trump Columbia Five Hundred Six Million Years Fifty Percent
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky this year's Nobel laureates in Physics UH painted a picture of a universe far stranger and more wonderful than we ever could have imagined theoretical kind of American science talk podcast later today for scientific Americans sixty seconds science I'm Steve Mirsky

Steve Mirsky sixty seconds
Nobel in Physiology or Medicine for How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels

60-Second Science

02:54 min | 1 year ago

Nobel in Physiology or Medicine for How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky then Nobel family at Karolinska Institute today decided to ward the two thousand Nineteen Nobel Prize in Physiology or medicine jointly to William Oxygen Availability Thomas Perlman Secretary of the Nobel Assembly shortly after five thirty a m eastern time Greg Samantha was born else oxygen is essential for life and is used by virtually all animal cells in order to convert food to usable energy however years three laureates have greatly expanded our knowledge of how physiological response makes life possible for an in-depth listen about the the amount of oxygen available to cells tissues animals themselves can vary greatly this prize for three physician scientists who found back with potential drugs used to treat anemia and to treat some forms of cancer these fundamental findings have greatly increased outstanding of how the body adapts to change and applications of these findings are already beginning to affect the way medicine is practiced this the molecular switch that regulates how ourselves adapt when oxygen levels drop. Applications of these findings are already beginning to make their way to the Clinton winning studies at Oxford University and he's continuing to do his research that Oxford University and he's also at the Francis Crick Tiv- Sir Peter Ratcliffe was born in Nineteen fifty four in Lancashire in the UK. He performed his price Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston where is still active in his own lab Karolinska Institute researcher Randall Johnson Studies the effects of Thousand Nineteen Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine look for these scientific American science talk podcast later today for scientific Americans six

Nobel Prize Karolinska Institute Nobel Assembly Dana Farber Cancer Institute William Oxygen Sir Peter Ratcliffe Oxford University Clinton Steve Mirsky Greg Samantha Francis Crick Tiv Randall Johnson Anemia Thomas Perlman Secretary UK Boston Lancashire Researcher
West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

60-Second Science

03:05 min | 1 year ago

West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm steve mirsky early years of the development of gunpowder. It was known as the devils distillate because of its seemingly sinister properties <hes> so what where do those properties come from well they come from the three principal ingredients of gunpowder outer which are sulphur charcoal and salt peter three naturally occurring materials which when combined produce something much greater the sum of their parts stephen wrestler he served thirty four years in the us army corps of engineers and retired as brigadier general he spoke at sea aboard a scientific the american crews august seventeenth off the coast of scotland. His subject was how fortifications had to evolve. Once gunpowder was widely in use wrestler wrestler revealed a little basic chemistry about the constituents of gunpowder and how they're represented in a familiar uniform sulfur mineral found in nature yellowish yellowish or golden color burns at a relatively low temperature and that made it an material intense interest in the middle ages where alchemists were constantly looking for magical properties of materials sulfur seemed to be one of those materials that had magical properties because it was a stone that burned and it burned at a relatively low temperature charcoal the product of combustion of wood typically hardwood in an oxygen starved environment environment produces pure carbon but not just any old pure carbon pure carbon with a very fine microscopic laddis like structure that actually turns out to to be absolutely essential to the functioning of gunpowder and then finally the third and really in many ways the most important ingredient in gunpowder and that salt peter the chemical compositions actually potassium nitrate and it's a waste product of decomposing organic matter. That's all it is. It's a it's a weitz material that appears on the surface of fermenting organic material and turns out to be the absolutely essential material and gunpowder okay i have to pause for a totally unrelated diversion because sulphur charcoal and salt peter have great personal significance to me above and beyond the fact that their constituent materials gunpowder and that is they form the basis for the school colors of my alma mater the u._s. military academy at west point black raincoat in goal the school colors are explicitly defined as the three materials of gunpowder black charcoal grey is salt. Peter and gold is the sulphur so the next time you see that inevitable video on the evening news of the graduation at west point and all the cadets throwing their your hats up in the air think about gunpowder because that's what the black gray and the gold are are meant to to signify for scientific kind of americans sixty seconds science. I'm steve mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Peter Principal U._S. Military Academy United States Scotland Sixty Seconds Thirty Four Years
Science News Briefs From All Over

60-Second Science

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs From All Over

"Hi I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. Here's a short piece from the July two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. In the article was titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor. Jim Daly from Guatemala archaeologists unearthed the largest known Mayan figurine. CORRINE factory the more than one thousand year old workshop mass produced intricate statues that were likely used in diplomacy as gifts to allies from Nepal researchers confirm the nation's first recorded. Tornado which occurred during devastating storm in March the team relied on satellite imagery and posts on social media to make the identification from Antarctica Emperor Penguins have abandoned one of their biggest breeding colonies. Colonies possibly because of sea ice loss biologists found that the population which reached about twenty five thousand breeding pairs of birds in two thousand ten collapsed in two thousand sixteen and has not rebounded since. From China the large high altitude air shower observatory on the eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau began operating in April located some forty four hundred meters above sea level the observatory will study high energy energy cosmic rays from Australia. The government announced it will not regulate gene editing technology provided it does not introduce new genetic material to target sites in the genome editing human.

Steve Mirsky Tibetan Plateau Jim Daly Editor Nepal Government Guatemala China Australia Forty Four Hundred Meters One Thousand Year
Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit From A.I.

60-Second Science

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit From A.I.

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky so what is the connection between A._I.. And Renat Sarai surprisingly direct Bernard May Orson chief innovation officer at I._B._M.. A._M. he spoke recently at the Cooper Union here New York City as part of a panel discussing the intersection of artificial intelligence A._I.. Ethics and healthcare so where two rhinos come in as you know poaching rhinos is a huge problem. The ranas were sworn represents about thirty years of revenue thirty years of income to an individual in sub Saharan Africa and that is why basically if you manage to kill a rhino and get a horn the represent essentially it's like winning the lottery. Unfortunately it's not so good for the Rhino not to mention you deplete a precious species yet again and poaching as a huge issue what people don't know about a thousand Gamekeepers U._N.. Kept numbers life in two thousand fourteen have been murdered by poachers. In order to get at the animals being protected this is about humans well. How do you basically protect rhinos with a I know it's a good question? Somebody said you know being a kid who grew up in the Bronx Smyth. Oh as well you know you put a collar on the Rhino on analyze is where they are their travel patterns and the guy who ran the reserve in South Africa sort of laugh said this does not help. That's the WILGA Vanden Game Reserve back to Meyerson I said why is this well. You know with a rhino stops moving. You'll know it was dead. That's certainly not helpful. Obviously you have a better idea says yeah what you do is get a bunch of animals that are easily spooked like gazelles antelope that sort of thing and what you do is you collar them and you look at that and we thought about it so you know that's brilliant because they become sentinels else because you see when a poacher enters area that it will encounter these creatures. It's not going to encounter rhinos there by far more rare when in encounters the creatures like any other animal they spook and run where does they. I come in well. It turns out when you have these collars on them. They're really a bunch of reasons. These animals run they migrate some Leopard is trying to make lunch out of it and yes. They're spooked by you know somebody who's coming entering in a truck to go poach you have to know Oh the difference and it turns out by looking at the pattern of movements and looking at historic data we rebelled. Tell the difference between each of that using system that essentially employed machine learning to separate yep these are incidences where were running into poachers. So these incidences where actually just you know there's a lion trying to make lunch out of this parental. The bottom line is by doing that. We were able to spot the poachers when they were nowhere. Near the preserve much less on the preserve of the rhinos are and this avoids. This is the kind of conflict where people ended up dead in large numbers not just the rhinos it basically I'd is nobody dies. You don't want the poachers today. They are desperate. You don't want the rhinos to be killed. We lose this species and of course the people who are incredibly brave protecting these animals. It really was an amazing thing to us because at the end of the day it worked and that's the kind of thing where you know A._I.. You sensibly as value that no human could possibly have achieved. It's not just about healthcare where.

Steve Mirsky Wilga Vanden Game Reserve Renat Sarai Saharan Africa Cooper Union Chief Innovation Officer South Africa New York City Meyerson Bernard Thirty Years Sixty Seconds
Why Baseballs Are Flying in 2019

60-Second Science

03:24 min | 2 years ago

Why Baseballs Are Flying in 2019

"Have you ever wanted to speak another language whether you want to speak spanish french or german babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you speaking confidently in your new language within weeks babble spaced repetition method gradually build your language skills so so you intuitive lee remember what you've learned no wonder babble is the number one selling language learning app in the world try babble for free go to babble dot com or download the app that's babbel b a b b e l dot com or download the app to try for free this is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm steve mirsky call justin verlander of the houston astros will start tonight's major league baseball allstar game for the american league he's in the news from more than that though monday he told sbn that these huge rise in home runs this season is due to the fact that these two thousand nineteen baseball is what he called quote an effing joke in quote many other players and commentators have questioned whether the ball is joost that is made so that it travels farther and faster so however they are making or creating the baseball coming up around baseball sports it's a data scientist meritas wills with a doctorate in astrophysics their first studies were in publications like they astrophysical journal and solar physics but her most recent research on the two thousand nineteen baseball appeared june twenty fifth any online sports publication be athletic so how do you make a baseball that's round or the other baseball's wheels got her hands on thirty nine major league baseball is used in two thousand nineteen compared with last year's ball the laces are santer the leather in substantially smoother any one of these changes will make aerodynamics of the ball better they will decrease the drag so the way they think of it is the ball doesn't slow down as quickly when it's traveling through the air which means that it stays faster longer which means that table to travel farther which could account for part of why the players are on pace to hit more than six thousand six hundred home runs this year up from five thousand five five hundred eighty five last year hitters are clearly also changing their swing planes and try to hit more homers which is probably also a factor but another indicator of less drag on the ball is home run distance wheels knows that eighty two home runs win at least four hundred and fifty feet in two thousand eighteen this year has already seen eighty four of that distance with almost half a season to play the changes in the ball also make it harder for the pitchers to manipulate it there kim problems why is that it becomes harder to grip the ball in a way that allows you to spin it enough to get break and then the other one is that the height of the seems themselves can affect how much the ball

Fifteen Minute Sixty Seconds Twenty Fifth Fifty Feet
Science News Briefs from Around the World

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Science News Briefs from Around the World

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor, Steve Mirsky. And here's the short piece from the June two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories for round, the globe compiled by editorial contributor, Jim Daly from Canada. Archaeologists have now confirmed that Toronto service Rex skeleton found in the nineteen nineties at a fossil site in Saskatchewan is the biggest and heaviest on record at nearly forty two feet long almost twenty thousand pounds. Scotty as it's called surpassed the record set by the famous sued t Rex which was found in South Dakota in nineteen ninety from Argentina are gala GIS identified a site, where ancient humans killed and butchered giant ground sloths, mega theory, American. Madam in the pampas region in eastern Argentina, the find provides evidence that Uman's contributed to the sloths extinction from Kenya. A science teacher who won the two thousand nineteen global teacher prize announced he intends to donate, the one million dollar award to benefit society, Peter to Beechy a Franciscan friar mentors, a science club that came in, I in its category in the two thousand eighteen Kenya's science and engineering fair from the autonomous island of Anjouan in the union of the Cymru's, that's in the Indian Ocean between the east coast of Africa, and the northwest end of Madagascar geochemists at Columbia University, found a load of court site, a metamorphosed rock formed from sandstone on the island of Andrea on the island is volcanic, and had been thought to contain only Ignace rocks. And from North Korea physicists at Kimmel sung universe. City in Pyongyang have brokered a rare green to collaborate with Italy's international school for advanced studies in Trieste, the North Koreans will study, computational neuroscience with talion physicists that was quick hits by Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Argentina Kenya Steve Mirsky North Korea Pyongyang Editor T Rex Toronto Trieste Uman Ignace Rocks Kimmel Scotty South Dakota Canada Indian Ocean Saskatchewan Italy Columbia University
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. Nari galman was one of the great physicists of the twentieth. Century historian, a physics Graham farm, low Nobel laureate Gilman. Died may twenty fourth. He was eighty nine I smoke with farm, low may thirtieth at Princeton's institute for advanced study the morning after a symposium related to his latest book the universe speaks in numbers. How modern math reveals nature's deepest secrets Gilman appears in formulas book, more, I think that anybody else in the nineteen fifties and sixties he helped to take us we human beings deep into the heart of atomic nuclei, the core of atoms and help us understanding, the bewildering variety, those sub nuclear particles, it was looked like a complete mess, but with Gail man's physical intuition, a mathematics, he. He's surefootedness. He enabled us to organize our understanding of those particles. And it was that, that laid him and, and a an another colleague, George vied to identify the Kuok, which is a particle that is a constituent of these strong strongly, interacting parties like the proton a neutral. So he was a really big vicar, a tremendously powerful a theoretician. He liked to stay close to data as well. That's really import this was a I think, if it to say that he was pretty much unrivaled as, as someone who could interpret these weird particle. Tracks of what have you and somehow see the fundamental patents of the universe in terms of those particle tracks to speak yell man was was admired by everyone feared by some people because he's lacerating wit his poisonous put-downs on what have you. But he th there was no doubt. There was absolutely no doubting. His intellectual quality. Gail ma'am, will be remembered as one of the great theoreticians of the twentieth century. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science, I'm Steve Mirsky.

Gilman Steve Mirsky Gail Nari galman Princeton George sixty seconds
Remembering Murray Gell-Mann

60-Second Science

02:11 min | 2 years ago

Remembering Murray Gell-Mann

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. Nari galman was one of the great physicists of the twentieth. Century historian, a physics Graham farm, low Nobel laureate Gilman. Died may twenty fourth. He was eighty nine I smoke with farm, low may thirtieth at Princeton's institute for advanced study the morning after a symposium related to his latest book the universe speaks in numbers. How modern math reveals nature's deepest secrets Gilman appears in formulas book, more, I think that anybody else in the nineteen fifties and sixties he helped to take us we human beings deep into the heart of atomic nuclei, the core of atoms and help us understanding, the bewildering variety, those sub nuclear particles, it was looked like a complete mess, but with Gail man's physical intuition, a mathematics, he. He's surefootedness. He enabled us to organize our understanding of those particles. And it was that, that laid him and, and a an another colleague, George vied to identify the Kuok, which is a particle that is a constituent of these strong strongly, interacting parties like the proton a neutral. So he was a really big vicar, a tremendously powerful a theoretician. He liked to stay close to data as well. That's really import this was a I think, if it to say that he was pretty much unrivaled as, as someone who could interpret these weird particle. Tracks of what have you and somehow see the fundamental patents of the universe in terms of those particle tracks to speak yell man was was admired by everyone feared by some people because he's lacerating wit his poisonous put-downs on what have you. But he th there was no doubt. There was absolutely no doubting. His intellectual quality. Gail ma'am, will be remembered as one of the great theoreticians of the twentieth century. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science, I'm Steve Mirsky.

Gilman Steve Mirsky Gail Nari Galman Princeton George Sixty Seconds
Nobelist: Harness Evolution As Problem-Solving Algorithm

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 2 years ago

Nobelist: Harness Evolution As Problem-Solving Algorithm

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm an engineer trained as an engineer degrees in Canada. Call and chemical engineering and some people claim that I practice chemistry without a license. For instance, Arnold, the Caltech scientists shared the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in chemistry. I care about is how do we share the planet with all the other living things and have a planet that's worth living in while we cure disease, and make our quality of life better. Or no spoke April ninth that the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring ten US Nobel and Calveley prize laureates the evening was sponsored by the cavalier station and produced by scientific American Arnold's. Nobel prize was for directing the volition of enzymes to make them work, even better or in entirely. Early new ways. And it seems to me that this tremendously powerful algorithm of evolution that create complexity. And they create the materials and create all of the lovely things in the biological world wish should learn how to use that algorithm to solve the biggest problems that we face. How do we house fuel feed? Clothe ten billion people, and it's the biological world that can do this, because we're learning how to harness this four billion years worth of work. The problem is no one knows how sequence of DNA and codes a function we can only read it, no one can compose that. But we have the process of composing it, and that is called of Lucien, and by using that process, we can make these things. That will help us live sustainably because who knows how to use renewable resources, the biological world does biology can take carbon dioxide from the environment and create living plants, and nitrogen and simple, starting materials and create complicated useful things. So I'm hoping that we too will learn how to do that and use our science to do that. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science, I'm Steve Mirsky.

Nobel Prize Steve Mirsky Arnold Engineer National Academy Of Sciences Canada Cavalier Station Lucien Washington Sixty Seconds Four Billion Years
How The Black Hole Said Cheese

Science Talk

06:19 min | 2 years ago

How The Black Hole Said Cheese

"Welcome to scientific American science talk posted on April. Twenty ninth two thousand nineteen. I'm Steve Mirsky on this episode and their ties where it seemed like it was kind of fall apart. But at a certain point, I got confident that they were gonna pull it off. But it was dicey from time to time. That's Seth Fletcher. He's the author of the book, I'm Stein's shadow a black hole band of strana mors and the quest to see the unseasonable. It's an account of the long struggle capture that image of a black hole that was announced on April tenth as is. Also scientific American's chief features editor it was pretty easy to get them to sit down and talk about the book and the image. Seth what is the big deal about actually being able to visualize a black hole? Why did they want to do this so badly? Well, no one's ever seen a black hole while now we have but as of a couple of weeks ago, no one outside of the astronomers in the event rising telescope had seen a black hole. This gets into all sorts of questions about what it means to actually see a black hole. But for now to say that black holes kind of fell out of Einstein's general theory of relativity one hundred years ago more than hundred years ago, and people kind of refuse to believe that it had physical significance these mathematical singularities sort of like the equivalent of dividing by zero which we all know from top very early can't divide by zero. It's undefined. It's the same kind of true about what happens to in in the math Feinstein's equations. But the question was does this mean anything for, you know, the physical reality and nine himself refused for a very long time to believe that it did. And it wasn't until about fifty years later. When radio astronomer started finding quasars that figured that. There was nothing that could explain them other than. What came to be called black holes? So, but even then nobody had actually seen a black hole. They are by definition unseasonable in a sense in that they trap all light that goes in. But they cast the shadow, you know, I'm used as saying in interviews like this that they should cast a shadow now, we know that they do. Now, we've actually seen the image. But that is just so small and so hard to see that it's taken decades for astronomers to even get to a place where they thought it might be possible, and the image that became famous is a sort of an orange ring around nothing. What is that are injuring what does that actually represent with the orange ring has a few different components? I think the image is a little too blurry to see this feature. But there's a feature called the last photon orbit. And it's just this perfect ring. It's the it's the last stable orbit for. Photons light before they plunge into the black hole. Basically that light is trapped kind of forever going in a perfect circle. If you looking at the image, if you just consider up north and down south, you know, you'll see that. It's it's it's lighter orange on the top darker orange in the bottom with all that orange. Glow is is is matter swirling, the event horizon at you know, an appreciable fraction the speed of light glowing about one hundred million degrees. And it's swirling, it's it's it's on the verge of falling in but it hasn't fallen yet. So that stuff is called the accretion disc. What you see in the in the in the south southern part of the bottom is the part of the accretion emission that's boosted because it's coming toward us. And what's weird about black holes? Is you can't see behind them? What you're actually seeing in the image is the the the way. Facetime is warped. The ring that's up at the top is actually behind it. If that makes any sense, and what you're seeing at the bottom is the image is the is the accretion that's coming toward us. So it appears brighter. And this is all as weird as it seems kind of exactly what theory predicted a longtime ago, right because you have to keep in mind that you're not looking at a will. You're you're looking at a disk, but that disk represents a sphere. And so the the ring around it represents the encasement of that sphere in a sense. Yeah. So think about Saturn Saturn is not a black hole. So we can't see behind it. But if the rings of Saturn were an accretion disk flowing orbiting black hole, and we were looking at the black hole sort of face on the quote unquote behind part of the ring the ring. Behind it from our perspective would actually look like it goes up above it up in over it. And that's just I mean, it's because of the way gravity warp space time, and it's very very strange. But now, we know that it's real, and we can see it. So you wrote this whole book about the effort to visualize the black holes that have that we've now seen and you follow this incredibly diverse cast of characters focusing really on one fellow mostly. But you you talk about a whole lot of people. How did they do this? I mean, you have to create through other telescopes telescopes that telescope that is literally the size of our entire planet, and you have to manage an international consortium and funded. How did all that work? And why were you? So interested in it that you spent years tracking their progress and released the book just before they released their successful finding well I mean, that's it took the entire book to kind of describe

Seth Fletcher Steve Mirsky Strana Mors Stein Editor Feinstein Facetime Einstein One Hundred Million Degrees One Hundred Years Hundred Years Fifty Years
Science News Briefs From All Over

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Science News Briefs From All Over

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. And here's a short piece from the April two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the articles titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Jim Daly from Greenland. Scientists have found the massive ice sheet covering Greenland is melting about four times faster than it was in two thousand three the gigantic hung of ice could become a major contributor to sea level rise in coming decades from Hawaii a fourteen year old Hawaiian snail named George believed to be the last of its species has died the archipelago's population of land snails, which was once incredibly diverse has substantially declined with perhaps seventy five percent of more than seven hundred fifty species now gone from guy. Hannah the guy in these government signed an agreement with the European Union to curb illegal logging improved forest management and expand the South American nation's legal timber industry, which exports to the EU from Australia. Overuse of water from the Murray, darling. River systems sparked a massive die off of fish in the down under state of New South Wales. An estimated one hundred thousand to one million fish suffocated because the river levels were too low to flush out farm runoff, this lead to algal blooms that resulted in bacterial proliferation, which caused a drop of oxygen from Liberia health officials announced that they found the Abol lavar is in a bat in west Africa for the first time previously had been found only in bats in central Africa. The discovery could help reveal how the virus jumps to humans. And from Northern Ireland bacteria in a soil sample effectively halted the growth of four types of antibiotic resistant superbugs, including methicillin resistant, staphylococcus aureus, better known as Mersa. Researchers say the discovery is an important step in the battle against such resistant bacteria that was quick hits. By Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Greenland Steve Mirsky Editor Abol Lavar Liberia European Union Hawaii Murray Methicillin Hannah South Wales West Africa George Northern Ireland Africa Mersa EU Australia
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky dear ago, I reported on a study about an increase in fatal traffic accidents on April twentieth. Four twenty a day considered somewhat of a holiday by marijuana aficionados that study was in the journal Jaama internal medicine and it used ADA from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The researchers looked at fatal accidents on four twenty between four twenty pm and eleven fifty nine PM from nineteen ninety two to two thousand sixteen and they compared that dates data with the day one week before and one week after they found a twelve percent increase in the relative risk of a fatal traffic accident after four twenty pm on for twenty four twenty pm being the time that a lot of pot smokers like to light up on four twenty the paper caught the attention of McGill University epidemiologists Sam harp. Over and Adam Pol you I should say at first I felt the paper was intriguing Sam Harper on the phone for Montreal. I think the most fundamental difficulty with the jam paper was really the large magnitude of the effect size, given what we already know about impaired driving. So in order to increase the national rate of fatal accidents by something like twelve percent would require, you know, either really large segment, you know, as much as fifteen percent of the population to be driving while high after four twenty pm on four twenty or really really incredibly high relative risks of driving after the kind of cannabis consumption that you might have had on four twenty. So I think this was actually a hard case to make substantively Harper polio decided to dig deeper so one way to test this is whether of this kind of elevated risk persists. If you compare for twenty not just to the same day when we before and after, but for example. To the same day two weeks before two weeks after or to every other day of the year. And that's that's part of what we did in. When did these sort of additional test? We found very little evidence of any elevated risk on four twenty. And then the last thing we we also looked at this question of whether certain days showed persistently high risks year after year, and that's another way of trying to assess whether or not something is really robust. So when we did this we found very little evidence that there was any kind of sustained effect of four twenty not even for recent years with this become a more and more popular event. But you know, other very well established holidays like July fourth weekends around thanksgiving Labor Day, these things show, very reliable excess risks fatal crashes basically every year since the data started in collected in nineteen seventy five. Harper is careful to say, they were not debunking the original research. That's not the way. I. See it. I see like, okay. These guys had an interesting idea. And now what we did was like poke a little more deeply looking look at it a little bit more carefully. And you know, maybe we find not so robust, and that's kind of interesting. I think that's the way the process should work. Hope for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Sam Harper Steve Mirsky McGill University US Jaama marijuana Sam harp polio Adam Pol cannabis Montreal twelve percent sixty seconds two weeks one week fifteen percent
4/20 Traffic Accidents Claim Curbed

60-Second Science

03:23 min | 2 years ago

4/20 Traffic Accidents Claim Curbed

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky dear ago, I reported on a study about an increase in fatal traffic accidents on April twentieth. Four twenty a day considered somewhat of a holiday by marijuana aficionados that study was in the journal Jaama internal medicine and it used ADA from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The researchers looked at fatal accidents on four twenty between four twenty pm and eleven fifty nine PM from nineteen ninety two to two thousand sixteen and they compared that dates data with the day one week before and one week after they found a twelve percent increase in the relative risk of a fatal traffic accident after four twenty pm on for twenty four twenty pm being the time that a lot of pot smokers like to light up on four twenty the paper caught the attention of McGill University epidemiologists Sam harp. Over and Adam Pol you I should say at first I felt the paper was intriguing Sam Harper on the phone for Montreal. I think the most fundamental difficulty with the jam paper was really the large magnitude of the effect size, given what we already know about impaired driving. So in order to increase the national rate of fatal accidents by something like twelve percent would require, you know, either really large segment, you know, as much as fifteen percent of the population to be driving while high after four twenty pm on four twenty or really really incredibly high relative risks of driving after the kind of cannabis consumption that you might have had on four twenty. So I think this was actually a hard case to make substantively Harper polio decided to dig deeper so one way to test this is whether of this kind of elevated risk persists. If you compare for twenty not just to the same day when we before and after, but for example. To the same day two weeks before two weeks after or to every other day of the year. And that's that's part of what we did in. When did these sort of additional test? We found very little evidence of any elevated risk on four twenty. And then the last thing we we also looked at this question of whether certain days showed persistently high risks year after year, and that's another way of trying to assess whether or not something is really robust. So when we did this we found very little evidence that there was any kind of sustained effect of four twenty not even for recent years with this become a more and more popular event. But you know, other very well established holidays like July fourth weekends around thanksgiving Labor Day, these things show, very reliable excess risks fatal crashes basically every year since the data started in collected in nineteen seventy five. Harper is careful to say, they were not debunking the original research. That's not the way. I. See it. I see like, okay. These guys had an interesting idea. And now what we did was like poke a little more deeply looking look at it a little bit more carefully. And you know, maybe we find not so robust, and that's kind of interesting. I think that's the way the process should work. Hope for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Sam Harper Steve Mirsky Mcgill University United States Jaama Marijuana Sam Harp Polio Adam Pol Cannabis Montreal Twelve Percent Sixty Seconds Two Weeks One Week Fifteen Percent
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky the truth for all of our senses that they are there to convert physical energy in the surrounding world into electrical responses, which are the common currency that the nervous system uses rugged fail university neuroscientist, James hood Speth. So I and the photoreceptors there have to convert light into electric ears. Someone only have to convert mechanical vibrations in the air into electrical responses, and the way this is done is there are so called hair cells these cells have little microscopic bristles about one hundred of them and on the top of each cell, these bristles vibrate back and forth in response to sound. That's an electrical signal that then goes down in near fiber into the brain, HUD, Speth, the university of Wisconsin. Medicines rubber fetish place, and the Pasteur institutes Christine petite shared the two thousand eighteen Calveley prize in Euroscience for. Their work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing, HUD, Speth and fed-up place. Both spoke April ninth at the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring tenuous Nobel Catholic prize laureates the evening was sponsored by the Calveley prize and produced by scientific American more from HUD Speth, and the real question is what happens with these hair cells as they degenerate. We lose them owing to loud sounds. We lose them owing to certain legitimate drugs. We lose them just with aging, and what can be done to repair them. So that we can restore hearing Robert Robert fetter place. Well, I mean to us specs this mean one is this. In fact, you could try and regret them almost all hearing loss due to death of the hassles. Like, a formation of them in the first place, the cells along the Cochlear are all different than you, not just generate a generic Hessel you to generate one specific for each place. It has the specific properties which differ along the organ, and and will connect up to the nerve fibers the problems that Robert has mentioned pertain to mammals including ourselves and the situation is very different with other four legged animals tetrapods so in in reptiles, including birds this regeneration is going on all time same in fish. And in fact, you can take into a motley Crue concert or whatever blasted Sears, and they will quite nicely. Regenerate. Even with frequencies Pacific ourselves. They will reconnect and the animal will be able to hear normally again, I agree that there is an enormous challenge. And this is certainly something that happened overnight in ourselves, but I don't think it's hopeless task. And I think basically what many people are trying to do is to decode the signals that are sent as these hair cells develop and by doing so to recognize the signaling pathways. That might be reactivated to recapitulate, the original development and restore hair cells by that means just don't take your chicken to Marilyn Manson concert. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

James hood Speth Steve Mirsky HUD Speth Robert Robert fetter HUD Marilyn Manson Christine petite National Academy of sciences Hessel Euroscience Sears Washington university of Wisconsin sixty seconds
What Chickens Can Teach Hearing Researchers

60-Second Science

03:17 min | 2 years ago

What Chickens Can Teach Hearing Researchers

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky the truth for all of our senses that they are there to convert physical energy in the surrounding world into electrical responses, which are the common currency that the nervous system uses rugged fail university neuroscientist, James hood Speth. So I and the photoreceptors there have to convert light into electric ears. Someone only have to convert mechanical vibrations in the air into electrical responses, and the way this is done is there are so called hair cells these cells have little microscopic bristles about one hundred of them and on the top of each cell, these bristles vibrate back and forth in response to sound. That's an electrical signal that then goes down in near fiber into the brain, HUD, Speth, the university of Wisconsin. Medicines rubber fetish place, and the Pasteur institutes Christine petite shared the two thousand eighteen Calveley prize in Euroscience for. Their work on the molecular and neural mechanisms of hearing, HUD, Speth and fed-up place. Both spoke April ninth at the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring tenuous Nobel Catholic prize laureates the evening was sponsored by the Calveley prize and produced by scientific American more from HUD Speth, and the real question is what happens with these hair cells as they degenerate. We lose them owing to loud sounds. We lose them owing to certain legitimate drugs. We lose them just with aging, and what can be done to repair them. So that we can restore hearing Robert Robert fetter place. Well, I mean to us specs this mean one is this. In fact, you could try and regret them almost all hearing loss due to death of the hassles. Like, a formation of them in the first place, the cells along the Cochlear are all different than you, not just generate a generic Hessel you to generate one specific for each place. It has the specific properties which differ along the organ, and and will connect up to the nerve fibers the problems that Robert has mentioned pertain to mammals including ourselves and the situation is very different with other four legged animals tetrapods so in in reptiles, including birds this regeneration is going on all time same in fish. And in fact, you can take into a motley Crue concert or whatever blasted Sears, and they will quite nicely. Regenerate. Even with frequencies Pacific ourselves. They will reconnect and the animal will be able to hear normally again, I agree that there is an enormous challenge. And this is certainly something that happened overnight in ourselves, but I don't think it's hopeless task. And I think basically what many people are trying to do is to decode the signals that are sent as these hair cells develop and by doing so to recognize the signaling pathways. That might be reactivated to recapitulate, the original development and restore hair cells by that means just don't take your chicken to Marilyn Manson concert. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

James Hood Speth Steve Mirsky Hud Speth Robert Robert Fetter HUD Marilyn Manson Christine Petite National Academy Of Sciences Hessel Euroscience Sears Washington University Of Wisconsin Sixty Seconds
Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

60-Second Science

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky the benefits from science as they show up in our daily lives are just enormous, but I want to transfer you that right now science can do something for us. Give us a kind of hope that goes beyond just those benefits Paul Romer. He showed the two thousand eighteen Nobil will Morial prize in economic sciences. Romer spoke April night that the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring tenuous Nobel and Calveley prize laureates. Now, there's nobody who's got benefits as direct and his immediate as Jim Jim Ellison who was also there and who shared the two thousand eighteen Nobel physiology or medicine for his work that led to new drugs against cancer when you can show there are people alive now because of the discovering you've made that just you know, that trumps everything most of us create benefits in an indirect way. And they come. All steps. So they're harder to perceive warmer than cited. William Nord house with whom he shared the two thousand eighteen economics prize Bill has this beautiful paper that measures a particular type of benefit which is asking how much light and luminaires can somebody get from an hour's worth of work. And roughly speaking from say, the beginning of the Neolithic revolution up to say, the time of the founding of the National Academy. That's about twelve thousand five hundred years ago to eighteen sixty three that went up by a factor of twenty people just bump into things they discover things so twenty times more light. But from the time of the founding of the kademi until now it's gone up by factor twenty thousand so one hour of work translates into twenty thousand more luminaires of light than it did. The time this this institution was founded, so those benefits are just huge. And we need the by the way, it's it's the system of science that made those very rapid ones possible. Not just curiosity not just random search. So they're huge benefits. But right now, I think there's more anxiety about how we're going to interact with each other as people than there is about just can we keep having more material of benefits, and here thing science is maybe even more important because it's very unusual community of people draws on people from all backgrounds from all over the world and unites kind of common purpose, and we get things done because we insist on things like truth and honesty, and we can trust each other because of that instead insistence, and we welcome people in to that community. If you're willing to live by those those norms, and we ask you to leave. We don't pay any attention to if you don't live by those norms. And the goal is really one of offering benefits that can be shared by everybody. So if you think about kind of like the hope for humanity scientists model of what we can accomplish. But who we can be and how we can be with each other for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Paul Romer Steve Mirsky Jim Jim Ellison National Academy Of Sciences National Academy Washington Calveley William Nord Sixty Seconds Twelve Thousand Five Hundred Y One Hour
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky swore poke if you've ever called in a pizza order, and then stepped out the door a couple of times to see if the pizza delivery guy was there yet. Well, you've experienced it swipe poke it's an Inuit word that quote refers to the antecedent patient one. Feels when waiting for someone whereby one keeps going outside to check. If they've arrived, and quote, that's what university of east London psychologist, Tim Lomas wrote in two thousand sixteen in the journal of positive psychology. It's where Polk was just one entry in his paper, titled towards a positive cross cultural lexicography, enriching our emotional landscape through two hundred sixteen untranslatable words, pertaining to wellbeing untranslatable as single words in English. That is other examples include the Georgian word Shemona, John MO. Meaning to be full but keep eating because the food is so good Bantu's macbook EMA Vuko whipping off your clothes today. Ans- and vol dining, sign kite. That's German word for the mysterious and possibly slightly creepy solitude. You may feel when you're in the woods by yourself. Early this morning. Lowest tweeted another such single word that covers a lot of meaning J ass- J A Y U S its Indonesian. And it means quote a joke so unfunny or told so badly. They just have to laugh in quote, why did he tweet that today? Check the calendar and be filled with melancholy and world weariness. You know, they'll Schmitz for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky journal of positive psychology Polk Tim Lomas Schmitz John MO London sixty seconds
There's A Word For Today

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 2 years ago

There's A Word For Today

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky swore poke if you've ever called in a pizza order, and then stepped out the door a couple of times to see if the pizza delivery guy was there yet. Well, you've experienced it swipe poke it's an Inuit word that quote refers to the antecedent patient one. Feels when waiting for someone whereby one keeps going outside to check. If they've arrived, and quote, that's what university of east London psychologist, Tim Lomas wrote in two thousand sixteen in the journal of positive psychology. It's where Polk was just one entry in his paper, titled towards a positive cross cultural lexicography, enriching our emotional landscape through two hundred sixteen untranslatable words, pertaining to wellbeing untranslatable as single words in English. That is other examples include the Georgian word Shemona, John MO. Meaning to be full but keep eating because the food is so good Bantu's macbook EMA Vuko whipping off your clothes today. Ans- and vol dining, sign kite. That's German word for the mysterious and possibly slightly creepy solitude. You may feel when you're in the woods by yourself. Early this morning. Lowest tweeted another such single word that covers a lot of meaning J ass- J A Y U S its Indonesian. And it means quote a joke so unfunny or told so badly. They just have to laugh in quote, why did he tweet that today? Check the calendar and be filled with melancholy and world weariness. You know, they'll Schmitz for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Journal Of Positive Psychology Polk Tim Lomas Schmitz John Mo London Sixty Seconds
Tech's Brain Effect: It's Complicated

60-Second Science

02:53 min | 2 years ago

Tech's Brain Effect: It's Complicated

"No, one sees the world the way you do. That's why it's important to capture your unique point of view. Now, you can meet the next generation Samsung galaxy featuring program camera a multi perspective camera system that intelligently adjusted focuses to create true-to-life picks like your eyes and with cinematic Infinity display, you won't know where your screen ends in the real world begins the Samsung s ten s ten plus the next generation galaxy. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky merely technology is helping us research the brain. But how is the brain responding to technology? And while you neuroscientist Alexandra Ocho Cohen, there's been a lot of mostly negative hype around this issue often referred to as screen time and how it's ruining all of our lives. And while there have been a few studies that have examined these questions the truth is that everything we encounter changes our brains, and we just don't have the data right now to say how meaningful these changes actually are cone spoke March twenty first at the Cooper union in Manhattan during a discussion called our brain on a I artificial intelligence who's in control me or the machine. In fact, a recent study examining over three hundred fifty thousand adolescents found a small of but negative association with technology use in well-being, but they also found. Relationships between eating potatoes and wearing eyeglasses in wellbeing. And yet we don't ask if potatoes and glasses have destroyed a generation study, titled the association between adolescent wellbeing and digital technology. Use appeared this January in the journal nature human behavior, heart of the issue in studying how technology influences our brain is that there are so many different forms of technology that often all get lumped into one category. So how we use technology. What specific technology we use? And what we use it for will be important variables to define future research, and even as we do more and better research on these topics the answer is still likely to be that it's complicated in a way. We're all part of a massive experiment on how technology is influencing our brains, and there will almost certainly be both positive and negative outcomes. So studies that track individual's behavioral and brain development. Over time will be. Particularly important like the ABCD or at eleventh, brain and cognitive development study, which is currently following over ten thousand kids for ten years. And this kind of research will be especially important in helping us to figure out what lasting influences technology has in our brains for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Samsung Alexandra Ocho Cohen Cooper Union Manhattan Cone Sixty Seconds Ten Years
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Uh-huh. Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky, and here's a short piece from the July two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine eagle eye by Simon making. Our abilities to see things that appear fleetingly or in cluttered environments or outside our focus of attention are all determined by single perceptual capacity trait that varies among people. That's the finding of a new study. The researchers involved say that these results could one day help, scientifically predict an individual's performance in jobs that rely on strong observational skills, researchers at University College, London tested participants on a range of visual tasks. One measured how well people could estimate the number of objects appearing on screen for a tenth of a second capacity known as supervising. Others measured the ability to notice small differences between two real world scenes to detect a change at a screens edge while focusing on the center and attract multiple moving dots among static ones. People who excelled at Subasinghe also tended to. To perform better on the other tasks. The team reported that finding online in the journal of experimental psychology, human perception and performance theoretically performance on any task that relies on this perceptual ability, not just those studied could predict performance on any other. The researchers also demonstrated that perceptual capacity is distinct from general cognitive ability and ruled out other possible factors such as varying levels of motivation. The findings are interesting and plausible, but their preliminary and need to be independently replicated in larger samples. The scientists say there were could help develop tests to screen potential employees for safety, critical jobs in demanding visual environments, such as air traffic controllers, security guards or military personnel. The team is already investigating whether measuring perceptual capacity can predict actual job performance in such roles. That was eagle eye by Simon making.

Simon Steve Mirsky journal of experimental psycho editor University College London Subasinghe one day
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. How many moons does Jupiter have? If you said four, you might be Galileo. If you said sixty nine, you were right until the announcement this morning by the international economic union of the discovery of an additional ten moons about the gas giant planet, bringing the currently known total to seventy nine. That's a lot of moons a research team from the Carnegie institution for science, the university of Hawaii and northern Arizona university was looking in two thousand seventeen for very distant objects in our solar system. Well, beyond Pluto, Jupiter happened to be in the same field of view. So they also looked for any as yet unknown moons they found twelve two of which were announced last year confirmation of the moons required multiple Ave shins and those data enabled a calculation of the moon's orbits. Nine of the dozen moons are well away from Jupiter and have ritual grade orbits, meaning they go around the planet and what we'd think of as the wrong direction. They take about two earth years to complete their circuits to new moons or closer in go the right way and take about an earth year for one orbit. Those eleven moons are probably remnants of larger bodies that got broken up in collisions. The remaining moon is less than a Collado across further out than the two conventional moons and has a one point five year orbit and the orbit is inclined that tilt has the weird little moon crossing the paths of those outer retrograde moons which means an increased likelihood of a big smash up one day depending on what survives from any such collision. Jupiter may then have even more moons or a couple of fewer. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Collado university of Hawaii international economic union Arizona sixty seconds five year one day
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. It's called water and may it's about a fifteen year old Dominican American living in Washington heights named Mari poodles, and she wants more than anything else to have a baby. And so she's very excited when she finds out that she's going to have a baby. And then the doctors tell her baby has only half a heart Williams. Dr Williams is a pediatric cardiologists that Montefiore hospital in the Bronx and the author of the young adult novel water in may. Amid Williams may nineteenth at the first annual Bronx book festival at Fordham plaza in New York City's northernmost borough as with so much so called young adult fiction. The novel deals with serious issues, including the medical problem surrounding such a heart defect do surgery for this type of heart problem, which is called hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Forty years ago, ninety five percent of infants with the condition died within a month. Now, most of these kids will make it to adulthood, but will also need frequent medical monitoring. And care. Anyone buying the book will support a worthwhile cause to forty thousand kids a year. Born with heart defects, partnered with a group called Collins. Kids betrays his money for families to have our acted by congenital heart disease and are in financial need, and also raises money for research. So five percent of book sales go directly to them because part of Michael reading the book is also to raise awareness about the number one defense most converts effects. Fourche Americans sixty second science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Dr Williams Mari poodles heart syndrome heart disease Bronx Montefiore hospital Washington heights Fordham plaza Kids New York City Michael Collins ninety five percent sixty seconds fifteen year five percent sixty second Forty years
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. Emphasis. Surprisingly inefficient, Tony of voter of one to two percents in one of the main culprits is an enzyme called Bisco Laura barter, a biological chemist at Imperial College, London, scientific American editor, and chief Marya decrease, Tina recorded these comments when they chatted at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos that enzyme rubik's go because it's vital for the first major step in photosynthesis. It's probably the most abundant enzyme on the planet, and it's worked fine for a very long time, but for our needs, we unions wanted to work better and I'm very interested in trying to improve upon this and sign because it's both slow on. It's also suffers from a lack of specificity when I can catalyze reaction with carbon dioxide that you want, but also competing reaction with accident. And so we're looking at ways that we can enhance the local concentration of carbon dioxide around your Visco to increase it sufficiency and. Ultimately increase crop yield bordering explained house. He's trying to do that at a talk. She gave at the forum sweet Evan's. I'm situ involved in the capture and release of carbon dioxide unlisted the sizing some molecules that can mimic this behavior with the hope that they can be sprayed on crops, much in the same way as a fertilizer, and we'll be taken up by the plant, increase the concentration of carbon dioxide around rip Iskoe inside the plant and increase its activity and photosynthetic yields. Now we have already synthesized suite of molecules have shown that they can capture and release carbon dioxide. I'm we're testing their affect on Risco that's been extracted from plants and seeing really Riddick citing results for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky rubik Tina Bisco Laura Riddick Visco Imperial College London Marya editor Evan sixty seconds
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm steve mirsky all three strategic trends that i see in space general j raymond commander of air force space command in colorado springs he recently visited sign of american to talk about space command which is responsible for space and cyber for the air force one is spaces congested we tracked twenty three thousand objects in space we provide that conjunction assessment a warning if you also for every object in space we do the analysis data on every other object in space to see if their potential causes and if there is a but tentacles and we make the warning for satellite operators are on the road to maneuver they're so as to keep from that from that clinton from i see the trends of that growing if you look at the numbers are launches that eric during the numbers allowances rupp rgf as the cost of aljaz ghanda uh so the access to spaces is got nesar not just are the numbers launchers going up but the numbers of satellite on each launch are also increasing and so i see that congestion just growing in the future and that's something that that we are obviously working to help mitigate the that growing stream the other thing that is happening in spaces that we were becoming more contested in it i think it's clear that space is a war fighting the main dislike air land and sea in we are seeing threats across the spectrum everything from lowend reversible jamming of gps satellites all the way up to a highend kinetic destruction which we saw two thousand settled with when china shut down there there were so and and in the last thing and i would say it's concerning by any means is the increase competitive nature of space i think that's a good thing english some huge opportunities here to leverage a growing commercial space market i think is is casa launchcode now and his technology allows for smaller sound.

steve mirsky commander colorado springs clinton china casa launchcode eric gps shut down sixty seconds
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm steve mirsky today november iv is national bison day celebrating the animal that last year congress in the president designated as the official national mammal of the united states for good reason the american bison also called the buffalo is the iconic animal that helped mould the ecology of the great plains and played a central role in the cultural life of multiple tribes of native americans including the araba hole and lakota today's healthy bison herds oh a lot to time their ancestors spend in of all places the bronx in new york city while historically the bronx zoo played a very important role in setting by sinn patrick thomas vice president of the wildlife conservation society and associate director of its bronx zoo an early 1900s when bison numbers were at their lowest miss issues facing extinction the brown suit a quiet as many bison as they could red bam and then sent off strengthen that breeding herd out west to reestablish herds in the wild thomas was involved in efforts with zoos current heard of bison right now we're working to establish a herd of genetically pure bison at the sale today there are about five hundred thousand bison in the us but there's only about between five and six thousand that are genetically pure bison the rest have some small trace amounts of domestic how genes in them so we are establishing a heard of pure bison breeding them in again our goal is to take off sprang from that era by sin and establish sure by inherits out west in what would be a continuation of one of the earliest success stories in american conservation.

steve mirsky president united states native americans new york city bronx zoo vice president associate director official sinn patrick thomas sixty seconds
"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

"Science talk will begin after this short message hither i'm brian i'm andrea and where with cold spring harbor laboratory and you probably heard about crisper citing this is that you know something that everyone now as rapidly having foreseen there are no easy answers that's jennifer dowden a codiscoverer of the chris burgeoning adding to talking with us on our beef pairs podcast roby back in a bit to discuss matif concerned about stay tuned welcome to scientific american science talk posted on october twenty fifty two thousand seventeen i'm steve mirsky on this episode at by the time you get the frankenstein what you have here is really a misunderstood creature whose father has abandoned it that's even as ron he's professor of philosophy of columbia conlude chicago and he's the author of the two thousand nine book on monsters an unnatural history of our worst fears he was last night on the podcast ten years ago to talk about his trip to the creation is museum kentucky and with halloween approaching in with me having finally got around to reading his book i gave him a call to talk about monsters he was in his office so you'll also hear some of these sounds of chicago come through his windows the the book is called on monsters and you talk obviously in a book with that title about monsters all over the place uh but then toward the end of the book you say one will search in vain through this book to find a single compelling definition of monster so given that where do we begin okay yeah that's not a out that's not me throwing in the towel and saying you know there is no there's no sort of their there um i think my argument here a sort of based on uh how vitkin stein thought about language uh which is he very famously said you know language is as language does end people who use english no what a monster is in a sort of general sense and it has a lot of sort of related meanings in offshoots so it sort of picture it like um.

steve mirsky ron chicago halloween windows stein jennifer dowden professor of philosophy kentucky ten years
"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm steve mirsky crawl aflatoxin their produced by funguses that infect crops and they can cause liver cancer immune damage and other health problems rare outbreaks related to peanuts or corn happen in the us but aflatoxin zor a big problem in the developing world pretty much every study that's out there shows the the vast majority of the food system is contaminated with aflatoxin ranging from a few fold to thousands of fold above the legal limit in the united states justin segal a biochemist at uc davis he's part of a team and exciting said of uncommon collaborators with mars inc thorough fisher in a bunch of great universities that wants to try to create an enzyme to attack aflatoxin at a vulnerable point a part of their molecular structure known as a lactone ring so it's been shown in studies a long time ago that breaking the slapped twin ring decreases toxicity by several orders of magnitude uh so it should render the molecule nontoxic at that point some soil microbes make compounds that can bust apart lactone rings a naturally breakdown lactones they just can't do this specific lactone they can't breakdown aflatoxin so siegel hopes that an enzyme that has the ability to attack lactones can be modified so that it works on aflatoxin and maybe you can help by playing folded folded uh is a massively multiplayer online game that was developed at the university of washington it's a it's a game that puts proteins online in a an and allows users to manipulate the structures these proteins like like they you can will think of it like a threedimensional tetra's players are really driven by a goal to get a good score but that scores driven by actually a physical reality of how stable this protein as the game goes live today usually the game stays life for two to three weeks and and anyone who wants to play it can play it um they just golda fold dot it.

food system united states uc davis online game steve mirsky justin segal mars inc siegel university of washington sixty seconds three weeks
"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

"And you know it first the eight it sounded to me like you know a me experiment but in the end you know we found really good signed dc quays to test uh you know a whole bunch of lipsticks and twig surely determined by the way turned out that the advertising was correct um but but we found it through peru scientific experiments for example by you know waving with very high precision balances um the lipstick that you know stuck to a piece of paper when when you know you press your lips against that piece of paper so it turned out to be a real incentive experiment even though we started with an interest that do me so sounded bizarre to begin with the answer is obvious from from the tyson quote being a scientist gets utilizes work on any scientific problem but but still i'm going to ask you why did you as an astrophysicist gets so curious about curiosity that you had to write this book when you just gave the on the terraces your said if i mean i i am just very very curious person and as a result of these at some point i became extraordinary curious about what is curiosity and how it works and i decided that you know i'm willing to put the you know more than four years of research into this topic in order to be able to write this book that's it for this episode get your science news at our website www knew that scientific american dot com or you can also check out our preview coverage of the total solar eclipse that will be visible in parts of the us on august 21st we'll have a podcast about solar eclipse is coming up soon to and follow us on twitter we'll get a tweet whenever new item hits the website our twitter name is at siam for scientific american science talk on steve mirsky thanks for clicking on us.

scientist twitter peru tyson steve mirsky four years
"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

"Welcome to scientific american science talk posted on august first 2017 i'm steve mirsky on this episode there is no immediate pickering aren't leave between you know these curiosity that we feel when we surprised or puzzled by something or see something i'm big us end that curiosity fime curiosity which drives us do not to really explore and find out that scenario livio is well known as an astrophysicist for his work on the hubble space telescope and his research on using supernova size engage the rate of the expansion of the universe and for the last two decades he's written books for a general audience his latest is titled y what makes this curious find out i called them at his home and what is curiosity for people who have not richer at or a really should say what are the different kinds of curiosity yes of course in everyday language curiosity usually refers to one thing uh but uh you know once you go more into the research you realize that uh there is more than one kind of curiosity uh so let me just uh give at least four kinds according to say juice daniel bear line uh who device these scheme um so the risk perceptual curiosity uh he's the curiosity we feel when we see something that puzzles us something that these doesn't quite agree we what we think we know or we you know generally surprises us that's perceptual curiosity a oprah's heat that the reason it be stemming curiosity that's the the true level of knowledge next the type of curiosity that drives the all saints to seek research uh that causes us to ask why and how it and things of that nature uh so that that's the kind of a sort of a lost over mind uh this is the hippie stemming curiosity then on on another axes so to speak there are two other types of curiosity one is very very simple that specific curiosity that's when we miss a very particular piece of information.

steve mirsky pickering oprah two decades
"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"steve mirsky" Discussed on Science Talk

"Welcome to scientific americans science talk posted on july twenty i 2017 i'm steve mirsky on this episode heroic oppression it might grow i'm vic ja in the world with single that grew in the middle of the sharks jack look like a sabail aid in the middle of that lower jaw coming out yeah that's susan ewing she's journalists and author and her new book is resurrecting the shark a scientific obsession and the mavericks solved the mystery of two hundred seventy millionyearold fossil and with shark week starting on july twenty third we figured this was a great way to get into the spirit of giant chomping cuddle ads in his fish such as elegant prion which is technically not really a shark but it so close as we'll get into in the discussion and which is distinguished by its desire world of teeth it's spiral of chompers which is really just one massive tooth that looks like dozens lemonade led ewing explain she's based in boesman montana so we talked by phone who would've thought there was such a thing as this my as this beast whten nobody nobody would've thought there were hiccuping that way could not figure out what it was that there was no analog no context q at in and um the thing that was so confusing about hella capron that confused so many people with that that tooth worrell was a m a midline structure so it was like a like a pizza cutter stuck in a quarter of ice cream.

steve mirsky mavericks boesman montana worrell susan ewing