36 Burst results for "Steve Jobs"

What has Tim Cook done for Apple?

This Week in Tech

02:13 min | 14 hrs ago

What has Tim Cook done for Apple?

"Piece in the Wall Street Journal this week about Tim Cook and really celebrating Tim Cook, and how like me? A lot of people win jobs passed away in twenty eleven were concerned about Apple's future without its visionary leader. And they talk about how Tim Cook didn't try to duplicate. Steve. Jobs. Instead found his own way made apple his own in in a way that actually worked quite quite well. Instead of innovating by creating products that redefined categories like the iphone and the IPAD and the ipod. he took the existing products and made them sing and refine them and found ways to make more money with him in fact. Apples close to being a remember when we made a big deal that apple was a trillion dollar company. is now a one point, nine, trillion dollar company very close. I would say this week probably will hit two. Trillion dollars So you'd have to say Mr Cooke has done fine. It's. He is a good product guy to. The Cook, doctrine. He took what he took. A lot of what Steve Jobs just did by instinct and made it into almost like a strategy and Cook Doctrine by itself is that apple only enter categories where they believe they can provide a differentiated experience and that's where Apple Watch. That's why they shipped. Apple, watch and not the television and why they shipped air pods, not some of the other things that they were working on so I, I think he he's not the product. Visionary. That Steve Jobs was. But he's very good at identifying markets where he thinks that apple can make a huge impact jobs. told him don't ask what I would do as he's on his deathbed and saying Tim. You're going to run the company. Don't ask what I would do what's right and the Journal said that's that's kind of what. Tim. Cook. Did he the In? Twenty seventeen, he said, I knew what I needed to do was not to Mimic Mimic Steve. I would fail miserably at that. And I think this is largely the case for many people who take time from someone larger than life. You have to chart your own course. You have to be the best version of

Tim Cook Apple Steve Jobs Wall Street Journal Mr Cooke The Journal
Fresh update on "steve jobs" discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:41 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "steve jobs" discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Steve, jobs was known as a revolutionary type of character they make movies about literally. Forty four years after he started, the company Apple's market value is closing in on two trillion dollars. It's the world's most valuable publicly traded company. But. Some of that success has come under the leadership of job successor apples now CEO Tim Cook. Cook is a very different type of leader than jobs was, and now that he's nearly a decade into the role, it's easier to see what his impact has been. Our apple reporter trip mickle is about to go on book leave to dig into this very subject, but he was able to stop by before he left trip. Thanks for joining. So. Remind us of Steve Jobs, Apple D. original apple how he led what he was known for Steve Jobs was known as a revolutionary. He was he was somebody who revolutionized technology changed the world that we live in put. I music in our pockets and then later or phone and the Internet in our pockets and not long after that put tablets in our hands in a way that all these products had kind of existed. But what he did and how he brought those together by working with the teams at Apple, really change our perception of them, and it's why the company turned all those products into such successful products from a sales perspective as well. As a leader he was he was driven by Gut. He would walk into a room and he would make a decision. Instinctively about something and he was a tremendous communicator and he had what people called the ability to kind of been reality to his will and to what he saw the future should be and it really had a huge impact on the people he worked with. Johns. Died in two thousand eleven after a battle with cancer I was Tim Cook selected to succeed him. In talking with people who worked with Tim one of the things that really distinguished him at apple was his leadership operations and that division was really just devoid of drama. It was a group that he really wanted to be collaborative and if people weren't collaborative, he didn't really have a high tolerance for for that and so when Apple Law, Steve Jobs, what it was losing was somebody who was a CEO. and. Really somebody was replaceable. If you think about it I, mean you don't really find somebody who can wear all those hats simultaneously and so what he needed was somebody who could lead differently and Tim Cook provided these transitions from founder visionary person who's kind of everywhere at once to successor have sometimes been fraught. So how did cooks transition go? Starting Rocky I mean if you think back right when he took over, there was a tremendous amount of skepticism and doubt about his potential to lead the company into the future apple had somebody else succeeds Steve Jobs in the one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s, and those successions and jobs departure from the company had put it on the brink of bankruptcy and there was a real fear that apple would. Return to the brink of bankruptcy without steve jobs in fact Larry. Ellison. Famously said in two thousand thirteen during interview with Charlie rose that we've seen apple with Steve. Jobs, and he held up his hand really high and we've seen it without Steve Jobs and he dropped his hand really low and then he said, and now we're about to steer apple without Steve Jobs again and he dropped his hand blow. Forecast bleak future for the company but as we know Tim Cook Defy those expectations. He's still got the job and apple's doing well..

Steve Jobs Apple Tim Cook CEO Johns Reporter Charlie Rose Ellison Founder Ceo. Larry
Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

02:53 min | 3 d ago

Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

"Talk about retired Phil he's just he's got a glow about him. Phil Schiller has decided to call it quits at apple and I can't say that I'm surprised he hasn't really been front and center for a while and seeing how they had steve jobs transition and Johnny. I have now transitioned out of their roles. This seems to be the game plan. You just stop showing up on stage appearing in the. People kind of forget about you but you're still there you still doing your job they quietly transition you out of your role, and then they quietly announced that they're leaving and they become an apple fellow, which is what happened to Phil. Schiller. He's now an apple fellow you WanNa take this story here. Lewis, I'm not like sure when the whole thing. Yeah. Sure. Yeah. So he a fill is going to continue to report directly to apple CEO Tim Cook in the new position as apple fellow, and he's going to continue leading the APP store and Apple Events Greg Jaaz Joswiak is fronts Joswiak I like that name as Joswiak Josh. It's actually very bizarre. Isn't it? That would go from Wozniak Joswiak? It's almost like a a word jumble. Quite odd. Anyway, Jaaz is going to take over a shortage previous role over the years. You know he's had a lot to do it apple and he's been there for like you think what? You say eighty seven he's like he's been there since eighty seven checkout this quotes. been a dream come true for me to work apple and so many products I love all these great friends, Steve? Tim. and Sony More I. I started Apple when I was twenty seven. Wow this year I turned sixty. That's a long time to be at the same. So, what is I? Guess that's thirty three years I. Guess It is Chess Wild. Yeah. And what did he say? He said I'll keep working here as long as they will have me I bleed six colors but I also want to make some time in the years ahead from my family friends and a few personal projects I care deeply about. Some people were saying that last statement personal projects. I. Care Deeply about. It's an interesting time to say that because right after he said that. John Processors Youtube Account was hacked. Right. I'm sure that a coincidence. Alert. Blocked John Browser on twitter and finally he's likes. Just a project in mind crack. And he just started typing loudly with two. He only uses two fingers. It's two index fingers, right? Because he's owed sees old school. But he was sitting there looking down to this keyboard looking back up at the screen and he just John Prosser got what was coming coming to him. Took a write down what a bitcoin scam.

Apple Greg Jaaz Joswiak Phil Schiller Wozniak Joswiak Joswiak Josh Lewis John Prosser Tim Cook Johnny Twitter CEO Steve Sony Tim.
"steve jobs" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

01:42 min | 3 d ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"Cowherd dressed the info you need Elissa shocker. The team that hasn't cared about the regular season all year. The Clippers doesn't care about the regular season, even in the bubble. This's big feet three and on the bubble fighting for a playoff spot. It's a fun story. PHOENIX They're really good MBA towns, one of those MBA towns they love their basketball. They've had bad basketball for several years. It's a fun story. For Phoenix. It means nothing. When the Clippers this year had told us time and again, they got beat by 26 by Memphis this year. In the regular season, they got beat by Sacramento twice they got beat by Phoenix now twice they lost to Chicago, Atlanta and awful Minnesota. And the reason they don't care is because the man who owned the team isn't get a guy Steve Steve Balmer. Is that Microsoft and CIA and his entire time there who did a bad Apple Steve Jobs, They write books about those relationships. Gates, Palmer, Paul Allen against Steve Jobs, and when you're battling somebody that big You have a better product You need wins. Big wings, not subtle winds and nuance. So bomber has been in this battle when he bought the Clippers, and he was now in a city with his apple for later. And the Lakers. Their gear is all over Los Angeles. It is hard to find a Clipper hat and think about this. How do you catch up one way, Get your own building and win championship. It's not about being better than Lakers.

Clippers Steve Steve Balmer PHOENIX Steve Jobs Lakers basketball apple Cowherd Elissa Los Angeles Memphis Sacramento Microsoft CIA Minnesota Gates Chicago Paul Allen Atlanta
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last week

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Disney Pixar Acquisition: What did we learn?

Software Engineering Daily

02:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Disney Pixar Acquisition: What did we learn?

"Pharma. But the picture, the Pixar deal is really interesting. The cornered Resource Hamilton kind defines it as like what is something. It's not just one person, but what's what is some resource that this corporation has access to uniquely that nobody else could competitively come arbitrage and higher away in the case of a person, and for Pixar it was the brain trust right, and it wasn't just Ed and John it was. Was the two of them and the collective culture around all the directors picks are and what they were able to accomplish in the creative process, and so I think Disney masterfully handled this where the intimidated by Bagger getting the acquisition to a big reason it happened was he said two to head headed John and Steve Jobs to you. We want you to come. Takeover Disney animation in addition to Pixar. That we realized the brain trust is what is medical. What is the power here and so not only are you gonNA keep it. We're GONNA expand bobbies, the analogy of the canvas that you get to paint on which is perfect for that for that deal. Yeah, last like. So funny of. The other big thing that dictates this is leverage so. I think most of the folks listening to your show. Jeff is like. Many of them are. Software engineers they may have sold. A company at some point and saying things like it took ten days for Disney to get a deal done with Pixar or took the weekend to buy instagram. If they've ever sold their company, they're like what you. That was a six month. Awful, awful process and thank. That is largely the case when the big companies got. Time on their side, the startup usually is either running out of money or has to make a call at some point soon. Do we need to fundraise very sell? It's hard to get multiple bidders looking at you, and so it's it's really rare scenario where a company actually has enough the acquire e actually has enough leverage to force deal to get done and to force a bidding war and I think most of the. The time when it looks like as you know, your sponsor needs to the deal sponsor on the acquiring side needs to carefully use their political capital and bill decks and build models and make pitches internally and stake their career on getting it done, and that just as many month process that gets expensive. It has lawyers, and so that to me is also a big factor in sort of

Pixar Disney Bagger John ED Steve Jobs Jeff
Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

Marketing School

04:05 min | Last month

Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric. Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about why learning to say no will accelerate your success. Let's reframe this real quick and early days Neil when you're starting out as an entrepreneur. You would always look at the newest opportunities. And what would you do about those opportunities? I always said not always what most cases I said. Yes, and that's what ended up causing me to do one too many things derailing my focus and funny enough 'cause less success over time I think what Neil's also saying is a lot of us become more and more successful. You're going to have more and more opportunities coming your way, and you can either accept the fact that you're. You're drowning in opportunity, or you can do something about it and say no more and funny enough Steve Jobs said this in the past. He says what's really lead to apple. Success was the ability to say no. They said no way more things than they said yes to. And when he first came back to apple after he was fired, he shut down many different product lines, and that's just the basis of it. It's really saying no all the opportunities that you're drowning in. When you say no, and you end up focusing on the stuff that really matters. That's when you double down I was once talking to entrepreneur name Brian Lee, and he created a company called shootout with Kim Kardashian before that was legalzoom, and the most recent one was honest company with Jessica Alba. And I remember years and years ago I. Don't know Bryan while at all I. don't even know him really by interviewed him for my blog years and years ago, and he mentioned one thing that really resonated with me, and he said you need to have super laser focus only tried to do one thing at a time and the moment your growth slows down and you can't get it to keep growing. That's when you expand until then you just stick with what you're doing. Yeah more Buffett and Bill Gates when they first met I believe this is a story, or this wasn't when they first met someone albums. Like what's the secret to your success? They both wrote down one word on a piece of paper and flip it over, and they said focus was the main obey. And the other thing to do just to give more examples. You look at Zillow. You look at glass door. You look at all those companies it's who's the one guy that started all those companies again rich partner. Expedia, glass, door and Zillow, yeah, but he focused on each one. He didn't try to do all of them. At the same time, he took the domain expertise that he had is like I. Know How to build a two sided marketplace. I know how to take advantage of Joe I know that there is a gap in the marketplace attack that so he used the same thesis three times, but he didn't try to do them all at the same time and I can tell you. These guys are older and more experienced than I. can say Neal My. We're getting older. We're not up there yet with them. We don't have the. The experience that they have yet, but I can tell you as Neela I've gotten older. We've gotten better at saying. No, I'll say better than before, but still trying to get better at it. It's hard because we all have the shiny. Object Syndrome. And when you learn to say no, it'll make you really understand what you should be focusing on. Because there's so many opportunities out there. In many cases, we missed the ones that are the best ones because we say. Yes, to so many that we don't spend enough time uncovering the true potential of anyone, business or anyone, strategy or anyone concept, and the same goes with your marketing. Even in the air. Can I talk Omni Channel? Yes, you should go omni channel, but focus on one or two marketing tactics out once doom, really well before you expand into all in because there's not enough time in the day to do everything perfectly well, unless you have a massive team, the other thing is I would google the T. sheets, marketer, and really understand as a marketer that you should try to go deep on one. One thing and then you try to expand and get a little more breadth, but the depth is what you really want to folks when people talk about what Neal's known for Seo or what I'm doing for I think largely people was. This is weird, sometimes WANNA go speak at a conference. They don't know what to call way, so they called me an seo extraordinary and I don't know where the hell they got that from. The same problem yeah. Seo Eric. All right. Put into this box, but I guess that's what we know and Belize pisses me off sometimes when I'm lying. Put into a box, but you have to be okay with that because you try to be everything being nothing

Neil Patel Steve Jobs Zillow Eric Neal My Apple Bryan Joe I SU Bill Gates Jessica Alba Kim Kardashian Brian Lee Partner Belize Expedia Buffett Omni Google
How to Be a Vision-Driven Leader with Michael Hyatt

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:24 min | Last month

How to Be a Vision-Driven Leader with Michael Hyatt

"I was in the coaching conversation with the business owner, the other day and we were walking through some of the powerful questions that every business leader should be answering questions one was. Why do you exist as a business? And they had the answer that question question to? What you stand for as a business, and they were able to answer that question as well and then the third question I asked him was wear. Is Your Business going and I'll never forget? They looked at me and they said I don't know. From the Ramsey network is the entree viewership podcast where we help business leaders themselves, their teams, and their profits I'm your host Alex Judd and the answer to that question of where are we going is found in your organization's vision and today we talked to someone who's both a practitioner and teacher on this topic of clarifying and executing on a crystal clear vision today. We're talking with Michael Hyatt and Michael. Hyatt has had a lot of success in the arena of vision and growth with the company that is currently running. It's a lesson that he actually learned from a failure when he tried to start his first publishing house at thirty one years old. We started back in nineteen, eighty six, and we had the good fortune of publishing oral hershiser's biography. Now he was the themed Pitcher of the dodgers, and they had just won the world series. He was a household name. Everybody'd heard of him. The book rocketed to the top of the New York Times bestseller list and it was there for seven months. And so it brought in a ton of cash a lot of notoriety and thinks that happens. Is you become successful as you start attracting a lot of opportunities, but if you're not careful, opportunities or distraction, show up on your doorstep, and you can't tell the difference between opportunities and distractions so distractions masquerades opportunities, so it happened us, so we decided you know we were bulletproof. In everything we touched turned to gold, so we thought we'll publish. Reference Books will publish. Gift books will publish children's books. We've been published a large Bible project. The problem was it fractured our focus it. Our resources and that business went bust. And, the reason it happened was because we didn't have a vision that we're starting with. It would be akin to deciding. You're going to add an addition onto your house. And as long as the Home Depot truck shows up and keeps unloading lumber and sheet rock, and you just keep building adding on, and that's exactly what we did. There was no blueprint. There was no plan and we failed for lack of vision, which is exactly interestingly what the book of proverbs says that without vision the people perish. That is so fascinating and I think it's one of those things that. That in leadership, courses and classes and books. We read about it all the time. You have to have a vision. If you're going to be leader, but so often, it seems like they dismissed. Thing that no one knows what it actually is, so can you? Can you set the record straight right now? When you say you need to have a vision as a leader? What are you actually talking about? Not. Talking about is a vision statement. You know we've been told that we need to have this short. Brief almo, slogan or motto that we could put on a coffee Mug or that. We had put on a bumper sticker. Can't. That's not robust enough so when I talk about vision. I'm talking about a vision script, and specifically I mean at this way. It's a written document. That's three to five pages in length. Okay, so it's going to be more robust and pithy thing but something. That's really thoughtful. The describes a future state. It outlines a clear, inspiring, practical and attractive picture of your organization's, future. Here's it's fun. It describes reality as you see it. Three to five years from now. And it's written in the present tense as though it's already happened. Now when you begin to do that, will you begin to visualize something like that? Right in the present tense? That's the first process of creating anything. And I basically learned this process the big idea from Stephen, Covey who said begin with the end in mind. And so to start a business or even a department, that's a part of a large organization without a vision. Is kind of a fool's errand. Leadership leadership presupposes that you know where you're going. You're going somewhere. You know where you're going. But if you don't know where you're going, right, how can you lead anybody there? Yeah. It's gotTa start. With vision. You jumped into this four terms already clear, inspiring, practical and attractive. I want us to jump into kind of the tactical of what those words look like. You're just a bit, but I love the fact that you say that this is robust, so it's not a pithy statement is catching that vision. Is that something that comes from? Is it a skill that can be developed, is it? A wiring is a gifting as A. A personality trait because sometimes we call people visionary, and it just makes it seem like okay well. They're visionary, which means if I'm not a visionary than I can't do right. That's a lot of people. Give up before they start because they think of somebody like Steve Jobs. That's right, you know. He could stand up and not only hold the stage, but I mean he. Had you totally into that reality distortion zone. Actually vision you know. His wife famously said at his memorial service that Steve Not only saw reality clearly, but he saw what reality lacked. And why it was imperative to bridge that gap between what he saw, and what could be so every other cell manufacturer saw that the market was saturated that every cell phone that could possibly be invented had been invented besieged, said Nope I got a different idea, and it was the iphone. As we know it today,

Michael Hyatt Business Owner Steve Jobs Alex Judd Dodgers New York Times Home Depot Stephen Covey
Apple to Split With Intel, Shift to In-House Chips for Macs

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | Last month

Apple to Split With Intel, Shift to In-House Chips for Macs

"Today apple says that is splitting with Intel to bring its chips in house in two thousand five then CEO Steve Jobs announced apple would begin using Intel processors and if we are going to begin the transition from the power PC Intel processors and now fifteen years later CEO Tim cook says the company is making another transition we're announcing that the mac is transitioning to our own apple silicon it's a shift the company says will increase compatibility between iPhones iPads and macs and improve

Apple Intel Ceo Steve Jobs Tim Cook CEO
Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

The Voicebot Podcast

04:51 min | Last month

Mike Zagorsek of SoundHound

"And maybe just pin little bit of a picture for the audience who haven't known you for twenty years like I have about some of the things you've done, so you would sapient you're you're you're working and user experience and some of those things and then? A Couple you went to the agency world, you worked at apple you worked at square. Thank at one point. Before coming down so if you think about some of the things that you did before sound down. What were some of the formative pieces? Thought were really interesting that you sort when you came to sound and you're like. Oh, here's something I can apply here. Perspective skill something like that. Yeah I reflect on that a lot and. UNRELATED TO APPLE IF YOU'VE listened to Steve. Jobs is I know the jobs get of quote, but. The fact that he said it is secondary to the idea which was you can to better understand where you are today, you can only connect the dots in reverse, and you can say well. How did one decision to another lead to another in how this connecting those dots help me understand it in so doing that in the benefit of this conversation I've always been. been fascinated about how humans interact with technology, what does that relationship between tools and technology and the reciprocal nature of the world that we live it as which is the result of tools and technology so I? I Love sci-fi was always watching Star Trek Star Wars you name it good bad Sifi! Always just take it all in, and because really interested in how? A world that had technology was itself a reflection on society, and I think Especially now with something like voice, that's playing itself out so. In the early days I didn't understand that as well and I don't think the the world of of technology was was. Quite at the sci-fi level yet, just getting a website you know going back twenty years. Getting a website was cool, but it. It wasn't the most exciting thing and. But I was always interested in digital after leaving Sapien I went on the agency side, but it was always very comfortable. Helping clients build websites. And digital advertising. I made the move to Apple. In two thousand seven have the day I joined with the day the iphone launched. And that was a pretty chaotic time. A very different company than it is now, and I spent five years building APPLE DOT COM and A lot of digital communication email worldwide. And but this idea of people in technology it I mean obviously being apple. You learn a lot about that. In Steve himself talks about you know liberal, liberal arts and technology merging so it's not a new concept. After apple I wanted to get a little bit closer. How companies were built so I left to go motion. Recruited by former apple colleague. And for those sites leap motion a real following. It was It was touch lists, but it was gesture based. It was actually hand and finger tracking to really high fidelity. and I learned what it needs to be. An interesting involved will start up. That's its own. PODCAST in and of itself. square for me was an opportunity to really build. A marketing practice within a more established company from scratch although that moving away from the leap motion environment where it was human computer warrant to Fintech. Realize I distance myself. From what I was passionate about so southbound with how to fight the voice platform. Is the culmination of my experience in large companies small companies. Immersed in. A world of Scifi or being more distant from it, and so it really is a combination of a lot of things. I think that's why for me. Personally I feel like we have a lot of momentum. So you Reverend Scifi. SCIFI fancy listed the voice about bad gas, not surprising being the industry, and so, what sei fide did you like to follow? Well I describe myself as a trekkie. I mean I'll. All of it and so that's. Most people. Who are inside I will have an affinity for. It's always a very safe. Safe Choice but but then as things started to diversify, really got into battle star. GALACTICA reboot and I really loved. The expanse is fan, although not everybody follows that in but when it comes to to star Trek I'm very agnostic. I love the old stuff and the new stuff than I know some of that's been poor polarizing, but it's always really just been. How does it does it help? Facilitate A world that allows us to to be more human I mean. That's always been been what Star Trek. Spin about so you can't ignore that and and be in the

Apple Steve Scifi Leap Motion Fintech
Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | 2 months ago

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

"I could begin today's episode by naming all the famous entrepreneurs. We all know that don't have a college degree. Whether. It's Mark Zuckerberg or Walt Disney or Michael. Dell or Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Ray KROC or I can keep going right. But. That doesn't prove that have a college. Degree is a waste of money, or the conjugate doesn't help you become an entrepreneur. I let's recognize the fact that everybody on that list I just named and more ones I didn't list are exceptional entrepreneurs, exceptional people whether they're very bright and talented, whether they have a lot of tenacity like Ray Kroc, or just are willing to work harder than everybody else I'm not interested in edge, cases or extraordinary people that are extraordinarily things. I am interested in addressing this question with the fact that what about everybody else everybody who may not be a genius or The special gifts of some of the people we've talked about. Can they make it as an entrepreneur without a college degree? Well, let's talk about what caused. Agree gives you so that we can boil it down to. Do you need those things to be successful there more college degree? We'll give you an education. They will teach you somethings who go to class and you'll learn now whether that. is of date or not is a different matter, but you will learn. You will gain those skills number two. It's going to put you in an environment where you're going to meet. Other people go to college whether it's online or offline, you are going to be networking with other people other likeminded people other people. WanNa be successful just like you, and often you know in the same field whether it's computer, science, or business, or whatever it is so one you're gonNA give formation number two. You're going to get exposed to people, and you'll be able to build a network and the third thing that call will give you is a piece of paper. They'll give you a certificate. They'll give you a diploma. Something that tells other people employers particularly that hate. This person knows stuff or knows this area of expertise whatever your degrees in, so it's almost like a permission, slip or sort of like a coupon like hey, this paper proves of this person. Know something in this area with a stern on a different matter, but that's how society views a degree, so those are the three things college will give you now. Can you achieve these three things outside of college with Al GonNa College Information Skills. Skills Yup, you can learn the outside college whether that is indifferent programs online learning courses online books, universities will have a monopoly on the information, right? You can get this information elsewhere network while there's a little bit different because you know you're not in a space like an actual campus, but hey, you still can go to conferences. You still can meet people online. You could be a a person that really values relationships in kind of. Of Fall some advice. We talked about in this in this podcast. How To make sure you build your network constantly? So this is doable. Assad College, and the third thing is the piece of paper now a totally different think society has agreed that this piece of paper will allow you to get you know opportunities whether it's jobs or an interview or whatever it is. This is the difference the piece of paper. So do you need a? A piece of paper. That's the question here, so college is beneficial. If you do need a piece of paper that permission slip, but if you plan to be an entrepreneur, if your soul is GonNa, be a business bill I want to be an entrepreneur. All my life I don't want to really pursue a career that requires me to have a degree. If that's you tried and true, then really GonNa College may not make the most financial. Financial Sense not going to say it's going to hurt you, but it's a lot of time often in your prime years and a lot of money being spent on something, you may not really need because you can achieve the things you want to achieve as an entrepreneur without it now if you are not sure if you like fifty fifty. Hey, I think I to be an entrepreneur, but maybe I want to work for a little while. While maybe I want to start a business and then after that I wanna go ahead and you know work somewhere at a corporation, a degree will help you get that job. This justice, the reality of the situation there are exceptions to the rules of course in different careers one of them is programming development engineering technology. Many engineers don't have college degrees, but they're so highly skilled, and so saw after that they can get a job. Job Easily and our certification programs outside of the university structure that you can take in that field that can qualify you to get jobs. A lot of people say hey, getting your degree is sort of like a backup plan. You can always get a job if things don't work out, but that really doesn't help you answer that question of. Do you need a college degree to Be Successful Entrepreneur? I don't think you need it I. I do believe you'll. The half caused. Degrees can be successful I. do believe that people that don't can be successful as well as a matter of how you WanNa spend your resources. Your time and your money I can't tell you for certain that thing that I learned in university. I don't use at all in my day to day life as an entrepreneur. I'm sure there are some things that I've picked up that I've used. But if I'm going to be completely honest. I don't think there's enough of that. I would say would require me to have gone to college to be. Successful, so you also have to define what success means. What does success mean to you as an entrepreneur? Is Success being able to pursue a hobby that you love and make a profit is success being able to replace current income in your current job with your business success, a a million dollar business is that a ten million dollar business? Is it a billion dollar business which a lot of? Of People think that's the only meaning of success. No, you need to define what success is for you as an entrepreneur and for most people I think it should be able to make a healthy living that allows you to be financially free doing something that you really feel passionate about that. You

Ray Kroc Assad College Steve Jobs Mark Zuckerberg Dell Bill Gates Steve Wozniak Walt Disney AL Michael
"steve jobs" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"If you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> notice this is one <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> way. That apple devices <Speech_Male> are <SpeakerChange> often different <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> at apple. Steve <Speech_Male> also helped design <Speech_Male> the ipod which <Silence> play digital music <Speech_Male> later <Speech_Male> helped design one <Speech_Male> of the first smartphones <Speech_Male> the iphone <Speech_Male> which wild the world <Speech_Male> with its powerful computer <Speech_Male> on the inside. <Speech_Male> It's beautiful <Speech_Male> design. It's <Speech_Male> many features <Speech_Male> in the APP store. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> iphone was the device <Speech_Male> that really made <Speech_Male> apple popular again <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> the smartphones <Speech_Male> computers and phones <Speech_Male> were separate devices <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> inventions. Like the <Speech_Male> IPHONE. They became <Speech_Male> one and the same. <Speech_Male> This was <Speech_Male> a revolutionary technology <Speech_Male> that even your <Speech_Male> parents didn't grow up <Speech_Male> with. You've probably <Speech_Male> heard them say <Speech_Male> I didn't have <Speech_Male> a phone when I was your <Speech_Male> age because it's <Speech_Male> true most <Speech_Male> personal phones. <Speech_Male> You could carry around <Silence> yet <Speech_Male> early on. <Speech_Male> Most computers were <Speech_Male> so big. They took <Speech_Male> up an entire room <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> They fit in the palm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of your hand. <Speech_Male> We live in a pretty amazing <Silence> time right <Speech_Male> in October. <Speech_Male> Two Thousand <Speech_Male> and three. Steve was <Speech_Male> diagnosed with cancer <Speech_Male> and tried <Speech_Male> to get rid of it. <Speech_Male> In many different ways <Speech_Male> slowly <Speech_Male> others took over his <Speech_Male> position at apple <Speech_Male> until in two thousand <Speech_Male> eleven. <Speech_Male> Steve passed away <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> later. Apple <Speech_Male> also created the <Speech_Male> IPAD <Speech_Male> and many new. I'm at <Speech_Male> computers. Iphones <Speech_Male> MAC books <Speech_Male> and many other original <Speech_Male> devices <Speech_Music_Male> up until today <Speech_Male> apple <Speech_Male> soon grew to be <Speech_Male> one of the most profitable <Speech_Male> companies in the world <Speech_Male> and today <Speech_Male> apple devices can <Speech_Male> be found everywhere <Speech_Male> over <Speech_Male> forty seven <Speech_Male> thousand people <Speech_Male> work for apple and locations <Speech_Male> across the <Speech_Male> world. It's <Speech_Male> incredible to think <Speech_Male> what has come from. Someone <Speech_Male> like Steve who <Speech_Male> worked very hard <Speech_Male> to build his company <Speech_Male> and create these devices <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and remember. He didn't <Speech_Male> do it alone. <Speech_Male> His FRIEND STEVE. <Speech_Male> Wozniak helped him <Speech_Male> build the first computer <Speech_Male> and over <Speech_Male> the years. Many people <Speech_Male> who worked for apple <Speech_Male> help come up with <Speech_Male> designs and parts. <Speech_Male> That have <Speech_Male> made these devices so <Speech_Male> incredible. <Speech_Male> Do you think you'd like <Speech_Male> to work for a company <Silence> LIKE APPLE? Someday <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> fun you'll have to look into <Speech_Male> the type of jobs. There <Speech_Male> might <Speech_Male> be designing <Silence> her coating <Speech_Male> interested. <Speech_Male> Think about <Speech_Male> what he might start to do <Speech_Male> today to <Speech_Male> learn some of these basic <Silence> skills <Speech_Male> in closing. <Speech_Male> I thought it'd be fun <Speech_Male> to do a quick quiz <Speech_Male> about what we learned today. <Speech_Male> Here's <Silence> the first question. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> did Steve Jobs teacher <Speech_Male> say should do <Speech_Male> if he <SpeakerChange> completed <Speech_Male> his math workbook? <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you said five <Speech_Male> dollars that's correct <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> question number. <Speech_Male> Two <Speech_Male> in one location <Speech_Male> was the first apple <Speech_Male> computer created <Silence> <Silence> <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> few said <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in a garage. <Speech_Male> The Jobs Family <Speech_Male> Karaj. That was correct. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Question number three. <Speech_Male> What's <Speech_Male> the name of the Graphics <Speech_Male> Animated Movie <Speech_Male> Company that Steve <Silence> Helped Start? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you said picks <Speech_Male> are that's correct <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> everyone. <Speech_Male> Thanks for listening and talk to you next time.

apple Steve Jobs Apple Steve Karaj Wozniak
The Power of No

Optimal Living Daily

04:18 min | 2 months ago

The Power of No

"Sirens were beautiful creatures from Greek mythology who lured sailors to their death the power of their songs so irresistible it 'cause captains to steer their boats into the rocks and drown. We're all seduced daily by ideas that sound great at first but may leave us shipwrecked unless we have the power to say. No investor Mark's sister recently warned about the perils of shiny new objects. Everything you say yes to is incrementally one more thing to support and you die a death by a thousand cuts. He says quote. I strongly believe that your success will be more defined by what you choose not to do than by what you choose to do. Of course what you choose to do has to be meaningful timely valuable prescient and high quality and quo. Why we say yes when we mean no Michael. Hi it says. There are three common responses to people who ask us to do things. We don't want to do number one accommodation. We say yes when we want to say no. This usually comes when we value the relationship of the person making the request above the importance of our own interests number to attack. We say no poorly does is a result of valuing our own interests above the importance of the relationship. Sometimes we are fearful or resentful of the request and overreact to the person asking her three avoidance. We say nothing at all because we are afraid of offending the other party. We say nothing hoping the problem will go away. It rarely does personally. I've always felt that being asked to do. Something was a measure of your fitness and status but some people will ask anybody when they need something because they know. There's no loss and being told no tim. Colony of the foolish adventure recently wrote about how self-doubt prompted him to say. Yes too often. I let those fears manifest into taking on too many projects so I can't do them to their fullest says calmly quote a little here me there and quote and as a result calmly says he finds himself in the fifteen percent of businesses. That are doing okay. Not Great better than the eighty percent of businesses that are failing he says but far from the five percent that are crushing it and where he has been in the past saying no is saying yes to freedom having the confidence in foresight to say no makes you stand out when you have clear. Goals is easier to say no. I'm actually as proud of the things we haven't done as a things I have done. Steve Jobs said at the nineteen ninety seven worldwide developers conference quote innovation is saying no to one thousand things and quote. There are lots of good ideas out there. None better than your own well executed plans. We often say yes instead of no when we doubt ourselves and our intentions when we say no to requests we freer selves to work on the things we value. Now what other people think is important. And that's the power of no no as powerful because it's rare near a all wrote about how scarcity can boost desire. We want what we have. Psychologists call this the scarcity heuristic when we are rebuffed. We want will. We can't have even more. They'll always be great new opportunities. The better you are what you do. The more people will want you. The more you say no the more you reinforce your value but say no can sometimes mean not right now is a grand founder. Kevin System turned on a personal offer. From Mark Zuckerberg to be one of facebook's earliest employees does move could have cost him hundreds of millions of dollars. Assist trump believed in his own vision and staying in school was the right. Movers future as luck would have it. He was right and facebook later. Bought his company for more than enough money to put any regrets to rest. People want to be liked. We don't want to offend rather than say no we'd rather string people along and hope they get the message some day but nothing is more clear than stating our intention. It shows respect self worth and conviction no is about you and no one else. The more clear our goals become the easier more powerful each no becomes saying no taste practice and it may backfire but to me is the ultimate side There are one thousand things will need to say no to in your life.

Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Steve Jobs TIM Michael Founder Donald Trump Kevin System
A Rocky Time for Google's Hardware Division

All About Android

05:16 min | 2 months ago

A Rocky Time for Google's Hardware Division

"Know who's not doing great. Google's hardware division. There have been a lot of shakeups and if you have been following along with the news as of last week then you might have heard about some. You might have heard about some t that's been spilled over at mountain view. Hq So as we learned from this very revelatory article published in the information which is a subscription only publication We are actually going to kind of give you the Quick Little T. L. DR points since not everybody can go immediately and read it So I one of the big reveals was that Mark Levin the person who is basically in charge of that wonderful Pixel Algorithm that made photos look so nice He left back in March. So actually since we've been in quarantine probably maybe right before he left who knows So that along with the departure of Pixels Mario Qudos last August which was kind kind of quietly You know snuck under the rug. This wasn't really something that we knew about. I mean we just found out about this last week really Sooner approach I was actually on the latest verge. Cast to Talk Abou this particular report He said that hardware is hard and that Google's playing to continue playing the long game by integrating the Hardware Division with nest absorbing ACC's mobile division and a couple of other little bits. They're just KINDA UNIFY. Those teams versus having them be in kind of their own spaces. He also talked about two to three years for deeper investments to bear fruit. I'm assuming that was you know relating to the Pixel lineup but we are coming upon the what the fourth bill for this one You know this also could possibly tied to the rumors that Google is creating. Its own chipset. And there's a lot of folks out there wondering if that news is something that's going to Kinda herald us into this new age of Pixel devices. What do you guys think or? Do you think this is all just kind of a don't you know? Let's Ya tempest tempest in a teapot. Yes yeah I mean I guess the question is are we worried about where the direction of Pixel phone when you've got the person who's behind arguably the critical key feature of the phones from day one along with another person who's critical to the division as a whole stepping out does does that signal any any warning You know any warnings Well yeah any warning signals around that I'm not sure how much effect this change would have on it. How much of Their DNA is already placed on the Pixel Brand But I mean you know it's also really important too to note that the Pixel devices as a whole hasn't really lived the world on fire. They certainly have done what Google intended for for them to do. I think they probably intended for these. These devices to go toe to toe with with the devices like the iphone and Samsung devices. And they're just not I mean but we are on. I'll I'll take all object to that though based on what though I don't I don't get the sense that Google ever expected this to go toe-to-toe the iphone in any capacity. I think that's I think that's almost a foolish endeavor. I think what I always took away from the from the Pixel. The pixels placement was to create the best in Google class. You know device to show off everything to do with android to really set the bar for Samsung End. A she see end one plus and all the other folks all the other. Oem that are using the the operating system. I think to to try to put out a device that would go toe with the iphone. Would would you know like it's you can after all this time period right? So what you have to do with the lead. By example so in that regard I think the Pixel has been a success. I think I personally never expected pixel sale. I think it would be it would be ignorant. It'd be naive to think that all of a sudden the whole world was going to be using a pixel been you have so many millions of of people who are in the Samsung ecosystem and so many millions of people in Motorola or whatever. It might be so I don't know I and I don't know what their goals are with the program. Who knows. I think if you if you if you create a piece of hardware correctly it. It doesn't have the DNA of just one person it could be said that the fund was Steve Jobs as last big project at has. Dna was all over it. But here we are. You know fifteen years later and that that piece of hardware keeps rolling on. Yeah so I it's. It's the future of the device will be defined by if they can outlive people who come and go and the you know becomes its own entity that other people you know becomes a some the sum total parts of everything every every put into it

Google Hardware Division Samsung Mark Levin Mario Qudos Steve Jobs ACC Motorola
Tech businesses wary of moves to bar brainy immigrants

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:20 min | 3 months ago

Tech businesses wary of moves to bar brainy immigrants

"An executive order last month temporarily suspending the approval of some green cards many in the tech industry pushed back hard. The sixty days suspension does not apply to h. One B. B.'s. `As the visas for high skilled workers that tech companies often used to bring in engineers and other employees but this ETA the big lobbying and Trade Association for the Tech Industry says immigrants have founded some of the country's biggest tech companies. They've contributed to the startup innovation economy in the US and said that if these restrictions go on or get expanded it will hurt the country's ability to compete. Michael Patrick own is the senior vice president of government relations for the CPA. It's huge issue for us. Immigrants and their children have founded forty five percent of the US fortune five hundred companies and that includes tech companies like Intel Amazon. Google and Apple Steve Jobs as father came from Syria. Andy Grove of Intel came from Hungary and Sergey Brin came from Russia. Jeff Bezos is father came from Cuba. Imagine how different our country would be. We'd closed our doors to those immigrants the order it doesn't affect workers who enter the US on H. One B. Visa which is used by many tech companies to bring in workers. But you're still worried just across the board. We have heard rumors that the administration is going to be addressing and putting limitations on h. One B. Visas next. That may something they're considering the near future and we think that would be a mistake. Got It and so the concern not is not just about this existing order which is for sixty days but the idea that down the road the tech sector could be actively hurt by ongoing restrictions will. Yeah I mean it is and also bear in mind. This is a competitive marketplace the the marketplace for the world's smartest people as competitive so of. Immigrants. Don't come here. You're going to go someplace else. They're going to go someplace like Canada. I mean for a long time there was a billboard highway one and it said something like immigration problems. Come TO CANADA. We have a new STARTUP VISA. You've got these. Other countries that are embracing skilled emigrants like programmers and engineers entrepreneurs at the same time the US tightening its borders and these countries these workers create businesses and generate jobs for locals. These immigrants that ends up another country is a win for that country at a loss for us. Is there any argument for the restriction? I mean I know that you know there probably will be people who agree with the president and say America should be first in line for jobs if we have thirty percent unemployment. Well the point is that immigrants. Come here and they create jobs right. It's not like there's a fixed number of jobs to be. Had they come here. They create companies. They create jobs and they hire Americans so immigrants are there a crucial part of our nation's economy and the tech industry. And that's especially true today. Right look around. Immigrants are helping respond to the pan-demic in research. It in AI. In Food Supply. And then as as we come out of the pandemic we're going to need to innovate as never before. We need immigrants and the world's best minds to be part of the process.

United States Steve Jobs Canada Jeff Bezos America Executive Sergey Brin Senior Vice President Intel Amazon Trade Association Michael Patrick Intel Andy Grove B. B. CPA Google Hungary Russia President Trump
Remember this Apple Car? Porsche’s early race replica up for sale at $500K

Geek News Central

01:08 min | 3 months ago

Remember this Apple Car? Porsche’s early race replica up for sale at $500K

"You've got Four hundred ninety nine thousand dollars laying around. You can have a replica apple themed race car. It's the original apple sponsored Porsche and had a brief racing career in one thousand nine hundred eighty S. So if you've got If you're an apple fan Four hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars it's available someone's going to buy it. Some silicon valley person nerds out on apple stuff. We'll have this in their garage. A no doubt is it street. Legal let me see here so nineteen. It's a replica of a nineteen seventy-nine Porsche. Nine three five key three and The version listen on sale on two point Dupont. Registry is not the original car O which is owned by Adam Corolla and worth in the ten million range according to the two thousand sixteen profile of its brief racing career Apple. Co-founder Steve Jobs was a fan. The idea of re company doing race car so a eating at the history on this save you wanted. But that's interesting I do remember Adam Corolla owning the original but That was Kinda the back in the cobwebs of my brain somewhere.

Apple Adam Corolla Porsche Steve Jobs Co-Founder Dupont
Must Read: Stillness Is The Key by Ryan Holiday

The $100 MBA Show

08:01 min | 3 months ago

Must Read: Stillness Is The Key by Ryan Holiday

"A lot of people here. The title stillness is sticky. And you think that your some sort of you know Buddhist monk that has no emotion that's not really Producing modern things in the world. Maybe a little bit old fashioned. No stillness is a sense of calm intercom that we often experience when we're in the zone. I remember when I was playing basketball competitively when I was younger. There's a sense of stillness. When things are just going right the game almost slows down for you. It's like everything becomes a little bit easier and I'm running up and down the court so it's not like I'm not moving. My body armor not being active. It's an inner stillness. It's a sense of common sense of confidence that you have. You can be an extreme action taker and still possessed stillness. That Ryan talks about now. If you're listening to this podcast you're like you know what Omar I'll have tried to meditate. I try to really habit. Stillness it's just not for me. This book is not about meditation. It goes way beyond that. It's more about how to make an informed decision. Whenever you're not a high stakes game situation. He gives countless examples. The one I remember off the top of my head is President Kennedy making really tough decisions during the Cuban missile crisis and how he exercise inner stillness to make sure he made the right decision and saved a lot of lives. He also gives examples from Steve Jobs and other modern day entrepreneurs so normally at the end of this kind of episode St Episode. Until you read this book because Xyz. I'M GONNA get in front of a renowned. Say The reason why you need to read. This book is because as an entrepreneur. You're constantly making decisions on a daily basis job as the leader of a company and you want to make sure that you're making more right decisions that wrong decisions and we often make wrong decisions when we're flustered when we don't have that peace of mind when we have that anxiety when we have that sense of imbalance we WANNA make sure that we're constant making clear headed decisions with a bigger small because they all have some sort of domino effect in our business. This is the main reason why this book is Worth Reading. Because of that fact alone you make decisions on the daily right always if your state of mind is not in the right place. It's GonNa Affect those decisions now. The second big reason why you need to read this book as an entrepreneur is business is stressful and you need to learn how to manage that. Stress can't get rid of the stress as long as you're in business you're going to have stress. But how do we manage it? How do I make sure it doesn't affect our personal health if we don't take care of our personal health and manage stress? No-one will okay. And if you're in bad shape your businesses in shape. You are the captain of the ship and the ship goes down when you do so understanding how to manage that stress especially in that moment when you're in that stressful moment is important in this book gives you incredible insights but thirdly this book is more about wisdom than actual you know having some sort of zen attitude. How do you become a wise person? Somebody who really has a ritual a routine of really gathering the facts and making the right decisions and make the right judgments about what's going to happen in the future and I feel. This book really covers all three now. I want to tell you this book is a how to guide is not like a common stillness and wisdom for dummies. You know it's not a ABCD now you're wise. No and if it was that way everybody would be wise. Be So simple. It asks you to ask them two questions of yourself to reflect absorb the information. This is not like a book you can zoom through you read. You think you ponder it takes some time to get through a chapter because forces you to think about how does supply in my own life. Am I doing these things? One of my caught in these traps that type of stuff. I found it very helpful to read this book before bed puts me in a great state of mind kind of good a bed with a little bit more wisdom a little bit more communists and I wake up the next morning. Ready to take on and implement the stuff. I just read last night. One of the big takeaways early on his book. Is this idea of having an empty mind and living in the moment The best parallel abyss example. Gibson's book is like when you were child when you were a kid and used to play outside. You didn't think about tomorrow. You didn't think about yesterday. You just thought about that moment. You just enjoyed the moment. You lived that moment whether you're playing tag or playing baseball with your friends or whatever it was when I was a kid I used to love to draw on the color and I remember clearly when I was doing those activities. I was just really interested in seeing that drawing. Come together or coloring in coloring book or that page in the coloring book now I was just enjoying it in the moment and just seeing it all happen. I didn't think about. What did I draw yesterday? I didn't think about what am I gonNA do tomorrow. And that whole worry mind was never there. And he's encouraging US and giving us some techniques to get back to that because that's when you're really living when you're enjoying the present moment a lot of us entrepreneurs we always are looking to the future always looking to what's going to happen next week next month. This quarter rig ahead or goals or targets all that. Kinda stuff right. We can't help but do that. We're we're goal driven and I'm not saying to stop it completely but I'm going to say that don't always do that. Give yourself time to enjoy the moment. The moment that you're in right now building your business for me. The moment right now is recording. This podcast episode. You know I have the privilege of having the ability to get up and do a podcast and have been doing it for six years of growth an audience and it's great to share what I've learned and and Hopefully help other people and most of us. We don't really take the time to think about that and really enjoy every day. Every moment that we're doing our thing in our business building our business making calls writing emails getting on webinars creating sales pages whatever. It is really appreciating that most of us are thinking. When is this going to be done? What's next what's the next thing to do? In my opinion it has to be a balance. You have to think of the things you have to do in the future otherwise. You're not going to get anything done. You HAVE A to do list. But when you're doing the to do's be president at to be president a moment realizing the moment. Hey I'm privileged to be able to start a business. This is not feasible for some people in the world. You'd be able to do this to have the finances to have the time to have the ability to have the opportunities that we don't realize is if you know the English language and I'm assuming you do because you're listening to this podcast you are privy and you are made available to so much knowledge on the Internet books that are published in English or Sony. Books that are not translated in other languages Especially the things that just get published brand new books on a subject and you get that edge. That's a blessing. It's incredible so by doing that by living in the moment you tend to have more gratitude and that's why generally children or more happy okay. Now of course that's not the case for all children but if you look back on your kid you were generally happier because you weren't worrying about the future or dwelling about the past you're like hey things are all right. You know. I'm eating my Peter Murphy Jelly Sandwich and watching some cartoons and You know and you just were happy in the moment and this is a really important point. I know I'm I'm harping on a lot. But because a lot of entrepreneurs were building rebuilding or grow or try and make more money. We're trying to build our revenue and all that kind of stuff is great but we enjoy. The journey happens is at ten twenty thirty years ago by and we say hey the best years of my life I spent doing. What did I enjoy that? I actually appreciate it. Did I recognize that? Those are the prime years of my life. Time flies by okay so let's make sure that we live in that moment.

President Trump Basketball President Kennedy Steve Jobs United States Omar Ryan Peter Murphy Gibson Sony Baseball
Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

Classical Classroom

06:33 min | 4 months ago

Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

"Hello everyone and welcome to the classical classroom. I'm dish plate and here with me today in the studio is Jonathan Dean. He's the he's the drama for the Seattle Opera and you may remember him from such episode of classical classroom as that one about the Steve Jobs Opera. The Seattle Opera is about to begin performances of Eugene Oregon which is based on a story by Alexander Pushkin and today John is here to talk to me about Pushkin and Russian upper John. Welcome thanks thanks for having me here. Sip before we get started. I have to ask for those listeners. Out there who don't know an me. It was a drama teacher. It's sort of a funny title. Not Every Opera Company has dramaturge but I would describe my job as being charged with making sure that everybody understands what's going on out of the CI- and actually sometimes the people on the other side of the stage to the I was hired at Seattle opera billion years ago to perform the super titles meaning to sit at the booth at every performance. Do make sure the right words over the right characters so when you go to the opera you can like actually read subtitles. But winter actually called Super Title Saban Super Titles. The same things have one is below and the other is up above Right if we did the bottom you wear the conductors head would be people like looking at those shiny bald heads words. Yes we've you know we've been doing super titles in opera in Seattle since the eighty s and pretty much everywhere in the world. That's very normal which gives opera audiences way more access to the drama than they used to have to do some cramming ahead of time and try to memorize what who everybody was going to say to. You know who and then Good Luck. Once the music started and super titles make them much much much. Easier to offer has turned his evolved since that new technology really into something much more theatrical you the listener can play along even if you don't speak Say Russian yeah and and the funny thing is I have that. I started doing that a long time ago as the musician. Getting the right line of if the right person's head by worked on my languages and took over writing the translations. Oh in the nineties. So if it's a talented French German you're usually reading and translation that I wrote. I have never actually learned Russian. We don't do too many Russian opera. So in this case for instance somebody else's has written the translation My job is just to make sure that it all happens. And and goes smoothly. Okay oh but still what a great story Eugenia again. And what a great honor Jerry working with this amazing artistic legacy of this this writer who he is he's one of Russia's greatest writers he belongs to the World Sorry Russia. You CAN'T kill this writers. Work Yeah. I was really excited. That we're going to talk about Pushkin today because back in the olden days when I was doing my Undergrad at Evergreen State College. I studied Russian literature for a while. I just fell in love with it. Because it's like I don't know it's got this really particular flavor this particular character to it that is just like you are curled up in a chair next to a fire with like a goblet of vodka on a winter's nights and having all of the emotions known to humanity all at once. I don't know I don't know how else to describe it. But but like I remember reading Pushkin and it just being this. There's something about his language just made me get what it was like to be Russian and it's very yeah involving it's the rest of the world goes away and it pulls you into so intimate. Yeah yeah so we should say like like who he was and like when he was writing which I think was like the early eighteen hundreds. Yeah remember the beginning part of the nineteenth century the operas you. I've been calling Pushkin. The wellspring of Russian opera every great Russian composer of made operas based on Pushkin Stories with him until much later took them a few more decades to get organized musically. It's funny because he became such a really just pivotal person in the Russian Arts night night even just literature but in the Russian arts but like he started out not so great like his home. Life wasn't great. He had kind of a bad time. He did a lot of Like gambling and drinking and he died young. Yeah that's right. Yeah he like. He was exiled south of Russian. Yeah yeah he kind of lived a lot of the stuff that he was talking about. One thing that I read about him was that he I think he got a lot of the fodder for his stories when So he had been had been exiled by the the Russian government for basically talking smack about them poet writing Commons writing for the stranger Seattle. Yes yes he was a Dan savage or Orlandi Western guy up your exile. So they sent him away like you. Do I guess at that time? And so he's like exile for like six years and then he finally a news. Art comes in like okay. I forgive you. We're still going to censor your work. You can come back. But right after the exile. He was like staying. His family was kind of well to do and they had the state and he went and he stayed on it after his period of exile. And there is. This nurse lived on the estate. Apparently Netanya Netanya. Jagna is the nanny. Oh yeah and so she like. It's just the two of them like everybody else's abandoned the state so he's just like on this estate with this old woman and she must have been a genius storyteller. Everything I don't understand is that he learned from her. How you tell traditional Russian story. Yeah she tells him all these folktales and then he kinda like I don't know yeah so I think she was. Maybe like the secret genius behind his. He he because he does a lot of those Russian folktales verse as these Long Narrative Poems so miserably the language in the poetry's his

Alexander Pushkin Seattle Russian Government Russian Arts Opera Company Pushkin Stories Pushkin Netanya Netanya Writer Russia Jonathan Dean Saban Eugene Oregon Evergreen State College Dan Savage Eugenia Jagna John Jerry
An Invitation to a Free Virtual Meeting on Digital Health

Outcomes Rocket

06:34 min | 4 months ago

An Invitation to a Free Virtual Meeting on Digital Health

"Hey man thanks. I suppose you're pleasure anti-revolutionary back you'd be successful in. This is such a great platform to be showcased on. So we're we're honored. Thank you my pleasure. My pleasure Soliloquy were sitting back and realizing that our world has been turned upside down world of orthopedic care. It's not just the planet out there but were canceling cases. Were sending people home. Who are who are needed to address Missouri. Way For us to rethink the way we deliver care rethink the care model and of course being in the digital orthopedic space trying to catalyze the adoption digital health tools. We thought it was a great opportunity for us to put something together for our audience Worldwide scale to give them some tools and ideas that they can use to address the challenges posed to our musculoskeletal P patients by Derek yet as Stefan. Oh it's it's It's really great that you guys are doing this and and you know I had the privilege of being there a couple years ago for your conference and I've gotta say the quality of the panelists. The speakers was just awesome and then the forward thinking of of some of the companies that that were there as well as the company sponsoring the the the the program just extraordinary if you had to highlight sort of the top two to three things that that are what makes this conference attractive and why people should be streaming it. April second and April third What are those two or three things that you want them to know? First of all where it'd be focusing on the challenges at covent maintained puzzles to surgical patient. That people are not really talking about with the from Pulmonary Perspective infectious these perspective magin patients really close up and potentially getting infected. That's something we'll address. We'll also bring forward some of the really top wine telehealth companies that are working in the space out there that people should be aware of these tools exists to get a sense of what technologies are available to you. It beyond just video visits is a lot more than that than shouldn't for that but also some really amazing partners in this whole event including zero and bts Ma. You guys did a really awesome ideal. A focus group. Last time I was there and I mean that brought about some great ways for me to think through things. I've shared some of that stuff with my team. And just brilliant stuff their idea for those who don't know came up with the concept design thinking that designed the first mouse for Steve Jobs. They have since gone on to be leaders in in how to use that thinking principles to solve problems. And what to do with this time to coming on early in the conference and they're going to be crowd sourcing from the people in log in challenges facing Ron Kovic. Deniger offline and in the background to a Hacker. Thon with their community to solve the problem showcase to us with design communicant do for healthcare and at the end of the conference that come in and finish the confidence. Show us the examples of what they've come up with with the whole community very exciting should be funneled to think a first. That's cool yet. You know and and today has never been I mean it. It's best time in history. I think to engage with with a program like this You know as far as details on on how to access it how much it costs all that stuff can you? Can you level set with US absolutely first of all it's free? We wanted to make this accessible to everyone with no barriers is the purpose of this share ideas of nations. So people can borrow steal build on. These concepts are in descends for. What does it stand for as a rip off and deploy? I love it and we're GONNA try to capitalize that as much as possible these great solutions so it's free the best way to access it is to go to. Www dot gov the health and for timing is right that these are folks that just make sure you're right. Www DOT DOC SF dot health in Australia The WWW D. O. C. SF DA health and the front pages link you'd like that will be streaming on crowd cast streaming on A twitter believe will be stinging on Youtube and facebook and all the material will be later available to registrants. Nossa others eventually Chula for on demand. That's awesome the final and so give us a little insight like you know. Many many of us haven't done a meeting like this. Wha Wha what can be expected are their interactions like todd. Tell us a little bit more about logistics and what that looks like a great question. You're good at this. So here's the thing This is really super platform relatively straightforward two years. You'll be able to see the speaker. You'll be able to see their slide back at the HAB one. Maybe more than one speaker on the screen the same time and the right side. The Spain there's a social Networking section was very much a streaming a male chain of comments. And we'll have a question answer session. We can ask the audience to rank ideas and thoughts. So there's a way I interface. Not Quite we can go off from the side and have a meeting but you certainly can Communicate from amongst members of seen people Answer each other's questions and engage in conversation we will have moderators on that side to answer questions. We know the answer to and some of the More relevant questions can be asked to be actual questioned button and then people can up rank and Dan. Rank questions really liked this question when they click on it. When you click on it goes to the top and then will spend over half the time with each speaker answering questions. So it's a each segments forty minutes long of which fifteen minutes is given to speak speak in the rest of the time will be to share an answer. Direct questions from the audience

Pulmonary Perspective Ron Kovic Bts Ma Steve Jobs Missouri Thon Derek DAN Spain Twitter Todd Youtube Stefan Facebook Australia
Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

Command Line Heroes

04:22 min | 4 months ago

Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

"In the early nineties a Hammy Software. Developer took a stack of wood and carved into small blocks of various sizes. He carefully compared the weight of each walk. And when he found one that felt pocket-sized he takes a printout of a tiny monitor onto it then. He topped the block in his shirt pocket and walked around with it to see how it feel to be attached to a device. He was imagining a not so distant. Future where we'd all be doing the same thing if you think that guy's name was Steve Jobs you're wrong. His name was Jeff Hawkins and he co created the palm pilot when the iphone hit the market in two thousand seven critics and competitors questioned whether smartphone with a decade later. The question is how can a person succeed without one? Smartphones are ubiquitous. They're APPs allow us to do pretty much anything and the hardware running them says a lot about who we are. But as sexual as the IPHONE has been to the RISE OF OUR MOBILE LIVES. It wasn't the catalyst. This is the epic story of how earlier? Hand-held device pave the way for the smartphone. And it's the story of a developed team that stuck with that device for its entire journey. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command line heroes on ritual podcast from red hat. The smartphone concept has been around since star. Trek's try quarter in real life though the concept I translated into cell phones in Nineteen eighty-four bulky things that looked like bricks during the nineties. They got a bit smaller small enough for more to carry on saved by the bell but they were still just used for phone calls. Remember phone calls. Nothing smart was happening on mobile phones. But there was another piece of technology gaining traction. It was called a PD a a personal digital assistant a mobile device that acted as your personal information manager. We'll get to that moment. But at the time the tech industry was way more focused on the personal computer which we learned about an episode. Three when we looked at the al-Tair Eighty eight hundred. Everyone was so caught up in. What a personal computer was. Was this huge big beige box sitting under your desk. They couldn't imagine that you carry this thing around in your pocket Ed Colligan was VP of marketing at a nascent mobile software company called Palm in the early nineties palm was founded by Jeff. Hawkins the guy who walked around with a block of wood in his pocket. It was a big vision. It was that the future of computing personal computing is handheld computing and that there would be more transactions done on handheld computers in the future than on desktop computers. That's dawn to Pinski Palm CEO. At the time I know today when I say that it sounds like whatever that's logical but believe me. It was not logical at the time. We didn't understand why other people didn't understand it. Because you know we're had computing gone. Right it'd gone from. Computers are filled room to mainframe computers too many computers which were kind of misnamed to personal computers desktop computers we saw the inevitable march of. Moore's law and more and more power and smaller smaller packages palm started out developing information management software for PD. Casio was making called the Zimmer. They also made some synchronization. Software for Hewlett Packard's devices but those first GEN PD as weren't taking off and then the whole personal digital assistant dream looked like a lost cause after the high profile failure of apples effort the Newton. They were all too big too heavy and the software was too slow but the palm team wondered whether a new approach could change the

Jeff Hawkins Pinski Palm Palm Steve Jobs Developer Casio Hewlett Packard Zimmer Ed Colligan Barak Trek
New Toys From Apple Coming This Week

The Tech Guy

02:40 min | 5 months ago

New Toys From Apple Coming This Week

"Toys from Apple this week. it's weird because apple has closed all their stores worldwide except for the Chinese stores which they've reopened we'll also weird But you can't go in an apple store In fact I just was reading. People who had brought apple gear in for repair were given a couple of days. Notice like come get your stuff. We'll we'll handed out through the mail slot to you and after that you gotta whale the stores reopened. Can that possibly be the case? I guess they don't want anybody going in. You can't go try these devices. I think Apple's probably understand that most people don't need to try the new IPAD or the the new macbook air that everybody knows what apple's you could smell what apple's cook right so New macbook air. Just like so they ha- they hadn't released a Mac book air for a long time and then twenty eighteen much to everybody's relief because the macbook air which was the very first ultra book. They really they really created a category. Everybody copied him then. That's those new newish now. They've been around for five years but the very thin round two pound light computer that was the first macbook air. Remember when Steve. Jobs introduced it which must have been pre twenty eleven. That's when he passed away so ten more than ten years ago he he He had it in one of those interoffice envelopes. You know interoffice mail. They Manila envelope. It was in that and he pulled it out everybody who How can you get a computer so thin? That was That was a big deal. The ultra book has set a standard. But they hadn't updated it very much and so it had kind of that had the old account. It was hard to use. Frankly because the screen Resolution was so low. So they've they've put out a retina macbook air in twenty eighteen. Chris ran out and bought it and discovered. It's number one flaw. The worst keyboard ever made I mean just awful so much so that apple has since promised to fix it for anybody. Who's got stuck with it breadcrumbs? Get under it at break and you couldn't you couldn't take apart and replace the keyboard you had to replace the whole darn thing. It was all glued together. It was just nutty but apple You know to their credit. After enough people howled fixed it in the new macbook pro. They can put out at the last year. They have a nice new magic. They call it. They call it magic. I think everything's magic now from apple magic

Apple Manila Steve Chris
"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Texted me after the show Monday and said thanks for being a good friend and while I'm reading all day one piece of Shit I was. I was like well. I can't take it to. Steve doesn't mind what I did. Was I the way I the way I think I chose? I think about this. You may get a chance if Stephen fired you. Know How fucking bad mike with look now? Holy Shit I would have been in Russia. Oh my God if you if you if you push on the air for fired him he got fired. Done that yeah. I'm sure I've made jokes about it afterwards. Mike is low in this issue tonight. Fuckers I was I was loaded in there too I went in. There was fucking like you really. Don't you think if he if Mike goes into the discord? They'll be nice to. Mike is going to Mike. The afternoon is doing right now with Amy Emma. Ama Discord Sefton. Awesome yeah fuck me do helming w with you if I I don't know who I think it's time for you to take some of the heat several gladly but so I can do it with Gigan- have Justin show up early from the mini vans. I guess into today. No I'm sick today. You're doing it takes some twenty seven o'clock tonight Well the thing is I. CaN'T I won't be able to see lady minute fans. It's tonight at seven. Yeah that's true too. Gives a shit but like so what you can watch any time. I guess All right we'll figure out what you can do it okay. I think it's time for us to to to battle with these people. Short time to Tampa for everyone to get together tend to be the same side would Saturday because that might be the easiest time. Sure I guess so. that's fine I think I've seen the civil war died down a little bit less twenty four hours. Yeah I think so. I don't know everyone's calmed down. I think so I think so. I mean you WanNa say them in the fans before you say goodbye thanks Karen and making parody accounts about me in parody songs about me. I love you asked the speech what it means. Age Jake's caring. They could fuck it not care. That'd be way where you realize they wouldn't care if you like the way they really wouldn't care. I guess so many. Dm's telling me awesome. I am three like three hundred. It's been a wild three days gang member refund. We've done a good job. Thank you and you are part you whether you like it or at least part of the family might about it. He's he's like to be able to close it. Maybe cousins more. I don't mind give me a give me a good heart. High pitch when he would you like these songs by ideally realistically next week next week. Yeah I mean. Don't they really know what they want to be at their best for you? Can you blame him? I got a practice and your wife is prepared to sing. Yeah Yup what do you mean? Well backups whatever. I mean. She's already GonNa do backups for me. So if you need it to do backups for other stuff just let me know up. Through for which songs she'll sing rape with me. There's some stuff that that all imagine on the Song Ray-ban no she's not. I did all the vocals on that one. But you'll help me to really change the way you can't do. I can't I can't do both vocals at the same time I can't throat saying like fucking in chorus there's there's a call and response. There's also eight. There's also a lower in a higher voice happening at the same time. Oh Okay I can't do both. I WANNA do okay. She's she's a fan of the song. Yeah okay good excellent. So we're back tomorrow with Steven Earl Robinson. The producer executive producer. Let me just say that correctly of the Kirkman show. He'll be sitting there when we start tomorrow morning literally tomorrow morning. We'll be talking to Steve. Mike Steve Great Back in the studio just when I need at ref returning hero who nevermore loved starve a very successful t shirt now even to get on a Kirkman show dot com. If you really supportive Steve. Yes go almost pockets. My opinion hard pass on the to Saint Patrick shirts myself you know. Come up with those ones. But those Steve. I don't know I didn't know about my favorites but I did like the I do like the Che. That's a good shirt. That is a good show. If you're a big steve supporter. I mean you should be rocking. Help them out. And even if you're not a Steve Supporter would that idea? Probably Irksome that. He's the new. That's true so if you mad at me for Spending Steve. Spend some money on shirt and then I get more money. Yeah I mean one of the easiest money to now does but not nearly as much as I remember that when you're going to spend money on that shirt put more money in my pockets so please get on that so. Yeah thanks to Milton's thanks to nobody who basing nobody your answer phones so there you go back tomorrow with Steve Robinson. We will talk to you then..

Mike Steve Dm Steve Supporter Steven Earl Robinson Steve Robinson Stephen Russia Tampa Amy Emma Karen Gigan Jake rape Saint Patrick Milton producer Justin executive producer
"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

04:26 min | 5 months ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Fifteen eight forty. Can you guys do a red SOx segment? Then that's a level of like in I'd be like no I'm like no no you know why? Like what good does that? Do Tricks. The boss believe anybody a at the time? The second most profitable sports radio station in America. You have your lying in by far the most profitable station at the time. And you're doing a. You're basically be like yeah. Dad's coming home ramp stairs. And pretend you're doing. Your homework is essentially the conversation. And you like what the fuck and it's also kind of a slap in the face that you think the CEO of the company or the or whatever his title is would not have the capacity to if you really wanted to know what you guys were doing. Well have to turn on the radio in my car. But I think but I think there's something not from there. I think it's something to think. They knew that that that would work. Yeah maybe the poet. It's unbelievable keep it off his desk to my larger point. Four we get the other stuff is like a guy like Greg Hill know. I heard I listened to begin this show this morning in the very beginning. I I listen to the first two or three minutes just to get an idea and I know the sales people go down to Florida. I guess going on this weekend and Joe Zarbano. We would never go down. They would never down there. I heard Greg say he's not working tomorrow because he's going on that trip who who's the sales people and hang out with the red SOx people and do. Red Sox Red Sox well to that I would say that's how you survive in that business like that's not a I mean he's a company man. He's a yes man. Yeah but I don't think you would say he isn't no probably not you know so it's like I mean he's a pushing everything but like all right he knows it. I don't think they would ever say I'm one of the most prolific radio personalities. I'm putting out. That's why respect Greg Hill more respect Gerry Callahan of. I'm really being honest because Jerry wants. That wanted the other way. He wants you to think he's as rebel bad boy. Yeah but they asked to do it where Greg Hill is like yeah. I'm going on the market. Do that like the Jerry. Pretend like this rebel. And he wasn't right Greg Hill who Has Higher Ratings and Jerry did. Is You know. We'll go down there and play ball. I mean I don't respect it but at least he's honest. Jerry's rebellion is more his. I guess political ideology in certain words. You might suppose but our bellies said that even at this point you know. I saw people tweeting yesterday. Another story about transgender male born male now female weightlifter. Who wants some competition in the East? You know I'm sure Jerry's Tweeden by everybody else. How crazy it is and of course. It is but you know what's left disable that conversation. It goes back to what we were saying about the articles about Porno. It just gets exhausting over and over again. Max and I happen to agree. I don't think that I I don't think it's fair. It's completely unfair standard. We all get that. It's not it is you can jump up and down. It is not changing right. Not Change only get more extreme. I think you know I mean the Olympics have already said they're gonNA allow transgender people that perform events. So you know they'll be Olympics this year because of the krona virus but still and there's really no turning back now all of a sudden. We're not do this anymore. No way no chance. This is the next generation gets older. Once you're less find this less and less offensive or more comfortable with it. It's not going to change now. You see that they're talking about. They're talking about getting really Olympics now at the corner virus or this summer because in Tokyo like postpone. Yeah it's getting rid of it completely postponing this. I mean that's what we're doing now. I'm carnivorous doubts. Scary fucking sick of reading about it. I gather you know. What are you GONNA do? I might have to shave his beard if I saw. I saw that the big I mean it's like remember when the joker came out. Yeah we were talking about. The media wants the media is begging this to be bigger every every day every they they want us to be the biggest thing of all time and it's every swine flu bird. Flu SARS the same motive. It's bad but every start the world's ending it's like okay. We we get it. You guys want this to be terrible everyone to die. I understand. It's not GonNa happen just as always like you just said we'd get these every whatever six years people freak out in a bunch of people dying at stinks but it's never as big as you want it to be. It's not going to be the flu or whatever that was nineteen thousand nine hundred eighteen. Wherever the hell was I think Spanish flu just still medical guy. Let's say he knows about what's your take on quarter Virus Matt. Help you get it. I think more people die in car accidents every day than than that. The CORONA VIRUS IS GONNA. Kill so the best way attack it. No but I.

Greg Hill Jerry SOx Olympics Flu America Gerry Callahan Florida CEO Joe Zarbano Max Tokyo
"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

09:47 min | 5 months ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Accolades. I'm thanking you want. I was just being sincere with how I feel. I WANNA be a part of the show. Eventually I'm being sincere part of the show. Thank you so much wanted to here permanently. I mean you only work for free not forever but we can't do it for free for a couple of months and then you make out with King's rents. They say this guy is so valuable disagree. That is the show gets bigger. And we've got plenty of actually. Steve Texted me yesterday with some sales news. God He didn't go for he got it from people. We've got big sales new sales actually x eighty percent from six months ago. Nardini told him so. That's great We've closed for this year as well. I found out yesterday. Steve did not Do not was not active. It was brought to him. You make the rules. It's okay if he was active. You make Mac and handle it if you want to send him some information. What do you mean I'm just saying Mac I handle? I absolutely could handle the ship. Into what all the sales dealing with barstool dealing with marketing. All that stuff five experienced you've experienced borstal now but I mean but he kind of become periods though experience experience dealing with other people. Is that what you're saying? Ceiling in marketing and sales. Why no no no no? We're you sell? Listen I appreciate the opportunity. You said that I don't know what you'd like. I mean sure would offer me a contract. No I said I said yes. But what would you do tomorrow? Steve's here like would you do I even had a thumbs. I I mean I could totally take over the the The Wilbur Shell absolute. That's a fulltime job full-time well that in marketing. And so I don't know I mean I know a good. That sounds like a great show. Hi thank you if you're GonNa Pitch Your side or job. I don't know I didn't watch is in his other great answer okay. I don't know I don't know everything that goes on because I'm not exposed to all I know. Is this job right here? Which I've done right. I know that this right. Here's a fulltime job. Well that's right. Steve has a full time job absolutely. But he's also doing a bunch of other ship. Show including producing a Broadway show. But that's also in the Broadway show PARV. It's not but that was his when he was hired. That was part of the job. My no but I'm saying it's paid very handsomely. I know it's a it's not about pay. It's about burnout. You'll have so many of hours of time in the day. Listen Reseal No. You're doing shit too but it's your show. It's your creative monster. That's part of that's part correct. Do Higher you know yes. I'll do this new art my Jay Leno. I don't know what that is filling out. What do think of that the macaroni show? Yes I think people would love quantum week. He could sit in the seat he can host the show. We can hear his thoughts. Mike I I guess. I don't know that the advertisers or Barstool issue it that's it. You're the new permanent fill in hosts. Thank you. Congratulations are most you do. I get paid what you get your damn yes you do per diem. Yeah I mean. Every day that I'm also per diem sandwich a sandwich. We can do that for you right. Our most interviews this contentious yours was great with not deny that was. That was a picture of amazing ashes. God Erica. Why do you think I deserve this job? Yes could you tell me? Why don't you Erica? Why don't you tell me what you tell me? He just takes more than those driving and she was. She enjoyed the Shoes at that convention. Yesterday I heard talking about you know this Jason Barrett Guy who She I guess there's some Barrett media whatever you say Jason Barrett is a professional radio consultant. Which means he essentially is a fucking zero. He doesn't have you know you just goes from station the station they hire him strategist to. It's incredible. I've I've told the story. He came into the hire them. Bring in Jason Batty strategist and I said. I don't have any interest in talking to this person. There's no way he knows how to do this job better. The main comes in as I've said before he looks like what Aereo consultant look like. I'm sandler played a radio host in nineteen ninety-seven like it looks like that typical guy and he's like you know he's like you guys are great guys are the best you know you might WanNa You know me I guess wants to the wall and hit the brakes time. But you're doing great. I want to tell you guys what to do. And that was it. I never heard from again then again. I'm going to Milwaukee Marmi with The AM station there. My God you are given credit fucking scam fest. So Nardini was there yesterday. I guess she she. She talked me up. I said she said that was sort of the big buzz because a big radio crowd so I think they're interested. Geez you know radios bad boys. Doing podcast handling him. How do you control this guy so it? She texted me this morning. She was just like I can't believe little radio people back their talents. True that too. I'm like you really. I mean I don't know I me. I was pretty aware of it but she said yeah they just are are scared of backing talentless said. Yeah that's the way. They've always been the way they will always be different world barstool as much as much shit as we give them. Sometimes it's not as bad as radio. No that's for sure true but so yeah so that was interesting. She said she's going to sound. So maybe we'll have some of that for big comeback show tomorrow. Yes wasn't going to say I did and I'm not particularly you know what was put me in a bad mood this morning. I can't remember who it was. I'm trying to figure it out. I texted a couple of people one time there was like twenty years ago. I don't remember which friend of mine told me this One of my buddies I can't remember was though I always remember shit like this said none away came up to me like that was up in the middle of the night last night sleeping while lay them. I remember somebody telling you the story. He and his girlfriend went to the Rosie O'Donnell show and he talked with a great time he had. And when you got there you went under your seat nor milk and cookies and how wonderful the show was and I remember being furious at this post for for like having a good time and I don't remember who was so fucking angry. I remember being like I was trying to be nice at the because his girlfriend I think was there. Yeah it'd be like Oh that's fine but like what am I got mad. The friend of mine could pretend that he was having that time. Rosie O'Donnell's television show interested. Yes and here's popped into your mind. Yeah I don't know who the hell knows why but I I was like fuck you like. What the fuck you talking or Rosie was big band. No friend of mine would think like that though no way. I can't imagine I think I may have been lace. No I think it might have been laced. You know that would hurt me to hear the lace talks like that Dr Lacey. Yes he'll text me today at whatever. Time the 11:05. Well put up one thirty. Yeah that's okay. I have the power to control and we start in the morning powered quickly afterward. Don't that seems like a long longer legs six day. I mean Steve's pro would I say well it seems like you WanNa just jump right in though yeah thing of so I how you fulltime. We're back they're getting music and then and then the wilburs over them what you're going to have another live show in the middle fucking nowhere. Yeah but that's not going to be like the Wilbur. Yeah it's no but it's still it's still glasser. Fuck you still have to figure out how to people where to do the show? There was plenty of stuff. Steve did a great job. But there's plenty of unknowns when you were great fifty critical Steve. I think he's got he's working no I said he. There was a lot of unknowns. Going there absolutely yeah. He'd never like he didn't go up there. He doesn't know what the situation and he doesn't know any of that. Go up there. You would go and scalp thoroughly. But like there's only so many could can do and travis which helped that did help you know where we where we go next. I suspect Travis suspect somebody there who will help I guess. What are YOU GONNA win? A fly author like scout before. Sure but the other thing. Too is Steve's away I can produce a show whenever Mike's away I can sit in there and hold on rough enough with him. You Youtube -solutely. He wants to do the second time. You've mentioned one of the NFC whatever makes you comfortable. That's what I WANNA do okay. I've never said that one was the first said. No when he came back here said hey listen. I don't know how well I meant. I don't know how comfortable DC is going to be in there. But I'm comfortable shit out of me because you can do it there though I know. I know I do a lot of credit this I. I wonder how this'll be perceived because I was doing very well. People were kind of saying. Hey I wish initiative job. I'm saying just trying to be earnest. No He's asking me to defend why I want a place on the show. She's pretty fucking obvious. He's offered no role he's going to do. Is The marketing and music enough. Already the musical director of the show right. Yeah aren't you or no? Yeah so what else you want. I told you what are you GonNa do tomorrow when when the when the sun is a sad big wet man tears. I mean you just GonNa shop here tomorrow and be like oh. I forgot something. Come back there behind seasonally. Quit SO jumping Christ. That guy doubled down on facebook. Really really what did he say he just he just said yeah be ready for only for no way that. Steve would trust some guy. Tell them this inside information and also not knowing well now never know well enough that that took it easy matt arbiter flying around. We all know we these crazy all right since it's not true. The sleuth works in mysterious. True fucking way. That's true that would be great. It'd be unbelievable radio. It would be great. Although we'd never get it up it'd be you.

Steve Nardini Erica Rosie O'Donnell Jason Barrett Mike marketing and sales Jason Batty Mac King Jay Leno facebook Milwaukee Travis The Wilbur Shell Youtube consultant sandler Aereo
"steve jobs" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"And he's told me some Steve Jobs stories that make your hair stand on as far as his behavior. But we got we got a hand. It's at a guy, you know, he was a human right? He was human. He was very common, and he was very fraught with you know, his own. Peccadillos his own. This dissociate of whatever disorder. He had God he was just missing Thrope, but he gave us so much. He really did. He gave us so much. You one of the things that I there are a lot of people out. There have tried to figure out what lessons to take away from him. And the one that I keep coming back for is is advocating for the consumer advocating for the end user. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. I'm into consumer non when he in that scene in his Steve Jobs movie. When Michael Fassbinder says to Lisa the actress playing Lisa I'm gonna put a thousand songs in your pocket. That's not thinking about itself that's thinking about people walking around wanting music. And of course, it's going to sell because it's good for them. You know, his and and he did have at apple when? He was alive that it is truly detect a big poster of Alan turing. And he went way back beyond you know, IBM and everything and and the big one they had at NASA, whatever they call to the invention of the thinking that led to the computer in fence Louis park. Finchley parked went on with soaring and. Well, you know, it's jobs jobs was an incredible individual. I read that a bio themm by Isaacson, Walter Isaacson. Great bile. Yeah. Great bio. You know, it's it's so good that you were able to talk to Jimmy I have about things like this. Because a number of people said that when they read the ISAACs book that people who new jobs that they didn't really feel like had captured him the way they knew him. They like each person around him had a different hiring and said he was really funny quicks sharp humor. You know? Even though it was nasty. You know, like actually good idea. Start your own company it, but but like that was a bad example butter it just day to day. He was he was funny. You know, he was nasty his hell, but he was also funny, and I guess Jimmy got a buffer down version of Steve because Jimi was mogul himself. You know, Jimmy Interscope records and everything he's done, you know, and he helped develop I tunes with Steve Jobs. So they have it. A we are. This has been amazing. Thank you so much for making some time for me. No, no problem. Victor enjoyed it. I enjoyed it. And I wanna thank w UNC for being so kind of letting us use their studio. Yes. Thank you so much on a Saturday afternoon..

Steve Jobs Jimmy Interscope Thrope Michael Fassbinder Walter Isaacson Jimi fence Louis park NASA apple Lisa Victor ISAACs IBM
"steve jobs" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"Right. They've got the TV plus that sort of fits a competitor to not not much cable or HBO as much as because HBO is a part of their agreements currently anyway, but more net flicks competing with other Disney, for example. Plus streaming service come out right is when they're going to compete with when it comes to computers, obviously, we know they compete with her phones like you said Samsung. But there we keep hearing rumblings about them building their own car. So they're they're getting off tesla. I don't know. You know, that's the whole of the ball. They have around seventy vehicles in California that are self driving license for self driving. Technologies there. But you trust somebody to drive a self driving car. I mean it and nobody could react like a human. Well, the it. It's a ways off, but when a vehicle can react like a human that the possibility or the potential for for drastically, reducing car accidents. Seems like a win. Sometimes they'll logical turn is the wrong on. Yeah. You know, my my concern is the knock on affects of that. If you reduce car accidents to you know, one percent of what they are today. That would be wonderful. Yeah. Then I'll be all for it. But I just itchy about it. Except except that you know, when you do that where you think about all the knock on affects. Right. What comes after that? While a result of that. If you reduce all of the car accidents in in the country, you also reduce all of the organ donation in the country. Yeah. Of course. So and you reduce the employment of firefighters and long haul truck drivers and yet. Yep. All of that. So there's a ton of changes gone. So what like if when we know that we apples might be doing something with self driving cars, you would kinda soon. It Tim cook has when every apple conference when they're not thinking phone. He always has. It says I use this like what the apple watch came out. I have this. That was kind of cool. So you can kind of assume that has self driving. Right. I think it's a little early for that. I think that's probably. A few years away. They're still doing the research kind of work. But you're right. When when it comes he'll have one while they're a couple years ago before the apple watch series, four came out. He was talking about having the ability to to real time scan the glucose in his blogs drinks. And that was something that then came, you know, was announced six months later as a partnership that they done with one of the Senator companies. Well, it's a wonderful stuff. I gotta say though, Tim cook. Probably Robson a limousine. Yeah. It's point. He's a public figure. And he's very powerful. Man. I would say I I suspect he no longer drives himself. Yes. Although although Steve Jobs drove himself around up in solve the the days where he got too sick to drive anymore. He drove himself in parked wherever the hell. He wanted you know, and he had a car without plates on it for like, six months. There was real in California that allowed him long as the car was was purchased or early six months before you could go for six months without a plate. And so he just changed cars every six months. And I I was at apple one day visiting some of the the hardware Vangelis and people there and his his Mercedes was parked in handicapped spot at right angles. I I went to high school with Jimmy I of and I know him forever. And he's told me some Steve Jobs stories that make your hair stand on as far as his behavior. But we got we got a hand. It's at a guy, you know, he was a human right? He was human. He was very common, and he was very fraught with you know, his own..

apple Steve Jobs Tim cook HBO California Samsung Robson tesla Disney Senator Jimmy I Vangelis six months one percent one day
"steve jobs" Discussed on Dentist Money

Dentist Money

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Dentist Money

"There was it was just a bunch of. No, period. And it was like repeated fifty times, and there was like three green little yeses in there all the nose were black, and then the yeses green that was kind of like a good visual of what you're what you're saying. Like, here's a few here. But the majority was like, no, no, no, I think in life. That's kind of how you proactively like create a path that works for you. I'll tell you find your own unique half and all of us have you've had. And I've seen you make that in your career, the choices you've made have been very different. We've both had to say no a lot in different ways to create the unique path that we wanted individually for our own lives. Yeah. And those knows are there critical. I mean, it's very impounding. When you finally say, no. And you finally say this is the definition of my path. Then you don't get there by saying. Yes, every time. I mean, it's not all it's a as we think that I think there's a quote that. I wrote down that I wanted to read in this from Steve Jobs. Can you read that one? Yeah. Actually to. Yeah. That was kind of a next little segment here. I wanted to talk about. What these opportunities even look like the Steve Jobs thing. He said people think focus mean saying yes to the thing that Steve Jobs put it this way said people think focus means saying, yes. To the thing you've got to focus on. But that's not what it means at all focused means saying, no to the hundred other good ideas that are there. You have to pick carefully. I'm actually proud of the things we haven't done as the things I have done innovation is saying no two thousand things. Yes. Really fast. Steve jobs. Big proud of the things he has done. Yeah. It's really cool techy. That I it makes you wonder like what did he create that? Never got built. Yeah. Well, or I think I think it's probably what did he say no to that? Actually, let him create the thing that he created. Yes, it it's like they would have been on could've been on a wild tangent. Looking like another Microsoft that had you know, they were selling their. Software or they're selling their hardware to software providers. But like they eventually like he was relentlessly focused on a mash between software, and hardware, and he had to say no two thousand -tunities in order to arrive at that. And he didn't even get a see the realization of I mean, Apple's trillion dollar market cap was many many many years after his death. You know, I mean, the real fulfillment of his vision didn't even happen Intel a few years ago, and it's just cool to see what I'm saying. No for so long, and it's probably like a bit in those thousand things he's talking about. There was so many Monday little things like no to that manufacturer noted that part think about I mean or not his career it Pixar indefinitely. No to his career at, you know, next not his career in one hundred other job offers that he got what you were saying to like, no saying, no isn't just the obvious stuff. Like, brother. Law has some unrelated side business. He's pitching you, you know. And like, do you wanna be in with me, you want ground level ground level with me? That's kind of maybe some of the more obvious things. Right. But it's the saying no to the the hard things the opportunities that are legitimately good. You're saying, you know, Burt Reynolds said to on Solloway JAMES BOND..

Steve Jobs Burt Reynolds Pixar Intel Microsoft Apple JAMES BOND trillion dollar
"steve jobs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Well, I feel I am representing a lot of straight white man here this evening, and some of them are hot. A lot of a lot of them are dad. So we'll just for a moment just just. Just remember the dad man who aren't with us here this evening. So Matt too bad to Mexico. The mobile. Hey. Creator of Winnie the Pooh. Dads. Night ages ago, to be honest. Here's the first of all the data. Okay. I presume you heard what, how, you know it was constipation, you. Back right up on them. Steve Jobs and the iphone. For me, the saddest part there after he died, they put his body a for ice to see if you come back to live. Never. People Titanic. Hold of the even the ones that they're dead. Now just go. You can swear bloody. I got you. North face clothing company died Las here headed. He Di David of exposure on a camping trip. It's the Baruch that is true. The segway died, teeny reverts fucking way off a onto too. Dyson must be shedding. He's cata scape from wherever you go. You could be hit my case. You know, I think the irony of maybe was sucked up inside Hoover's just him. Noiselessly rotating in the back of drove screaming, but no sound comes out because travel in vacuum..

Dyson Steve Jobs Hoover Las Di David Matt Mexico
"steve jobs" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

"Pixar to disney so he was the one that made all the money and all the original pixar employees got screwed out of the value of their stock and i couldn't believe what i was reading when i read this even though it does kind of have the aroma of things that steve jobs has done in the past doesn't it so i went to check out glenn speker its website he has a link to his website on coal to mac and sure enough he has this whole website where he's documenting all these different pixar stories and the guy is salty he's he's he's happy about this i mean he's got a whole website dedicated to this whole experience and what it was like to work at pixar and how steve jobs totally screwed him so i kind of understand his perspective he was one of the original pixar employees steve jobs made his first billion selling pixar to disney so this clint speaker guy could have made who knows until millions made nothing because steve jobs was dick yeah i mean i think steve jobs like earned that money but yeah that'd be pretty mad salty vada to because yeah you were one of the founding members of the pixar software team rights and how much did steve jobs said sell to disney i don't know it was like twenty billion or something like that it was ridiculous so well clearly he did share some of the stock with some of the people i mean steve jobs this is this is a common apple story steve jobs was very tight bunghole about stocks.

Pixar mac steve jobs disney clint apple
"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Uh but that noticing the details in life is something i can learn from leonardo speaking of details one of that one of the things that there are multiple questions on is how do you get to know the details of people's lives i think we all are trying to get to know the people around us better do you have favorite questions favorite ways of starting an inquiry to really understand someone yeah i mean one thing of feel as a biographer is that for a guy if you're riding from steve jobs ben franklin i'm sign leonardo dolphin all about dad i mean in fact if you read any memoir from you know bill clinton describing his fall stepfather actually or obama saying i guess every boys try neither live up to the sends of his father of the dreams of his father and for me it's both or richard nixon i was born in the house my father built so i look at steve jobs and he keeps talking about the influence in this case of is what he calls his father he pushing the wizards father but adoptive father likewise einstein who's father goes bankrupt trying to do uh light use electricity i mean do the electricity for certain cities leonardo living up to his father because leonardo's illegitimate and his father never makes him an air but you know so i could give one hundred examples put a begins with the relationship to parents and how do these when you think about your different different innovators that you profiled holiday defined success what were they after they were not after money i mean steve jobs could have made a lot more money at apple and he was always trying to make the product better i'll give you a tiny zampbell i remember and you probably do the mac the new mcthat that came out in two thousand after he returns and it's sort of the beautiful thing and is a few colors of slightly translucent and there's a handle on it.

bill clinton the house leonardo steve jobs apple ben franklin obama richard nixon
"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"One of the things i i think is liberating about your work is sort of a collection if you think about jobs davinci franklin einstein the innovators is you also get to see the variety as its creativity that there's not one way to do it and by the way will quickly the varieties of kindness mean ben franklin and leonardo da vinci or the other extreme they have the more friends and you can possibly imagine that deeply kind people leonardo da vinci buys birds in the marketplace where he can free them and see them fly and doesn't want them killed and and as more people in renaissance florence and milan who call him my best friend so you know one of the things about a biography of especially the steve jobs is it's not a how to book you're not supposed to read it and say okay i will be that way that there are different varieties of the way to live your life i do think it's encouraging them at some level when you were you see these different people and you say luck you know okay maybe i'm not like jobs but i can see some of my qualities in in other great innovators what are some of the starkest differences you've seen and how they work yacht will one thing is innovators creative people tend to be very different and the people who are the most innovative and successful realize that you then have to put together a team of people with different styles in different towns whether it's ben franklin who's greatest contributions the founder was not being the smartest founder 'cause you know you had jefferson madison all these not being the most passionate because you've got john adams and his cousin samuel or even the man of great you know gravitas like washington it's he knew how to put together a team who's going to play shortstop who's good play you know who's gonna be the ryder madonna so he puts together a team whether it's should do the declaration of the constitution or whatever when i s steve jobs when he was dying what was your best product i thought he'd say the macro the iphone.

ben franklin milan founder jefferson madison john adams samuel washington madonna
"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Did he have to be so mean and most of them would say he didn't have to be this meeting but i ended up wanting to walk through a wall forehand when i asked steve at the end of the book did you have to be so mean did you have to be so cruel to people he said to me you know i guess claiming the east coast you said you east coast polite types always speak as if you have a velvet gloves on i mean there's a weird metaphor and velvet thank and you always sugarcoat your words when people do something that sucks i just have to tom it sucks because i'm just a middleclass kid trying to make sure i don't have deep players on my team and so i don't i can't afford to be as gentle and is nice now i do not try to answer the question fully in the book i want each reader of steve jobs to address the question is beginning to read the book to see some of the answers at the end and to answer for themselves there are a lot of people come up to me and the old days when i used to talk more about steve jobs and they'd say you know i'm just like steve jobs they arm of boston unlike camp so what he means well something does somebody does something that sucks i just tell them i said yeah have you ever invented the ipod have you ever created on the iphone have you ever design the mac and of course you don't have a lot of li way to do that even if you have invented the ipod and i guess my answer in late retrospect not something i would've put in the book is now you don't have to be that mean you don't have to be cruel to people you have to be tough in you have to be intellectually honest which sometimes i have trouble doing because i'm almost at the other extreme as a manager which is if they're a tough thing to say somebody i try to get my deputy you know you go.

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"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Uh you know push you a little bit don't be afraid of daydreaming and then trying the impossible so you mentioned steve jobs a few times at it it sounds like he was one of the reasons he wrote this i guess when with steve jobs tells you to write a book you have to do it you you got to do that process totally differently so with with the others that you profiled it's been historical look at people who are no longer with us in the jobs case usbaed many many hours with him and also many people who knew him well what was the experience like getting to know who the person who many people sort of you is the greatest innovator of our time well he was deeply spiritual very intense person who you know if you've read the bulk had rough edges and was nasty at times and mean but also having driven people crazy that also walk through walls for me drive them to do things that they didn't know they could do and so the question is you know how do you get that intense personality and of course working with him you know i was daily 'cause i you know sometimes for days on end either staying at his own more nearby uh subject to watching him sort of have that very mick curiel as he put it personality uh and it was difficult especially when it was clear he wasn't going to beat the cancer and he was angry at times you on painkillers at times and saying things at times that i thought you know i mean about people on knew were his friends or people very close to him and that but presented i know we're not at the annenberg school with the warden school but a journalistic dilemma because all my life it was always to try to get people to say things at than would be kind of explosive an exciting there was a lot i ended up leaving out of the book where i thought okay he's just said some really mean things that are gonna be and i had to balance.

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"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Yeah but words interesting is when they're innovative or creative as in your blocks and i said well what's the pattern that does that and the pattern tends to be or at least one of the patterns to be curious across disciplines you're at a university now that pioneered crossing disciplines as opposed to other ivs that really do have you know departments and disciplines much more silo ben franklin of course did that he goes up and down the coast looking at how a swirls of air resembled the swirls of the northeastern storms and then he discovers the gulf shrink same with leonardo he sees patterns across nature and so when i was doing steve jobs he would end his product presentations always with the intersection of the arts and then and technology now aide said at that intersections where creativity happens and he said to me when does the ultimate of that and then bill gates who you've talked to he bought the codex leicester the science one of the signs notebooks of leonardo and so that ability not just to be connect art and science but in leonardo's case to make no distinction between the beauty of art and science that's why he was sort of the final mountain to climb in this series of books but i'll turn it back to you because people like myself right biographies and then people like you actually dstld the wisdom of the biographies we're just destroyed tell us how do you take like a set of biographies and say i'm going to find the lessons that you put in your course in your books get turn this around on me this is my interview.

ben franklin leonardo steve
"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"When i tried to do steve jobs is periods in the 1990s near when he was in the wilderness between the stands at apple he worked at next computer we we went back to try to get all the emails in the memos he couldn't get him out of his machine the operating system couldn't retrieve him anymore but paper is a really good technology for the storage of information 100 years later you know i can be saying look what he did in his notebook you know and and i made just a plug for the publisher i ask simon schuster did this book i said look do it all on art paper not one of these things were you put the things in the center i won it threw out to be that heavy quality coded color images through out because i just wanted to show that paper is actually sometimes good for transmitting info so why why davinci you've i mean you've picked a lot of original thinkers throughout history been how hitting a lot about leadership and you've written about innovation and creative leadership and you've seen the patterns and it takes me a wild to see the patterns i mean i started with ben franklin mainly i mean i've done some books before and then you know einstein and steve jobs and the pattern after awhile wasn't that they were smart because if you're pin you've met lots of smart people and they don't usually amount to much you know they're a dime a dozen this is good news for all your yeah.

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"steve jobs" Discussed on The Critical Path

The Critical Path

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"steve jobs" Discussed on The Critical Path

"Is is inherently fragile now at driven business depends on on on eating often in impossible to discern causes for success and because impossible to discern there are uh discounted so we just don't know what causes success and failure to you don't know what's causes success and failure you're gonna assume that that is just not sustainable um that you were lucky that that success was was um determined by by circumstances that are fleeting that are transient that are temporary um that was the i think the the apple of steve jobs was he who said i am we're dislike babe ruth we only know how to do one thing and make a whole brought that we just do it over and over again while the problem is that people don't believe you in the city his well here if you if you are able to hit five home runs in a row what are the chances you're gonna hit six sale up pretty lo i serve right and and that we we also use a metaphor the or the rather the the parable of the uh the the the the goose that lays the gold megs of the premise they're being that at the chances they're being more eggs coming um are are low and there if there are eggs in in the in the goose you might as will kill the gruesome and the eggs out i have to wait for the possibility that another one will or not will not come out and once you kill the goose you realize that.

steve jobs