5 Burst results for "Steve Levitzky"

"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:15 min | 6 d ago

"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

"More concretely, though, if you look at surveys, Americans are deeply worried about our democracy there in a polarized way, in the sense that you asked Republicans Republicans in many polls, A majority of Republicans will tell you that they now believe that the Democrats represent a threat to our democracy that if they allow the Democrats to take power to govern that they will threaten democracy. The majority of Democrats believe that if the Republicans Wind power that they will threaten democracy. So we're probably the Democrats are not worried about exactly the same thing. They're worried about each other but collectively close to a majority of Americans in some polls, a majority Americans Deeply worried about the stability of our democracy. This public meeting has changed a lot in the last five years. I guess then maybe I should ask a basic question. If a democracy is That we have fair and equal representation. You could argue America has never been a democracy. As you have said big portion of our country was disenfranchised. For hundreds of years, and right now we have we have minority rule. If you want to talk about it concretely Donald Trump won less than Hillary Clinton in the popular vote, so Let me just ask a basic question. What is a functioning democracy? So it's a system in which the way that political scientists defined. This is pretty straightforward. It's a system of government in which broad segments of the electorate have the right to vote. Government is accountable to that. Electorate, and you have a whole system of civil liberties and civil rights in place to protect the rights of individuals. It's not a yes. No black white issue democracies agreed in countries, arm or less democratic. S so we, You know the U. S is in the year, 2015 was more Democratic, arguing at any point in our history. What's happened, though, since 2016 it's not just us, you don't have to believe us. You know, there's a whole series of organizations that rank democracies around the world. These independent organizations have evaluated you the U. S and all other countries and has shown that the US is actually experienced a decline in the extent of its democracy since 2016 So the U. S has experienced genuine backsliding. And so in a particular the kinds of things that these organizations point to our diminishment of voting rights and so on, you know, big kind of major change, I think It is really weakened. Our democracy is 2013 Supreme Court decision. The Voting Rights Act no longer applied to the US South. And as a result of that, since that period, since you know, in the last seven years we have had a whole syriza of new voter laws introduced. At the state level across the U. S often at Republican hands and hands of Republican state legislatures, which have made it more difficult to vote. In ways that make our country less democratic. And so when you see people standing there voting waiting in line to vote because there's not enough polling stations. This is a sign of a democracy, not working. The big point. I would make those that just because our democracy has been flawed in the past doesn't mean We can't say that our democracy has gotten weak over the last four years. Okay, so let's end on an optimistic note. And do you have hope that things can turn around relatively Quickly. And if so, what are some concrete steps that we should be taking? Don't have hope that Basically turn around relatively quickly. I guess I have hope I don't have the expectation that things will turn out very quickly. I think things can turn around. I think that us democracy stands a good chance of muddling through this and surviving and even Strengthening in the medium run. Like the polarization that helped bring us trump the polarization that is racked this country really now for a couple of decades, especially the last decade is not going away. There's no signs that he's going away. Unfortunately, the Republican Party has radicalized too dangerous degree. To the point where it is beginning to play with rejecting democracy, attacking and even rejecting democracy. Famous tweet by Senator Mike Lee a couple of weeks ago, raising questions about whether we're even supposed to be a democracy. I think as long as the Republican Party represents a sort of embattled, declining white Christian majority This radicalization is likely to continue. I think the dream of Ah Biden presidency Returning us. To some, some prior level of formality is It's just that a dream until we begin to Overcome this polarization. Dysfunction and potential threats toward democracy. Wolf will persist. That said, the medium run. I think there is a majority emerging in this country in our society. And that is willing to embrace is even supportive of the corps. Pillars of multiracial democracy, which is what we need to accept. If we're ever going to survive is a democracy and into the 21st century were simply too diverse. Society to not either must be a multi racial democracy or nothing at all, not a democracy. It all and public opinion has been shifting vertically white public opinion. Especially younger people, especially in urban centers has been shifting in a much more racially tolerant direction. And I think that majority which is growing slowly, but surely Which really showed itself in the aftermath of the Georgia boy killing Ultimately is a majority that will sustain a much deeper and hopefully more stable democracy. Question is getting that majority power. You know, I agree. I agree with Steve, that this polarization is enduring. I mean, certainly we have to. We have to celebrate. The fact that our elections and the quote that you began with you know the 2020 elections were very clean election. This is a remarkable achievement that the way that Other democracies have fallen apart is you get highly corrupt elections or rigged elections by the incumbent to prevent the opposition from coming to power. So the fact that Kennedy fighting could become president elect bite and shows you that our elections work, so that's a big cause. It'd sign for our democracy. That makes us different in countries like Hungary or Turkey, where where incumbents have essentially rigged elections to allow themselves to stay in power. This is in a sense what? We're seeing the effort it but I think the effort will fail. So that zah good sign for us The question of how to get to the future that Steve outlines. I mean, one thing that has to happen to Steve has said, is the reform of the Republican Party and the way people think that party's changes when they lose elections. And another thing that has to happen, though, is a serious of debt reforms toward democracy, including Re buttressing of voting rights and so on. But all of that hinges on reform agenda, which has actually passed the House of Representatives. And if your listeners and go look at HR one from 2019, the House resolution asked financing policy included a whole series of reforms that would strengthen our democracy. They all died in the U. S. Senate. If you have a Democratic Senate, I think this reform agenda could be taken up in, you know, but you're closer Majority, a small majority, But that small majority may make enough of a difference that this reform agenda has some kind of hope. So it's so At least in the media room. This this election in January. 2021, as well as the midterm elections of 2022 will be absolutely critical. Create the environment in which a kind of reform agenda can get through. The one that got to caution, though, is taking. This is sort of all or nothing thing. This is going to be a prolonged Political struggle over the next couple of decades, which I think our democracy has a good chance. Of getting through and actually ending up in a better place, but to to imagine that all his lost after a single election. I think it is somewhat misguided. I think we need to step back and it's important. It makes a big difference. Democrats win a majority in the Senate. But it's not the final act in this play. Steve Levitsky and Daniel's.

Democrats Steve Levitsky Republican Party U. S. Senate US America Donald Trump Supreme Court Democratic Senate House of Representatives Ah Biden Hillary Clinton Senator Mike Lee Georgia U. S
"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 6 d ago

"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

"If we're ever going to survive is a democracy and into the 21st century were simply too diverse. Society to not either must be a multi racial democracy or nothing at all, not a democracy. It all and public opinion has been shifting vertically white public opinion. Especially younger people, especially in urban centers has been shifting in a much more racially tolerant direction. And I think that majority which is growing slowly, but surely Which really showed itself in the aftermath of the George Boyd killing. Ultimately is a majority that will sustain a much deeper and hopefully more stable democracy. Question is getting that majority power. You know, I agree. I agree with Steve, that this polarization is enduring. I mean, certainly we have to. We have to celebrate. The fact that our elections and the quote that you began with you know the 2020 elections were very clean election. This is a remarkable achievement that the way that Other democracies have fallen apart is you get you know highly corrupt elections or rigged elections by the incumbent to prevent the opposition from coming to power. So the fact that Kennedy fighting could become president elect bite and shows you that our elections work, so that's a big positive sign for our democracy. That makes us different than countries like Hungary or Turkey, where where incumbents have essentially rigged elections to allow themselves to stay in power. This is in a sense what? We're seeing the effort, but I think the effort will fail. So that zah good sign for us The question of how to get to the future that Steve outlines. I mean, one thing that has to happen to Steve has said, is the reform of the Republican Party and the way people think that party's changes when they lose elections. And another thing that has to happen, though, is a serious of debt reforms toward democracy, including Re buttressing of voting rights and so on. But all of that hinges on reform agenda which has actually passed the house of Representatives. And if your listeners and go look at HR. One from 2019, the House resolution passed financing Posi included a whole series of reforms that would strengthen our democracy. They all died in the U. S. Senate. If you have a Democratic Senate, I think this reform agenda could be taken up immutable you closer majority, a small majority. But that small majority may make enough of a difference that this reform agenda has some kind of hope. So it's so At least in the media room. This this election in January. 2021, as well as the midterm elections of 2022 will be absolutely critical. Create the environment in which a kind of reform agenda can get through the one that got a caution, though, is taking. This is sort of all or nothing thing. This is going to be a prolonged Political struggle over the next couple of decades, which I think our democracy has a good chance. Of getting through and actually ending up in a better place, but to to imagine that all his lost after a single election. I think it is somewhat misguided. I think we need to step back and it's important. It makes a big difference. Democrats win a majority in the Senate. But it's not the final act in this play Steve Levitsky and.

Steve Levitsky Democratic Senate Republican Party president Democrats George Boyd Hungary Posi Turkey
"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 3 weeks ago

"steve levitsky" Discussed on KCRW

"And so there is a little bit of a kind of catch 22. They're so in that regard. I think there's a silver lining. People are engaged in the questions. Can we capture that motivation? And connected Teo a desire to rebuild helping norms of democratic life. So one of the things we've seen for the last couple of decades really well sketched out in a book by Daniel Sublet and Steve Levitsky called How Democracies Die is that some of the basic norms and guard rails that healthy democracies need have started fall away. So, for example, one such guardrail is the idea that you Leave space for your opponent's political discussion. If you are the winner in a particular election you none. The last expect to leave space for the opposition and Tio limit sort of how much you want to take in your victory from the opposition. That's the opposite of how Mitch McConnell does politics Mitch McConnell takes every last thing he get with his power gives his opposition no quarter So a healthy democracy is one in which winners keep the opposition at the table winners chair the conversations. They set the agenda, but they keep the opposition involved and they actually still have a spirit of working together. Do you think like, Let's say the Democrats sweep into power tomorrow are you know in the coming weeks and win the presidency the Senate and keep the House Do you think they'll be in a mood to share power after what's been going on in the last four years? Are they going to be in the mood to say, you know we're going to make sure that you guys don't have any power at all? Because of what you've done to the country in the last four years, Like what would incentivize them to actually work with Republicans? They didn't have to. Well, it's got to be a love of democracy that incentivizes because basically, if you can't work with the opposition, you will ultimately destroy democracy, and we've been in some sense rethink the fruit of that kind of attitude for the last period of time. So I'm sure they won't be in a mood to work with Republicans. I mean, it's been really bitter, and it's very hard for people to turn that corner. But this is where honestly, mate may seem like a stretch. But I think Abraham Lincoln's words from second inaugural are good guidance. Right where he concludes that speech by saying with malice toward none with charity for all with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work. We're in. Do you always say be may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves. So in other words, we can't act out of mouth. We had to have charity for all that doesn't mean we're gonna walk away from what we believe is right. OK, so if the Democrats you know they have a legislative package called HR one, which is about a lot of democracy reform. A lot of really good stuff in that, and they should have firmness in the right in terms of moving that forward. That bill it must be says originally designed also had some stuff that was very add Hamadan and directed against Trump. That stuff should come out. So I think that is the right kind of ethical guidance, so to speak for this hard moment. Daniel Allen is a political.

Democrats Republicans Mitch McConnell Abraham Lincoln Daniel Sublet Teo Steve Levitsky Daniel Allen Trump Senate
"steve levitsky" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:39 min | 4 months ago

"steve levitsky" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From NPR and WBZ ARE BOSTON. I'm Jane. Clayson and this is on point. It's been said that politics makes strange bedfellows that seems to be true within the modern Republican Party an unlikely coalition between the country's wealthiest big money. Interest has grown intellectual harmony with the nation's working class blue collar populace. How did this improbable alliance power on Capitol Hill and in the White House? This hour on the political marriage of plutocrats and populous. With us from New Haven Connecticut is Jacob Hacker. He is a political scientist at Yale University and CO author of the new book. Let them eat tweets. How the right rules in an age of extreme inequality you can find an extra outer website on point radio. Dot Org. Jacob Packer welcome back to one point. Nice to have you at such a pleasure to be here Jane, thanks and from Hanover New Hampshire on point news analyst. Jack Beatty Hello Jack. Jen Hello, Jacob. So Jacob Let's start with the title of Your Book. Let them eat tweets, which is of course, a play on Marie? Antoinette's famous words explained the title. White chose it. Yeah well, we started with this playful title. As mostly a way of making reference to Marie, Antoinette, but also you know trying to focus in on the degree to which trump had used twitter as vehicle for reaching his his base of voters, but we really didn't think that tweets would be quite so central when the book came out, Time that the book came out about a few weeks ago, that trump was tweeting something. Something like two hundred tweets a day. because trump has really developed kind of strategy that builds on what the Republican. Party had been doing for for more than two decades of trying to provoke outrage backlash, often using right wing media to get voters to support an agenda that as we show, the book is really tilted toward the richest of Americans, not the Republicans core voters. In fact, the very first line of your book reads. This is not a book about Donald Trump. You're the Donald Trump is not so much the cause of the tensions and conflicts in our current political culture but a symptom. Of A long evolving problem, so you described this idea. This dynamic called conservative dilemmas a conservative dilemma. WHAT IS THE DILEMMA? And how is it shaping our politics? Yes, we draw this this phrase from the political scientist. Daniels flats work. He's best known for his writing with Steve Levitsky on the threats. Democracy faces today, but he actually wrote an award winning book a few years ago on how democracy was established in the West, and in particular, he focused on conservative parties. He said that the fate of democracy really hinged on whether conservative parties could resolve a basic dilemma that occurred when they basically had to compete for ordinary working class. Even, though they wanted to stay true to their economic patrons to the rich within society, and how these parties dealt with this dilemma. Really shaped the course of democracy, so we we describe how in Britain. The Tories actually came up with a strategy for attracting non rich voters by playing on patriotism, another not to harmful themes, but the contrary story is the German story in which the conservative. Party allied with extremist individually at. To those extreme forces, as we all know so essentially the. In. The US is occurring, not because the franchise to is expanding, but because we've become so much more unequal as a society, and that's Place Republican Party is the party traditionally been more closely allied with business in the affluent in the same position that conservative parties faced the dawn of democracy, trying to figure out how they can stay true to their prior commitments to those at the top, while also appealing to voters who are not winning out in a winner-take-all economy, essentially persuading ordinary citizens to vote for the party that represents the interests of society's richest and most powerful members is what you're saying. Yes exactly and you know. Since the two thousand sixteen election, journalists and political analysts have. Spent enormous amounts of energy trying to understand exactly why voters in what we sometimes call flyover country. Were willing to back. You Know A. Billionaire. New Yorker for president and. We think that's missing the deeper story namely that over the last generation our society has transformed in ways that have made the trade off for the Republican. Party between standing up for those at the top and getting the votes of those not at the top much much starker, just one figure to really drive home. How much more unequally become a since one thousand, nine, hundred eighty, the bottom half of Americans have seen their share of national income fall by half while the. The top one percent of Americans have seen their share of nationalincome double, and we don't see that in any other rich democracy that kind of star, change that's a really huge change that then shapes how the Republican Party evolves in response to this conservative dilemma that arises, so you coined the term plutocratic populism, and you say at answers, the conservative dilemma top that what what does it mean? And why is it useful and understanding that dynamic? That's happening in American politics today. Won't because we think of Donald Trump in the Republican party is becoming a right wing populist party like right wing, populist parties and other rich democracies, but what's really distinctive about the American version of wing populism, is it? It's been married to plutocracy by which we mean government of buying for the very rich, and this marriage is bitter brew. has transformed the Republican Party over the last generation, not just under Donald Trump, and so. So one side of this is the is the organs of of money. The organized money within the Party and you can think of the Chamber of Commerce in the Cope brothers. Network the American Legislative Exchange Council that works at the state level but there's another side I think we at least not paid as much attention to in our prior work, and that's the organs of outrage the national rifle. Association the Christian Right. And especially right wing media so the Republican Party in response to the conservative dilemma. We say it opens a Pandora's box if you will. Coming to rely more and more on these groups that can really mobilize voters a, but the Republicans find increasingly difficult control, so the plutocratic populous you say, rely on these well resourced groups to shift the conversation is what you're saying away from economic issues more toward cultural ones, so speak more about that. How organizations like the NRA even large bloating voting blocks like the Christian ride and Evangelical voters along with the right wing media as you. Said! How are they linked to these trends? Well, the first thing to say is that the plutocrats those groups the Chamber of Commerce the Coke Brothers, network. They're the ones that are really getting most of the big policy. Wins with the exception of the supreme. Court where both the plutocrats and these outrage groups can kind of get what they want because you can get a justice who's conservative on social issues and conservative on. Issues with the exception of the cord, the outrage stoker's. Are often seeking very narrow ends and they're not as as capable in lot of cases is shaping policy in Washington is a lot of the plutocrats. The plutocrats kind of get the policy. And the folks who are stoking outrage are really focused on building a deputies that help them build power. So the national rifle. Association is just a fascinating example. It's a group that started as a very moderate organization. It actually was supportive of firearm regulations at one point, but then as the country was facing the wrenching upheavals caused by the civil rights movement, and then the rise of of crime, the the NRA reach fashioned itself as as a highly conservative organization that built a kind of rural working class identification around the ownership of guns and kind of made the Second Amendment into this central protection of freedom in the. The United States and similar story can be told with the Christian right, and we tell that in the book the One side of it that doesn't fit as cleanly with those two organizations is right wing media because right wing media is hugely important in the United States only fourteen percent of Republicans in two thousand sixteen, said trusted the mainstream media. That's a level of distrust that we don't see in other countries even among supporters of conservative parties and right wing media, which goes from.

Donald Trump Republican Party Place Republican Party United States Jane scientist NRA Jacob Hacker Chamber of Commerce NPR Jacob Let WBZ Clayson Jack Beatty Jacob Packer BOSTON New Haven Connecticut Steve Levitsky
"steve levitsky" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"steve levitsky" Discussed on AM Joy

"You are concerned about this and i think it's an indication of the kind of inclinations that donald trump has and so the thing that focus on though is whether or not our institutions and the republican party particular stand up to him and there are certainly are these worrying cya specially on the side of the republican pole indeed indeed indeed masha gessen daniels zip latte steve levitsky thank you ought to essential book the all shipping reading and for more of my thoughts on this topic check out my latest column in the daily beast republican rule week 55 there is no bottom to this bottom coming up donald trump goes all in on defending abusers of women are we have an update now on our top story donald trump is doubling down on his defence of the white house aide aides who resigned this week amid allegations of abuse just moments ago trump tweeted people's lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation some are true and some are fall some are old and some are new there is no recovery for someone falsely accused life and career are gone is there no such thing any longer as due process join me now to discuss our religious freedom activist frank schaefer author of letter to lucy a manifesto creative redemption in the age of trump fascism in lies and back with me masha gessen and queen jump here frank i'll get your reaction we already saw donald trump's defense of really more saying he denied it so therefore you know there we go he said steve wynn who's been in multiple the accused of abuse of sexual harassment denied it so we have to give him a chance what do you make of the fact that he's a doubling down on his support for his former aide rapporter.

steve levitsky donald trump steve wynn harassment republican party white house frank schaefer lucy