35 Burst results for "Steve Inskeep"

Biden Extends Deportation Relief for Haitian Immigrants

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 5 months ago

Biden Extends Deportation Relief for Haitian Immigrants

"Is available at Lemelson dot or g'kar. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin. The Biden administration says it will extend deportation protections for tens of thousands of Haitian immigrants currently living here in the U. S. Trump Administration announced the end of this temporary protected status or TPS, but legal challenges blocked that decision. The argument was that years of extensions were drawing out immigrants stays in the U. S. Long after crises abroad had come to an end. The program is meant for immigrants whose home countries are unable to guarantee the safe return of their citizens. Because of conflict or natural disasters For more. We're joined by girlie in Joseph. She is the president of the Haitian Bridge Alliance. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you so much. Rachel for having us. I imagine this is a big relief for many Haitian immigrants in this country. What kind of fears had they been living with? Absolutely a major relief are about 100 and 54,000 off my Haitian brothers and sisters who have been in the United States living for very long time. And as we have come to understand a lot off them have bean in the forefront of cove in 19 really, really putting their lives at risk to keep our United States of America moving during the condemn IQ, And so it comes with a lot of relief to learn that this people not Only will they be able to continue to serve our communities here, but they will be protected. They don't have to worry for at least the next 18 months. What is the situation in Haiti right now? I mean, what kind of conditions would they have returned to if they had been deported? The situation is dire in Haiti, As we all know, for the past few years, it has mean extreme violence. And there are been kidnapping in extreme turmoil. Political turmoil in a lot of insecurity on the ground right now, and I want people to understand that those people who are currently in Haiti, they do not want to leave. They want to be home. They want to be

Npr News Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Biden Administration U. S. Trump Administration Haitian Bridge Alliance U. United States Joseph Rachel Haiti
French President Macron isolating after positive coronavirus test

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 11 months ago

French President Macron isolating after positive coronavirus test

"Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Emmanuel Macron. The president of France has tested positive for the coronavirus. MPR's Eleanor Beardsley is in Paris. Hi, Eleanor. Hi, stave. How is he? Well, he said to be fine so far, but he has some symptoms and the Elysee Palace is that's why I gotta test this morning. He's going to be isolating for a week, and he's continuing his schedule of meetings today but by videoconference, and obviously he's canceled his lunch for today. Now his wife, French first lady Brigitte Macron, is also in isolation. She's a bit older than he is. She's 67 My call is 42. You know, French media is all abuzz now about who he could have gotten it from and who we may have given it to, and the French prime minister has already gone into isolation. And so has the Spanish prime minister, Pedro Sanchez, who had lunch with Macron on Monday. He's said to be isolating until Christmas Eve. Okay. How seriously had the French president been taking the virus? Steve very seriously. He's had different approach than some of the other world leaders who have gotten it like Boris Johnson, British Prime minister. Our President Donald Trump and the Brazilian president. Fireball so narrow to name a few. They were very cavalier. They even poo pooed it. They never wore masks. Macron is always seen wearing a mask. You know, he's stressed that every decision he's made has been with huddling with the country's top scientist, Steve not really not not literally huddling then when good, but anyway, you talks with them going exactly And you know, France has been one of the hardest hit countries in the world and in Europe right after Italy and Britain with deaths, it's been bad. The country's just come out of a second national lockdown that reduced the daily rate from 60,000 to 14,000 cases a day. But people are still being urged to take precaution. There's an eight PM overnight curfew now, in effect, people are being told where your mask at the Christmas dinner table, you know you go outside. You don't see anybody who's not wearing a mask, even outside in the streets. And I think you know, the Elise a palace is emphasizing the fact that macron someone extremely careful who's closely watch. He's still got it. That means the virus is still out there circulating everyone is vulnerable circulating. Although 14,000 cases a day that's a much lower rate than the United States, even when you adjust for population and so forth, Francis Not in the worst position in the world, but still here they are with the president. Testing positive are the French authorities in a position to distribute a vaccine soon as we're seeing in the United States and Britain and elsewhere, well, watching that going on in the U. S and Britain everybody wants to hear the government has outlined his strategy. Elderly homes, first health care workers to By the end of the spring, it says, you know, all non vulnerable public will be vaccinated. You know, the European Medicines agency. That's the use equivalent to the FDA has not approved of icing the vaccine, the father buying tech vaccine, It's going to be done soon. France already has more than a million doses on order for the end of December. The EU and macron they want to for that. You two start vaccinating, you know, simultaneously altogether very important Symbolic. Germany has mentioned the date of December 27th so it may be taking place around them. But in the French case, they're just saying, we have our own process. We want to be careful. Here. We need a few more days and weeks. Is that right? Well, it's the European Medicines Agency that has to to to approve this vaccine, and everyone is waiting on that right now, and people are starting to trumpet the bed. It needs to happen soon. But you know, everyone is told him to told to be very careful until the vaccine comes. But it is being promised this month. They're gonna began vaccinating Eleanor. Thanks. Thank you, Steve. That's NPR's Eleanor

Macron Steve Inskeep Emmanuel Macron Eleanor Beardsley Elysee Palace Brigitte Macron Pedro Sanchez France Eleanor Steve Britain Boris Johnson Donald Trump Paris European Medicines Agency United States Italy Europe Francis
World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 1 year ago

World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

"This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the United Nations World Food Program. The Norwegian Nobel Committe honored the agency that fights hunger and that has tried to prevent the use of hunger is a weapon of war. NPR's Rob Schmitz is with us and rob for those who don't know what's the World Food program Do The world for program is the UN's largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security last year provided assistance to more than 97 million people in 88 countries. I think what stands out about this program is it's one of the few U. N agencies that has the ability to enter Countries that are extremely difficult to enter places like Syria, North Korea, Yemen, and its goal is literally to save the lives of those who are starving due to poor governance, Armed conflicts, you name it, Okay, so I see the connection to war in peace. But why give them this award during a pandemic? Well, Nobel Peace Prize Committee chair buried Reese Anderson made an interesting connection between the Corona virus pandemic in the World Food programs mission. Here's what she said. The world is in danger off experiencing hunger crisis off inconceivable proportions if the World food programme On other food assistance organizations do not receive the financial support they have requested. So Steve. She's hinting here that financial support for this agency could be in question due to the pandemics impact on the economies of the developed world, and that's a big problem. You know this past summer, you Steve Inskeep interviewed the head of the World Food Programme, David Beasley, and he said the pandemic is having a big impact on world hunger. Here's what he said. Before Cove it I had been given speeches that 2020 was weren't going to be the worst humanitarian crisis years since war, too, because of Covad. We are now looking at an additional 130 million people that will be knocking on the door of starvation and Steve Nobel Committee chair buried. Reese Anderson mentioned the fact that this year the pandemic has exposed a lack of global cooperation. This idea that the world needs to unite to combat the biggest threats to humanity. Here's what she said. Multilateral corporation is absolutely necessary to combat global challenges. And multilateralism seems tohave. Lack of respect these days. Steve, you can hear how she stumbles over her words here. She's obviously trying to put this in the most diplomatic way possible. But it's clear with the rise of populist leaders throughout the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee deemed it necessary to send a message that in the end, joining together is sorely needed in a world facing both the enormous threat of a global pandemic, but also global hunger.

Reese Anderson Nobel Peace Prize Committee Steve Nobel Steve UN Steve Inskeep David Beasley Rob Schmitz NPR Covad Multilateral Corporation Cove Syria North Korea Yemen
Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 1 year ago

Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

"Rice is one of a handful of women on Joe Biden's short list for a running mate. She told us she is the right fit for the job. Yes, I think I could bring my experience of almost now. 20 years in the senior levels of the executive branch to bear to help tackle the most pressing problems we face. And while this would be the first time she would campaign for herself Ambassador Reiss told our co host Steve Inskeep that she's ready for him. Regardless of your experience in government, a big part of the vice presidency or seeking the vice presidency is campaigning, of course, which is not something that you've had a lot of experience doing. Do you have any eagerness to to campaign? Well, Steve. Yes, I've not run for office on my own behalf, but I've run for office on other people's behalf, where I did actually quite a bit of retail politics and speaking to groups of people. But I think unfortunately, in the current context with the pandemic, this will be quite an unusual campaign. If you were in office, you would face the fundamental problem of trust in government or lack of trust in government that is playing out. Now, Many people are refusing to wear facemasks. It seems evident from surveys that many people would think the same way about a vaccine once it's available. What would you do about that? Well, I think that's a huge challenge. And we have had vaccines many in many stages in our history. Still, today, Children need certain vaccines to be able to go to school. And I think that we're gonna have to take a similar approach that you know for kids to be able to go back to school and in Whatever jurisdiction they ought to be vaccinated and the localities ought to consider also requiring the people in the household with the Children to be vaccinated for the very reason that's obvious that this is You know, something that affects the entirety of the community. I want to ask about a couple of foreign policy problems that any administration would face on January 20th 2021 1 of them is deteriorating U. S relations with China. Now I know you've been critical of the way that President Trump is approached China. But at the same time, there are foreign policy experts across the spectrum, who said China's a problem? We don't know how to confront China. Maybe it's time for a confrontation with China. Would you want to roll back U. S relations with China to the way they were in 2016? Steve. No. I don't think you can roll back the clock on any critical issue to 2016. The world has changed and we have to deal with the world as it is. But having said that my criticism is Based predominantly on the fact that we have approached the challenge the China poses economically and strategically in isolation rather than in partnership with our allies in Asia and Europe. You know, instead of, for example, approaching our concerns about trade and economic policy, collectively with our European and Asian partners, who share many of those same concerns, and who Joining with us could add to our collective pressure on China to change its policies and approaches. We started separate trade battles with our closest allies. If you've got more partners behind you, is there some value in a confrontation with China? Well, if by confrontation you mean is it smart for us to start a hot war? I think absolutely not. No. But what about in other ways, diplomatically or otherwise? Well, diplomatically. Sure. First. What we don't need to seek confrontation for its own sake. We need to be strong and smart in how we compete with China. And push back on China's policies on the economic and the security front that threaten our interests. We also should be speaking up vocally and and forcefully about China's egregious human rights abuses from How it treats the Uighurs to the people of Hong Kong. It's common to say that a lot of the divisions of the last few years are merely highlighting what was already there. You could say that President Trump talks the way that a lot of Americans talk and believes what a lot of Americans believe, which is why millions of people voted for him. For example, it is often said that the pandemic Has struck the most vulnerable communities because they were vulnerable over a long period of time that we're just having American society exposed in a different way. Do you believe that? Well, I believe that What the pandemic has done is show how much disparity there is among Americans from a socioeconomic point of view and to a large extent of racial and ethnic point of view, And you know if it wasn't obvious to people before it, it ought to be now. But I don't think that that is the same thing is the first part of your question, which is To suggest that you know, all Donald Trump has done is shined a spotlight on some of the underbelly of our society. I don't think that's right. I think Americans at the end of the day Are not people who like to hate and to fear one another. Do you feel that you understand the roughly 40% of Americans who approve of the job the president is doing. I do think I have a good understanding. Maybe not a perfect understanding in part, Steve, because, as I write in my book, I have a 23 year old son whom I love dearly, whose politics are very, very different from my own, and from the rest of our family. Talk more about that. What are his politics? Ah, you know, I have a very conservative son in a very progressive daughter. They're both wonderful, intelligent. Passionate, committed kids. My son and I will have some robust disagreements are over some matters of policy. Not all. And yet at the end of the day. I love him dearly, and he loves me. As there have been an issue where he is almost persuaded you that maybe you're wrong. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure there is And you know the thing is, and I read about this in in the book. In the last chapter. I write about the areas where we agree. And the areas where we disagree, So we agree, for example. On the importance of the United States, playing a responsible principle leadership role in the world. We agree on the importance of having strong alliances. You know, we disagree. On things like, Ah, choice. I'm pro choice. He's pro life. That's the kind of difference that we oughta be able to respect. Ambassador Susan Rice. It's a pleasure to talk with. Thank you, Steve

China Steve Inskeep President Trump Susan Rice Ambassador Reiss Joe Biden Donald Trump Executive Hong Kong United States Asia Europe
How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

All Things Considered

06:50 min | 1 year ago

How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

"Rahman Rahman and and Colin Colin Furred. Furred. Mattis Mattis were were kids kids from from immigrant families who made good both graduates of prestigious law schools. She represented tenants in Housing Court. He was an associate at a corporate firm in Manhattan. Now they face life in prison in one of the government's highest profile cases against protesters. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team reports. The night of May 29th in Brooklyn was chaos as curfew Jew near police in riot gear began to make arrests. Protesters started throwing water bottles and bricks. The NYPD tried to break up the crowd with pepper spray in swinging batons being excessively aggressive with this crowd here, and it is inappropriate. 70 woman Diana purchased and I'm an elected official, and they just pepper sprayed me for no reason. Rouge Rahmon was there to local journalist stopped her for an interview. Her face was covered with the scarf. She was wearing a black T shirt that read. The struggle continues. This protest is a long time coming. I think that the mayor Should have pulled their his police department back. The way that the mayor and Minneapolis But the part of the interview that ricocheted around the Internet was this. Won't ever stop unless we Take it all down. And that's why the anger is being Express tonight. In this way, prosecutors say in NYPD surveillance camera captured images of Rockman a short time later, she was writing in the passenger seat of a van. Her friend Colin for Mattis was driving. What allegedly happened next defense attorney Shipman says is the basis for the charges against them. It's alleges that a rouge threw a Molotov cocktail into a police car and empty police car. Essentially abandoned police car police car that had been previously vandalized. Two police officers were across the street They gave Chase and Rouge and Colin were arrested. The NYPD video apparently shows it all Rothman and that T shirt. Beige van slowing as it neared the police vehicle. The lighting of a toilet paper fuse the arc of a beer bottle as it crashed under the cruiser's dashboard. The whole episode lasted just seconds. Rahman and Mattis now face seven felonies in federal court. The charges include the use of explosives, arson conspiracy, the use of a destructive device, civil disobedience and the use of a destructive device in the furtherance of a crime of violence. This last charge alone, known as 9 24 C of the criminal code carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 30 years in prison. Add that to the other charges against them, and they could face life behind bars. Attorney Paul Shechtman represents a rouge Rockman and he says his client's case has been singled out ever since. It's been taken federally it has been treated with a seriousness. Ah, harshness unlike any I've ever seen. NPR reviewed 47 Molotov cocktail in arson cases filed across the country. That involved the destruction of police property. And this case to which prosecutors added 1/3 person, Rahman Mattis say they don't know is the only instance in which that 30 year mandatory minimum charge appears. Molotov cocktail cases are usually charged his property crimes in state courts. A spokesman for the U. S Attorney's office declined to discuss the case or they're charging decisions. Attorney General William Barr has been saying for weeks that extremists plotted the violence that erupted during the protests. And he said as much to NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview last week when we arrest people in charge them at this stage anyway. We don't charge them for being a member of Antifa. We charge him for throwing a Molotov cocktail or we charge them for possession of a gun or possession of gasoline and things to make bombs with. Those are the kinds of charges that are filed. And while prosecutors haven't offered any evidence that Rothman and Madison, part of an extremist group You wouldn't know it from the way they were charged. Good afternoon. Your Honor, This is David Kessler. I'm in the U. S attorney in the Eastern District of New York. The harshness and the Rothman and Mattis case went beyond the charges. Prosecutors also fought their release on bail even though it was supported by two different judges. 56 former federal prosecutors found the government's position so alarming. They filed an amicus brief with the court. A panel of judges heard arguments last Tuesday and because of the Corona virus, all this happened over the phone. This is how it began. The District court's order releasing the defendant on bond should be reversed. And when I want to focus on here is the core issue the danger to the community government attorney David Kessler. This is not a case about a youthful indiscretion or crimes passion. It's about a calculated Dangerous crime committed by adults who risked the lives of innocent civilian first responders. Their crime is so serious, Kessler argued. It negates any mitigating factors that came before it. To throw that Molotov cocktail, he said, required essentially a fundamental change in mindset about for them. That's really what the core of the cases, Shenkman told the judges. Thie entire evening was an aberration. Here's their exchange. You can't imagine what a soldering event this arrest was. Mr Shipman. I can imagine how these people did what they're shown on video to have done. I find the whole case unimaginable. But having during that happened once I'm I'm wondering why it is so unimaginable that it wouldn't happen again. I think because that night Wass really unique. It was young people not just used to people out to protest police violence who saw more of it. Right one. Khun lose one sense on an evening like this. That argument appears to have convinced two of the three judges that Rockman and Mattis aren't a danger to the community. The judges said in an opinion yesterday that they agreed with the lower court that the pair could be safely released on bail. Rahman and Mattis were allowed to go home last night. In the months ahead, they have more than just the government charges to fight. They also have to battle the suggestion that they're mixed up in what theater knee general is called. A witches brew of extremists. Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS New York

Mattis Mattis Rahman Rahman Attorney Colin Colin Furred Nypd NPR Rothman Molotov David Kessler Arson Rockman Dina Temple Raston Mr Shipman Housing Court Npr News Rouge Rahmon District Court
Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

All of It

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

"A day before his bombshell memoir hits the bookshelves former national security adviser John Bolton's giving some detailed scathing assessments about the White House before he and president trump parted ways on less than cordial terms one involves Chinese leader xi jin ping and peers Frank or Donia says that according to Bolton trump and she spoke often about the president's reelection prospects in that both lamented the Donald Trump could not serve more than two terms according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep Boehm said his seventeen months in the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead planned to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would identify later Franco or doing as

John Bolton White House President Trump Donald Trump Ching United States NPR Steve Inskeep Boehm Joe Biden Franco Frank Donia
Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

"Former national security adviser John Bolton says president trump and his Chinese counterpart spoke frequently about trump's reelection prospects and beers Frank or don't yes reports the two leaders lamented that trump could not serve more than two terms as US president according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep bone said his seventeen months of the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead plan to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would

John Bolton United States Ching Donald Trump NPR Steve Inskeep Bone President Trump Joe Biden Frank
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve Inskeep today is June fourth the day in nineteen eighty nine when China sent its military against protesters Chinese troops massacred many people as they cleared Tiananmen Square commemorating this massacre is forbidden in mainland China but Hong Kong has held huge rallies every year to remember the victims until this year when police band of that activity although organizers say they're going ahead and peers Emily Fang is covering the story from Beijing either Emily Hey Steve why is this anniversary so important in Hong Kong well that you're thirty one years ago ninety nine hung was still a British colony and this all these protests in Beijing as a parallel of their own struggle at that point the other you can train it already agreed that in the future nineteen ninety seven Hong Kong will be returned to Chinese rule so the idea was if protesters in Beijing could create a democratic China then democracy might finally arrive in Hong Kong as well which we know didn't happen but after the military crackdown on June fourth Hong Kong served another purpose if you came this important town factual of what China could have been with some limited civil rights here's Joe from saw an activist who now lives in New Jersey but in nineteen eighty nine he was one of the student leaders and gentlemen I think out of Hong Kong show the odds are stacked up chime in spirit off the people yes this condo at the beach you hi it's represented to lawful street the ninety people that China could be different but in some ways nineteen eighty nine also sealed Hong Kong's fate that your Beijing and Hong Kong were drafting the conditions under which China would govern Hong Kong and Beijing after the Saudis tenement protests effectively took control of writing those conditions may include more stringent language on national security and the version that you see them citing today the lack of that candlelight vigil that Jones was just talking about in Hong Kong feels particularly existential this year because Hong Kong is now coming under threat from Beijing's control yeah and and of course the the very fact that they were able to hold this vigil at all this memorial for Tiananmen square over the years suggests that there has been greater freedom in Hong Kong what's happening now that the government the central government's cracking down that could disappear quickly there's this proposed national security law which would effectively criminalize all forms of dissent in Hong Kong that will likely be passed this month by Beijing and then today Hong Kong's own legislature passed a national anthem law which criminalizes people who make fun of China's national anthem that could maybe three years in prison now or a hefty fine lawmakers try to block that vote one was dragged out of the chamber the bill passed anyways so now we have this anniversary which has been marked for generations for decades anyway and in Hong Kong and that that that that commemoration is banned water people going to do after this behind the rally said tonight they're still going to congregate they're going to risk arrest and fines churches which has more the way when it comes to corona virus related social distancing guidelines say that they're going to hold some smaller private events across Hong Kong and people are encouraging other individuals to light candles in their home if they don't want to come to a public space so events are still going to go forward now other countries are trying to put pressure on Beijing to not pass this national security law US White House has said they'll revoke Hong Kong's trade privileges if the laws passed but Beijing will likely bear that cost and the United Kingdom the former colonial power that ruled Hong Kong actually set this week to open a path for citizenship for about three million Hong Kongers if the national security laws passed.

Steve Inskeep China
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king this pandemic has had a devastating and disproportionate economic impact on American communities of color president trump has promised to try and address this NPR's learned about one option that he's considering extending a program that gives tax breaks to those who invest in certain low income neighborhoods so think real estate investments this program has bipartisan support it also has some serious critics NPR White House reporter Asia Roscoe's been following this one good morning Asia good morning what is the White House saying about this program so it's still it's the opportunity zone program was created by the twenty seventeen tax cut law it allows investors to defer and lower their capital gains taxes to twenty twenty six that they put their profits into designated low income areas the White House is thinking about extending that program to provide more help to these communities I spoke with White House adviser Deron Smith who's been a point person on this issue it's a cool calm and and there's a number of other tools we want to leverage but we wanna hold if we figure out how we can be younger federal partners he didn't say exactly when an extension might look like and he did say this is just one of many options being looked at to help minority communities but this program in particular has been a big part of the president's outreach to black and Latino voters with the argument that it's helping communities that built that have been left behind the opportunity zone program has also attracted some criticism earlier this year the treasury department's inspector general started investigating whether that federal tax break is helping wealthy investors instead of helping poor people who live in these communities has the White House said anything about whether they plan to prove that this is going to help the people it's meant to help the White House and supporters of the program are you that it is helping the issue is that the initial log did not include reporting requirements that would allow the public to know exactly how this money is being used so backers of the program they acknowledge this and they're pushing for legislation to remedy that and to provide more information about these investments how are these investments in opportunity zones in low income communities how are they doing now in the middle of a of a health crisis it's not really clear I talked to mark Elliott he founded the South Carolina opportunity fund which has about two hundred fifty million dollars in projects in the works he acknowledged that some deals may fall through but he said he's seen other avenues open up including possibly backing a face mask manufacturing plant in South Carolina looking at hiring until recently laid off folks from another manufacturer in South Carolina and you know or call the doctor a great project it's something with needed right battle so there are projects moving forward how much impact would expanding opportunity zones really have in such a severe economic downturn supporters say that it would make a difference in places that would have a hard time back bouncing back but you know talking to some other experts they say that there have been some success stories but a lot of the investment has been in real estate and not an operating businesses and it's not clear that all zones are benefiting from this program so it's hard to say what how much of a difference this can make NPR White House reporter I Usha Roscoe AC thanks so much thank you time now for StoryCorps on this Memorial Day weekend we recall army staff sergeant Emilio Leo DePalma who fought in World War two and served as a guard at the first Nuremberg trial among those he guarded.

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning economic policy leaders are trying to find ways to pull this country out of a deep hole we don't know yet what's going to happen will a strong bounce come after this downturn trump administration officials say it will or will it take longer because people need to get their confidence back before they go out the same thing is playing out in many countries and we're going to look at two and we have to NPR correspondents to help us chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is in Washington DC and central Europe correspondent rob Smith is in Berlin good morning guys good morning the US government has authorized billions of dollars in aid the fed is printing trillions more and yet federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell has continued to say Congress might need to do still more that's right pal is warning the economic downturn triggered by this pandemic could stretch well into next year but the relief measures that authorized so far are set to run out well before that those twelve hundred dollar relief payments have already been spent in many cases the loan to small businesses are only expected to cover a couple months worth of expenses and the six hundred dollars a week in extra unemployment benefits are due to expire at the end of July so pal told the Senate banking committee yesterday additional federal help may be needed to avoid lasting damage to the economy what Congress has done to date has been remarkably timely and and forceful I think we could say the same about what we've done I do think when you take a step back and ask over time isn't enough we need to be prepared to act further and I would say we are if if the need is there you know compared to Germany the relief efforts in this country have a kind of Rube Goldberg quality to them and powers if the downturn drags on workers will drop out businesses will fold and that would make the eventual recovery that much slower and more difficult and the question is asking is has Congress his Congress has done a lot but has Congress done enough will it be enough how are lawmakers in Congress responding you know house Democrats passed a big relief bill last week but it's been dismissed by both the White House and Senate Republicans Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell told reporters just yesterday he's in no hurry here to approve additional spending we still believe with regard to the corona virus we need to assess what we've already done take a look at what works and what doesn't and will discuss the way forward in the next couple weeks so no real urgency there president trump paid a visit to Capitol Hill yesterday to meet with GOP lawmakers and afterwards he told reporters he's hoping for a much more rapid economic rebound well let's talk about Europe or countries fates are tied together in ways and that the U. S. doesn't have to think about so German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Emmanuel macron reached a deal on a relief package but it was a long time coming it didn't happen quickly no it took a while because European leaders have disagreed on how to fund this relief plan up to now Europe southern states have wanted to be funded by the entire E. U. S. sort of collective approach where member states would share the debt but a handful of countries known in some circles as the frugal five Austria Germany the Netherlands Denmark and Sweden they wanted a more individual push that each member state would take out a loan for its own needs now the proposal that the krona Mericle agreed on this week shows the southern states got their way under this plan the E. you would borrow half a trillion dollars and share the data on all member states even though the aid would primarily benefit southern states like Italy and Spain it's important member here that this package is only a proposal and all twenty seven EU members including their national parliaments will need to approve it so this is far from a done deal but the fact that angle America has agreed to this shows an interesting change of heart for her what's behind that why did she agree to this big relief package of it's not going to benefit Germany that much yeah one reason is this pandemic was not the fault of Italy or Spain it's a natural disaster and unlike the eurozone crisis a decade ago this is not rooted in the fiscal policies of southern U. member states secondly angle Americal is at the end of her tenure as chancellor and her management of this crisis has restored her popularity her approval ratings are skyrocketing in Germany so she now has the political capital to solidify her legacy by supporting a recovery package that aims to unify the EU not further separated what an interesting trajectory for her Scott we don't exactly know when recovery will happen everyone kind of admits that at this point do we know what it will look like you know what will they find to be you know it depends on the path of the virus and also on public attitudes how quickly do people feel comfortable going back to the shopping mall how quickly they feel comfortable going to restaurants or getting on an airplane again there are some small signs of improvement if you squint hard to look at him but on the other hand there are also huge holes in state and local government budgets which could trigger another round of layoffs and of course all bets are off if we see another spike in infections okay so a lot we don't know here in the U. S. rob in Germany the country starting to slowly be open is the picture a little brighter where you are yeah a little you know Germany just announced it's officially in recession and its economy has shrunk by more than two percent of the first quarter of this year but you know thanks to German Germany's government and its tradition of keeping a balanced budget the country is better positioned than others you know Germany ended last year with the surplus and spending that in more on an eight hundred billion dollar relief package Germany's been able to keep workers employed thanks to its Kurds are by program instead of the US approach of unemployment checks in Germany companies are subsidized to keep workers on the payroll so workers won't lose their jobs and companies don't have to retire after the crisis nearly a million German companies have applied for this program and much of the country's recovery package is going to radically into that to keep germs employed but the question going forward is how long can Germany for da paid into these programs before the money starts to dry up be interesting to see what each country learns from others when this is all over in Paris rob Schmitz in Berlin and Scott Horsley in DC thanks you guys you're welcome thank you the pandemic and the U. S. response to it has of course dominated the presidential campaign although there are other topics such as a sexual assault allegation against Democrat Joe Biden an allegation he denies journalists are vetting this allegation voters have to consider how it's resolved could affect more than the campaign it could shape the future of the me too movement here's NPR national political correspondent Mara lias Tara Reid's allegation that Joe Biden assaulted her in the Senate hallway twenty seven years ago has presented a real challenge to the me too movement Jen Palmieri who was communications director for the Clinton campaign in twenty sixteen wrote a soul searching SA recently about what she calls the complex discomfort of Tara Reid's allegation to primary it was a kind of need to track a lot of us Democrats I know Joe Biden had this collective vertigo which was reconciling the host V. two standard of defaulting to believing women with the fact that we know Joe Biden and don't believe that he would be capable of that kind of assault no prominent Democrat has broken with Biden over the allegations Democrats say they're satisfied with the way Biden has responded unlike Donald Trump who's actually admitted on tape to work read accuses Biden of doing and has called the more than twenty women accusing him of sexual misconduct liars or not good looking enough to make a pass that Biden has said reads motives should not be questioned even as he emphatically denies the allegations as for women who believe read and are struggling with their vote Biden told MSNBC this is a believe terror read they probably shouldn't vote for me I would vote for me if I believe Tara Reid Biden and the women who support him say all women should be heard and respected and their stories vetted and that infuriates Republicans who say in the past Democrats applied a different standard believe all women to the accusers of Republicans like trump or Brett Kavanaugh what actually faced with it themselves they're saying oh well yes now due process matters when before it was just Kavanagh's not qualified anymore boom done and over with Erin parini is the deputy communications director of the trump campaign she says Democrats are hypocrites they pretend to be champions for the American people and for women and for the me too movement and then they only believe all women when it fits their political purposes you know as a woman myself I think that this shows what we've known all along that Democrats when faced with it themselves could not stand by their previous standards Republicans have been aggressive accusing democratic Senate and congressional candidates of the double standard but Republican strategist Sara Fagen isn't sure that the read allegations will make much of a difference in the presidential race there's no polling yet that suggests it's moving any votes and Biden still has a big advantage with women there's so many issues related to coronavirus China in a global trade immigration that are likely to take the focus when we get to November it it's not that this isn't in the backdrop because I think many trump circuits will remind to conservatives of the hypocrisy that we see around this issue but it's just the base motivator unfortunately another reason the allegations may not loom large is trump himself who has reacted to Biden's difficulties in a very un Trumpian fashion instead of weaponizing the charges adding them to his branding of Biden as senile and a socialist trump has suggested that the charges could be false just like what he told podcast host Dan Bongino what happened to him but all of a sudden you become a wealthy guy you're famous guy did you become president and people just and you've never seen that you've never heard of make charges so you know I guess in a way you could say I'm I'm sticking up for him to Jen Palmieri this was a surprising show of empathy because Donald Trump usually tries to turn the tables on his own vulnerabilities after the access Hollywood tape surfaced for instance he showed up at the presidential debate with a group of women who accused Bill Clinton of sexual misconduct but this time trump seems to identify with Biden we give them a doubles down and says that the other person is worse and this time he showed some vulnerability on and said he's like he did not go for the jugular yes I can politician if you're a normal politician and your opponent did something that you are vulnerable on you would not attack that the other politician so at least for the moment there may be a weird kind of troops and the politicization of sexual misconduct and that means some progress for the me too movement which has struggled to come up with a standard that's more nuanced than simply believe all women a standard where women are heard not disparaged or dismissed where allegations are taken seriously and investigated independently and where there is due process for the accused it may be too much to ask for in the heat of a super polarized presidential campaign but that's what men and women in both parties say they want Mar Eliason NPR news this is NPR news six nineteen is the time on KQ weedy Joe.

Steve Inskeep
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin good morning maybe you saw those pictures last week of all the voters in Wisconsin standing in long lines attempting to social distance while casting their ballots in the state's primary well today we have got the results as expected Joe Biden won in the democratic presidential primary but there were some down ballot surprises my Jaan silver of member station W. W. M. joins us now to talk about them high man hi good morning good morning so the biggest upset of the night actually came in a state Supreme Court race what happened there yes the liberal backed candidate Jill Karofsky beat the trump endorsed incumbent Daniel Kelly she held a socially distant victory party it was just Karofsky in her two kids and she thank her team and supporters but she also had a copy at look we should never had election on Tuesday and for many many people they had to decide between whether or not they were going to risk their own health or the health of people they love or their lives or the lives of people that they loved in order to vote it wasn't on tenable decision the GOP controlled legislature and the conservative majority in the state Supreme Court had fought hard to hold the election date in place despite calls to postpone or change to all male and so this was a big defeat for them a lot of Democrats had said they were worried that holding an election under the circumstances a mode amounted to voter suppression of looking at the results is there any evidence of that Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez had called this election voter suppression on steroids and in larger cities voters reported waits an average of one to two hours up to four hours some voters just couldn't wait that long or didn't want to brave the polls and risk their health nearly ten thousand voters requested mail in ballots on time and didn't get them and there were post office problems and postmark problems so there were voters who were disenfranchised and will never know just what turned out would have been if it hadn't been for coronavirus but all in all one point one million mail in ballots were requested and returned that makes the total vote count right in line or even higher than previous state Supreme Court races and also on par with other presidential primaries so Wisconsin made this huge transition from being a state where a majority of voters cast ballots in person on election day to a majority mailing in their ballots so just briefly is that what's going to happen in the fall well so based on Republicans opposition to proposals for all mail in election this time around it's possible we could get a replay of the long lines and and few polling places but it's possible that their opinions could change after this election seeing that mailing turned out very high among both Republicans and Democrats so it's not just something Democrats do it also depends on where we are with corona virus right exactly my own silver of W. you W. M. in Milwaukee we appreciate it thank you thank you so much the Wisconsin when it is not a good for Joe Biden but even more significant news for his campaign yesterday getting the endorsement of one Bernie Sanders today I am asking all Americans I'm asking every Democrat I'm asking every independent I'm asking a lot of Republicans to come together in this campaign to support your candidacy now try in dos to make certain that we defeat somebody who I believe from speaking just for myself now what is the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country but Biden has been struggling to hold on to attention and reach voters amid the corona virus pandemic Karen Finney as a democratic strategist she was senior spokesperson for Hillary Clinton's two thousand sixteen campaign and he is on the line with us now to talk about what is really become an unprecedented campaign Karen hi hi good morning well could this thing get anymore historic so what did you make of Sanders endorsement I mean how does it compare specifically to when he endorsed Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen well it was very strong and I'll tell you one of the most important things and I give us senator Sanders a lot of credit for this he ran a tremendous race and he gave us a really full throated endorsement of Joe Biden and recognizing the gap in the number of delegates then that he couldn't really make that up he stepped forward early and doing it long but you know before we are at convention because as you may recall in twenty sixteen there were some calm I know right into the convention it was Maranda sticky right and this is a nice way to put it well not good it was it was not good however what it means now is that the full Democratic Party enter progressive allies can be focused a hundred percent on how to defeat Donald Trump but also as you know if you're just talking about with Wisconsin we know that voting in November we have to prepare for that as well that's definitely a real issue top of mind are Bernie Sanders supporters going to show up for Joe Biden do you think what kind of concessions might bite and have to make well I think you know certainly when it comes to it's it's complicated right because I think certainly when it comes to thinking about where the economy is going to be in the kind of recovery were going to be needing to be thinking about obviously vice president Biden has been through that when he and president Obama took office in two thousand nine so he has some ideas I'm sure senator Sanders as we know has some very specific ideas and I think you've seen vice president Biden start to move towards some of those ideas I know Medicare for all is one that senator Sanders is going to keep pushing I don't see bite in doing that I would say I think he will stick to our expanding obamacare which you know again in the middle of this covert crisis a lot of these ideas I think now seem much more reasonable to people who are doubting these ideas sometime ago because it's laying bare are some of these do you know just huge fissures in our economy and our health care system so I could see those being the two key areas where they'll have conversation just briefly in seconds remaining you're a strategist how do you advise Joe Biden in this moment when he can't go have rallies he can't go get it you know lock eyes with a voter put his hands on their shoulders as he doesn't communicate his message he's got to be offered to all yeah you know what by being virtual though I mean tech just be the contrast to the kind of note down that sort of daily unhinged meltdown we see coming out of the White House that doesn't make many people it doesn't make us feel more confident or comfortable or trustworthy be the guy who just show up on me the guy who shows com and has a plan and shows okay all democratic strategist Karen Finney thing scared we.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Wisconsin
The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

Morning Edition

03:00 min | 1 year ago

The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

"This next story features some of the most powerful moments of the conversations that team had in those words Steve Inskeep and Sarah McCammon found a deep divide this division is not quite the same as the red and blue partisan divide it's different from the gaps between races our incomes our generations the truth is it's bigger than all those divisions and it embraces all of them it's the divide between the city and the surrounding countryside in metro Charlotte we met urban and rural voters on the same day now we've heard their differing views on this program in past days today we hear what some think of each other I visited a predominantly black church in Charlotte it was within sight of the big skyscrapers downtown and there I met with local activists and I told them that you Steve had been talking with mostly white suburban and rural voters many of whom support president trump what do you think of I guess our neighbours and away who voted so differently from I K. said in church that's willing Fleming he's sixty three African American a long time activist in Charlotte I think anybody to anybody it did both the trump has to have the same school of thought a trump passed and as racism that I just don't believe in it I don't Sadam Vangelis preacher can stand up and have to give trump player than he does what he's talking about there is the way many white evangelical leaders have supported the president even after he admitted to paying off a porn star even through his impeachment we had this long conversation about politics in the state of the country and Karan mac because the local NWC P. president told me she feels like many white people just don't see their own racism what I've learned is this that black people do not seem to have the same level of work in this country our lives don't have worked in this country and it's been that way since the beginning of time to sixteen nineteen let's put it that way she's referring there to the years slavery started in the United States other voters described rural trump supporters as low information voters who don't understand how they rely on government programs like social security or farm subsidies Collette all sin is president of the African American caucus for the county Democratic Party I am going to say that a lot of people are just aren't educated they don't understand the system and the process and at the end of the day once that's understood I don't think that would have been a lot of people that would have voted for him but a lot of people are voting on a motion and fear and whatever so these voters feel marginalized by some of their white suburban and rural neighbors in the Charlotte area and they also feel like some of those neighbors just aren't seeing the big picture Schering your voters were not wrong there to talk about people voting on fear because some people do fear cities at the same day that you were in central Charlotte I was the far edge of the metro and went to a cafe in the small town called kings mountain and had breakfast in the corner with Tracy Stewart his mom Linda Stewart

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"David green I'm Steve Inskeep what does the president want to do to disability benefits in America the administration budget proposes changes in requirements to go on disability this affects a lot of people across the country so let's check the facts and the implications of something we heard on this program this week White House budget director Russell vote said there is a chance to save money on disability there's about seven billion dollars in improper payments in the program so we obviously want to read those out but in general we want to get people back to work in labor force right now the inability to speak English is a qualifying factor that allow you to get disability we think that's not how the program is meant to work and so that's an example of one of the reforms that we have within the disability program so much to dig into their an NPR Selena Simmons stuff and is in our studios to help us do that good morning my name first seven billion dollars in improper payments is that much money available to be saved well I asked on the for the source of that figure and they sent me a report that shows the seven billion dollars in improper payments across disability programs in fiscal year twenty eighteen but here is an important point that is out of hundreds of billions in payments to beneficiaries OMB puts the rate of improper payments at about four percent other estimates say it's closer to one percent that is decimal dust according to a source I talk to about this and another important point vote says route out but most of these improper payments are because of inefficiencies or administrative issues not because of fraud people trying to game the system in some way okay first decimal dust as of yet is I'm gonna say from very much I appreciate that second he said the thing about speaking English that if you don't speak English well you can get disability and you didn't see the president doesn't seem to like that is that correct kind of you cannot get disability benefits just because you don't speak English you have to first have a serious medical condition that prevents you from working if you do language skills might be considered along with other things it's like agent education level the thinking is say you have a physical conditioning can to manual label labor for instance but you could work in a desk job you don't have the education or work is going to language skills to do that all of that might be taken into consideration although for talking about language it sounds like a measure here to target immigrants at some but it sounds like that's not necessarily what's going on here this is not is not just about immigrants claiming disability right it's part of this really complex grade of considerations and the trump administration tells me it's close to final finalizing a new regulation to remove that consideration out of the grid and some experts I talked to said that that process does need to be modernized but English language consideration would not be the place that would start it's a pretty small piece of the pie okay Russell vote also said that the administration wants to ask people much more often if they really are qualified for disability let's hear that we want to have ongoing disability reviews instead of having a root disability review every seven years we want you to have it every two or three years what's the story there okay part of what he's saying is not quite right to seven years is the very outer limit between what are called continuing disability reviews this is for people who have really serious conditions like an intellectual disability down syndrome might be an example there is a recent proposal from the trump administration on this but it would not change reviews from seven years to two years we make some other changes to the frequency of these reviews on these changes aren't final yet the disability advocates have been sounding the alarm and some people told me that the frequency is not the issue it's that there isn't enough staffing or funding for these field offices in order to actually check up on people regardless of the time exactly Selena thanks so much for coming by thank you NPR's.

David green Steve Inskeep president America
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Steve Inskeep and I know will king people who graduated from historically black or predominantly Hispanic colleges might be paying more to borrow money because of where they went to school that's according to a new report from a financial watchdog group and here's Chris Arnold got an advance copy of that report a lot more people these days are getting loans from a new breed of lenders known as Finn tax or financial technology firms add some of these lenders factor in where you went to college a really racing alarm flags cat well back as the civil rights council the nonprofit student bar were protection center her group decided to run a test they chose a fintech lender called upstart you get a loan offer off its website and they applied for dozens of loans online at posing as a twenty four year old man they said he lives in New York makes fifty grand a year the only difference was where he went to school they applied as if he went to and why you in New York a bunch of other schools and Howard University one of the most famous historically black colleges and universities in this country and we looked at what would a bar where from Howard what with a swimmer if they see if they apply for this type of loan and then they compare and they found that if you went to and why you versus Howard for a thirty thousand dollar personal loan with a five year term they found you pay about thirty five hundred dollars more in interest in fees if you went to Howard a historically black college there's no other difference between these two borrowers other than the fact that one attended it and why year in one attended Howard the group found you'd also pay more if you went to New Mexico state which has a high percentage of Hispanic students in a new report called educational redlining the group says lenders it may be discriminating based on what college you attended we reached out to Dave Girard the CEO of upstart we definitely appreciate the intent Gerard it used to be a senior executive at Google and found it up start he says to use technology to make credit more available upstart he says goes way beyond looking at your credit score there are more than a thousand factors I mean we're a company that your entire mission the reason you know we get out of bed every morning is to improve access to affordable credit so we are actually supportive of the intent that credit should be biased unfair anyway Hey but you're right says basically the test the nonprofit group ran it doesn't prove that using education as a factor it leads to discrimination using you know hypothetical contrived applicants for loans who are real people and was but you know both anecdotal and and not reflective of the real world and you know we're a company that has tested for fairness and bias over millions of applicants and that's our approach to ensuring that our platform isn't biased against anybody still the report raised the eyebrows of some legal experts and tied Baker teaches a course on fintech at Columbia university's law school he says that the traditional credit score approach to landing has its own problems and biases and at some fintech landers alternative approaches can help using alternative data can be highly beneficial but also has dangers and we need to be very vigilant that we don't recreate some of the problematic practices of the past unintentionally advocates are increasingly worried the casting such a wide net for data to make decisions introduces biases in new and different ways well back says her group is pushing for better oversight and more transparency from fin tech companies Chris Arnold NPR news Iowa the first state to vote is looking last in vote counting we're still waiting for a final tally on the twenty twenty Iowa caucuses the state Democratic Party chairman has promised a full investigation and already there are calls for Iowa to lose its status NPR's don Gonyea reports new technology was supposed to make the twenty twenty Iowa caucuses a smoother running operation it didn't work out that way Monday night passed and then Tuesday morning with no results reported then just after four PM yesterday partial but not complete vote totals were posted online showing Bernie Sanders and people to judge battling for first place by now all of the ideal candidates were off in New Hampshire leaving the spotlight to Iowa Democratic Party chairman try price good afternoon thank you all so much for taking a little time today to to chat a little bit about what happened last night price held a short news conference starting with a mea culpa he said the problems tabulating results are unacceptable as chair of the party I apologize deeply for this he said an investigation would be thorough and transparent but he also stressed that the use of voting cards this year that's a new thing for the caucuses means there's a paper trail and that there will be an accurate final count eventually during Q. NA price said there were no indications of problems during testing of the new app used to transmit results from caucus sites he didn't say when a complete vote count would be released and he was asked if having such a major problem could lead to Ireland losing its spot as the first to vote the fact is is that this is a conversation that happens every four years there's no doubt that that conversation will take place again in fact it's already been a hot topic on local television news in Iowa here's KCCI channel eight in the morning hafu is of course increasing calls nationwide and I was first in the nation status in the presidential election process in the past the debate has focused on whether Iowa is to world to white into one like the nation as a whole to occupy the privilege first spot on the election calendar it has so far always weathered such arguments but the very public very embarrassing problems of this week gave I was critics a boost according to Drake University political scientist Dennis gold for the twenty twenty caucus was a pretty much of a nightmare scenario he says the push to give another stated turn or to even make it rotating position with the new first state each election cycle will now get a more serious look those wanting to change the nomination procedure to move or just place the Iowa caucuses have gained a lot of ammunition in the meantime Iowa Democrats will need to show that they fix the problems of this week more difficult might be proving to voters especially those disappointed with the results that fairness is carried the day don Gonyea NPR news des Moines this is NPR news John McConnell with the San Jose traffic.

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Well king and I'm Steve Inskeep we have the story of the most influential years of Qassem Soleimani the United States had him killed in an airstrike in Iraq just after the new year he was in a rotting in general arguably the most important member of the revolutionary guard a military arm of the Islamic Republic of Iran which has been fighting direct and proxy wars in the Middle East for forty years a bit of recent history reveals why so the money was so important and why the U. S. considered him so dangerous here to talk about this is one of the co hosts of NPR's history podcast through line rum tenor of Louis Hey welcome back thanks so I guess this goes back to nineteen seventy nine when Iran's Islamic revolution began and there's this organization called the revolutionary guard did even then include a young man named Qassem Soleimani yes Qassem Soleimani join the revolutionary guard in his early twenties right after the revolution when the Iran Iraq war broke out in nineteen eighty that organization dramatically expanded and solely money made a name for himself as a war hero after the war ended in nineteen eighty eight he climbed the ranks and eventually led the revolutionary guards for military operations and when nine eleven happened he was thrust into the middle of an incredibly tough foreign policy challenge for a run because the United States was striking back after nine eleven and had other plans exactly when the U. S. invaded Afghanistan to destroy al Qaeda and the Taliban government there was fear in Iran so in a secret meeting in Geneva Iranian diplomats actually handed over military intelligence about the Taliban two US officials kind of olive branch and it seemed for a brief moment that Iran US cooperation in Afghanistan might actually be possible my co.

Steve Inskeep Qassem Soleimani United States Iraq Islamic Republic Iran Middle East NPR Afghanistan Taliban Geneva
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who should host Steve Inskeep joins us to talk about covering president trump's impeachment then we'll hear about his new book in perfect union it tells the story of political activists Jesse and John Fremont a couple who explored and mapped the American west of the eighteen hundreds then at ten fifty seven Cisco forty Niners are one game away from the Super Bowl they compete with the Green Bay Packers in their first NFC championship game in seven years we'll talk with the chronicles and killing about this year's team and their chances going into Sunday's game that's all next after this new live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying the U. S. Senate has accepted the articles of impeachment of president trump and peers quality grease Alice reports this move triggers a start of trump's trial after he was accused of leveraging hundreds of millions in military aid to Ukraine to pressure the U. S. ally to help him politically Adam Schiff the chairman of the house intelligence committee led the impeachment manager team in presenting the articles to the Senate using the powers of his I. office president trump solicited the interference of a foreign government Ukraine in the twenty twenty United States presidential election the Chief Justice of the United States is being sworn end and will in turn swear in the full chamber of senators who will act as jurors the senators must sit in silence and without their electronic devices for the duration of the trial the proceedings are slated to start on Tuesday could last several weeks cloudy salicin peer news the capitol meanwhile Ukrainian police have announced they are investigating whether a US ambassador was under illegal surveillance last spring before the trump administration remove her from a post over Ukraine says its position is not to interfere in the US is internal political affairs the president's marking national religious freedom day with a reminder the public school students have constitutional rights to prayer and they could risk losing federal funds if those rights are not protected and peers record on yes reports the White House says it's not changing existing laws were plans to update those already on the books president trump will host a group of Christian Jewish and Muslim students who say they face discrimination at school in an exclusive interview with NPR the director of the White House domestic policy council Joe Grogan said provisions that protects student prayer have been eroded over time by hostility toward religion or trying across the board to invite religious institutions and people of faith back into the public square and say look your views are just as valid as anybody else's and by the way they're protected by the first amendment to the constitution the event comes as trump works to boost support among evangelical Christians before the twenty twenty election Franco or Dona as NPR news the White House the US Senate has overwhelmingly approved an updated trade agreement with Mexico and Canada and peers gun Horsley reports of vote follows passage in the house last month the vote in the Senate was broad and bi partisan with eighty nine senators voting in favor of the updated trade deal and just ten senators voting no that similar to the lopsided tally that the U. S. M. C. A. one in the house last month at ten P. R. Scott Horsley reporting the retail sectors coming off what one analyst called the healthy holiday season the national retail federation reporting holiday sales of twenty nineteen were more than four percent higher than the year before the retail group partly credits online sales which fared better than several major brick and mortar stores the Dow was up one hundred sixty five points this is NPR live from KQED news online Tiffany cam high twenty nineteen was the second hottest year on record according to a new report from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration here's KQ.

Steve Inskeep trump president
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"No well king and I'm Steve Inskeep on new year's eve the governor of Illinois issued more than eleven thousand pardons for past marijuana convictions now that the state is legalized the use of marijuana he says he wants to right the wrongs of the war on drugs here's Brian Mackey of W. U. I. S. in Springfield Illinois is first day of legal recreational marijuana featured long lines more than three million dollars in sales and a round of applause for lieutenant governor Giuliana Stratton who queued up to buy pot gummies from a shop in Chicago but a day earlier anticipating the hoopla governor JB Pritzker said all that was secondary the purpose of this legislation is not to immediately make cannabis widely available or to maximize product on the shelves Pritzker a Democrat says that will come with time but instead the defining purpose of legalization is to maximize equity and so the governor issued pardons a lot of pardons these eleven thousand and seventeen misdemeanor convictions represent individuals who have carried around with them a stain on their records for possessing less than thirty grams of cannabis Pritzker decided to announce the pardons and an African American church in Chicago with a long history of community activism at times the event felt more like a sermon in a press conference the story is not about cannabis being free is about people being free this is taking place today other Michael Slager is an activist and a Catholic priest whose congregation worships a few miles away in the coming weeks thousands of sisters and brothers who have been held hostage by background and records that closed doors and locked out opportunities not just in jobs but also in homes and an education that ceiling is now being taken down illinois' marijuana law demands a proactive approach to pardons an expungement the Illinois state police has been coming through files looking for records of cannabis convictions and arrests the governor's office says there could be as many as one hundred sixteen thousand convictions eligible for a pardon for possession of larger amounts of pot up to half a kilo people can apply for an expungement how many of the men and women behind those numbers actually get clear of the law we'll see back at the church news conference Esther Franco pain of Chicago's Cabrini green legal aid says expungement is usually a really difficult process the fact that much of this is happening automatically really means something not just to us in this room but to the people who are not often times able to take that first step officials hope illinois' law serves as a model elsewhere in the country Kim fox's the cook county state's attorney the lead prosecutor for one of the largest justice systems in the U. S. last month she personally filed court papers to vacate of thousand pot convictions in her jurisdiction I want us to absorb what is happened because not only for the people Illinois but for the rest of the country who perhaps believe that this wasn't possible that perhaps we could only do legalization and not do reparation you can actually do both in Illinois has demanded that you do such all this is just part of what Illinois officials say they hope to see from the equity aspects of legalization for NPR news I'm Brian Mackey in Springfield Illinois it's morning edition from NPR news you're listening to KCRW KCRW sponsors include Warner brothers presenting joker from director Todd Phillips starring golden globe and Screen Actors Guild nominee for Best Actor Joaquin Phoenix awards eligible in all categories including Best Picture director and after coming up you'll get news headlines at the top the hour plus a check your weather forecast and Jose gal von gets your weekend start off right with morning becomes eclectic coming up later today on KCRW's All Things Considered there for more than five hundred oil spills off the coast of Louisiana since hurricane Katrina but the state government isn't holding oil companies accountable.

Steve Inskeep Illinois
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Serrated I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king at their numbers shift political power to those areas is that how they should work also this hour why will some flavours of E. cigarettes reportedly be banned by the FDA and the latest from Baghdad where protesters are camped outside the US embassy plus we remember the voice heard on this show for decades it's Wednesday January first your grand master flash is sixty two years old in the news is next live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dale Willman US forces of fired tear gas to break up demonstrators gathered outside the US embassy in Iraq today it's the second day of protests there is NPR's Greg my reports the protesters were throwing stones and calling for some five thousand US troops to leave Iraq the demonstrators place tents and mattresses in the streets outside the US embassy suggesting they plan extended stay in the center of the Iraqi capital Baghdad about a hundred US marines have been flown in for additional security at the sprawling embassy already one of the most heavily fortified US diplomatic compounds in the world the demonstrators support in Iraqi militia that's closely aligned with neighboring Iran they were met with tear gas as they threw stones at the embassy on Wednesday a day earlier they set fires and badly damaged a reception area however they have not breach the main embassy compound which is surrounded by high walls and barbed wire Greg my re NPR news Washington tens of thousands of pro democracy protesters March this morning in Hong Kong they're demanding an independent investigation of the police actions amnesty for the thousands of people arrested so far and full democracy police fired tear gas before the event was halted the BBC Jonathan head reports that on new year's eve riot police also fired tear gas and deployed water cannons when protests turned violent this was a largely.

Steve Inskeep FDA Baghdad Washington Iraq NPR Greg US Iran Hong Kong Jonathan head BBC
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm David green an appeals court in New Orleans has struck down the individual mandate a key part of the affordable Care Act but the ruling stops short of saying that the whole law known as obamacare is invalid this case is very likely on its way to the Supreme Court and let's talk about it with NPR health policy reporter Salinas and stuff in the morning Selena hi okay so we're might is exactly what this case is that we're talking about so it's known as Texas V. A.'s are if you think back to twenty seventeen when Republicans in Congress had tried to repeal and replace replace obamacare again and again they fail to do that but then in the tax bill they passed in December they made the penalty for not having insurance zero dollars that's the penalty associated with the individual mandate so the Supreme Court earlier had said that the ACA was constitutional because Congress has the power to tax so in this case the argument goes as zero dollar penalty is not a tax so the mandate is unconstitutional and because it can't be broken off from the rest of the law the whole law is unconstitutional a lower court agreed with that whole argument that this court this ruling that just came it came out found that the so called individual mandate is now on cuts unconstitutional but on the question of whether it can be broken off from the rest of the lot they sent that back to the lower court for further analysis okay enough to rethink this could and end up in the Supreme Court eventually so this step this decision comes out last night as a been reaction so far yes trump released a statement last night he called the decision a win and said it quote confirms what I have said all along that the individual mandate by far the worst element of obamacare is unconstitutional he also emphasized that this decision will not alter the current healthcare system in the immediate term and he mentioned protecting people with pre existing conditions and that kind of reminds you that this is a bit of a tricky situation for the administration they are not defending the ACA in court which is quite unusual since it's a federal law and many of the provisions in the A. C. are popular the threat from the attempted repeal in twenty seventeen is credited with helping Democrats win the house of representatives in twenty eighteen and it also brings it to release that trump does not have a plan to replace the ACA if the law were ultimately struck down and some other reactions in statements Democrats railed on the ruling as heartless and poorly reasoned conservative groups were generally pleased and said it proves the ACA was on shaky legal ground all along and we'll have to see how the public reacts to this news well I mean speaking about the public if you're someone who's thinking about your coverage and and you're hearing this news about this decision I mean what what what could it what could the impact be for you well it might make people nervous but the big take home message is that no one's coverage will be affected by this ruling in the immediate term and this is probably of particular concern for the twenty million people who got their health coverage because of this law whether it's in the exchanges like health care doc of or Medicaid expansion I'm but the stakes go beyond those people much of the country's healthcare system was transformed by this law essential benefits calorie counts on menus the list is very long so the stakes are really high okay and and just remind us what exactly happens next with this case well the California Attorney General who was on the defending side of this case has said said last night they will ask the Supreme Court to hear the case the Supreme Court will have to decide whether or not to do that it does seem unlikely that that decision would come before the election next year so it means that this uncertainty will be hanging over the election all of next year on an issue that is sure to be very much part of the conversations we had to an election year and your health policy reporter Selena Simmons stuff and thanks so much Lena.

Steve Inskeep David New Orleans
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Well king and I'm Steve Inskeep two hundred thousand American students now know that officials in the U. S. education department were on their side they took out student loans they said for profit colleges fleece to them they would like their loans forgiven and internal education department documents obtained by NPR argue that the loans should have been forgiven so why did the education secretary say no NPR's Corey Turner got his hands on those documents is at our studios good morning good morning what's this fight about so you remember few years ago during the Obama administration a handful of big high profile for profit colleges essentially collapsed right Corinthian colleges ITT tech were too big names in this left hundreds of thousands of borrowers with big debts and agrees that they say are basically worthless so the students started protesting saying they deserve to have their debts erased you have to remember because we're talking about federal student loans the decision of what to do about those loans is really up to the US department of education so ultimately the Obama administration urged the students to file claims under an old rule known as borrower defense which basically says if you think you were defrauded state your case and maybe you'll get your money back you obtain documents than saying what education department officials thought of those requests for forgiveness that's exactly right so in early twenty seventeen this is just a few weeks really before Betsy to boss is sworn as in as secretary a bunch of career staff at the department right these memos after reviewing thousands of these bar defense claims and they basically say yeah Corinthian and I. T. T. schools misled borrowers making promises about things like job prospects after graduation and the transferability of credits they just weren't true and so these department staff say in these memos we agree with the students the value of an education from the schools is quote either in negligible or nonexistent so the memos even quote defrauded borrowers one of them says I cannot find a job using my degree people just laughed in my face wow so these memos officially recommend to the department a sweeping approach to relief all of these bars they say deserve to have their debts wiped out I guess we gotta take that present tense and put in the past tense you said these memos recommend these metals recommended almost three years ago that these loans before given what happened they did in this fight has been playing out ever since because secretary to boss comes in and over the course of the past read three years has made it clear she does not like this with this full relief approach to bar defense she has called it easy money and so instead in fact just yesterday she unveiled a new approach to grant students essentially partial relief her reasoning is even if students were lied to with the department still doesn't dispute if they're working now and earning a respectable living why should they get the money back that's what the department now argues in a statement to NPR department spokesperson said quote full relief sounds nice to force taxpayers to provide blanket forgiveness that would be abandoning our duty to be good stewards of tax dollars the department they say will provide student loan relief to those who qualify and we should say you know this fight is going to play out on a very big stage tomorrow the boss is scheduled to testify before the house education committee will be listening Cory thanks so much thanks Steve that's NPR's Corey Turner this country's leading cause of serious long term disability is strokes after having won many people use wheelchairs a man in Oregon wanted to go hiking but his chair couldn't hack it so he invented a new way Emily Cureton from Oregon public broadcasting has the story okay big rock on the right five people move in tandem down a trail Steve Bennett times narrower than the frame of a wheelchair connecting them HRC's guys to figure out I will get through or out of get those and spots without tipping me over to one side yeah for Jeff fab one miscalculation and he could go over the edge toward an ice cold river below and even though this hike is challenging Babs says he feels more vulnerable crossing a city street I have survived to brain stems ropes and after my first one I was not able to walk I was fourteen years ago he spent much of the time since then working on a project called.

Steve Inskeep three years fourteen years
Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

Morning Edition

07:43 min | 2 years ago

Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

"How is the White House going to defend itself against an on going impeachment inquiry some White House officials and people connected to the White House have declared a congressional investigation to be unconstitutional of said they will not cooperate Rudy guiliani the president's personal lawyer says he does not have to comply with subpoenas his lawyer wrote a letter saying the impeachment inquiry was unconstitutional and baseless vice president pence has issued a more nuanced statement suggesting that he may be able to provide some documents in some circumstances the White House counsel's office has said there is no need to cooperate with an illegitimate inquiry and yet witnesses connected with the administration continue to appear before a house impeachment inquiry so what's going on Stephen groves is on the line he has a special assistant to the president until recently was in the White House counsel's office and is now deputy press secretary Mister gross good morning morning Steve thank you ever probably Neil I I want to begin with Rudy Giuliani's statement the statement made by his lawyer saying it was unconstitutional and baseless to to investigate in this way and saying that he doesn't have to provide documents for various reasons really direct question because you're a lawyer in the United States can someone decide to ignore a subpoena okay ignore or not comply with subpoenas you know if they are asking for materials that the person issuing a subpoena art and title to like for example if someone subpoenaed you and said I want all the communications between you Steve Inskeep and your lawyer you don't have to necessarily comply with that subpoena I mean you might you might have to litigate and have a judge decide whether your attorney client privilege can be overcome by the subpoena but the subpoena a lone it is not something that can not be child in the United States in other words you can say sue me you can order the person issuing subpoena can realize I'm asking for attorney client privileged material here maybe I'll pursue other documents that are covered by privilege well I want to understand Julie on his position and I recognize that he's outside the White House you don't directly speak for him but you have to have some understanding of this Giuliani has publicly said in the last couple of days I don't care if people look into my business dealings in Ukraine and of course Giuliani had business dealings in Ukraine while also representing the president of the United States in seeking an investigation of people connected with Joe Biden and Joe Biden himself he said I don't care if people look into my business dealings they can look into it all they want but then his lawyer drops this letter saying that we won't cooperate if there is nothing to hide why not cooperate well you're you're quite right that as a private citizen not working in the US government I don't speak for Rudy Giuliani and the more the point the the letter that you referenced in the opening issued by the White House counsel no that that doesn't apply to people you know outside of the administration I think that there may be some things that were subpoenaed from Giuliani that touch on attorney client privilege if they were communications that he had with the president but otherwise you know it's up to Giuliani to decide whether he's going to be complying with a congressional subpoena would you urge him to cooperate and comply with legitimate subpoena definitely not my place to urge him about complying with the subpoena that some that he added that he retains another lawyer as you pointed out they'll have to decide that were or deal with Congress in their own way or I have to go to court if the subpoena is going to be enforced or if Congress tries to hold him in contempt these are all decisions that Giuliani will have to make I'm trying to understand the White House is specifically the white house's strategy here as well because the White House counsel as you know for whom you'll work until recently has taken what to a layman seems like the same here this is an illegitimate inquiry we don't have to comply with anything and yet people who are in the administration still are testifying showing up complying with subpoenas producing documents when asked are it is the White House doing anything to try to stop them the White House has been clear on on its position that you know in the past when impeachment Cory's I have been opened there's been certain processes that everyone it has agreed to whether it was Nixon with a Democrat Congress or Clinton with a Republican Congress others been up for vote opening a formal inquiry and then most importantly in both cases minimum the minimum due process rights reported to both president Nixon and to quit but let's not because we have discussed this but you're in a situation now where you've said the house is being unfair we don't have to cooperate and yet people are cooperating are you trying to stop them in anyway I believe without getting into anything that like internally delivered of that witnesses have been informed about executive privilege and informed about classified information and they have gone and and participated or worse that for depositions or interviews hopefully they you know are you know know what their obligations are as current or former employees of the federal government vis a vis a revealing executive privilege revealing classified information but you know we're going to go forward with this inquiry as as best we can given the Democrats you know lack of transparency lack of formality and you know we'll see how this thing pans out the end but right now the White House is clear that it's not going to participate in an illegitimate sham process which is really what this is but you're only going so far and stopping other people who are working for the U. S. government from participating when you say we're going to go forward as best we can that's what I hear you saying that's what seems to be happening we don't want people to be hurt we don't want people to be held in contempt you know the Democrats are are issuing subpoenas like hot cakes and you know we have an obligation to protect classified information in the sector privileged information and and we'll go forward in this thing at you know as best we can and we we intend to go forward and not dissipate Mister gross thanks for your insights really appreciate it thank you Steve Stephen gross is a special assistant to the president of the United States NPR White House correspondent Frank or don yes has been listening along with us and Franco what do you hear there well I mean he's following administration line is talking about you know that the administration is you know it's not going to cooperate with what it sees as a sham investigation criticizing closing in democratic leadership of giving out subpoenas like hot cakes but I found it interesting that you know he you know said that the administration will cooperate or at least the White House will be quote cooperate but as you pointed out we're finding out that many members of the administration are sitting down for these interviews and the White House is all is only going so far to try to stop them we haven't had court battles over the testimony of various US diplomats for example know exactly I mean this is this been for it's very fascinating particularly you know we have someone coming up we just had Volker we just had we have McKinley coming tomorrow for me today it's you know the next few days are going to continue to be very interesting NPR's of Franco done yes thanks so much thank

White House Rudy Guiliani President Trump
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Steve Inskeep in Washington DC and I'm David grain in Culver city California so we expect prices of goods and services to go up over time right but why has the cost of health care and education risen far faster than things like TV's cars and everyday consumer items well you can trust the condiments to come up with a theory they call it the bomb all affect Cardiff Garcia and Daniel courts leaving from our daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money explain how this works Alex Tabarrok an economist at George Mason University is the co author of a new book called why the prices so damn high and the answer he says starts with an economist named William Bommel he says think about a string quartet in eighteen twenty six it takes four people forty minutes to play this string quartet now let's think about the same string quartet in twenty nineteen live performance same for people it's still takes them forty minutes to produce the music but the price you paid to see that live string quartet has gone up way more than the price of everything else in the economy the reason why is the bomb will affect some sectors of the economy get better at making stuff every year another words product to be grows really fast in the sectors for example let's say an electronics company can make more flat screen televisions this year with the same number of workers as last year and those workers work the same number of hours more is produced for each hour of work maybe because there's better equipment for the workers to use our new technology that makes producing flat screen TV's more efficient when a sector of the economy as fast productivity growth that means you can afford to raise the wages it pays to its workers with how raising the prices of the goods they make there are also some sectors that have very slow productivity growth they do not become more efficient at producing their goods or services from UT. kind of like the musicians in a string quartet these workers do not produce much more of the same product the health care and education sectors fall into this category doctors nurses teachers college professors their productivity just doesn't go up much every year the reason they don't get more efficient over time is largely because a big part of what their customers want from them is their time their presence the health care and education sectors still have to pay wages that can compete with other sectors of the economy that do have fast productivity growth because otherwise not enough people would become doctors nurses teachers professors or play in string quartets the way that the health care and education sectors pay those higher salaries is by raising the prices of what they sell since the workers in the sectors are not making more stuff to sell each year the businesses that hire them the schools the colleges the hospitals they have to raise their prices so they can afford to pay those rising salaries yeah and when Alex analyze what was happening in the health care and education sectors he found that not only had salaries for education health care workers climbs year after year for decades but also we have more of them than we used to because teachers are fairly a well educated and skilled we have to pay them at least as much as they could earn elsewhere the cost of healthcare and education would still rise faster than the costs in other parts of the economy simply because productivity growth in health care and education is slower that is the mechanical relationship explained by the.

Steve Inskeep David grain Washington forty minutes
US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

03:09 min | 2 years ago

US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

"Since pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear deal the US has reimposed and stiffened economic sanctions against Iran the US goal being hit Iran's oil exports exports that produce a huge part of the country's wealth in a few minutes we're going to hear from NPR Steve Inskeep who's in Tehran reporting on how the sanctions are affecting Iranians but we begin our coverage at the United Nations where secretary of state Mike Pompeii trying to rally support today for US efforts to isolate Iran since the United States declared our intention to bring already nor purchases zero in April the Ayatollah has gone all in on a campaign of extortion diplomacy and here is Michele Kelemen has been following pump has remarks to the UN security council and she joins me now Hey Michelle hi there also so what exactly does secretary Pompeia want countries to do about Iran well for one stop buying oil from Iran which uses only fuels Iran's bad behavior he also wants more countries to join a maritime security initiative to protect shipping in the strait of her moves the U. K. and Bahrain are part of it there's a lot of skepticism though from countries that really don't want to be drawn into a conflict with Iran and you know countries that are you supportive still of the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with Iran so is Pompeii are going to get this party once well in the security council today actually heard a lot of concern about the U. S. approach you heard representatives of Germany France in the U. K. all saying they don't see any alternative to the nuclear deal they were involved in the negotiations and don't want to see it unravel China's ambassador said his country is opposed to power politics and bowling and then Russia's ambassador said that he went through all of Pompeii is remarks word for word and found only words like threats regime conflict and no mention of dialogue he says the only time palm bay spoke about cooperation was to call for a coalition against Iraq well the US pulled out of the nuclear deal soon after compare became secretary of state that was over a year ago what's your sense at this point is this maximum pressure campaign working the way the trump administration had hoped has it made a run change its behavior well Pompeii is is is working in the one example he always gives is that a round doesn't have as much money to give the groups like Hezbollah and Hamas but also if you look at the whole list of U. S. demand you'll see that Iran is moving in the opposite directions on many of these friends around still holding American prisoners it shot down a U. S. drone it captured and it's still holding a British vessel and as Pompey himself pointed out in the security council Iran has been ramping up its nuclear program recently and that's what he was called extortion diplomacy he's telling people not to cave to that kind of pressure that that is that the sanctions will pay off eventually because it's the only way to pressure Iran back back to the negotiating table as NPR's Michele Kelemen thanks Michelle

United States Iran
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Steve Inskeep basketball football and baseball may draw big crowds and score prime time television spots but knew each sports are tracking some interest in money sports like corn hole and axe throwing and even professional arm wrestling so get ready elbow on the table get a good grip here are Stacey Vanik Smith and selling her ships from NPR's daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money what is it about these last traditional sports that's attractive to sponsors like Johnsonville sausage and I mean nothing against corn hole or acts during when you know basketball or hockey what people know about don't you don't play at like eight year old birthday party for breast cutting off a lamb and finally how do the sports get on TV in this case ESPN you know I think you have to remember that the E. N. E. S. P. N. stands for entertainment start Rosner is academic director of the sports management program at Columbia so just because it's on ESPN doesn't make it a sport to wit poker has been a fixture of their efforts for a very long time popularity can actually represent an unusual perk for a broadcaster just over three point five billion viewers watch the World Cup in twenty eighteen for the bears in the world axe throwing league says its World Championship got hundreds of thousands of years last year on TV that makes acts going what they call an evergreen property meaning that you can put on the air any time you have a gap in your scheduling but there's also another possibly more important reason that the sports are getting on ESPN you're not paying them if your ESPN they're paying you that is true many new sports by time on the airwaves because there are profits to be made the American choral organization have been streaming videos on Facebook but it is almost two million views and it decided the time was right and it launched its own digital streaming network last year which brings us to another question what is it about these sports that's attractive to sponsors the companies that are sponsoring are looking for really highly targeted audience this is an opportunity for smaller companies the kind you can't afford to advertise during an NBA game or during the Superbowl but in order for a starter support to get big enough to cut a deal to get on TV that support needs financial backing to begin with and the question why would you want to buy a team who played corn or through axes Scott says buying a team even a small one in a more obscure sport can have some perks as well including just being you know straight up a really good financial investment they all have a jury they all have the dream that they can be the next the NBA or Major League Baseball or National Football League Major League Soccer that they can.

baseball Steve Inskeep eight year
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"No well king and I'm Steve Inskeep Instagram is slowly testing out a big change the social media company is starting to hide the number of lakes that posts in stories get when they're put on that platform Sam Sanders host of the NPR podcast it's been a minute is an Instagram fanatic so he's here with analysis either Sam Hey how are you for people aren't on Instagram I guess you're you're putting up pictures and you can see that five people like that are five hundred people liked it what's happening to that feature now exactly so in the same way that on Facebook you can see how many people like your grandma's post about someone's birthday it's like that on Instagram as well but that social award that we all get for making Instagram post to get a bunch of lakes it's become a popularity contest Instagram says and they want less of that so in may Instagram began to experiment with removing the ability to see how many likes views other folks post received just in Canada at first and not all Canadian users just some and this week Instagram rolled that out to Australia and Brazil and Ireland Italy Japan and New Zealand so now some folks in those countries won't be able to see the light view counts on other people's posts but they can still see the tallies on their own posts wait a minute I can still have that addictive feature of looking to see if anybody likes my thing but I don't have to feel bad that somebody else got five thousand likes on theirs yes so at this well this conference in April Adam miss area the head of Instagram he said he wants users to spend a little more time quote connecting with the people they care about not wrapped up in popularity contest with strangers and that kind of statement maybe Instagram responding to a recent trend especially with younger users they want a social media experience that feels a bit more private and personal not so public informative so they basically are moving towards a more walled off social media just for folks that they actually like or at least now and of course this is also a moments the full of negative headlines about all of the social media apps how they affect our emotional health fears about what kind of data they collect on us and over Instagram dislike test allows the company to possibly get a few days of positive headlines and it may make it seem like this big tech company really cares about us there certainly are big issues on the table as you've just suggested and there are studies suggesting that people can be more or less depressed to based on how they use social media for example but is this week and I guess it sounds more like a tweak than a huge change really going to change the experience and make it more healthy well I was thinking about it I use Instagram a lot all the time and I said to myself even if I don't see the light count on Instagram for other people I will still see all those pretty people on the beach with ABS and pretty friends in cute dogs living a life that looks better than mine the photos in the videos of a picture perfect life are still out there so that intense comparison it can still be there even without me seeing a light count and I talk with Karen north she's a professor of digital social media at USC's Annenberg school and she told me sometimes that like function on Instagram is not a bad thing they may be trading one problem for another people say if I get X. number of like donate you know a service dog to a vet or had planted tree or do some other because we cannot join together anymore to promote this causes or even have that sense that we've come together with other people we could lose the next ice bucket challenge to look in the village to galvanize and unite folks on Instagram around good things through the like and to that I say Steve who would actually like that I'm pressing the like button on this interview Sam thanks so much thank you so much that's in pure Sam Sanders and you can hear more of him on the news of the week by listening to his podcast it's been a minute NPR this is NPR news and you are listening to KCRW KCRW sponsors.

Steve Inskeep
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning critics are saying a new asylum rule from the trump administration is illegal the rule is meant to discourage people from seeking refuge at the U. S. Mexico border and it means they would likely be denied asylum if they didn't already apply for it in another country along the way legal learned as a lawyer with the ACLU they say they'll sue to block the policy and he's on the line from New York morning morning alright so you're saying this is illegal what your argument our argument is that this violates the laws Congress has passed ultimately this is an end run around Congress decision to provide for asylum regardless of whether you transited through another country at the end of the day this is a separation of powers issue Congress makes the laws about asylum this administration doesn't like those laws so it decided to rewrite them but he cannot rewrite them unilaterally can you lay out logistically what this role would be in for people who want asylum in this country right so what it says is if you've gone through any other country and arrived at our southern border you're not going to be allowed to apply for asylum unless you applied in another country so that means everyone other than Mexicans coming from Mexico and so not just central Americans but anybody who is transmitted through another country will not be allowed to apply for asylum yeah essentially it's an end to asylum at the southern border the United States and Canada have this so called safe third country agreement which means asylum seekers have to apply to the first of either of those countries that they set foot in why is it wrong for the trump administration to do the same for Central America yes I'm glad you asked about that because it's an important point at a you know a few things first of all we do not have a formal third party agreement with any other country in Central America so we don't so if if the masters was you were going to go down that route we would have to have an actual formal written bilateral agreement that those countries would provide asylum but but the second point is just having an agreement is not enough those countries have to be able to provide a safe meeting for efficient asylum process so that people can actually get asylum in those countries and Guatemala for example is not equipped to provide asylum to all the people that would be sent there but we don't even get to that point because there is no formal agreement with the administration's basically saying is try your luck somewhere else but they know very well that those countries would not be safe for people to wait and it would not be able to provide a fair and efficient and safe asylum process the ACLU is challenging another one of the administration's asylum policies it's called remain in Mexico and it means migrants have to wait in Mexico while the US deals with their asylum claims a fiddle a federal appeals court said the administration could keep enforcing that policy for now does that concern you we are we are definitely concerned about it because there are thousands of people now including families and young children waiting in Mexico who are in real danger have been suffering have a some for assaults are living in no no I mean to say yes we we have reported it but does it concern you with respect to this new suit that you plan to file well I think we're all two million a profound that suit but but regardless I think this raises very different issues we believe that the current law that was the current rule that was passed yesterday it is violating the immigration laws directly and so whatever ultimately happens with that case we hopefully will prevail in this one because we believe it's directly contradictory to what Congress is done with the asylum laws legal learned his deputy director of the ACLU immigrants rights project thanks thank you president trump rephrased some racist remarks without changing the meaning he said that for lawmakers should go back where they came from and then said if they don't like America they can leave the lawmakers for the record are Americans elected by Americans and NPR's tovia Smith visited the district of one I Anna Presley of Massachusetts as president trump was dismissing criticism of what he said he was also insisting that quote a lot of people love it but in deep blue Massachusetts not so much aces the psychotic destroying democracy DL Polanski wears a deport trump in an all state in a gritty neighbourhood of Boston that's represented by African American Congress woman a Jana Presley and anti trump political cartoonist Polanski says he's offended by the president's latest comments but not surprised he sees it as a deliberate political stunt meant to rally trump space you just trying to distract these just gas lighting and he's just a disruptor around the corner at a neighborhood bar bartender Serra leaves as trump has hit a new low again is dragging down the public discourse she says jacking up resentment among white Americans take the.

Steve Inskeep
ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 2 years ago

ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning critics are saying a new asylum rule from the trump administration is illegal the rule is meant to discourage people from seeking refuge at the U. S. Mexico border and it means they would likely be denied asylum if they didn't already apply for it in another country along the way legal learned as a lawyer with the ACLU they say they'll sue to block the policy and he's on the line from New York morning morning alright so you're saying this is illegal what your argument our argument is that this violates the laws Congress has passed ultimately this is an end run around Congress decision to provide for asylum regardless of whether you transited through another country at the end of the day this is a separation of powers issue Congress makes the laws about asylum this administration doesn't like those laws so it decided to rewrite them but it cannot rewrite them unilaterally can you lay out logistically what this role would be in for people who want asylum in this country right so what it says is if you've gone through any other country and arrived at our southern border you're not gonna be allowed to apply for asylum unless you applied in another country so that means everyone other than Mexicans coming from Mexico and so not just central Americans but anybody who is transmitted through another country will not be allowed to apply for asylum yeah essentially it's an end to asylum at the southern border the United States and Canada have this so called safe third country agreement which means asylum seekers have to apply to the first of either of those countries that they set foot in why is it wrong for the trump administration to do the same for Central America yes our I'm glad you asked about that because it's an important point at a you know a few things first of all we do not have a formal third party agreement with any other country in Central America so we don't so if if the ministers was even gonna go down that route we would have to have an actual formal written bilateral agreement that those countries would provide asylum but but the second point is just having an agreement is not enough those countries have to be able to provide a safe meaning for efficient asylum process so that people can actually get asylum in those countries and Guatemala for example is not equipped to provide asylum to all the people that would be sent there but we don't even get to that point because there is no formal agreement with the administration's basically saying is try your luck somewhere else but they know very well that those countries would not be safe for people to wait in I would not be able to provide a fair and efficient and safe asylum process the ACLU is challenging another one of the administration's asylum policies it's called remain in Mexico and it means migrants have to wait in Mexico while the US deals with their asylum claims a fiddle a federal appeals court said the administration could keep enforcing that policy for now does that concern you we are we are definitely concerned about it because there are thousands of people now including families and young children waiting in Mexico who are in real danger has been suffering have suffered assaults are living in no no I mean to say yes we we have a report on that but does it concern you with respect to this new suit that you plan to file well I think we're all two million a profound that suit but but regardless I think this raises very different issues we believe that the current law that was the current rule that was passed yesterday it is violating the immigration laws directly and so whatever ultimately happens with that case we hopefully will prevail in this one because we believe it's directly contradictory to what Congress is done with the asylum laws legal learned his deputy director of the ACLU immigrants rights project thanks

Steve Inskeep NPR
Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

Up First

08:19 min | 2 years ago

Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

"Like behavior what to Democrats do as the president claims victory. I'm Steve Inskeep with David green. And this is up. I from NPR news. Democrats have lines of inquiry. They wanna hear from this, man. The president was frustrated and angered by his seer belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency. What questions do they have for the attorney general also protesters finally forced Sudan's president from power, but their protests have not stopped. What are they want next? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. The bottom line findings are the Muller report allowed President Trump to claim victory. He does not face criminal charges. Many details. Give critics a lot of room for questions a heavily redacted four hundred and forty eight page document was released with the president legal team describing this report as a total victory. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway claim this was quote, really the best day since he got elected. And then this very accepting apologies today to for anybody who feels the grace in offering them. Now, Democrats have a very very different take on. This report. Here is House Judiciary committee chairman Jerry Nadler, the special counsel made clear that he did not exonerate the president and the responsibility now falls to congress to hold the president accountable for his action to vastly different narrative. So what does the report actually say? And what are the implications of these findings? We have a team that's been digging through the document, including NPR Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Who's here either? Very good morning, Steve. So if the president is not charged. What would there be in this report to hold the president accountable forty used Jerrold Nadler's phrase? Well, there's this team the investigators actually wrote that after the thorough investigation. They conducted if they had confidence the president clearly did not commit obstruction of Justice, they'd say, so, but they were not able to say that there are a number of what investigators describe as disturbing incidents ten or more involving the president's attempts alleged attempts to obstruct Justice to try to jam up the special counsel probe to fire. The attorney general Jeff Sessions to fire Robert Mueller, the special counsel himself and to try to get people to change their stories before they spoke with the media or or other people including trying to dangle carrots or sticks in front of people who were thinking about cooperating with Robert Muller's. Well, I'm just thinking about one particular example of the many in this report it involves Don Mcgann was then the White House counsel. Let me if I get this wrong in any way, carry the president tells Mcgann in so many words to get rid of Robert Muller. And the reason that this act is not taken which might have been seen as catastrophic by the president's critics, and even his allies the reason this is not taken it's only because mcken refused and and threatened to resign. Instead is that correct? That's exactly right. That's just one of a number of incidents where the president directed people in the White House to do things in often, Steve they actually blew him off which turns out to be a good thing for their legal liability moving, I guess Mcgann. According to the report again as you put it blew off the president in another way because the president when this was reported when this was revealed by the New York Times that the president told Mcgann to get rid of Muller. Trump told Mcgann to deny that story and Mcgann said I'm not going to falsely deny it because it's true. Yeah. I make an told investigators apparently he felt threatened by the president that the president was trying to test his metal now attorney general bar is going to face some questions after having been the man who redacted this reporter oversaw. Aw, the redaction I should say. And who then described it in a press conference yesterday? The attorney general set to testify on may first and may second in front of the Senate and the house he's gonna have a harder time in house, which is controlled by Democrats, many of whom have already described a crisis of confidence at the Justice department. They say because the way that bar has handled. This report they think he's played down the findings and basically protected President Trump at the expense of this investigation. Are there also internal investigations within the department of Justice? There are Steve the Justice department is investigating. The inspector general is investigating the launch of this investigation. The Fiso warrants in the first place as well as twelve ongoing investigations, we don't know anything about the special counsel has referred to other US attorney's offices. Everyone's talking about the Faisal warrants. I guess we should be clear on that part. This refers to I guess, we could say the Republican narrative of the Republican view of this investigation. Which is that it never made any sense. It never had a good basis, and they are questioning why. Some of the surveillance warrants were approved in the key in this investigation. Yes, the inspector general is investigating the investigators both in the US and some of the sources they were on overseas. Carry thanks for your reporting on this occasion, and many others over the past couple of years. My pleasure. Okay. So how's this report being viewed among members of congress, and what further lines of inquiry if any Democrats intend to pursue NPR's? Tim Mack has been taking a look at this. Tim, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Okay. Democrats have been focused on the question of obstruction of Justice by the president William bar didn't think that the evidence reached that level and Muller himself did not make that conclusion. Even though he didn't clear the president. What does that mean for Democrats will it likely means that in the house of representatives impeachment is off the table, the chair the house intelligence committee? Adam Schiff told NPR's all things considered this yesterday. The evidence would have to be graphic and spark a bipartisan consensus that it warrants the president's removal, given the fact that the public is a congressman on willing to stand up this president in any respect it's hard to see that changing here. But Democrats did signal that they intend to continue their aggressive investigations of the president's finances. His administration and the various episodes revealed by the Muller. Port and they're going to be keeping their demand that the full unredacted version of that Muller report is released ten when I was reading the report you get to the black sections, and there's usually a little tag an explanation for why something has taken out. It's either part of an ongoing matter or it grand jury material, which is supposed to be kept secret in virtually all cases, how likely is it. The Democrats are going to be getting those blackened areas removed. Well, a small group of house members, particularly those related to a DOJ oversight are gonna be able to see a less redacted version of the Miller report. But it's hard to say when the public would be able to see if ever it's going to be a long drawn out legal fight for a fuller version of that Muller report. Okay. Let me ask about what happens in congress over the next year and a half. I know the presidential campaign is well underway. But you know, there's congress and there are problems in the country and the president in his state of the union speech, essentially gave lawmakers choice as the president sought. You're either. Have warned investigation or peace, and and legislation is there any inclination in congress to actually legislate, what Republicans are echoing the president's line. They're saying, no collusion. Nope. -struction? They think all of these investigations are baseless Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell yesterday focused on what he views as Democrats is latest line of attack. That's on attorney general Bill bar Atrush. Bill bar other issue rather laughable, shade turn their guns on him. But that that's all they're left with frankly is to go after him Democrats say that they're doing oversight on a number of important issues. The characterize that there are a lot of troubling developments in the Trump administration and in the world of Trump's finances. They say it's a fundamental part of their responsibilities as a check on the executive branch, and they won't be stopping their investigations. Now, just because the mall report in that investigation is over Tim. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Okay. Those were key things you need to know. From the redacted Muller report. But of course, there is much more that we learned in those four hundred pages if you scroll back through your up, I feed you're gonna find that the NPR politics podcast published a special episode. We dropped just for you, deep diving on everything we learned.

President Trump Robert Muller Steve Inskeep Attorney NPR Special Counsel Congress Don Mcgann White House Justice Department Tim Mack Department Of Justice Senate Jerrold Nadler House Judiciary Committee Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Steve Inskeep. In washington. And I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. Iowa congressman Steve king is facing more pressure to quit. The Republican has been under fire for questioning why terms like white, nationalist and white supremacist. Our offensive in his own state, the editorial board of the Des Moines. Register now says king can no longer effectively represent his constituents. We have one of king's colleagues with us this morning. It's Utah Republican John Curtis. Welcome to the program. Congressman thank you. David should Steve king quit his job. Well, let me before you even go into that. Let me just say Percival under no circumstances. Are these comments appropriate, nor should they be tolerated? And I think then that begs the question of what how do we how do we make sure that happens please in actions of Kevin McCarthy to take away his committee assignments has white support and the Republican congress. Very powerful, very powerful move. Yeah. I think it shows that Republicans want to police themselves, and we ourselves behaviors is not appropriate. Okay. But should he leave is just shady quit. Well, this is interesting because he was only elected by Iowa just several months ago. And in my opinion, those people who need to hold him accountable, and he should be responsive to to to their wishes, and you mentioned that the Iowa paperless calling for his legacy of nation and to me. He was elected by those people. He represents his people. He needs to respond to what you're asking them to do. Although you said it's important to police yourself as as fellow members of congress. And I mean, you have your Utah colleague Chris store to fellow Republican Senator Mitt Romney from your state both thing he should quit. Why are you? I mean, are you less offended by what king said, no, not at all not at all. If you if you want a straight up and down answer, I would ask him to resign. What I'm telling you. It's more important. But what I think is what I think's. You're saying you would ask him to resign. So you you yourself as John Curtis are calling for him to resign. But saying that it's it's up to voters to actually make that happen. Is that fair? So David you're I see what you're trying to do. And I in in your baby me, and I'm not trying to I'm not trying to dis. You does the debate. That'd be great. You'd be appropriate for him to be. I don't think I don't think my opinion matters. I think I was opinion matters. You just those you want represents. Okay. I'll I'll obviously let our listeners parts what you're saying. But but it I I do want to move onto another topic. And that is that is the government shutdown. Many of your fellow Republican House members were invited to the White House yesterday. Democrats did not show up at that meeting. Have have you heard if there was any progress made at all on the shutdown in conversations with the president? I I have not heard, but I can tell you this. What happened there represents? Why were in where we are Democrats are unwilling to even talk. They're unwilling to discuss something they had previously supported. I hear lots of room for moving on the president side. That's what needs to happen on both sides. This shutdown is not good in any way shape. Turbie tool that we use as a government. I don't I don't like it a bit. What movement are you hearing from the president? I mean, he he's been so firm in saying he wants money for that border wall period. I mean what what movement? Sorts of move. But he's he's he's willing to change the type of barrier is he's willing to add in things like, you monetary assistance immigration judges better facilities at the border. He's he's really given the Democrats everything they've asked for they just haven't hardly asked for anything. And so my point is the need to step up and ask for something. And then. Moves the pressure to the president. But at this point, they're not asking for anything Republican congressman John Curtis from Utah. Joining us this morning. We appreciate your time. Congressman, thanks. You bet. Students in Los Angeles have a new routine when they arrive at schools in the morning. They are greeted by their teachers picketing outside..

Steve king Congressman Republican congress president John Curtis David Greene Utah Kevin McCarthy Percival Iowa Steve Inskeep Republican House Des Moines washington Culver City Senator Mitt Romney editorial board California Los Angeles government
Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

"Unclear. The salient was on a police watchlist flagged as Patel. Essentially radicalized Strasbourg came to the European Union's parliament remained on down overnight and residents have been warned to stay vigilant. France's interior ministry says police had attempted and failed to arrest. The gunman earlier on Tuesday for an attempted murder. And that this may have triggered the attack for NPR news. I miss me Nicholson in Berlin. You're listening to NPR news. There's been a moderate earthquake in Tennessee this morning. The US Geological Survey says the tremors magnitude was four point four, and it was centered in eastern, Tennessee. It could be felt in Atlanta. The first quake was followed. A few minutes later by three point three magnitude aftershock, the final version of Congress's farm. Bill is out and it legalizes industrial hemp harvest public media's Esther honing explains that will bring stability to farmers and states that are already growing the crop thirty nine states already allow for the cultivation of hemp, and there's currently more than twenty five thousand acres devoted to the crop. In the US federal legalization is a boon for producers of CBD oil, which is derived from hemp and used from additional purposes, Kristen Kuna gross hemp in Colorado and says federal legalization gives her and her husband the confidence to invest in their farm. We just feel a little bit safer that we are going into a legitimate business. And there is going gonna be room to grow and to do what we've always been wanting to do the farm Bill would allow each state to oversee local hemp cultivation for NPR news. I'm Esther Hoenig in Greeley, Colorado. A Canadian court has granted bail to Chinese business executive mung Joe of ten million dollars. She and her company while we technologies are suspected of selling equipment to Iran in violation of US sanctions American. Authorities would like to have her extradited to the US separately an international think tank reports one of its officials a former Canadian diplomat has been detained in China. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include L, D, entertainment and roadside attractions with Banus back starring Julia Roberts as a mother whose son unexpectedly returns home Christmas. Also with Lucas hedges. Now in select theaters expands December fourteenth. Steve Inskeep is going to speak with Trump supporter. Chris Buskirk Buskirk runs. The conservative publication American greatness. And the conversation will be about President Trump possibly being linked to a film of campaign finance violations that story just ahead on morning edition also had an Alabama policeman. As you may know recently killed a young black man is he ran away from shooting in a mall. The was legally armed but police figuring out who the quote, unquote, good guy is in chaotic situations can be difficult. A closer look is coming up on morning edition.

NPR United States Donald Trump Esther Hoenig Chris Buskirk Buskirk Bill Mung Joe Colorado European Union Tennessee France Patel Steve Inskeep Congress Julia Roberts Berlin Nicholson
MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

"In baseball. If the bombers pull off an upset over the Boston, you bang in Harvard, having donkey buying L wives. I mean, the Red Sox it'll break hearts all over New England. The best kind of New York win. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's recall a supreme court battle before the one we're living through now. Judge bread Kavanagh's. Contentious Senate hearing last week recalled some earlier ones, including a nineteen eighty-seven showdown between democratic senators and then federal appeals court judge Robert Bork who been nominated to the supreme court Senator Ted Kennedy led the attack in Robert Bork's, America. There is no room at the end for blacks and no place in the constitution for women and in our America. There

Robert Bork Senator Ted Kennedy Steve Inskeep America Red Sox Bread Kavanagh Rachel Martin Baseball New England NPR Boston Harvard New York Senate
Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:17 sec | 3 years ago

Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

"Sex crimes prosecutor, I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. How can the Trump administration pressure? Other nations to stop buying Iranian oil will question the State Department's Iran onboard the south also Boston educators, look to close the achievement gap between kids of different backgrounds,

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Prosecutor State Department Iran Boston
No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 3 years ago

No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

"There's new CBS chairman and CEO, les Moonves is leaving NPR's. Steve inskeep. Talks to the New Yorker magazine. Reporter this morning about the newest allegations against moma's CBS says there's no severance package worked out from this pending the results of the investigation, and for CBS the departure has bearing on an ownership battle for the corporate structure of CBS. Marketplace. Nancy Marshall genzer who was Moonves fighting with on the CBS board. He was in a battle with Sherry Redstone over a possible sale of CBS Redstone heads a company called national amusements. She's the daughter of Sumner Redstone Sumner Redstone had controlled CBS. And Viacom they were under one roof. But he split them up Sherri Redstone wanted to reunite them. But Moonves thought that was a bad idea, and why was Moonves against that? Well, Viacom is struggling it owns some cable TV channels that aren't doing well comedy central and MTV moon. Moonves didn't want Viacom to drag down CBS, which has been doing been doing. Well, CBS actually sued the red stones and national amusements national amusements filed a countersuit and on that score. What happens now both sides have dropped their lawsuits. The CBS board has been we shaped with six members stepping down and being quickly replaced share Sherry Redstone in national amusements have promised to wait at least two years before proposing. Merger between CBS and

CBS Sherry Redstone Cbs Redstone Sumner Redstone Sumner Redston Kristen Dickey Viacom IRS Les Moonves Accountant Steve Inskeep Toyota Nancy Marshall Genzer Chairman And Ceo New Yorker Magazine Sherri Redstone James Moonves
NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"Demonstrators. Is demanding jobs and public services also set fire to a main government building NPR's? Jane Arraf has details. Witnesses say protesters set fire to the provincial government building in Basra and blocked the entrance to Iraq's main port security forces have tried to disperse the crowds firing lie them munition Iraq's prime minister, flew to Basra and ordered an investigation after several protesters were killed earlier this week port officials said the demonstrations blocked, the main entrance to the port of Kassir and set up roadblocks on the highway from Basra to Baghdad. The protests have continued all summer in Iraq's second biggest city demanding steady electricity, clean water and

NPR New York Times Israel Iraq Kim Npr Nora Raum White House Rob Schmitz Basra Daniel Estrin Japan President Trump Hokkaido Official Steve Inskeep Washington Supreme Court Of India Rachel Martin