35 Burst results for "Steve Inskeep"

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve inskeep. I'm a Martinez. And I'm Leila fallen. Remember Meghan trainor's style when she first topped the charts in 2014. Because you know I'm all about that bass 5 diabetes no trouble I'm all about the base 5 diabetes no trouble. I'm well with her new album taking it back, she's taking back that old school sound that made her famous. All the comments I've seen recently are like, oh yes, this is our Meghan trainor from 2014. We love her and miss her. So I'm just trying to take it back to that time, but like an elevated version. Let's talk about what's changed with you since your last album. You've become a mom. Yes, I'm a mama now and everything's much more important. And everything's also scarier. But I feel like I've accomplished so much with just this baby, you know, that I'm like, I can make a baby, I could do anything. I could have a C section and survive. I couldn't do it anything. Like, easy. And then I lost because that was so hard. I was like, next challenge, and I lost the healthy way, 60 pounds. Wow. And I was like, oh, nothing can stop me. I'm on fire. And then I rode this album. The music is upbeat. It makes you want to dance, but trainers also unpacking things a lot of women and new moms deal with. From the scars left behind by her C section to the weight gain that made her feel less than beautiful. In her song titled, made you look, she sings about the moment she learned to love her body again. I go in my loose at dawn, but even with nothing on that I made you look I made you look my therapist said when I was working through all the scar work and the body love she

Meghan trainor NPR news Steve inskeep diabetes Leila Martinez
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Steve inskeep. And I'm Leila faulted. School districts across the country are trying to make classrooms more inclusive, but misinformation is fueling fears of a hidden agenda with baseless conspiracy theories being spread online, sometimes with the help of top elected leaders. We get a snapshot of how all this is playing out in one school district in upstate New York from reporter Zach hirsch. Last summer, parents, teachers and school officials got together online and in person in tupper Lake, New York. Nestled in the adirondacks. It's a rural, mostly conservative place. Hi, everybody. I'm the guy who communicated with you and email. So thank you for volunteering to participate. That's administrator Lee Kyler. He's in charge of a committee formed by the local school board to draft a new policy on diversity, equity, and inclusion. 12 people volunteered to help mostly parents. I'm retired. And I'm bored. So it's lunch. Thank you. New York is pushing all schools to develop equity policies. When the initiative launched last year, a press release said the country appears ready to address its long history of racism and bigotry. But even before their first meeting, the tupper Lake committee got pushed back. They were accused of trying to impose critical race theory, an academic framework taught in law schools and graduate programs. In conservative circles, that's become a shorthand for almost anything diversity related in K12 schools. Kyler said he felt like his job as committee chair was to fact check and dispel misinformation. Critical race theory is not at all on our agenda. It will not be adopted. It is not up for consideration. It has not been taught in our districts. It will not be taught in our district. Kyler said the committee would look at a wide range of issues in school, not just race. But several people were skeptical, resident David has said at a public committee meeting that it doesn't matter what you call it, but there are a number of academics who want to fundamentally change this country

Steve inskeep Zach hirsch Lee Kyler New York Leila tupper Lake tupper Lake committee Kyler David
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Leila faulted. And I'm Steve inskeep, good morning. A hot dry summer in Europe has made parts of the Rhine river to shallow for many cargo ships. The Rhine is the most important river in Western Europe. It runs through a German industrial region among other places, and more than 300 million tons of goods are supposed to move on its waters each year. And pierce rob schmitz has been walking the banks of the Rhine hey there rob. Good morning, Steve. How's it look? Well, yesterday I visited the city of koblenz, which is located around the midpoint on the Rhine and normally at this time of year, the river there is between ten and 20 feet deep at its deepest point. Today, at its deepest point, it's only around 5 feet deep. So if you're taller than maybe 5 7 or so, you can wait till the middle of one of Europe's biggest rivers and it's shallow enough for you to stand up at its deepest point. I stood at the bank of the river with a scientist for the international commission for the protection of the Rhine, Adrian Schmidt bretton, and he said in a normal year, we'd see all sorts of goods being carried along the river. And steel and oil and gas, and here they are carrying so many containers from the sea from Rotterdam. So it's the most important shipping navigation laying in Europe, 800 kilometers from Switzerland to the North Sea in the Netherlands is a navigable, normally navigable. But nowadays, this is not the case. Rob, I just have to ask, you're a pretty tall guy. Did you try it a way to the middle of the river? I didn't. Okay, that's fine. It's fine. You don't have to do participatory journalism, but it's only 5 feet deep. I'm guessing that shipping must be close to a stand still. Yeah, one would think, but in fact, Steve boat traffic was busier than ever yesterday, and that's because all of the companies they need to transport their goods, whether it's coal, gas, oil or grain. They've been forced to fill more ships with less product in order to give the ships enough clearance so that they don't run around in places like koblenz. So that means that incredibly, there is now more ship traffic, but each ship has around a 5th of the goods that they typically carry. Oh, one 5th. Does that mean there is a limit to how far people can stretch things? Yeah, they're definitely as ships can only carry so much when the river is as slow. So the goods that don't fit on a ship are now being carried over land by truck or by train, neither of those modes of transport can carry what a barge can though. So for example, it takes 40 trucks to carry one barge full of grain. So that means that the cost of all these good Steve is rising very fast. And in this era of rapid inflation, it's going to be worse for this part of Europe. A British economic firm estimates the low water level on the Rhine will equal .2 percentage points of reduced economic growth for Germany for the rest of the year. Wow, what is the low water mean for the ecology? Yeah, biologists have been trying to reintroduce Atlantic salmon to the Ryan river. So this situation is terrible for them as they swim up river to spawn. They have to do

The Rhine Steve inskeep pierce rob schmitz Europe international commission for t Adrian Schmidt Leila koblenz Steve Western Europe rob Rotterdam North Sea the Netherlands Switzerland Rob
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Leila faulted. I'm Steve inskeep. At a meme Martinez At the beginning of the pandemic, superstar rapper logic was arguably at his peak. Hit songs sold out tours, performing at the Grammys, he had it all. I'm loved and I'm hated. I started from the bottom now my neighborhood is gated. They say drink to you accomplishments so every night I'm faded feel like every other day me and somebody new related you my sister then in July of 2020 seemingly out of nowhere, he announces retirement. Recently, I asked him why. Well, I had a child's first and foremost. I wanted to be there for his birth. I wanted to be there for his first steps. His first words, I wanted to hold him and love him and change his diaper and learn how to install the car seat and be there for my wife. And I did that. And I am still doing that. Logic's own childhood was difficult. I think statistically I'm not supposed to be here, you know, my parents are drug addicts, alcoholics, you know, violent people, criminals, and somehow I made it out. It's kind of insane how simple it is to actually be a good parent. Because I doubted myself, even as a father, every day myself, a husband. And I think it's that those things that keep me in check because I really do care so much. But it's a sad thing to know that all I needed to have a good childhood were parents who were one present, like literally there because they weren't. And two, you know, not addicts. And hurt broken people and unfortunately, those were the cards that I was dealt, but I think in return, it truly taught me to appreciate and showed me the values that I have today as a

NPR news Steve inskeep Leila Grammys Martinez
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 6 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Standards of public service in journalism and cultural expression It's one of edition from NPR news I'm Steve inskeep And I'm Leila faulted Behind some of the success of Ukraine's military in its fight against Russia is a little known U.S. initiative An initiative built around a state National Guard Jay price of North Carolina public radio brings us this story The skill of the Ukraine military surprised a lot of people but not David Baldwin When the California National Guard adjutant general got a text from a Ukrainian colonel saying the invasion had begun his first reaction was concerned for his friends Then also a little bit of Palmer feeling because I knew that these guys were ready for the fight and that they were going to do well He knew that because for nearly 30 years California's citizen soldiers have been helping Ukraine shape its military And after Russia annexed Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula in 2014 the guards of several other states began pitching in They've taught sniper skills ambush tactics aerial combat and how to launch the javelin missiles celebrated for destroying so many Russian tanks They also helped Ukraine build an asset Russia doesn't have A cadre of non commissioned officers who know how to lead from the front lines Troops from Ukraine and California have flown back and forth dozens of terms for exercises and training Baldwin lost killing of its own visits to Ukraine after 40 Yes we do increase actual combat capability of our partners But what we really deliver is discussion of the United States is there to help your country We really are coming in to help The Ukrainians say that's true Major general Boris Kreme is the Ukrainian defense attache in the Washington embassy This partnership help us to increase our combat capabilities and to increase spirit of our not only soldiers but population at all The state partnership program is a joint initiative between individual states and The Pentagon but it's not just about military training It also models values like civilian control of the military and abiding by international law for combatants The program now partners state guards with more than 90 nations When it started though it was aimed squarely at one region This is all things considered I'm Robert Siegel Mikhail Gorbachev resigned today as president of a country that had already dissolved the union of Soviet Socialist republics In 1991 as the remnants of the Soviet Union came apart the United States saw an opportunity The Department of Defense believed that we should reach out to these nations in central and Eastern Europe who had been part of the Warsaw Pact John Finney is a senior strategic adviser with the National Guard bureau To help them refashion their military's which were of course developed under the Soviet Union And prepare them for more modern military engagements and to prepare them for eventual membership in NATO Finney says The Pentagon chose the National Guard for the mission because it felt that would seem less threatening to Russia And guard troops can build long-term relationships because unlike regular active duty troops they often stay with the same unit for years Baldwin the California guard adjutant general says he's been working with Ukrainians since 1994 He's now acting as a conduit between The Pentagon and Ukraine commanders on things like battlefield intelligence and weapons needs We can have very Frank discussions about what they're asking for and the U.S. can deliver or can't deliver and sometimes it's softens the blow It will give them a bad news if it comes from me rather than from the U.S. government and then by the same cocaine I can also encourage them and coach them on things that are in the realm of possibility that they can ask for Baldwin is talking to his embattled counterparts regularly In fact the day after the invasion he activated his emergency headquarters in Sacramento He wanted to make sure the guards Ukrainian partners and friends had the round the clock support they need For NPR news I'm J price Tomorrow on morning edition we're bringing you more stories from inside Ukraine Even as conditions improve in the country's second largest city some people on the outskirts of her Kyiv are still living in basement bomb shelters To hear the story listen the same way we're doing right now or ask your smart speaker to play your member station by name What can we learn from reports of UFOs The Pentagon is investigating what are now referred to as UAPs or unexplained aerial phenomena We have detected no emanations within the UAP task force that would suggest it's anything non terrestrial in origin Naval intelligence officials Scott bray testified last week at the first public congressional hearing into UFOs In a half century In human speak he's saying there's no proof of aliens swooping into our atmosphere I think for them to concede there was evidence of non terrestrial origin that you have to come down and say hi Carol cleland directs the center for the study of origins at the University of Colorado Boulder and says we need to see all the governments 400 UAP files before making a final conclusion The preliminary assessment just gives a report It says whether traveling really fast and they're stopping cold and they're moving against heavy winds and doing all of this stuff that we can't explain by natural processes Now Cleveland believes that life could be out there so more experts she says should weigh in I think that there's probably extraterrestrial civilizations out there It's a question is are they close enough Because given current physics traveling between stars even the nearest star to us takes light years It's not easy to get between stars Cleveland is also a Professor of philosophy who wonders whether worlds beyond our scientific reach will have escaped the self destructive perils.

Russia NPR news Steve inskeep Jay price David Baldwin California National Guard Pentagon Soviet Union U.S. Boris Kreme Baldwin Washington embassy California Crimean Peninsula John Finney Leila National Guard for the mission Robert Siegel Palmer National Guard bureau
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 7 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve inskeep in Washington Enemy Martinez in Los Angeles California Abortion rights supporters and providers in Illinois say they've been getting ready for what could be an influx of people seeking abortion if the Supreme Court does overturn roe versus wade That's because many surrounding states have laws that would automatically ban abortion if that federal law is thrown out NPR Cheryl corley has been following this as Sheryl Illinois has a provisions that would keep abortion intact regardless of what the Supreme Court does Can you walk us through what makes that possible You know a nearly 5 years ago a Republican governor signed into law measure that removed so called trigger provisions that allow a state to immediately ban abortions if the court overturned roe it also allowed abortions to be publicly funded So that was one thing that happened in Illinois And in 2019 the governor approved and the legislature approved and the state's democratic governor signed the reproductive health act which made access to reproductive health including abortions a fundamental right in the state And last year the governor also signed a law that stopped miners from having to give parental notification before having an abortion So lawmakers here essentially codified growth for the state So how many out of state residents have come to Illinois to have abortions Well we have figures from 2020 and the Illinois department of public health says about 9600 people from out of state have come to Illinois I spoke with Jennifer Welch she's the president of Planned Parenthood of Illinois She says currently they serve about 60 to 70,000 people a year for a variety of reproductive health issues including abortions What we're trying to figure out is how can we welcome in 20 or 30,000 more patients from all of our neighbor states or even farther away Welch says Planned Parenthood often uses telehealth or video visits for Illinois patients who can pick up abortion pills at a clinic or have them mailed to an address in the state That would leave more room at facilities for out of state clients They.

NPR news Steve inskeep Enemy Martinez Illinois Cheryl corley Sheryl Illinois Supreme Court Los Angeles Washington California Jennifer Welch legislature Illinois department of public Planned Parenthood Welch
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:22 min | 9 months ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm a Martinez in Culver City California And I'm Steve inskeep in Washington D.C. What is it like to live in Ukraine's capital while it's under attack Ukrainian forces remain in control of Kyiv though Russian forces seem to be building up their strength outside The reporters covering the city include asami terajima of the new site the Kyiv independent welcome to the program Thanks for having me I'm just going to call attention to your publication here I've been reading the key of independent kind of obsessively and I appreciate it very much so thanks for what you do Now what is the new routine of daily life So our daily life is basically we are watching the news 24/7 because we need to be aware of what's happening and we need to take all measures to ensure that we are safe and that in the safety of our families and friends as well right But at the same time Ukraine has been under Russia has already created 2014 So people have been stressed for all these years more than 13,000 Koreans have died in the bus vision So it's difficult time for everyone but people are doing their best to stay calm and doing their best to for example like they are packed They're ready to go If something does happen but for those who are staying in apartments especially people are just trying to encourage each other and to try to stay united with one another I'm glad you mentioned people who are packed or ready to go if something happened I mean something is happening We've heard of thousands of people who fled who chooses to stay and why So there are people who I mean not everyone can afford to leave right Because going to another city or even a foreign country that's not affordable for all decrease The average Ukraine is approximately $600 a month So that's difficult like living abroad or living under the city They have their own homes and many who are staying here would rather stay here in their own home and many would also like to protect their homeland to protect their city that they love and they live for many years Is their food and supplies So I went to a nearby supermarket yesterday and grocery store as well so the supermarket there's a long line so I didn't get the chance to go in but this smaller glossary store so there were no bread No grains but there were also no vegetables or fruits So I think the fresh products did the stock fresh products and grains are the food that lasts long It's limited but there's other plenty of other food available So you may not get the meal you want or you may not be able to stock up the pantry but you're able to get something Is that what you're telling me Yes and no one is panic buying everyone is only buying or whatever they need for the next couple of days When if at all do you go to a shelter we've certainly talked with and seen images of many people spending the nights in the subway stations So there are people who would rather stay in service station because it's deeper than you create historically has very deep retro stations Ukraine also has the world's deepest maturation in the center in Kyiv So yeah there are people who feel safer in legislation but it's also not it's not comfortable to stay there for a long time I spent it two hours myself and I had to sleep on the floor for a couple of a little bit And work on the floor So it's not comfortable so many people did go back after spending several nights there But we're already if something that if there is for example a setting nearby then we should all head to a nearby or somewhere that's very safety insured I want to note people have followed the past several days now as Kyiv has fended off Russian attackers but the Russian military seems to be bringing in more force How do you see the next few days or weeks and what is your long-term plan if you have one So I think it would be a very difficult job coming days or even weeks could be very difficult for the Ukraine military and for Ukrainian people The Ukraine made you however has been so heroical for the past few over the past few days you're fighting against a much stronger enemy But we need more manpower we need more arms So we will see what happens and we're doing our best to stay calm and just analyze the situation rationally And yeah I practice stay here for a foreseeable future in Kyiv But that is not 100% but most likely I will be staying here What would you most want in terms of help from the world I would welcome cross so the rest has been really supportive of and they've been post They've been imposing more and more sanctions against Russia which have been good because now we're making Russian economies software even more But we need to make sure that they suffer even more They suffer we need to make sure that the work costs Russia so much that they want they would record a force that they would pull their troops back and we need to make sure that Russia gets isolated from the world as much as possible And that includes taking away Russia's membership in the Security Council of the U.S. Asami terajima is a reporter for the Kyiv independent Thanks so much Thank you very much.

Kyiv Ukraine NPR news Steve inskeep Washington D.C. asami terajima Culver City Martinez Russia California Asami terajima Security Council U.S.
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Some big companies have been swift to speak out against how Texas has dealt with big political issues. Everything from voting rights. Police reform climate change. But the New Texas law banning abortion hasn't generated the same response from corporate America. Governor Greg Abbott told CNBC last week. Texas politics is not hurting business. This is not slowing down. Business is coming to the state of Texas at all. In fact, it is accelerating the process businesses coming to Texas. Houston Chronicle BUSINESS columnist Chris Tomlinson has been writing about the role of corporate leaders in Texas politics and he joins us now. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me Rachel, First off. Is there every any evidence of what Governor Abbott is claiming that the new anti abortion law is bringing business to Texas? Our governor is just whistling past the graveyard. Um, it's too early to know, Uh, companies that decided to relocate made that decision a year ago two years ago. It's you know, we can't judge anything by what's happening at the moment. Um, Texas is the headquarters for a whole lot of big U. S corporations. And as we noted, several of them went public, quickly criticizing moves by the state's legislature on LGBTQ rights or what they viewed to be insufficient climate policy or gun laws. What is different in this case because they're not speaking out in the same way? We know. In the last four years we've seen GOP conservative lawmakers make clear that they don't feel any sense of accountability to corporate leaders. Both Abbott and our lieutenant governor Dan Patrick, have told them basically stay out of politics, and that's something that would have been unthinkable five years ago. What are the repercussions of that, though I mean it's one thing of governor, Abbott says. We need to just separate business from politics. But for corporations and businesses, politics is a big part of of their Brand it can be anyway. How how consumers perceive them. Well, undoubtedly, consumers, Americans in general expect their corporate leaders, the makers of the products they care about to take stands on social issues. And also employees have high expectations from their employers. So I think, um, what we're going to see is a slowdown of companies coming to Texas because their employers don't want to come here and the CEOs don't want to be associated with it. Is there something different about the issue of Of abortion. That's that's far less clear cut for some of these corporations and their marketing arms than than voting rights or climate change. Yes, There is a a big difference because abortion really does divide the country. It is a an emotional issue. It's one that you know you can't Take a stand on and have an upside if you stand for the climate, Uh, of course you do You want voting rights? That's just being American. But abortion is so much more divisive. It's so much more personal for people. That taking a stand on it just doesn't make any sense. The way that Texas went about this, um and creating this enforcement mechanism that would empower citizens. I mean, this really is exceptional. And is there any expectation that even though there might be might not be the corporate boycotts that just individuals of might make decisions not to come to Texas for tourism or recreation or entertainment? You know, I think that's the real risk to the Texas economy is that we do rely quite a bit on tourism, particularly San Antonio with the river walk in the Alamo. Houston is a major convention town. So is Dallas and you know when people vote, you know they're they're voting with their feet. They're voting with their dollars and they're going to choose not to come here because Our reputation is that of a deeply socially conservative state. Business columnist Chris Tomlinson with the Houston Chronicle and the San Antonio Express News. Thank you. Thank you. The actor Jean Paul Belmondo has died. He came to fame and don't look good, Ours New Wave classic breathless, He went on to become a French national treasure. He was 88 years old. He was often compared to such American icons is Marlon Brando and Humphrey Bogart. NPR's Bob Mondello remembers. He wasn't conventionally handsome. His face was craggy, his nose flat, his eyes hooded and with a cigarette dangling from his lips. He always looked to be spoiling for a fight. But for mid century audiences, his brand of rebellion was the very essence of cool cast him as a professional car thief and existential killer, opposite America's Jean Seaburg York Herald Tribune..

Bob Mondello Jean Paul Belmondo Rachel Martin Marlon Brando Chris Tomlinson Humphrey Bogart Steve Inskeep Rachel San Antonio CNBC Dallas last week Houston Governor GOP two years ago a year ago Abbott NPR U. S
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. We're keeping an eye on coronavirus hotspots in the US where case numbers and hospitalizations are increasing. They're in places with low vaccination rates. Missouri, Arkansas and all of the Gulf Coast states have vaccination rates of 40% or lower. So for the latest updates, we're going back now to member station. Reporters in those states have been following this for us. Rebecca Smith is with K. B. A. In Missouri. Angelina chat Lonnie is with the Gulf States newsroom in New Orleans. Good morning to both of you. Hey there morning. Sh Alina. A couple of weeks ago, You reported that public health officials were worried that vaccination rates in Gulf states are low and are not growing. Has that changed at all? Since he reported that Well, No, that really hasn't changed much at all. But I am hearing an increased sense of urgency. Last week, Mississippi health officials told people who are aged 65 over or immuno compromised to avoid all indoor mass gatherings. Here's Thomas Dobbs, who's the state health officer in Mississippi. I don't think that we're going to have some miraculous increase in our vaccination rate over the next few weeks, so people are going to die needlessly. And since we collectively can't do what it takes to protect the state as a whole, we want to at least give individuals the best guidance so that they can survive the covid pandemic. The delta variant is now a big issue, of course. And is it correct that the rising numbers in the Gulf or because of the delta very variant being dominant there and because it's more infectious than initial strain of Covid? Yes, That's exactly right. It looks like we're at the beginning stages of adult, a variant driven surge in Mississippi and the gulf Hospitalizations. There are up 36% in the last two weeks, and much of those are related to the delta. Vary it There have been outbreaks in summer camps, schools, churches and other places where people can gather, which means kids are getting covid and spreading it. In Louisiana. There have been outbreaks in the last two weeks and in Alabama officials are also starting to note a rise in cases, particularly in rural areas that include more unvaccinated people. It's interesting that in some states this is in the rear view mirror, but it still seems front and center where you are Rebecca in Missouri, where you are. Does any of this sound familiar? Yes, all of it. We have cases, hospitalizations and deaths are all up and have been going up for the last month or so, Especially in our rural southwest part of our state, one of the big hospital systems in the area, Mercy saw demand for their ventilators increased so quickly that they had to send for them from hospitals in places with fewer cases. And then just a week ago, uh, an exact from Cox Health. Another hospital system in the area was literally begging for more staff on Twitter because their current staff is so overworked. I noticed that one health official in Missouri tweeted that new cases there are now and this is the quote. Sicker, younger, quicker. How's that playing out? Yeah, And that's just really stuck with me. They say the spread of the virus in the area is now exactly the opposite of what they saw a year ago. Here's what Katie towns, the acting director of the Green County Health Department, told me The average age of our case has come down into the twenties. Um, we have seen infant in the hospital being treated for Covid. And we have had more Children, um, having contracted covid over the past couple of weeks than we ever have. Um, we have not necessarily seeing huge increases or large increases in vaccinating people earlier in the pandemic, that kind of situation might have prompted people to talk about mask mandates. Is anybody talking about that now in Missouri? Not really here in Missouri, Missouri. There's no statewide mask mandate, and no one really expects our governor to issue one. Given how politically conservative the state is, We actually have a mayor in a small town, in the heart of all of this is going on who is now facing a recall vote because he implemented a mask mandate. Angelina. Yeah, you know, over here in the Gulf South, mass mandates are also pretty politically polarized. And there is some just disconnect with public health officials as well where Mississippi's governor Tate Reeves lifted the mask Monday. In March, the state health officer, Dr Dobbs immediately went to Twitter. Urging people to please continue wearing their masks in public, and now he's urging anyone over the age of 65 to avoid indoor indoor gatherings, regardless of their vaccination status. I believe that both of you have reported that with vaccination being so political, it's particularly conservatives, evangelicals and white people. Among the least likely to get shots. Selena you're you're seeing that Yes, that's true. But of course, there's also hesitancy to get vaccinated among black residents, who are less likely to support conservative candidates. Most of the low vaccination rates are concentrated in some of the most resource poor. And rural parts of the region. Um, I spoke to Alabama Health Officer Scott Scott Harris. And he says most of the uptick in cases is happening in rural southeast Alabama. These areas in the southeastern part of the state are among the lowest vaccination rates we have. So I would say, I'm not too surprised that we're seeing an uptick there The diseases is widespread. I mean, it's everywhere and has been for a year and a half, you know, And so those rural areas just aren't being spared in the same way as we saw. When the disease was first, you know, come into our country. And that discussion of these rural areas and how they're not being spared is worrying, especially in the south because it's more rural than the rest of the country, and there are huge swaths of the population that are vulnerable. And you know we're already seeing the impact. Just yesterday, Alabama health officials said. 96% of people who have died since April were unvaccinated Rebecca again where you are in Missouri. What is being done to try to convince people are people still are health officials still trying? Are they feeling like we've reached the best numbers we can? They're definitely still trying and pretty desperately. You know, we're not seeing a huge uptick in vaccine numbers yet. But everyone from hospital execs to fire chiefs to Health department leave leaders are really taking to social media begging people to get vaccinated. You know, towns, the county health director says they're organizing these community based vaccination events at breweries, Fire stations, churches. Really whoever will partner with them because they think that that personal connection is going to be the key to getting to those vaccine numbers up, Angelina Well over here in Louisiana. They've already had a lottery. That's millions of dollars. And in the week after it was announced, the number of people initiating vaccines increased by 14%. Really? It feels like health officials across the region have tried every trick in the book. They've sent people door to door to offer vaccines, but there are still plenty of people here who believe erroneously. That vaccines are more unsafe than covid itself. That's Rebecca Smith at K B. A. In Missouri and Selena..

Steve Inskeep Thomas Dobbs Sasha Pfeiffer Rebecca Smith Louisiana Monday Alabama New Orleans Lonnie Missouri Cox Health US Green County Health Department 40% March Last week 14% yesterday Gulf Coast Arkansas
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. The country's largest Protestant denomination, has a new leader. His name is Ed Linton, and he says his goal is to create unity among the more than 14 million members of the Southern Baptist Convention. Which isn't easy. In this moment, the SBC has been dealing with several controversies, including the alleged mishandling of sexual abuse and the organizations approach to combating racism. I talked with Pastor Ed Linton yesterday about the path forward for the SBC. Those are very serious issues, and I want to say at the same time While there is great concern among our members, what was very clear is that we left and I left with a mandate from the convention for whoever the president was going to be. Mandate to deal with the issue of sexual abuse fairly honestly transparently and also to engage the process of racial reconciliation. Those two things are very clear. I do want to spend a couple moments talking about each of those issues, though separately, let's begin with the reckoning about racism that's happening obviously around the country, and the Southern Baptist Convention is no exception. There was an effort to get the convention to take a stand on critical race theory, which is the idea of viewing our current institutions in America through the lens of racism and our history with slavery. Where did you land on that? Well, it's interesting because those efforts did not succeed. And in fact what I think our listeners need to understand about Southern Baptist as we have bound ourselves to the word of God as the tool for evaluating anything systems of injustice would be included. And the reason we don't first turned to C R T is because CRT doesn't really deal with what we think is the core issue, which is the human heart. And and the truth is CRT doesn't deal with the origin of sin in all of us. It doesn't deal with the origin or the the nature of redemption to the blood of Jesus Christ shed for us, nor does it give us hope for What we call a revelation. 79 vision, which is around the throne of God in eternity. There'll be every tribe and tongue. As you know, I mean, there have been black pastors within the Southern Baptist Convention who have felt unwelcome, and they have put that criticism into letters to the leadership. I mean, Spc. Churches are overwhelmingly white. American demographics are changing. I mean, are there efforts underway to diversify to reach out to block Americans to change the way the SPC is perceived? Well, yeah, absolutely. But it's not just perception. It's some realities that we're having to face. The issue for us is to engage them because you're absolutely right. The culture we want to communicate the gospel to is very diverse. And it is diversifying at a rapid rate and gospel loving people. Welcome that we want people of color. We want people with different perspectives at the table with us. A friend of mine recently said that the best way to listen is to just stop talking. Just get to know each other and hear each other and listen to each other. As we began to open up and share in here and learn my perspective got challenged. But the reality is, I realized my theology didn't change. What happened is my heart began to change. When you say your perspective changed your heart opened how and to what? Well, I I've always considered myself a student of history. And I have to admit I was an ignoramus about What my brothers and sisters of color have been living with and things that they've experienced. And so my reading changed. I started reading other history sources. I started seeing things I didn't knows things started falling in place and began to make sense to me. How limited my perspective was May I say, though, that that shining a light on those holes in your own, um, understanding of history and black experience. That is what critical race theory is about. I mean, it's secular. You're right. It doesn't have a religious component. But That's that's the whole idea is is recognizing the holes in our collective white memories. I'm and I'm not. I'm not gonna argue with that. As a matter as a matter of fact, I think that maybe well right, but that's not what brought me to it. It was the gospel that brought me to that revelation. The label itself has become polarized and politicized. And you're saying set it aside and think of it through the lens of the Bible, and I'm not demanding other people set it aside. I'm I'm saying for Southern Baptists, you don't have to approach it through critical race theory. What we have to approach it through is the love of Jesus Christ. I also do want to talk about what will practically change with how the Southern Baptist Convention deals with sexual abuse allegations. You're going to oversee a task force to investigate allegations, uh, that the Especies Executive committee mishandled sexual abuse claims. Right. What can abuse survivors expect you to do differently? Well, what's real clear? Leaving the convention in Nashville as Southern Baptist has spoken plainly and clearly you almost unanimously that they want this investigated properly through a third party. They want it not to be tainted. The task Force's commission from the four of the convention is to Look at the evidence and report back to us what's actually happening and what or what has happened. And so that is exactly my charge. And right now we're in the process of putting that team together to do that. We want to look at it honestly and transparently because we have to deal with this for the sake of the survivors, but also we really at the same time need to lead our churches to become serious about Creating safe places for people that people do not have to fear that they're going to be molested or abused or taking advantage of, and so that's that's our challenge. What would you want to say to the hundreds of alleged victims who are listening to you? Right now? Looking for a way back to the church, Perhaps. Well, I understand Trust has been violated. And as a pastor, I would say I am sorry and and I I want to do everything I can to help you heal and find healing. It takes time. But at the same time you need to know that your pain is not in vain. And that that there are people listening to you. I would be heartened if I were you that the whole convention resoundingly said deal with this, not just not to cover up some sense of public embarrassment. Deal with this because it's wicked. Pastor Ed Linton. He is the new president of the Southern Baptist Convention. We appreciate you taking the time and having this conversation with us. Thank you, Rachel. I'm honored to be here and thank you protecting.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Rachel Martin Ed Linton Nashville Jesus Christ SBC yesterday Bible Southern Baptist America NPR News Pastor each God more than 14 million members first two things Convention four
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Noel King. Good morning, Naomi Osaka, one of the top tennis players in the world, withdrew from the French Open. Organizers had find her $15,000 for skipping a news conference. Elite tennis players are contractually obliged to talk to the press after matches. But Osaka said the press appearances were hurting her mental health and that she's going to take some time away from the court with me now USA Today Sports columnist Christine Brennan. Good Morning, Christine. Good morning, Noel. What do you think about Naomi Osaka's reasoning here? I'm glad that she clarified it in on Instagram and Twitter on Monday from Paris know well, because It was confusing. There were a lot of people wondering exactly what was going on with this particular focus on the press conference. Now there's a much larger view and we see an athlete who was being honest about her struggles. She said. She has suffered long bouts of depression. Since the U. S open in 2018, which she won. That was the first of her four Grand Slam titles. She's only 23 years old, and she said she's had a hard time coping with all of this. She's an introvert, she said. Anyone who's seen me at a tournament will notice that I'm often wearing headphones. As that helps dull my social anxiety. She says. She's not a natural public speaker and gets huge waves of anxiety before she speaks to the press, So I think she offered clarity and I think the world's reaction is one of sympathy. And support and help. It was a very important day for Naomi Osaka and for tennis when she told that story yesterday, Christine why is talking to the press? Part of these tennis players contracts. It's how they promote the game goes all the way back to Billie Jean King and all the other women who were pioneers Trail Blazers trying to get women's tennis on the map, and we see it throughout women's sports that that it's it's about talking and telling your story and saying what happened in the game or the match? Fans care about that readers. Listeners care very much to hear about what happened after they watched Ah, match or a game. But it's also about promoting the sport, and that is so essential for any sport, especially in this very crowded sports landscape. And I think that's why this became such a big deal, especially for women promoting their game. Okay, so it sounds like that probably won't change. They won't remove that clause from the contracts, but I wonder. When a top athlete like Naomi Osaka does something like this, Do you think it all opens the door? More broadly to talk about the mental health of these? These top athletes who we feel like we know? Oh, yes, Absolutely. And I think that's why this is such a a n'importe moment in sports. And in our culture, you know, support often takes us to these important national and international conversations. That we otherwise is a society would not engage in and because of that we have these conversations, and I think Naomi Osaka. Now a 23 is going to lead us there in a very important way to help herself and hopefully help others and just quickly. What's been the response from other players. Oh, it's It's been an outpouring from Billie Jean King supporting her and Martina Navratilova saying something important as athletes. We are taught to take care of our body. And perhaps the mental and emotional aspect gets short shrift. And she's cheering on Naomi Osaka. That's Martina Navratilova. Christine Brennan of U S a today. Thanks, Christine. My pleasure. Thank you. American taxpayers spend lots of money on farmers a record $46 billion last year. That helps to keep farmers in business when the weather or the markets might otherwise put them under. Now, the Biden administration wants agriculture subsidies to do something new help fight climate change. In that work. Frank Morris of member station Casey, you are looked into it. Members haven't unease E relationship with climate change well forming creates about 10% of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U. S. Most farmers hate to admit it's a problem and they certainly don't want to invite new regulations. But to those like Richard Oswald,.

Martina Navratilova Billie Jean King Christine Brennan Richard Oswald Naomi Osaka Christine Noel King Steve Inskeep $15,000 Frank Morris Osaka Noel French Open Monday $46 billion last year yesterday Paris 2018 Twitter
Biden Extends Deportation Relief for Haitian Immigrants

Morning Edition

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Biden Extends Deportation Relief for Haitian Immigrants

"Is available at Lemelson dot or g'kar. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin. The Biden administration says it will extend deportation protections for tens of thousands of Haitian immigrants currently living here in the U. S. Trump Administration announced the end of this temporary protected status or TPS, but legal challenges blocked that decision. The argument was that years of extensions were drawing out immigrants stays in the U. S. Long after crises abroad had come to an end. The program is meant for immigrants whose home countries are unable to guarantee the safe return of their citizens. Because of conflict or natural disasters For more. We're joined by girlie in Joseph. She is the president of the Haitian Bridge Alliance. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you so much. Rachel for having us. I imagine this is a big relief for many Haitian immigrants in this country. What kind of fears had they been living with? Absolutely a major relief are about 100 and 54,000 off my Haitian brothers and sisters who have been in the United States living for very long time. And as we have come to understand a lot off them have bean in the forefront of cove in 19 really, really putting their lives at risk to keep our United States of America moving during the condemn IQ, And so it comes with a lot of relief to learn that this people not Only will they be able to continue to serve our communities here, but they will be protected. They don't have to worry for at least the next 18 months. What is the situation in Haiti right now? I mean, what kind of conditions would they have returned to if they had been deported? The situation is dire in Haiti, As we all know, for the past few years, it has mean extreme violence. And there are been kidnapping in extreme turmoil. Political turmoil in a lot of insecurity on the ground right now, and I want people to understand that those people who are currently in Haiti, they do not want to leave. They want to be home. They want to be

Npr News Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Biden Administration U. S. Trump Administration Haitian Bridge Alliance U. United States Joseph Rachel Haiti
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News. I'm Steve Inskeep. I'm Rachel Martin, now to Istanbul, a city bisected by one of the world's busiest waterways. The boss for a straight, NPR's Peter Kenyon paid a visit to a man who spends a lot of his spare time watching the ships that sail up and down the street. York ish. It was trained in international relations and makes his living as a marine consultant. But his true love is ship spotting from the rooftop of his Istanbul apartment building issue has a fine view of a stretch of the bosphorous not too far from the entrance to the Black Sea. He says. One day he realized that he could make his hobby useful by documenting many of the more than 50,000 military, commercial and other ships that transit the Bosphorous. Every year. I taught I can't put out some factual news about exactly where I'm living, and I really love it stumbled also, and apparently, people really were interested with such information that wasn't available because My Twitter account gets rather popular. Some 40,000 Twitter followers later, Ishika still snapping photos and writing up social media posts on the submarine's huge commercial cargo ships and warships he sees from Russia. Turkey, even from time to time, the United States issued says he grew to love putting out raw open source information for all to see. Lawsuit have been watching the ships anyway. Just for fun. He couldn't help getting a little excited in April, when the U. S Navy announced two destroyers would be heading up the Bosphorous. That plan was shelved after Russia warned that such a deployment would not contribute to regional stability. Instead, the U. S Coast Guard cutter came up the Bosphorous to the Black Sea. Naturally issued knew that it was the first such cutter to make the voyage in some eight years. This is a legend class cutter that arrived now as we speak. The vessel is in the Black Sea. It is likely armed. So it's actually perfect for this kind of mission off freedom of navigation etcetera, which is right now it's a big subject. Shit works with other ships potters and sometimes knows what vessel is on its way. But he says part of the fun for him is when the plan suddenly changes the beauty of ships Man in Bosphorous and general life in the stomach. I think like in in English, there's a term like in a New York minute or something right, like it's like you can really translate that to this in a stumble minute, he says. Of course, it's disappointing to miss an important ship. But he says he makes up for it with the unexpected discoveries. You think you miss an important ship? One are later a ship passes, which doesn't look necessarily so interesting, etcetera. But Death is the ship that is maybe carrying the undeclared wheat to Maduro to Venezuela and that they are out off wheat and here is a ship passing. Yeah, it's like you don't know what's the next actually so important ship ship is part of a loose network of ships, spotters watching maritime traffic on the Aegean Sea near the Straits of Gibraltar and to the North and the Baltic Sea or the Sea of Murmansk. He stresses that what they do isn't journalism. He just post what he sees from his Istanbul neighborhood. He does take steps to reduce the chance that his information will be used for real time tracking. For instance, he will wait several hours after seeing a ship before posting its location to his Twitter account. I asked issue if after years of ships spotting, is it still as much fun? Does it make him want to get up in the morning? 100%. I'm in, actually. If it wasn't shit much maybe I wouldn't get up. No, everyone get up that early. I would say it's just everything I liked, and that is kind of like a stumble. It's just so I'm known, very multicultural. It's very uncertain and you don't know what's gonna happen. Next Prosperous ships Butter York issue, keeping an eye on the traffic that never seems to stop floating by. Peter Kenyon. NPR NEWS Istanbul So I started writing things on our family calendar in the kitchen for the first time in over a year. My kids are like Mom, One of those words to which I've replied, Those Children are what we call.

Steve Inskeep Peter Kenyon Istanbul Aegean Sea U. S Navy April 100% Venezuela Rachel Martin Black Sea New York Maduro Twitter Russia Ishika Baltic Sea U. S Coast Guard two destroyers first NPR
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is a little known agency within the Department of Homeland Security and what that agency did or didn't do in the lead up to the January 6th attack on the U. S Capitol could have big consequences. Today. A Senate panel will examine that very question, and NPR has obtained a report by a former New York Police Department intelligence chief about why DHS did not anticipate the violence that day. Him back and Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team report. The Office of Intelligence and Analysis, or Diana is the intelligence arm of the Department of Homeland Security, and a key part of its job is to provide an advance written analysis of possible domestic threats. These threat assessments aren't just done for events that might have the potential for violence. Julia Kayyem, former assistant secretary at DHS, says that I any assessments are routine. Even for gatherings like the Kentucky Derby or the New Orleans Jazz fest. Its job is to create these threat assessments so that its consumers have a better sense of how to deploy resource is how to think about what a threat maybe. And ahead of January 6th. The consumers of an irony assessment would have been the Capitol Police or the D. C. Metropolitan Police Department. But the threat assessment that would have put everyone on notice never came. Mitch Silber is the former head of the New York Police Department's intelligence unit. He's the author of an upcoming Atlantic Council report, which looked at what went wrong ahead of the riots. He says the FBI, the New York Police Department, and DHS all had the information they needed to see that there would likely be violence. What failed, he says was the analysis because when we think about an intelligence agency, they have three functions collecting intelligence. Analyzed the intelligence that you know, when you connect the dots. What does it look like? And when you have that picture, then you warn the appropriate, authorities said they could take some actions to mitigate what you think is coming. Former DHS officials and intelligence analysts interviewed by NPR. Make plain that any review of the failures ahead of January. 6th should start with the I n A. It turns out that despite its critical role and identifying threats here at home The division is not seen as a plum assignment. If you're 23 year old and you want to get into the intelligence business, the fun stuff you're not picking DHS I n a and and that has been a struggle for the department from the beginning that sky am again and remember, she's to be the assistant secretary of DHS. Within the intelligence agencies. DHS. Ayanami was not an equal partner. It might not even have been viewed as a zit cousin. It was a distant friend that you tolerated who showed up to the party. What makes tea chest I in a different from other intelligence agencies, is that its priorities have traditionally been set by the White House. The Obama administration focused on Isis and its effects on young people here in the United States. The Trump Administration. It was the border with Mexico and threats from extremists on the left. Todd Rosenbloom, a deputy undersecretary of intelligence, a DHS up until 2015 Still has contacts in the department. And he believes that the Trump administration was pressuring DHS analysts. They were insisting on a narrative that wasn't true, which made it far harder for I in a You had the president screaming. Auntie Fei Antifa is behind all this And do you just leadership was very much aligned and accommodating the president. And, uh, there were warnings raw intelligence from the NYPD warnings from the FBI and threats on social media that the entire world could see. I ain't never put it all together. In one assessment, DHS has said it provided to general report about threats during the election season. Rosenbloom sees a failure of imagination as part of the problem. The dots were all there. Absolutely. Um, but I mean, I'm among the many who could not conceive of an insurrection against the capital being led by the president of the United States. For Mitch Silber. The way to learn from the right is to see it as a turning point for intelligence officials. Justus 9 11 was certainly for the last 20 years. We've sort of been externally facing and now obviously, we have to take a look within within within our borders for people who would do the country harm. And that is a different type of challenge. The Biden administration announced last week that it was creating a new branch with an eye in a it will focus under mess tick terrorism, and the House of Representatives has plans to form a bipartisan commission to examine the events of January 6th. Investigators are expected to focus on what happened at I n A. I'm Tim Mac and I'm Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS Washington OK, Boomer for those who don't know that's a term of derision said with an eye roll to someone who offers outdated thinking. But 57 year old Gary Ryder says it helped to save his life. Two months ago, Gerry's doctors told him he needed a liver transplant. He's taken medication for other for another illness, which damaged his liver. But a transplant was going to cost $40,000 in the prospect of raising that much was overwhelming. The first week was the hardest. I really didn't know whether I was coming or going. Jerry's daughter started a go fund me page for the first two months. It raised less than $200 more than $39,000 short. With just months to live. Gary desperately started selling things I've sold my guns sold my hunting equipment, fishing equipment. You know anything that I was able to sell anything included an old air compressor. The ad for that compressor caught the attention of a Facebook group called This is the name of the group Ah car group.

Gary Ryder Steve Inskeep Julia Kayyem Rachel Martin Dina Temple Raston Mitch Silber FBI Tim Mac Todd Rosenbloom NYPD United States House of Representatives NPR D. C. Metropolitan Police Depa DHS January. 6th Department of Homeland Securit Gary Capitol Police $40,000
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm No. Well, King. Good morning. These are tough times for New England Patriots fans just hear me out. They have to watch their beloved former QB Tom Brady go to the Super Bowl with his new team, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Here's NPR's Toby A. Smith. Some new England fans. They're just not over him yet, then can't bear to root for Brady as he struts down the aisle with the bucks with every intention of putting a ring on it like it would've heard, just like how would be hurtful like senior girlfriend Be happy with someone else? So, Yeah, my shed a few tears if he wins. Esteban Garcia says he's not proud of it. But has the stages of grief go. He's kind of more angry than sad. If I'm being honest, it's kind of revenge. Like I kind of felt like a bad break of So that's why I'm salty about it. No one's disputing that Brady's the goat the greatest of all time, but Shawn Kerr says it's okay that fans are still too sort of celebrate. Each Brady win is a painful reminder of their loss. It's like, what about all of us who supported you? You know, we cried with you. We stood behind you. We never let you down. But at the end of it all. What do we find out? You didn't care about us. Now I'll go where more money is It was kind of a slap in the face. It's been the talk of the town that Brady helped establish as title town as he took the Pats to nine Super Bowls. Brady himself was asked about it by a reporter last week. I'm curious. If you are New England fan today, Would you be happy or sad to see Tom Brady and the Super Bowl? I had. You know, I had an incredible 20 years and I wouldn't change anything over the course of 20 years that was magical and all the relationships again that I developed. Even that stumbling snippet of sweet talk was enough to suit some New England fans like Don Fraser. Wasn't falling from the whole time I'll get I'll be honest with you, so I don't know if I wanted to win. No. One seat once he pulled it off. I said, You know what? The guy put smiles on our faces for how long I can hold it against him. You know, he's the greatest the revolution and now that he's accepted it and no longer bitter anybody who can't roof of rave in New England..

Tom Brady New England Patriots Esteban Garcia New England NPR News Steve Inskeep England NPR Tampa Bay Buccaneers Toby A. Smith Don Fraser Shawn Kerr reporter Pats
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning, President Biden has called closed schools a national emergency. He says he wants most K through 12 schools in this country open in his 1st 100 days. And he signed several executive actions aimed at getting that done any common. It's from NPR's education team has been following this story. Good morning on you. Morning. Well, before we get to bite him, let's step back for a minute and let me ask you broadly. What is happening with schools right now? Well, it's been a hectic picture. It's been changing week by week, the organization Burbey Oh reports about half of the country students right now are enrolled in virtual only remote, only district's. Half. Okay. Now the problem is no longer just the virus. Right? It's the surge in numbers of cases. How is that complicating things? Well, it complicates things quite a bit because you know, there's there's basically two distinct types of district's right district's that have not come back yet are finding it very, very hard to do so now And so you're seeing debates in D. C in Chicago. They're taking votes towards a strike. It's really hard to open up a large urban district during a surge Other places that had opened up our having to close down quite frequently, either individual schools or entire district's or even states. As they run out of staff. They have to quarantine people s. Oh, and then there's worries about. Of course, the new variants with that might bring in terms of the safety strategies that we have. So how? How can a new administration help here? Well. The actions that were signed yesterday instruct federal agencies to get schools, more PPE more masks, gowns, gloves or testing vaccines and more data and guidance. So schools cannot be fully reimbursed for safety supplies through FEMA. There's new pandemic testing board, and there's they're talking about producing a distributing more rapid tests supporting Schools and doing rapid testing. That's something new. Well, that's some private schools have been able to do to stay safe. But many public schools have not been able to afford that. We heard about the expansion of federal vaccination sites in these orders specifically mentioned teachers as a group that should get equitable access to vaccination very soon. One of the court's here is that the federal government doesn't much get involved in funding public education, So the Biden administration is going to need to do something other than more money, right? Right so overall, the federal government's responsible for about 10% of funding to public schools. Most of that is very targeted anything, if again pandemic biggest relief to public schools is going to have to come through Congress it maybe through state and local government aid. On Collect aggregate, analyze and report the data and the best practices in order to help schools stay open safely. And this is a big deal, Noelle because up until now there's been no centralized federal data collection of cases or outbreaks are strategies so we don't even know what safer. What's not safe in schools very well. NPR's Anya Kamenetz. Thanks, Sonia. Thanks, Noah. Mm hmm. It is Friday, which is when we hear from StoryCorps. And today we have a story about new beginnings knock when was born in Vietnam near the end of the.

President Biden NPR Steve Inskeep Anya Kamenetz executive Chicago Sonia Vietnam Congress Noah FEMA Noelle
"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning for four years, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell avoided public confrontations with President Trump. Trump, of course, was often enacting McConnell's agenda. But on the president's last full day in office, McConnell stood on the Senate floor and blamed him for the January 6th attack on the Capitol. Here's NPR's Kelsey Snell. Standing at the heart of the Senate chamber that have been breached by a mob of writers. Just two weeks earlier, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell criticized President Trump in a way that would have been unthinkable for a GOP leader. Before the election. The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people. It was the last full day of McConnell six year stretch leading the Senate and the last full day of the Trump presidency. Republicans are at a crossroads as the fight over the 2020 election loss and the insurrection of the capital threatened to tear the GOP apart. The Senate is preparing for an unprecedented impeachment trial, where they must decide whether to convict Trump on the single charge of incitement insurrection. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer insist the trial will go ahead even though the vote will happen after Trump leaves office. We need to set a precedent that the severe is defense ever committed by a president will be met by the severe ist remedy. Provide Cited by the Constitution. Impeachment and conviction. This chamber. As well as disbarment from future office. McConnell hasn't denied the possibility that he may vote to convict Trump in a Senate trial, but he hasn't publicly said he'll vote. Yes, either. Hand, House Republicans voted for impeachment and a growing number of Senate Republicans are publicly considering the same. A charge of incitement to insurrection specifically spells out Trump's attempts to overturn the election and his involvement in spreading misinformation, all of which McConnell disavowed before the attack began. Voters. Courts. In the states. All spoke. Have all spoken..

President Trump Senate Mitch McConnell Senate chamber president GOP Steve Inskeep NPR Kelsey Snell Chuck Schumer
"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"steve inskeep" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning, Ken Burns has spent his career documenting US history but the catastrophes of the Trump era from the pandemic to the economic collapse. Have him reaching back into his archives to look at how the country might move forward in 1947, the city of New York vaccinated and less than one month the entire populace six million inoculations against smallpox. You could do that in 1947 because people were on the same page. He wrote about this in an essay for Politico. But he told our co host Rachel that rallying Americans for a common good won't be as easy these days. I used to think that there were three great crises, the civil War. The Depression in the second World War in American life, I would add this and maybe this is the very, very worst. You sat down and started thinking through your own archive of documentaries and about the hundreds hundreds. Thousands of interviews you've done over your long career. And tried to identify some that would bring wisdom to bear right now, Where did your mind settle? Well, you know, I think that history despite being a kind of litany of dark and complicated and challenging moments also makes one paradoxically on optimist, and so I wanted to include a phenomenal moment when FDR in the middle of his first term goes out. To the Dakotas and goes to a in progress. Mount Rushmore in which only the heads of Washington and now Jefferson have emerged from the rocks. And he says this remarkable thing He says that 10,000 years from now and he said, I think there will be American 10,000 years and you think, 10,000 years Before that moment, human beings were living in caves. That 10,000 years from now that they would look back and say that we had done our best. We can wonder whether our descendants because I think they'll still be here what they will think about us. They will believe that we have honestly striven with reserved for our descendants, a.

Ken Burns Steve Inskeep Jefferson NPR News US FDR Mount Rushmore New York Rachel Depression Washington
French President Macron isolating after positive coronavirus test

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 2 years ago

French President Macron isolating after positive coronavirus test

"Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Emmanuel Macron. The president of France has tested positive for the coronavirus. MPR's Eleanor Beardsley is in Paris. Hi, Eleanor. Hi, stave. How is he? Well, he said to be fine so far, but he has some symptoms and the Elysee Palace is that's why I gotta test this morning. He's going to be isolating for a week, and he's continuing his schedule of meetings today but by videoconference, and obviously he's canceled his lunch for today. Now his wife, French first lady Brigitte Macron, is also in isolation. She's a bit older than he is. She's 67 My call is 42. You know, French media is all abuzz now about who he could have gotten it from and who we may have given it to, and the French prime minister has already gone into isolation. And so has the Spanish prime minister, Pedro Sanchez, who had lunch with Macron on Monday. He's said to be isolating until Christmas Eve. Okay. How seriously had the French president been taking the virus? Steve very seriously. He's had different approach than some of the other world leaders who have gotten it like Boris Johnson, British Prime minister. Our President Donald Trump and the Brazilian president. Fireball so narrow to name a few. They were very cavalier. They even poo pooed it. They never wore masks. Macron is always seen wearing a mask. You know, he's stressed that every decision he's made has been with huddling with the country's top scientist, Steve not really not not literally huddling then when good, but anyway, you talks with them going exactly And you know, France has been one of the hardest hit countries in the world and in Europe right after Italy and Britain with deaths, it's been bad. The country's just come out of a second national lockdown that reduced the daily rate from 60,000 to 14,000 cases a day. But people are still being urged to take precaution. There's an eight PM overnight curfew now, in effect, people are being told where your mask at the Christmas dinner table, you know you go outside. You don't see anybody who's not wearing a mask, even outside in the streets. And I think you know, the Elise a palace is emphasizing the fact that macron someone extremely careful who's closely watch. He's still got it. That means the virus is still out there circulating everyone is vulnerable circulating. Although 14,000 cases a day that's a much lower rate than the United States, even when you adjust for population and so forth, Francis Not in the worst position in the world, but still here they are with the president. Testing positive are the French authorities in a position to distribute a vaccine soon as we're seeing in the United States and Britain and elsewhere, well, watching that going on in the U. S and Britain everybody wants to hear the government has outlined his strategy. Elderly homes, first health care workers to By the end of the spring, it says, you know, all non vulnerable public will be vaccinated. You know, the European Medicines agency. That's the use equivalent to the FDA has not approved of icing the vaccine, the father buying tech vaccine, It's going to be done soon. France already has more than a million doses on order for the end of December. The EU and macron they want to for that. You two start vaccinating, you know, simultaneously altogether very important Symbolic. Germany has mentioned the date of December 27th so it may be taking place around them. But in the French case, they're just saying, we have our own process. We want to be careful. Here. We need a few more days and weeks. Is that right? Well, it's the European Medicines Agency that has to to to approve this vaccine, and everyone is waiting on that right now, and people are starting to trumpet the bed. It needs to happen soon. But you know, everyone is told him to told to be very careful until the vaccine comes. But it is being promised this month. They're gonna began vaccinating Eleanor. Thanks. Thank you, Steve. That's NPR's Eleanor

Macron Steve Inskeep Emmanuel Macron Eleanor Beardsley Elysee Palace Brigitte Macron Pedro Sanchez France Eleanor Steve Britain Boris Johnson Donald Trump Paris European Medicines Agency United States Italy Europe Francis
World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 2 years ago

World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

"This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the United Nations World Food Program. The Norwegian Nobel Committe honored the agency that fights hunger and that has tried to prevent the use of hunger is a weapon of war. NPR's Rob Schmitz is with us and rob for those who don't know what's the World Food program Do The world for program is the UN's largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security last year provided assistance to more than 97 million people in 88 countries. I think what stands out about this program is it's one of the few U. N agencies that has the ability to enter Countries that are extremely difficult to enter places like Syria, North Korea, Yemen, and its goal is literally to save the lives of those who are starving due to poor governance, Armed conflicts, you name it, Okay, so I see the connection to war in peace. But why give them this award during a pandemic? Well, Nobel Peace Prize Committee chair buried Reese Anderson made an interesting connection between the Corona virus pandemic in the World Food programs mission. Here's what she said. The world is in danger off experiencing hunger crisis off inconceivable proportions if the World food programme On other food assistance organizations do not receive the financial support they have requested. So Steve. She's hinting here that financial support for this agency could be in question due to the pandemics impact on the economies of the developed world, and that's a big problem. You know this past summer, you Steve Inskeep interviewed the head of the World Food Programme, David Beasley, and he said the pandemic is having a big impact on world hunger. Here's what he said. Before Cove it I had been given speeches that 2020 was weren't going to be the worst humanitarian crisis years since war, too, because of Covad. We are now looking at an additional 130 million people that will be knocking on the door of starvation and Steve Nobel Committee chair buried. Reese Anderson mentioned the fact that this year the pandemic has exposed a lack of global cooperation. This idea that the world needs to unite to combat the biggest threats to humanity. Here's what she said. Multilateral corporation is absolutely necessary to combat global challenges. And multilateralism seems tohave. Lack of respect these days. Steve, you can hear how she stumbles over her words here. She's obviously trying to put this in the most diplomatic way possible. But it's clear with the rise of populist leaders throughout the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee deemed it necessary to send a message that in the end, joining together is sorely needed in a world facing both the enormous threat of a global pandemic, but also global hunger.

Reese Anderson Nobel Peace Prize Committee Steve Nobel Steve UN Steve Inskeep David Beasley Rob Schmitz NPR Covad Multilateral Corporation Cove Syria North Korea Yemen
Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 2 years ago

Possible VP Pick Susan Rice Says She Can Handle Pandemic

"Rice is one of a handful of women on Joe Biden's short list for a running mate. She told us she is the right fit for the job. Yes, I think I could bring my experience of almost now. 20 years in the senior levels of the executive branch to bear to help tackle the most pressing problems we face. And while this would be the first time she would campaign for herself Ambassador Reiss told our co host Steve Inskeep that she's ready for him. Regardless of your experience in government, a big part of the vice presidency or seeking the vice presidency is campaigning, of course, which is not something that you've had a lot of experience doing. Do you have any eagerness to to campaign? Well, Steve. Yes, I've not run for office on my own behalf, but I've run for office on other people's behalf, where I did actually quite a bit of retail politics and speaking to groups of people. But I think unfortunately, in the current context with the pandemic, this will be quite an unusual campaign. If you were in office, you would face the fundamental problem of trust in government or lack of trust in government that is playing out. Now, Many people are refusing to wear facemasks. It seems evident from surveys that many people would think the same way about a vaccine once it's available. What would you do about that? Well, I think that's a huge challenge. And we have had vaccines many in many stages in our history. Still, today, Children need certain vaccines to be able to go to school. And I think that we're gonna have to take a similar approach that you know for kids to be able to go back to school and in Whatever jurisdiction they ought to be vaccinated and the localities ought to consider also requiring the people in the household with the Children to be vaccinated for the very reason that's obvious that this is You know, something that affects the entirety of the community. I want to ask about a couple of foreign policy problems that any administration would face on January 20th 2021 1 of them is deteriorating U. S relations with China. Now I know you've been critical of the way that President Trump is approached China. But at the same time, there are foreign policy experts across the spectrum, who said China's a problem? We don't know how to confront China. Maybe it's time for a confrontation with China. Would you want to roll back U. S relations with China to the way they were in 2016? Steve. No. I don't think you can roll back the clock on any critical issue to 2016. The world has changed and we have to deal with the world as it is. But having said that my criticism is Based predominantly on the fact that we have approached the challenge the China poses economically and strategically in isolation rather than in partnership with our allies in Asia and Europe. You know, instead of, for example, approaching our concerns about trade and economic policy, collectively with our European and Asian partners, who share many of those same concerns, and who Joining with us could add to our collective pressure on China to change its policies and approaches. We started separate trade battles with our closest allies. If you've got more partners behind you, is there some value in a confrontation with China? Well, if by confrontation you mean is it smart for us to start a hot war? I think absolutely not. No. But what about in other ways, diplomatically or otherwise? Well, diplomatically. Sure. First. What we don't need to seek confrontation for its own sake. We need to be strong and smart in how we compete with China. And push back on China's policies on the economic and the security front that threaten our interests. We also should be speaking up vocally and and forcefully about China's egregious human rights abuses from How it treats the Uighurs to the people of Hong Kong. It's common to say that a lot of the divisions of the last few years are merely highlighting what was already there. You could say that President Trump talks the way that a lot of Americans talk and believes what a lot of Americans believe, which is why millions of people voted for him. For example, it is often said that the pandemic Has struck the most vulnerable communities because they were vulnerable over a long period of time that we're just having American society exposed in a different way. Do you believe that? Well, I believe that What the pandemic has done is show how much disparity there is among Americans from a socioeconomic point of view and to a large extent of racial and ethnic point of view, And you know if it wasn't obvious to people before it, it ought to be now. But I don't think that that is the same thing is the first part of your question, which is To suggest that you know, all Donald Trump has done is shined a spotlight on some of the underbelly of our society. I don't think that's right. I think Americans at the end of the day Are not people who like to hate and to fear one another. Do you feel that you understand the roughly 40% of Americans who approve of the job the president is doing. I do think I have a good understanding. Maybe not a perfect understanding in part, Steve, because, as I write in my book, I have a 23 year old son whom I love dearly, whose politics are very, very different from my own, and from the rest of our family. Talk more about that. What are his politics? Ah, you know, I have a very conservative son in a very progressive daughter. They're both wonderful, intelligent. Passionate, committed kids. My son and I will have some robust disagreements are over some matters of policy. Not all. And yet at the end of the day. I love him dearly, and he loves me. As there have been an issue where he is almost persuaded you that maybe you're wrong. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure there is And you know the thing is, and I read about this in in the book. In the last chapter. I write about the areas where we agree. And the areas where we disagree, So we agree, for example. On the importance of the United States, playing a responsible principle leadership role in the world. We agree on the importance of having strong alliances. You know, we disagree. On things like, Ah, choice. I'm pro choice. He's pro life. That's the kind of difference that we oughta be able to respect. Ambassador Susan Rice. It's a pleasure to talk with. Thank you, Steve

China Steve Inskeep President Trump Susan Rice Ambassador Reiss Joe Biden Donald Trump Executive Hong Kong United States Asia Europe
How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

All Things Considered

06:50 min | 2 years ago

How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

"Rahman Rahman and and Colin Colin Furred. Furred. Mattis Mattis were were kids kids from from immigrant families who made good both graduates of prestigious law schools. She represented tenants in Housing Court. He was an associate at a corporate firm in Manhattan. Now they face life in prison in one of the government's highest profile cases against protesters. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team reports. The night of May 29th in Brooklyn was chaos as curfew Jew near police in riot gear began to make arrests. Protesters started throwing water bottles and bricks. The NYPD tried to break up the crowd with pepper spray in swinging batons being excessively aggressive with this crowd here, and it is inappropriate. 70 woman Diana purchased and I'm an elected official, and they just pepper sprayed me for no reason. Rouge Rahmon was there to local journalist stopped her for an interview. Her face was covered with the scarf. She was wearing a black T shirt that read. The struggle continues. This protest is a long time coming. I think that the mayor Should have pulled their his police department back. The way that the mayor and Minneapolis But the part of the interview that ricocheted around the Internet was this. Won't ever stop unless we Take it all down. And that's why the anger is being Express tonight. In this way, prosecutors say in NYPD surveillance camera captured images of Rockman a short time later, she was writing in the passenger seat of a van. Her friend Colin for Mattis was driving. What allegedly happened next defense attorney Shipman says is the basis for the charges against them. It's alleges that a rouge threw a Molotov cocktail into a police car and empty police car. Essentially abandoned police car police car that had been previously vandalized. Two police officers were across the street They gave Chase and Rouge and Colin were arrested. The NYPD video apparently shows it all Rothman and that T shirt. Beige van slowing as it neared the police vehicle. The lighting of a toilet paper fuse the arc of a beer bottle as it crashed under the cruiser's dashboard. The whole episode lasted just seconds. Rahman and Mattis now face seven felonies in federal court. The charges include the use of explosives, arson conspiracy, the use of a destructive device, civil disobedience and the use of a destructive device in the furtherance of a crime of violence. This last charge alone, known as 9 24 C of the criminal code carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 30 years in prison. Add that to the other charges against them, and they could face life behind bars. Attorney Paul Shechtman represents a rouge Rockman and he says his client's case has been singled out ever since. It's been taken federally it has been treated with a seriousness. Ah, harshness unlike any I've ever seen. NPR reviewed 47 Molotov cocktail in arson cases filed across the country. That involved the destruction of police property. And this case to which prosecutors added 1/3 person, Rahman Mattis say they don't know is the only instance in which that 30 year mandatory minimum charge appears. Molotov cocktail cases are usually charged his property crimes in state courts. A spokesman for the U. S Attorney's office declined to discuss the case or they're charging decisions. Attorney General William Barr has been saying for weeks that extremists plotted the violence that erupted during the protests. And he said as much to NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview last week when we arrest people in charge them at this stage anyway. We don't charge them for being a member of Antifa. We charge him for throwing a Molotov cocktail or we charge them for possession of a gun or possession of gasoline and things to make bombs with. Those are the kinds of charges that are filed. And while prosecutors haven't offered any evidence that Rothman and Madison, part of an extremist group You wouldn't know it from the way they were charged. Good afternoon. Your Honor, This is David Kessler. I'm in the U. S attorney in the Eastern District of New York. The harshness and the Rothman and Mattis case went beyond the charges. Prosecutors also fought their release on bail even though it was supported by two different judges. 56 former federal prosecutors found the government's position so alarming. They filed an amicus brief with the court. A panel of judges heard arguments last Tuesday and because of the Corona virus, all this happened over the phone. This is how it began. The District court's order releasing the defendant on bond should be reversed. And when I want to focus on here is the core issue the danger to the community government attorney David Kessler. This is not a case about a youthful indiscretion or crimes passion. It's about a calculated Dangerous crime committed by adults who risked the lives of innocent civilian first responders. Their crime is so serious, Kessler argued. It negates any mitigating factors that came before it. To throw that Molotov cocktail, he said, required essentially a fundamental change in mindset about for them. That's really what the core of the cases, Shenkman told the judges. Thie entire evening was an aberration. Here's their exchange. You can't imagine what a soldering event this arrest was. Mr Shipman. I can imagine how these people did what they're shown on video to have done. I find the whole case unimaginable. But having during that happened once I'm I'm wondering why it is so unimaginable that it wouldn't happen again. I think because that night Wass really unique. It was young people not just used to people out to protest police violence who saw more of it. Right one. Khun lose one sense on an evening like this. That argument appears to have convinced two of the three judges that Rockman and Mattis aren't a danger to the community. The judges said in an opinion yesterday that they agreed with the lower court that the pair could be safely released on bail. Rahman and Mattis were allowed to go home last night. In the months ahead, they have more than just the government charges to fight. They also have to battle the suggestion that they're mixed up in what theater knee general is called. A witches brew of extremists. Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS New York

Mattis Mattis Rahman Rahman Attorney Colin Colin Furred Nypd NPR Rothman Molotov David Kessler Arson Rockman Dina Temple Raston Mr Shipman Housing Court Npr News Rouge Rahmon District Court
Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

All of It

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Bolton: Trump 'frequently' spoke to China's Xi about reelection

"A day before his bombshell memoir hits the bookshelves former national security adviser John Bolton's giving some detailed scathing assessments about the White House before he and president trump parted ways on less than cordial terms one involves Chinese leader xi jin ping and peers Frank or Donia says that according to Bolton trump and she spoke often about the president's reelection prospects in that both lamented the Donald Trump could not serve more than two terms according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep Boehm said his seventeen months in the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead planned to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would identify later Franco or doing as

John Bolton White House President Trump Donald Trump Ching United States NPR Steve Inskeep Boehm Joe Biden Franco Frank Donia
Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Bolton: Trump And China's Xi Talked 'Frequently' About Trump's Reelection

"Former national security adviser John Bolton says president trump and his Chinese counterpart spoke frequently about trump's reelection prospects and beers Frank or don't yes reports the two leaders lamented that trump could not serve more than two terms as US president according to Bolton trump would tell Chinese president xi Ching paying that his supporters thought the term limits were unfortunate I just thought this was it was it was the kind of back and forth with authoritarian leaders that did not reflect well on Donald Trump himself or the presidency or the United States in an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep bone said his seventeen months of the administration created a difficult dilemma form he said he would not be able to vote again for the Republican president he also said he wouldn't vote for Joe Biden but instead plan to write in the name of a conservative Republican who he would

John Bolton United States Ching Donald Trump NPR Steve Inskeep Bone President Trump Joe Biden Frank
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

Morning Edition

03:00 min | 2 years ago

The Deep Divide Between Urban And Rural Voters

"This next story features some of the most powerful moments of the conversations that team had in those words Steve Inskeep and Sarah McCammon found a deep divide this division is not quite the same as the red and blue partisan divide it's different from the gaps between races our incomes our generations the truth is it's bigger than all those divisions and it embraces all of them it's the divide between the city and the surrounding countryside in metro Charlotte we met urban and rural voters on the same day now we've heard their differing views on this program in past days today we hear what some think of each other I visited a predominantly black church in Charlotte it was within sight of the big skyscrapers downtown and there I met with local activists and I told them that you Steve had been talking with mostly white suburban and rural voters many of whom support president trump what do you think of I guess our neighbours and away who voted so differently from I K. said in church that's willing Fleming he's sixty three African American a long time activist in Charlotte I think anybody to anybody it did both the trump has to have the same school of thought a trump passed and as racism that I just don't believe in it I don't Sadam Vangelis preacher can stand up and have to give trump player than he does what he's talking about there is the way many white evangelical leaders have supported the president even after he admitted to paying off a porn star even through his impeachment we had this long conversation about politics in the state of the country and Karan mac because the local NWC P. president told me she feels like many white people just don't see their own racism what I've learned is this that black people do not seem to have the same level of work in this country our lives don't have worked in this country and it's been that way since the beginning of time to sixteen nineteen let's put it that way she's referring there to the years slavery started in the United States other voters described rural trump supporters as low information voters who don't understand how they rely on government programs like social security or farm subsidies Collette all sin is president of the African American caucus for the county Democratic Party I am going to say that a lot of people are just aren't educated they don't understand the system and the process and at the end of the day once that's understood I don't think that would have been a lot of people that would have voted for him but a lot of people are voting on a motion and fear and whatever so these voters feel marginalized by some of their white suburban and rural neighbors in the Charlotte area and they also feel like some of those neighbors just aren't seeing the big picture Schering your voters were not wrong there to talk about people voting on fear because some people do fear cities at the same day that you were in central Charlotte I was the far edge of the metro and went to a cafe in the small town called kings mountain and had breakfast in the corner with Tracy Stewart his mom Linda Stewart

Steve Inskeep
Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

Morning Edition

07:43 min | 3 years ago

Federal investigators have been looking into Giuliani's dealings in Ukraine since early 2019

"How is the White House going to defend itself against an on going impeachment inquiry some White House officials and people connected to the White House have declared a congressional investigation to be unconstitutional of said they will not cooperate Rudy guiliani the president's personal lawyer says he does not have to comply with subpoenas his lawyer wrote a letter saying the impeachment inquiry was unconstitutional and baseless vice president pence has issued a more nuanced statement suggesting that he may be able to provide some documents in some circumstances the White House counsel's office has said there is no need to cooperate with an illegitimate inquiry and yet witnesses connected with the administration continue to appear before a house impeachment inquiry so what's going on Stephen groves is on the line he has a special assistant to the president until recently was in the White House counsel's office and is now deputy press secretary Mister gross good morning morning Steve thank you ever probably Neil I I want to begin with Rudy Giuliani's statement the statement made by his lawyer saying it was unconstitutional and baseless to to investigate in this way and saying that he doesn't have to provide documents for various reasons really direct question because you're a lawyer in the United States can someone decide to ignore a subpoena okay ignore or not comply with subpoenas you know if they are asking for materials that the person issuing a subpoena art and title to like for example if someone subpoenaed you and said I want all the communications between you Steve Inskeep and your lawyer you don't have to necessarily comply with that subpoena I mean you might you might have to litigate and have a judge decide whether your attorney client privilege can be overcome by the subpoena but the subpoena a lone it is not something that can not be child in the United States in other words you can say sue me you can order the person issuing subpoena can realize I'm asking for attorney client privileged material here maybe I'll pursue other documents that are covered by privilege well I want to understand Julie on his position and I recognize that he's outside the White House you don't directly speak for him but you have to have some understanding of this Giuliani has publicly said in the last couple of days I don't care if people look into my business dealings in Ukraine and of course Giuliani had business dealings in Ukraine while also representing the president of the United States in seeking an investigation of people connected with Joe Biden and Joe Biden himself he said I don't care if people look into my business dealings they can look into it all they want but then his lawyer drops this letter saying that we won't cooperate if there is nothing to hide why not cooperate well you're you're quite right that as a private citizen not working in the US government I don't speak for Rudy Giuliani and the more the point the the letter that you referenced in the opening issued by the White House counsel no that that doesn't apply to people you know outside of the administration I think that there may be some things that were subpoenaed from Giuliani that touch on attorney client privilege if they were communications that he had with the president but otherwise you know it's up to Giuliani to decide whether he's going to be complying with a congressional subpoena would you urge him to cooperate and comply with legitimate subpoena definitely not my place to urge him about complying with the subpoena that some that he added that he retains another lawyer as you pointed out they'll have to decide that were or deal with Congress in their own way or I have to go to court if the subpoena is going to be enforced or if Congress tries to hold him in contempt these are all decisions that Giuliani will have to make I'm trying to understand the White House is specifically the white house's strategy here as well because the White House counsel as you know for whom you'll work until recently has taken what to a layman seems like the same here this is an illegitimate inquiry we don't have to comply with anything and yet people who are in the administration still are testifying showing up complying with subpoenas producing documents when asked are it is the White House doing anything to try to stop them the White House has been clear on on its position that you know in the past when impeachment Cory's I have been opened there's been certain processes that everyone it has agreed to whether it was Nixon with a Democrat Congress or Clinton with a Republican Congress others been up for vote opening a formal inquiry and then most importantly in both cases minimum the minimum due process rights reported to both president Nixon and to quit but let's not because we have discussed this but you're in a situation now where you've said the house is being unfair we don't have to cooperate and yet people are cooperating are you trying to stop them in anyway I believe without getting into anything that like internally delivered of that witnesses have been informed about executive privilege and informed about classified information and they have gone and and participated or worse that for depositions or interviews hopefully they you know are you know know what their obligations are as current or former employees of the federal government vis a vis a revealing executive privilege revealing classified information but you know we're going to go forward with this inquiry as as best we can given the Democrats you know lack of transparency lack of formality and you know we'll see how this thing pans out the end but right now the White House is clear that it's not going to participate in an illegitimate sham process which is really what this is but you're only going so far and stopping other people who are working for the U. S. government from participating when you say we're going to go forward as best we can that's what I hear you saying that's what seems to be happening we don't want people to be hurt we don't want people to be held in contempt you know the Democrats are are issuing subpoenas like hot cakes and you know we have an obligation to protect classified information in the sector privileged information and and we'll go forward in this thing at you know as best we can and we we intend to go forward and not dissipate Mister gross thanks for your insights really appreciate it thank you Steve Stephen gross is a special assistant to the president of the United States NPR White House correspondent Frank or don yes has been listening along with us and Franco what do you hear there well I mean he's following administration line is talking about you know that the administration is you know it's not going to cooperate with what it sees as a sham investigation criticizing closing in democratic leadership of giving out subpoenas like hot cakes but I found it interesting that you know he you know said that the administration will cooperate or at least the White House will be quote cooperate but as you pointed out we're finding out that many members of the administration are sitting down for these interviews and the White House is all is only going so far to try to stop them we haven't had court battles over the testimony of various US diplomats for example know exactly I mean this is this been for it's very fascinating particularly you know we have someone coming up we just had Volker we just had we have McKinley coming tomorrow for me today it's you know the next few days are going to continue to be very interesting NPR's of Franco done yes thanks so much thank

White House Rudy Guiliani President Trump
US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

03:09 min | 3 years ago

US And Iran discussed on All Things Considered

"Since pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear deal the US has reimposed and stiffened economic sanctions against Iran the US goal being hit Iran's oil exports exports that produce a huge part of the country's wealth in a few minutes we're going to hear from NPR Steve Inskeep who's in Tehran reporting on how the sanctions are affecting Iranians but we begin our coverage at the United Nations where secretary of state Mike Pompeii trying to rally support today for US efforts to isolate Iran since the United States declared our intention to bring already nor purchases zero in April the Ayatollah has gone all in on a campaign of extortion diplomacy and here is Michele Kelemen has been following pump has remarks to the UN security council and she joins me now Hey Michelle hi there also so what exactly does secretary Pompeia want countries to do about Iran well for one stop buying oil from Iran which uses only fuels Iran's bad behavior he also wants more countries to join a maritime security initiative to protect shipping in the strait of her moves the U. K. and Bahrain are part of it there's a lot of skepticism though from countries that really don't want to be drawn into a conflict with Iran and you know countries that are you supportive still of the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with Iran so is Pompeii are going to get this party once well in the security council today actually heard a lot of concern about the U. S. approach you heard representatives of Germany France in the U. K. all saying they don't see any alternative to the nuclear deal they were involved in the negotiations and don't want to see it unravel China's ambassador said his country is opposed to power politics and bowling and then Russia's ambassador said that he went through all of Pompeii is remarks word for word and found only words like threats regime conflict and no mention of dialogue he says the only time palm bay spoke about cooperation was to call for a coalition against Iraq well the US pulled out of the nuclear deal soon after compare became secretary of state that was over a year ago what's your sense at this point is this maximum pressure campaign working the way the trump administration had hoped has it made a run change its behavior well Pompeii is is is working in the one example he always gives is that a round doesn't have as much money to give the groups like Hezbollah and Hamas but also if you look at the whole list of U. S. demand you'll see that Iran is moving in the opposite directions on many of these friends around still holding American prisoners it shot down a U. S. drone it captured and it's still holding a British vessel and as Pompey himself pointed out in the security council Iran has been ramping up its nuclear program recently and that's what he was called extortion diplomacy he's telling people not to cave to that kind of pressure that that is that the sanctions will pay off eventually because it's the only way to pressure Iran back back to the negotiating table as NPR's Michele Kelemen thanks Michelle

United States Iran
ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 3 years ago

ACLU files suit to block Trump rule to stop asylum seekers

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning critics are saying a new asylum rule from the trump administration is illegal the rule is meant to discourage people from seeking refuge at the U. S. Mexico border and it means they would likely be denied asylum if they didn't already apply for it in another country along the way legal learned as a lawyer with the ACLU they say they'll sue to block the policy and he's on the line from New York morning morning alright so you're saying this is illegal what your argument our argument is that this violates the laws Congress has passed ultimately this is an end run around Congress decision to provide for asylum regardless of whether you transited through another country at the end of the day this is a separation of powers issue Congress makes the laws about asylum this administration doesn't like those laws so it decided to rewrite them but it cannot rewrite them unilaterally can you lay out logistically what this role would be in for people who want asylum in this country right so what it says is if you've gone through any other country and arrived at our southern border you're not gonna be allowed to apply for asylum unless you applied in another country so that means everyone other than Mexicans coming from Mexico and so not just central Americans but anybody who is transmitted through another country will not be allowed to apply for asylum yeah essentially it's an end to asylum at the southern border the United States and Canada have this so called safe third country agreement which means asylum seekers have to apply to the first of either of those countries that they set foot in why is it wrong for the trump administration to do the same for Central America yes our I'm glad you asked about that because it's an important point at a you know a few things first of all we do not have a formal third party agreement with any other country in Central America so we don't so if if the ministers was even gonna go down that route we would have to have an actual formal written bilateral agreement that those countries would provide asylum but but the second point is just having an agreement is not enough those countries have to be able to provide a safe meaning for efficient asylum process so that people can actually get asylum in those countries and Guatemala for example is not equipped to provide asylum to all the people that would be sent there but we don't even get to that point because there is no formal agreement with the administration's basically saying is try your luck somewhere else but they know very well that those countries would not be safe for people to wait in I would not be able to provide a fair and efficient and safe asylum process the ACLU is challenging another one of the administration's asylum policies it's called remain in Mexico and it means migrants have to wait in Mexico while the US deals with their asylum claims a fiddle a federal appeals court said the administration could keep enforcing that policy for now does that concern you we are we are definitely concerned about it because there are thousands of people now including families and young children waiting in Mexico who are in real danger has been suffering have suffered assaults are living in no no I mean to say yes we we have a report on that but does it concern you with respect to this new suit that you plan to file well I think we're all two million a profound that suit but but regardless I think this raises very different issues we believe that the current law that was the current rule that was passed yesterday it is violating the immigration laws directly and so whatever ultimately happens with that case we hopefully will prevail in this one because we believe it's directly contradictory to what Congress is done with the asylum laws legal learned his deputy director of the ACLU immigrants rights project thanks

Steve Inskeep NPR
Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

Up First

08:19 min | 3 years ago

Eye Opener: Trump claims victory, Dems dig in

"Like behavior what to Democrats do as the president claims victory. I'm Steve Inskeep with David green. And this is up. I from NPR news. Democrats have lines of inquiry. They wanna hear from this, man. The president was frustrated and angered by his seer belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency. What questions do they have for the attorney general also protesters finally forced Sudan's president from power, but their protests have not stopped. What are they want next? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. The bottom line findings are the Muller report allowed President Trump to claim victory. He does not face criminal charges. Many details. Give critics a lot of room for questions a heavily redacted four hundred and forty eight page document was released with the president legal team describing this report as a total victory. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway claim this was quote, really the best day since he got elected. And then this very accepting apologies today to for anybody who feels the grace in offering them. Now, Democrats have a very very different take on. This report. Here is House Judiciary committee chairman Jerry Nadler, the special counsel made clear that he did not exonerate the president and the responsibility now falls to congress to hold the president accountable for his action to vastly different narrative. So what does the report actually say? And what are the implications of these findings? We have a team that's been digging through the document, including NPR Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Who's here either? Very good morning, Steve. So if the president is not charged. What would there be in this report to hold the president accountable forty used Jerrold Nadler's phrase? Well, there's this team the investigators actually wrote that after the thorough investigation. They conducted if they had confidence the president clearly did not commit obstruction of Justice, they'd say, so, but they were not able to say that there are a number of what investigators describe as disturbing incidents ten or more involving the president's attempts alleged attempts to obstruct Justice to try to jam up the special counsel probe to fire. The attorney general Jeff Sessions to fire Robert Mueller, the special counsel himself and to try to get people to change their stories before they spoke with the media or or other people including trying to dangle carrots or sticks in front of people who were thinking about cooperating with Robert Muller's. Well, I'm just thinking about one particular example of the many in this report it involves Don Mcgann was then the White House counsel. Let me if I get this wrong in any way, carry the president tells Mcgann in so many words to get rid of Robert Muller. And the reason that this act is not taken which might have been seen as catastrophic by the president's critics, and even his allies the reason this is not taken it's only because mcken refused and and threatened to resign. Instead is that correct? That's exactly right. That's just one of a number of incidents where the president directed people in the White House to do things in often, Steve they actually blew him off which turns out to be a good thing for their legal liability moving, I guess Mcgann. According to the report again as you put it blew off the president in another way because the president when this was reported when this was revealed by the New York Times that the president told Mcgann to get rid of Muller. Trump told Mcgann to deny that story and Mcgann said I'm not going to falsely deny it because it's true. Yeah. I make an told investigators apparently he felt threatened by the president that the president was trying to test his metal now attorney general bar is going to face some questions after having been the man who redacted this reporter oversaw. Aw, the redaction I should say. And who then described it in a press conference yesterday? The attorney general set to testify on may first and may second in front of the Senate and the house he's gonna have a harder time in house, which is controlled by Democrats, many of whom have already described a crisis of confidence at the Justice department. They say because the way that bar has handled. This report they think he's played down the findings and basically protected President Trump at the expense of this investigation. Are there also internal investigations within the department of Justice? There are Steve the Justice department is investigating. The inspector general is investigating the launch of this investigation. The Fiso warrants in the first place as well as twelve ongoing investigations, we don't know anything about the special counsel has referred to other US attorney's offices. Everyone's talking about the Faisal warrants. I guess we should be clear on that part. This refers to I guess, we could say the Republican narrative of the Republican view of this investigation. Which is that it never made any sense. It never had a good basis, and they are questioning why. Some of the surveillance warrants were approved in the key in this investigation. Yes, the inspector general is investigating the investigators both in the US and some of the sources they were on overseas. Carry thanks for your reporting on this occasion, and many others over the past couple of years. My pleasure. Okay. So how's this report being viewed among members of congress, and what further lines of inquiry if any Democrats intend to pursue NPR's? Tim Mack has been taking a look at this. Tim, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Okay. Democrats have been focused on the question of obstruction of Justice by the president William bar didn't think that the evidence reached that level and Muller himself did not make that conclusion. Even though he didn't clear the president. What does that mean for Democrats will it likely means that in the house of representatives impeachment is off the table, the chair the house intelligence committee? Adam Schiff told NPR's all things considered this yesterday. The evidence would have to be graphic and spark a bipartisan consensus that it warrants the president's removal, given the fact that the public is a congressman on willing to stand up this president in any respect it's hard to see that changing here. But Democrats did signal that they intend to continue their aggressive investigations of the president's finances. His administration and the various episodes revealed by the Muller. Port and they're going to be keeping their demand that the full unredacted version of that Muller report is released ten when I was reading the report you get to the black sections, and there's usually a little tag an explanation for why something has taken out. It's either part of an ongoing matter or it grand jury material, which is supposed to be kept secret in virtually all cases, how likely is it. The Democrats are going to be getting those blackened areas removed. Well, a small group of house members, particularly those related to a DOJ oversight are gonna be able to see a less redacted version of the Miller report. But it's hard to say when the public would be able to see if ever it's going to be a long drawn out legal fight for a fuller version of that Muller report. Okay. Let me ask about what happens in congress over the next year and a half. I know the presidential campaign is well underway. But you know, there's congress and there are problems in the country and the president in his state of the union speech, essentially gave lawmakers choice as the president sought. You're either. Have warned investigation or peace, and and legislation is there any inclination in congress to actually legislate, what Republicans are echoing the president's line. They're saying, no collusion. Nope. -struction? They think all of these investigations are baseless Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell yesterday focused on what he views as Democrats is latest line of attack. That's on attorney general Bill bar Atrush. Bill bar other issue rather laughable, shade turn their guns on him. But that that's all they're left with frankly is to go after him Democrats say that they're doing oversight on a number of important issues. The characterize that there are a lot of troubling developments in the Trump administration and in the world of Trump's finances. They say it's a fundamental part of their responsibilities as a check on the executive branch, and they won't be stopping their investigations. Now, just because the mall report in that investigation is over Tim. Thanks so much. Thanks a lot. Okay. Those were key things you need to know. From the redacted Muller report. But of course, there is much more that we learned in those four hundred pages if you scroll back through your up, I feed you're gonna find that the NPR politics podcast published a special episode. We dropped just for you, deep diving on everything we learned.

President Trump Robert Muller Steve Inskeep Attorney NPR Special Counsel Congress Don Mcgann White House Justice Department Tim Mack Department Of Justice Senate Jerrold Nadler House Judiciary Committee Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway
Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 4 years ago

Michael Flynn asks judge to let him avoid prison

"Unclear. The salient was on a police watchlist flagged as Patel. Essentially radicalized Strasbourg came to the European Union's parliament remained on down overnight and residents have been warned to stay vigilant. France's interior ministry says police had attempted and failed to arrest. The gunman earlier on Tuesday for an attempted murder. And that this may have triggered the attack for NPR news. I miss me Nicholson in Berlin. You're listening to NPR news. There's been a moderate earthquake in Tennessee this morning. The US Geological Survey says the tremors magnitude was four point four, and it was centered in eastern, Tennessee. It could be felt in Atlanta. The first quake was followed. A few minutes later by three point three magnitude aftershock, the final version of Congress's farm. Bill is out and it legalizes industrial hemp harvest public media's Esther honing explains that will bring stability to farmers and states that are already growing the crop thirty nine states already allow for the cultivation of hemp, and there's currently more than twenty five thousand acres devoted to the crop. In the US federal legalization is a boon for producers of CBD oil, which is derived from hemp and used from additional purposes, Kristen Kuna gross hemp in Colorado and says federal legalization gives her and her husband the confidence to invest in their farm. We just feel a little bit safer that we are going into a legitimate business. And there is going gonna be room to grow and to do what we've always been wanting to do the farm Bill would allow each state to oversee local hemp cultivation for NPR news. I'm Esther Hoenig in Greeley, Colorado. A Canadian court has granted bail to Chinese business executive mung Joe of ten million dollars. She and her company while we technologies are suspected of selling equipment to Iran in violation of US sanctions American. Authorities would like to have her extradited to the US separately an international think tank reports one of its officials a former Canadian diplomat has been detained in China. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include L, D, entertainment and roadside attractions with Banus back starring Julia Roberts as a mother whose son unexpectedly returns home Christmas. Also with Lucas hedges. Now in select theaters expands December fourteenth. Steve Inskeep is going to speak with Trump supporter. Chris Buskirk Buskirk runs. The conservative publication American greatness. And the conversation will be about President Trump possibly being linked to a film of campaign finance violations that story just ahead on morning edition also had an Alabama policeman. As you may know recently killed a young black man is he ran away from shooting in a mall. The was legally armed but police figuring out who the quote, unquote, good guy is in chaotic situations can be difficult. A closer look is coming up on morning edition.

NPR United States Donald Trump Esther Hoenig Chris Buskirk Buskirk Bill Mung Joe Colorado European Union Tennessee France Patel Steve Inskeep Congress Julia Roberts Berlin Nicholson
MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 4 years ago

MLB -- New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox set for showdown

"In baseball. If the bombers pull off an upset over the Boston, you bang in Harvard, having donkey buying L wives. I mean, the Red Sox it'll break hearts all over New England. The best kind of New York win. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Let's recall a supreme court battle before the one we're living through now. Judge bread Kavanagh's. Contentious Senate hearing last week recalled some earlier ones, including a nineteen eighty-seven showdown between democratic senators and then federal appeals court judge Robert Bork who been nominated to the supreme court Senator Ted Kennedy led the attack in Robert Bork's, America. There is no room at the end for blacks and no place in the constitution for women and in our America. There

Robert Bork Senator Ted Kennedy Steve Inskeep America Red Sox Bread Kavanagh Rachel Martin Baseball New England NPR Boston Harvard New York Senate
Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:17 sec | 4 years ago

Steve Inskeep, Rachel Martin and Prosecutor discussed on Morning Edition

"Sex crimes prosecutor, I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. How can the Trump administration pressure? Other nations to stop buying Iranian oil will question the State Department's Iran onboard the south also Boston educators, look to close the achievement gap between kids of different backgrounds,

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Prosecutor State Department Iran Boston
No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 4 years ago

No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

"There's new CBS chairman and CEO, les Moonves is leaving NPR's. Steve inskeep. Talks to the New Yorker magazine. Reporter this morning about the newest allegations against moma's CBS says there's no severance package worked out from this pending the results of the investigation, and for CBS the departure has bearing on an ownership battle for the corporate structure of CBS. Marketplace. Nancy Marshall genzer who was Moonves fighting with on the CBS board. He was in a battle with Sherry Redstone over a possible sale of CBS Redstone heads a company called national amusements. She's the daughter of Sumner Redstone Sumner Redstone had controlled CBS. And Viacom they were under one roof. But he split them up Sherri Redstone wanted to reunite them. But Moonves thought that was a bad idea, and why was Moonves against that? Well, Viacom is struggling it owns some cable TV channels that aren't doing well comedy central and MTV moon. Moonves didn't want Viacom to drag down CBS, which has been doing been doing. Well, CBS actually sued the red stones and national amusements national amusements filed a countersuit and on that score. What happens now both sides have dropped their lawsuits. The CBS board has been we shaped with six members stepping down and being quickly replaced share Sherry Redstone in national amusements have promised to wait at least two years before proposing. Merger between CBS and

CBS Sherry Redstone Cbs Redstone Sumner Redstone Sumner Redston Kristen Dickey Viacom IRS Les Moonves Accountant Steve Inskeep Toyota Nancy Marshall Genzer Chairman And Ceo New Yorker Magazine Sherri Redstone James Moonves
NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 4 years ago

NPR, New York Times and Israel discussed on Morning Edition

"Demonstrators. Is demanding jobs and public services also set fire to a main government building NPR's? Jane Arraf has details. Witnesses say protesters set fire to the provincial government building in Basra and blocked the entrance to Iraq's main port security forces have tried to disperse the crowds firing lie them munition Iraq's prime minister, flew to Basra and ordered an investigation after several protesters were killed earlier this week port officials said the demonstrations blocked, the main entrance to the port of Kassir and set up roadblocks on the highway from Basra to Baghdad. The protests have continued all summer in Iraq's second biggest city demanding steady electricity, clean water and

NPR New York Times Israel Iraq Kim Npr Nora Raum White House Rob Schmitz Basra Daniel Estrin Japan President Trump Hokkaido Official Steve Inskeep Washington Supreme Court Of India Rachel Martin