18 Burst results for "Steve Goodman"

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:56 min | 3 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And by whether a stranger hit you in the head with a rock. In every neighborhood could be found all the ingredients of the small town. Local tavern, the funeral parlor, the bakery, the vegetable sort of the butcher shop. The drugstore, the neighborhood drunk, the neighborhood trollop, the neighborhood idiot, The neighborhood war hero, the neighborhood Police station, the neighborhood team, the neighborhood sports star of the ball field. The barbershop. Pool Hall and the clubs and the main street. Captures it isn't that but they're not. Uh, it's just it's quite a book. I would recommend it at very, very highly. It tells you about daily, but it also tells you about the Chicago that is It is probably vanished for certainly for keeps. He wrote it and, amazingly, he wrote it. On weekends and at night. While doing his column four days a week. You can get it easily easily. The book is boss, Richard J. Daley of Chicago. The cover of the book has a photo illustration of daily in a kind of Roman conquers kind of suit on a picture of Mike and the back. So that is my book of the week. We'll take a little commercial break and I will play you two songs of Ah, they two songs. Which will be the song off the week there, buzz on Mike. I greatly admired those same thing was Steve Goodman died in 1984 when he was only 36 years old, So we'll be back in a couple of minutes. For you, Chief. Hi,.

neighborhood Police station Steve Goodman Chicago Mike Richard J. Daley Pool Hall
"steve goodman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:04 min | 5 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"So that was steve. I baseball song and pretty quickly becomes a crowd pleaser at his shows and kind of a local favourite in cognitive and in fact the local. Tv station wants to film him. Performing it at wrigley field but the cubs wouldn't allow it They said no. And the reason was. The song pokes fun at their propensity to lose nate. They didn't like that and this was at time when they were trying to rebuild a team and they were focusing on winning and didn't want that lovable losers crap in their stadium. So this is where dan fabian. Okay comes into the story talking into the receiver dan. Fabian was a radio producer at wgn radio and one time while he was at work. He saw steve goodman on the radio. You know like doing an interview or performance and mandal. Lightbulb went on fabian. Had been looking for some bumper music for the wgn cubs broadcasts stuff to play in between the innings and so he sussed goodman there and he had this idea. What if steve goodman writes a song. Now i literally ran to the studio dribbled a little note when it's flipped it to him during commercial. Hey do you want to write another song like cubs fan last requests. Would you like to read a happy cup song. That was on tuesday..

dan fabian cubs wgn radio wrigley field steve goodman baseball nate steve Fabian fabian dan goodman
"steve goodman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"So that was steve. I baseball song and pretty quickly becomes a crowd pleaser at his shows and kind of a local favourite in chicago and in fact the local. Tv station wants to film him. Performing it at wrigley field but the cubs wouldn't allow it They said no. And the reason was the song pokes fun at their propensity to lose and they. They didn't like that. This was a time when they were trying to rebuild a team and they were focusing on winning and they just didn't want that lovable losers crap in their stadium. So this is where dan fabian. Okay comes into the story talking into the receiver dan. Fabian was a radio producer at wgn. Yeah radio and one time while he was at work. He saw steve goodman on the radio. Like doing an interview. Or performance and mandalite boat went on. Fabian had been looking for some bumper music for the wgn cubs broadcasts stuff to play in between the innings. And so he's been there and he had this idea. What if steve goodman writes assault. I literally ran to the studio dribbled the little note when slipped it to him during a commercial. Hey do you want to write another song. I like dying cubs fans last request. Would you like to rent a happy cubs song. That was on tuesday. Eighteen back thursday with a guitar with the bones of the song and the following monday night tuesday morning we had a party little studio just south of wrigley goodman just like rounds up a bunch of folk singing friends i think a couple of the cubs were actually part of it too.

cubs dan fabian steve goodman Fabian wrigley field baseball wgn steve chicago dan wrigley goodman
"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It is nice to hear Steve Goodman again in any level. It's an amazing thing that we Such is life. We lost Stephen a very, very early age. And as I said, a couple minutes ago, we lost Michael Smyth one day was 78 among I hear it. I read you a little of what you can read in today's Tribune Online or in a riel newspapers. A great picture Michael, too. I said that Smith was in one word enchanting. Rolling Stone magazine once called him the greatest songwriter in the English language when he first told me that 20 years ago to go so he would make unbelievable fun of it. Go, Rick it that can't be me. The English language didn't Shakespeare writing, He's honest and Steve Goodman, right, sometimes. As talented as he was. He was very self effacing, and earlier this month The American songwriter online magazine fairly compared him to the recently deceased John Prime. Writing that both men quote in viewed their songs with heartfelt, sentimental tenderness. Each of them wrote lyrics of unforced grace and elegance, using language, wistful and concise to create generally poignant songs. We're spending this half hour, 15 minutes of just left to honor. Michael Smith. The outpouring was unbelievable. Michael didn't like, you know, Go on TV and say Hi, I'm sick. Hey, just got sick and he died. And the people who remember him in this town are legion and had some really amazing things to say about him. I'll read some more from my obituary Tell you those of you who don't know who Michael was What he wass and how great he was, and we'll play another. Song, which maybe he wrote hundreds of Sonny 500 size. And the one that I'll play for you later is perhaps my favorite song of his, which is really saying something. I'll be right back. Wrap.

Michael Steve Goodman Michael Smith Michael Smyth Rolling Stone magazine Stephen Rick Sonny Tribune Online John Prime
"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:33 min | 9 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Time to check in with the Richards for the entertainment news. Good morning, Dean. Good morning. What does that mean? That you could do this job in yourself? You want sleeping through the show? Ah, well, I didn't get my sleep last night because on you may not have heard earlier, but we're doing a dental procedures on the on the ones here and yeah, I had root canal yesterday. So I didn't get much sleep overnight. And here I am. Because you hard at work. I am. I'm like Cal Ripken, Lou Gehrig. You know that already play through the pain as it s o. I was. Ah, I was sorry to hear about the passing of Ah, popular Seinfeld character, Yes. Thie character. Known as Poppy. Ah hoo! Ah, have that recurring role for four years on Seinfeld passed away? Actually, over the weekend, it was just revealed his name is Reni Santoni. And best known, I guess for the episode where he's he's Ah Restauranteur, a pizza maker, but Jerry runs into him in the men's room where he uses the men's room does not wash his hands and then goes back out to make a hand hand roll a pizza for Jerry and his daughter Jerry is dating. It's a hilarious classic Seinfeld episode, but he was in lots of different episodes, including the finale, but Reni Santoni also starred in Dirty Harry. With Clint Eastwood, 28 days with Sandra Bullock. A whole load of motion pictures who's a Broadway star, died after a long illness, 81 years old. And talk about the Dutchman who passed away Michael W. Smith. Yeah, we know probably best know the song the Dutchman from the hit version that Steve Goodman had But that song, along with about 500 other songs, was written by a just prolific songwriter by the name of Michael W. Smith were only Stone magazine once called him the greatest songwriter in the English language Here is a little bit of his song, The Dutchman, the Dutchman's not kind of man to keep his son, James Holmes streams. That's a secret. Only Margaret such a beautiful song When I hear the song I hear this Steve Goodman version in my head, because that's the one that Bob Collins used to play all the time here on W G and embroider Leonard. When he hears the Steve Goodman version of It is well, you can hear a little of this rise of advised the young man on my beautiful song, Right? Wondered who was very close friends with Steve Goodman. What happened in the studio and he would play the song So I mean, it's got some real Chicago attachment, but Michael Smith was In New Jersey came to Chicago When Steve Goodman's version hit the charts. He would stay here and become one of these great names that would perform down in old.

Steve Goodman Ah Restauranteur Michael W. Smith Jerry Seinfeld Dean Cal Ripken Richards Bob Collins Sandra Bullock Lou Gehrig Clint Eastwood Chicago New Jersey Margaret Leonard Stone magazine James Holmes
"steve goodman" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

04:24 min | 10 months ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Curious City

"But. That's actually not the end of the story. So you remember I told you he wanted to write a great baseball song and you know arguably he wrote to. Do Remember his other big goal wanted to have a song that he wrote himself that he performed. That would be a hit exactly exactly so that song go cubs go was used by Wgn for a few years, but then it kind of got forgotten. You were talking about the cubs playing at the end of every game. That's a relatively recent tradition that started in two thousand seven, which was also a big year for the cubs, somebody at the cubs organization said Hey remember that old song from the Eighties Steve Goodman all that. Why don't we just that off and play it after a home game win, we'll see if people sing along and they dance. They sing along. It caught on became this big tradition at Wrigley field also caught on in the bars. You know they were people would sing along. Then in two thousand sixteen. Here's the along. This is going to be a top quite. Go cubs. Go got a lot of attention. Murray and a couple of become sang the song and Saturday night live. The cast of Hamilton in Chicago, saying it and Hundreds of thousands of people were seeing it in grant park at the victory parade. There's something like two million streams on spotify and it went up on the billboard, charts. Wow and that's like what thirty years later. He finally gets a hit that he sang. Yeah, he did. He finally got that hit. and Steve Goodman fans would say it's kind of ironic, because go cubs, go is not what they would consider to one of his best songs. But clay heels and others say goodman would have appreciated the situation know namely his favorite team that he had rooted for his entire life finally winning the world series like the fact that that's what drove go cubs go to the charts. Steve of loved that. And Yeah, it's sad that he didn't live to see it, but if you think about it, it's also kind of the perfect story for this song because you know for most of Steve's life, the notion that the cubs are GonNa Win Baseball. Season's here again. You know it's time to start a whole new day. All of these lines are about optimism in spite of all the available evidence and. I think that resonates deeply with Chicago cubs fans. and I think that. Sorry I'm getting emotional I think it's also even though it's pretty simple song, it is also. Kind of essence of Steve Goodman to. and I think you know in that clip. I played for you and you see all those people singing the song full-throatedly and they've got signs that say this is for GRANDPA. Think Steve Tapped into that. Yeah! No, I think you're right. I mean I think there is that dream that somehow succeed some day and people not giving up on that Dream I. DO think it's real and I think it some kind of like the spirit of the city a little bit. You know where Chicago Were Not New York, but we're going to matter to I. DO think it's a part of the spirit of the city itself. That's captured in that idea. So maybe you could see why. It might be a little bit difficult for the cubs to think about rewriting or reforming the song. Okay Yeah I see why now it's not such a simple thing. It's like it's like ripping pages out of secret text. Metaphorically we're talking baseball, not religion here, but for some people. There's not much of a distinction. Okay. So what are the cups doing? Well. They have said they're going to continue the tradition to play. Go cubs go after home victories, and they've been doing that at exhibition games. But according to Klay Heels, Steve Biographer. It doesn't actually matter what comes to the song is going to survive any ownership. Change any radio change because the fans. mean go cubs, go I. Think is forever..

cubs Steve Goodman Baseball Chicago Murray Steve Steve Tapped Wrigley field Wgn Steve Biographer spotify Klay Heels Hamilton New York
"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"So a big win in court for Lincoln Park for a look of our parents is largely can telling as they're known in again even in business sixty years that song right there Lincoln Park pirates by the late great Steve Goodman the father of folk rock a lot of people's estimation is fifty years old so think about backed so here's the deal the one eight people I if you're a Chicago inner you've ever did you do you live in the suburbs you've driven your car's been taken away by clicking telling I don't well well it turns out that the judge decided this because I was interested in this myself I found that when they were looking at the violations by it would have been considered violations gets like a towing for taking a car that they shouldn't take him only twenty one violations an eight month period which equaled less than one percent of all the toes conducted Ellen pearl the attorney for Lincoln telling says the company's record is just fine how many toes with whole year and how few violations we have it's like point zero zero zero three percent of one percent literally every five hundred cars is it is a violation that's a pretty good record that's a good record unless it's your car I was right and then you go there's no you really do about it because they get your car and there's the it's not like they're just gonna give.

Lincoln Park Steve Goodman Ellen pearl attorney Lincoln Chicago
"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Anyone who's ever had the feeling that place may not have fully escaped its past might be well advised to open their ears right now as we take a look at a beautiful and haunting new audio essay that seeks to explore and conjure ideas of the eerie written around walk along the coastline of Suffolk at England's easternmost edge on vanishing land by the late Mark Fisher and the not late Justin Barton is a melancholic exploration of a land it's geography and the failed promise of its past is the first release on a new subsidiary of London's iconic electronic music label hyper dob this label's called flatlined Steve Goodman and electronic artists also known as code nine and founder of hyper dub came in to talk to about on vanishing land the audio essay and why some things are best listen to together on there is is the scene and the rapidly shelving beach walking towards the small rocky headland where the Felixstowe seafront comes I suppose it emerged conversation I was having with a friend cooperation who is actually part of a group called the auto's group who originally commissioned on vanishing land to be in a Kinda playback at the showroom gallery I think it was and I initially had this conversation with cogil because I was interested in playing some of these audio S.'s this monthly night called zero that we run in Corsica news elephant and castle so I was interested in playing mark and Justin's earlier audio which is kind of a prototype for in many ways the art films or our audio to get access London London is kind of like a balanced road world setting that kind of uptick London deepen an option edited content aw camouflage netting and the ceiling and kind of fake Franz and vines hanging from that to give a slightly humid jungle like atmosphere it's supposed to be the London of drown world anyway we go onto the idea of releasing on banishing land and discussing differences between radio contexts for these pieces gallery contexts are installations and so on and then I think what we all find the most in interesting context which would be one of collective listening of like a collective playback in a space with ideally decent acoustics so taking of the radio contacts which is usually quite individualized an isolated solitary listening or small groups moving away from the often generic ambience generic obstruction of Dr moving away from the often generic self aggrandize is D- notions of noise are transgressive noise art so and finding a somewhere in the middle should be kind of new format for what we're interested in documentary fiction or sonic fiction or an what would be audio vaction in order to version of what Chris Market does with films who kind of strata of context you know from radio to this collective context and to release it available as an MP three and we're interested in the Oh cost industry as I was saying two before the people are just using them for music people are you finding in the space in which they listen to headphones time to engage with words I suppose that seems to move away from the collective context that you're describing and I wondered how that has changed the release fear obviously we're very where the fight that most people to the mix especially the event series zero that were that we do every month we do caucases terim venue and both rooms have very good sign systems we do a party in a small room but we turn larger room into an installation every month we don't wanNA installation to be a chilly uh room to be an escape from the part we want the party to be intense as possible and the installation too demanding and attention required hiring is possible and collective attentive listening is not easy it takes a low of concentration especially because you're in a group of people distraction and his body noise people rustling chat hang so because it's a difficult context for listening that's one of the things made it more attractive US vanishing land follows this trip that mock phishing justin button took along the Suffolk coast by foot the villages they walk through.

"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"That adding chuck Taylor's name to the shoe would help to have it stand out again also one of my favorites collaborations in the book is Walt Disney and Converse did a set of sneakers for children featuring the famous Mickey Mouse and so these things that I think are continuing to play out in collaborations today about having maybe a heritage model revived through the eyes of celebrity collaborator actually have their origins in the difficult market that was the one thousand nine hundred thirty s going just brings up today I guess to a degree here it is Ah talk about no no it's absolutely fascinating and I think there's sort of strands that run from exactly what you're talking about right up to the present day where this conversation about the influence that street where had on high fashion even it's finished now and I wonder if you think that the footprint if you'll forgive the part of the sneaker is that process because basically now if you look at someone like I don't know Virgil blow or others of his ilk it's not even really street where now I it is high fashion the sneaker belongs wherever it wants to go I mean do you think that that's a process that is actually finished I correct it is yes I agree I believe that that crossover if you will is complete and the idea of life fashion sneakers is still even though it feels quote unquote natural today we really have to go back only to the late nineties and early two thousand and for that trend to really have started and so in the whole scheme of you know the history of fashion sneakers as fully embraced items of quote unquote fashion high fashion regular fashion it is still relatively new but I think that sneakers are very trouble now in that high fashion setting and your evident passion for your enthusiasm for the sneaker does that go back to you've talked so eloquently already about the history was there a shoe that brought you in before you even thought about the history of it like for me one of my just general design heroes but always shoe hero is Tinker Hatfield Amex stories Jordan five but that was the thing for me which really really triggered my passion. It's an obsession was there a single sh- did you have a gateway shoe this is my question I think that you know there's sort of my personal story and then there's the fact that I'm a shoe historian right and so what he set me along the road of wanting to research the importance of sneakers has to do with the work that I was doing on the history of the High Heel in that this was in the early two thousands when I started working on that and at that time high heels had really gripped on the imagination of culture as well as fast listen and to the point that when I would go to parties or tell someone the U Boat I did people would just say I was at the museum people would say oh well that must be a museum for men and I thought that that was ridiculous given that in our culture we don't express gender by women wearing shoes and going barefoot and so I thought that it would be the interesting to also look at men and masculinity and the consumption of footwear and so I- focused on sneakers and so that sort of what sent me along this road professionally but personally it has been the superstar for a very very long time run DMC interested to know breath if it seems like this disruption of the purest slow at this engagement by an external act on what is canonical whether it's Amax saw another China is kind of widely accepted by sneak ahead is not something that people necessarily recall against always interest did to see how an artist or a musician or another designer is going to make their own mark on something which psychotic and I kind of want that if you're aware of any sort of sneaker purist so actually resent the whole process of collaboration or whether it's in fact a fully integrated part of the culture I know that there are people have trepidation about the acceleration of collaborations and you know I I do talk about it in my essay in the book that some collaborations are not that engaged with bringing the individual collaborators real personal style to the table or really playing with or transforming silhouette but having said that there are so many highlighted in the book that actually really address and engage with with both the history that a sneaker will bring to the table and then also the unique insights of the collaborator and so in answer to your Shen I think that there would be people who might consider themselves purists but we'll still see as canonical collaborations from long ago as maybe not even recognizing them as collaborations and thinking of them as being absolutely iconic with in sneaker culture and so I guess what I would counter to somebody who is uncomfortable with collaboration is that the proliferation of collaboration is to step back and see which collaborations are actually making history which collaborations will stand the test of time and for me also I'm interested in why we want collaborations so much now fashion is often prescient and I think that you can actually begin to see a larger cultural change by looking at what is mass consumed and so I think it's interesting that we are culturally interested in this yeah of working together and I wonder what that says about where we might want to head culturally I guess connected to that point then what does it say see quarter pronounced aesthetic given moment does that tell us something about white culture I'm thinking particularly surprising the frequency in your beautiful book that you mentioned this Phrase the ugly sneaker movement of the kind of two thousand sixteen seventeen personally I blame Kanye West for a lot of this but I mean where does an aesthetic like that come from because as you said it's kind of ugly bulky we still see it now there's I'm going to name names as Balenciaga snakes which I do not like to would it be erroneous to read something into that until this about why the culture I would not think that that would be a Romania I actually think there's a set of really interesting concepts that can be explored when silhouette Preferences Change and the ugly shoe and I this is not the focus of this book on collaboration but the trend for the ugly shoe I think brings is up a lot of dicey questions if the basketball shoe silhouette had been so important for so long and then all of a sudden in comes the quote Unquote Dad shoe my first question when that phrase started to be used as whose dad and what does he look like does this have to do at all with difficult topics like Njord but it's one way into something the awesome really serious and profound potentially profound questions there are and this the book with its focus on collaboration as I said at the end I kind of put out the question of whether or not this idea of recognizing multiple voices and the creation of product or cultural icon why are we interested in acknowledging that now and why do we WanNa consume that and I think that there are larger Cultural Meanings about this we've been for a very long time very focused on the individual and individualism so I think it's interesting that all of a sudden were interested in collaboration and so only time will tell but does this at all signal kind of shift in what we're value doing more widely and as a philosophical question that can't be answered at the moment but I posit and then in talking about the Dads shoe the dad sneaker you know I think that that there are very very complex ideas of masculinity idealized masculinity ideas about co-option and and race and so thinking about who is image when you say the Word Dad's shoe I think deserves a little more thoughtful mining and so I think it's interesting if it's sort of middle American idea of who that dad might be that that image has come into fashion and so why is with we could talk all day but there we must leave there is absolutely fascinating hearing from you it's fascinating reading and each fool to look at its core lab sneakers X. Culture published by resilient Lecter Elizabeth thank you so much for joining us on the weekly you're listening to the Monaco weekly on Monaco twenty four hours does come we'll be meeting Steve Goodman our very own Monaco library is growing into a robust collection of.

Walt Disney Tinker Hatfield Amex chuck Taylor Virgil Jordan twenty four hours
"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"It is an inescapable fact that the twenty first century witness to the inexorable ascent of a certain type of fashion once thought informal or even infantile street wear centered around the city acre or as we call it here in the UK the trainer I for one org welcome that development it helps me cling onto my evermore rapidly escaping youth that's why I myself am not like a very shoelace Org yes indeed sneakers have not risen to the top of the footwear food chain entirely under their own steam they've been helped along by cultural Collins Sports people musicians and designers some of whom have in return been invited to make their own mark on the sneaker the resulting culture of collaboration has become rich forms the core of a fascinating a beautiful I'm going to say purely brilliant new book by the Shoe Historian Elizabeth semo Hack Co lab sneakers X. Culture Explores how the trainings become an Avatar for the Inter textual and I'm delighted say Elizabeth joins us now to talk about it welcome to the Monica weekly and again yes watch nations on this book which is a really deep dive on the history of the collaboration in sneaker trainer culture just how important is that history Elizabeth collaborations have become increasingly important within fashion within secret culture and so I am somebody who he is interested in how things begin and so I wanted to try to figure out how far back it went and it even surprise me that it went all the way back into the late nineteen twenties and into the early thirties I mean of course I knew the first commercialized collaboration I knew about Jack pursell the F. Goodrich but even then you know years ago when I was sort of working on sneakers I hadn't thought about that specifically as a collaboration and so looking at the history of sneakers through that specific lens was a really interesting way to not only revisit history that I was familiar with but also to consider the wise of collaboration today as you say you know it's become really important today in its early stages like what you kind of trace it back to when we think about celebrities collaborating with labels or superstar designers what's the first iteration of that Trans Cultural Pooling of resources I am going to still take us back to the thirties the thirties were time obviously the great depression was there and companies had to find innovative ways of vying for consumer dollars of really getting seen and so this is when Jack Pursell is asked to collaborate with B Goodrich but this is also when Chuck Taylor gets his name on the famous converse all star the all-star had come out in one thousand nine hundred seventeen and so in thirty or it was deemed.

UK F. Goodrich Jack Pursell B Goodrich Chuck Taylor Elizabeth semo Monica weekly
"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The Monaco weekly a monocle twenty four Hey Tom Nice to see this Sunday Sunday thanks yeah if early we are in rainy season aren't we in the UK is troubling but plenty of audio sunshine serving in the weekly can't wait to get started how's the week intriguing oh you had a little bit of a sniffle it's been nice I had a sniffle but I've also been you never know implying not about your colds never know I was brought up not to I think they listening up trotting Augustine he complains a great deal now that you've been all across Europe good tons really great Paris lovely city who knew gay Perry is it just didn't get the memo so nice small compact easy to walk around really great shops cafes cheap wine beautiful people everywhere really right seven hundred ten wor deafen again I'm just I've never heard you literally anything before extraordinary honey what what I was ill I did manage to get quite a lot of cultural homework out of the way I piled through a series which I wouldn't normally do but it was so mesmerizingly good what was the school the Terror Tom and it tells the true story. I mean obviously it's fictionalized account Munster in it for Pete's sake but it tells the story of the HMS Tara which as you know went to seek the northwest passage the elusive northwest passage in the nineteenth century with the ill-fated Sir John Franklin interesting that narrative fascinating I like vainglorious tales of adventure and misadventure as you'd expect up reading the works of Robert Louis Stevenson and his ilk before you continue from my old age shall we move on who's been seeking out the hard to access passage of next week's news tonight could it be Fernando Gustavo Shekar welcome hello guys honestly I had a busy week so it definitely has been through the tunnel this week because we would say through the mio include a tunnel tunnel let's kill to it's with one stone as I believe they say your motherland and chalk off a few of next week's news happenings today I will have to stay in Latin America Latin America does Moan it's just as I mean we had massive protests in Chee Lay with a lot of people dying protests in Ecuador Constitutional Crisis in Peru and also believe you which we don't know what's going to happen and elections it's election season as well and today actually two countries are voting so there'd be two stories year coming from the region the first one is urgent Tina which you know I've been talking about throughout the year a compelling narrative a compelling narrative and it will be the return of the peronism Os while our over to finance this I'm almost sure that he would win the election let's remember Christina Kushner favorite perhaps she is the vice president and and it's interesting because a lot of Argentina's themselves they know that actually Christina my being power apparently forty five percent of the thing that should be the real power behind the scenes you know I think yes she might have some power but I believe in about two Finan- this his quite diplomatic I I don't think you'll be perhaps as radical as Christine in her last term as well so it's interesting we tracked we had a lot of the kind of pink tide these these leftists across Latin then we've seen what we thought we were seeing a shift back to the right Cetinje with Boston new motherland and others who definitely pretty pretty right wing are we seeing another pivot now are we seeing the return again the left or or is it a little too early to say I think it's a little bit too early to say I've been thinking about that because you're right about that pink tide most Latin American countries left was in power at the time and they all kind of friends of each other but I think not at the moment if every country has their own narrative and you will see from my next story Uruguay and there's different types of laughed as well you have perhaps a more you know th centuries left coming from Uruguay and then you have some kind of more you know the populist left I mean look at ever morale is now in Bolivia I mean actually I don't know what's going to happen if he's being kind of elected but there's been some issues there not so yeah it's lot of tides it's not a pink one if I might butted I'd suggest that the common thread here is populism rather than the left right divide Bernardo kitchener you know they both speak to people who feel disaffected left behind by centuries of left behind by liberalism number values and that's and that's the the outcome you get and can be honest they were left behind I mean just look at Argentina why Obama Fan and is so popular because marketing the supposedly centuries candidate for the business people going to bring gorging Tina to the modern world I mean Argentina the moment they have their current poverty levels are similar to the ones in two thousand one I believe in the country and it's I remember conversation we have with ED soccer recently America's lodge when he was in these very chestnut he's talking about this and you wonder if it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy about Argentine this necessarily cyclical financial crisis is ten yearly model it's following a voice to the to the letter and you wonder whether I don't know do people kind of Bahrain to the the sort of they buy into the it's not romance but the sort of the mystique of this idea that there's something beyond that can almost I I believe so but but at the same time I do I have to say I'm a bit scared because you know the the the can't be wrong and then at the end of the day I can be completely wrong in marketing so then he won re election I mean it's not like that way but it's quite dinosaurs from time we'll tell us next well let's go to Uruguay they're also voting yeah fun point interesting neighboring countries they're voting on the same day I mean Uruguay I mean it's been much more peaceful in the last fifteen years you know they had kind of into laughed governments you know pretty success for the economy was growing it's a fairly rich country but they also have their own issues so for example people not only voting for the next president but they're also voting for a constitutional reform they'll give more power to the police to the military because there's been an increase in crime actually for example I didn't the homicide rate in Uruguay is actually Bigger than in some of the neighboring countries like Argentina itself so I mean those are massive issues but wonder who's going to win there is a risk that the left my leave the power and you know the the right-wing Party win I mean we have to wait and see but the right is getting stronger and stronger leaner what you're not that kind of voting to give a right wing government more municipal more legal more military power isn't necessarily the happiest blueprint not really but I have to say for the ride in Uruguay is different from both sonar for example these still host of they're not all of them but these to approve you know this kind of The the abortion rights to gay rights in Uruguay which is one of the most progressive countries in the region so socially inclusive progressive conservatism of a of a sort we allegedly had in this country exactly they'll recently let's not bring things back to UK shores or maybe we will where where are we headed next well maybe we will because actually the thirty first of October I know is a bit cliche but it is Halloween the only reason because you know as as you have been to Japan and a few weeks ago and there was already so much halloween stuff so I think it became kind of a a national around the world in my opinion but I don't necessarily like the costumes and the policies I think they're pretty boring but what I do like Hillary surprise me yeah you've such contradictions I thought you'd like some of the kind of high camp schlaug array of Halloween no yeah the Gore I like the Gordon Listen Okay far away three times I mean they're not so left field because you know there some of them pretty obvious the exorcist I think it's a good time to look at nine hundred seventy eight Russian of Piranha which is earned while underrated by some it's a classic and another one a nightmare on elm street chew Freddy's revenge it's the campus of the nightmare on Elm Street do watch listen if you are listening do you have any recommendations aw seasonal horror probably not probably what watch the Westminster Channel Federal I've got a few the hole in the ground the scariest horror the I've seen this year and I've seen a lot also worth hang up hereditary if you still haven't seen that we've been doing I'm Tom will you be taking your infant outs trick or treating pleurisy absolutely will around my neck of the woods it's like being a John Hughes movie on Halloween it's APPs Everett kids are everywhere the house decorated I've heard tell people bussing in from other neighborhoods to take part apparently even the big supermarkets now using people to get more into Halloween than our traditional November the fifth bonfire night big big plays like saints with they're not selling fireworks anymore because it's health and safety nightmare compelling people to buy colleen tat instead and where the supermarkets lead the public is almost inevitably forced to follow we must tonight I'll be shooting fireworks two bottles I'll be stunning last we'll be hearing from you today we've got an interview that you've done with the director of one of the most eagerly anticipated films of the coming right up in two thousand Sixteen Peace Agreement and Columbia promised to bring an end to a bloody decades-long conflict between the government and radical guerrillas today while the agreement looks decided Lee shaky the extremities and harshness of militarized life lived in the jungle has certainly become fertile autistic ground monarchies a dreamy and unsettling foam set in the now it's met with universal critical acclaim scoop the top prize the bear Fi London Film Festival so columnist pick for the best international feature the Oscars Monaco's Nando. type.

UK Paris Europe Augustine Perry Sir John Franklin Robert Louis Stevenson HMS Tara Munster Pete forty five percent fifteen years one stone
Argentina Imposes Capital Controls as Reserves Drain Away

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:07 min | 1 year ago

Argentina Imposes Capital Controls as Reserves Drain Away

"Four times in the last thirty years. Argentina has defaulted on its debts. Now a battle is underway to prop up the peso and avoid a deep recession. Argentina's nineteen is government has imposed currency controls. It is an embarrassing move for no ready embattled president who is seeking reelection to understand what's going on joined in the steve goodman. Who's european economics correspondent for the new york times peter. Thank you very much coming in. Thanks for having me. I'm so the root of this seems to be that mature macrey suffer this back in primary election and since that point the value of the pacers kept falling. That's right yeah. I mean entered. International investors have taken a look at the prospect and it's a growing prospect that we're going to see a return to peronism to this left wing populism resum that has prevailed in argentina for most of its modern history and that's involved handing out money to poor people without a real strategy to generate growth <hes>. It's in contrast to neoliberal policies that haven't worked very well either <hes> but this <hes> this left wing populism has generally left argentina with very high debts. It's not a lot of growth a lot of pressure on its currency which means high inflation and that requires the central bank to lift interest rates very high to prevent more money from going out the door and if you're poor and the alternative is a crippling budget austerity which is what's happened when argentina has shifted to the right then you like the idea of left-wing populism because he leaves at least you get something but this is not a story that ends well and investors are looking at the current cycle in saying a high here we go again. We're going back to populism and that means. We better get our money out the door and indeed argentina's central bank spent a billion dollars from its reserves in a week and and it doesn't seem to be achieving n._f._l. Right reserves of dropped all the way down to something like sixteen billion dollars. I mean that's not a lot of ammunition. If you're central bank trying to defend pressure on the currency and again you know when a currency falls and you're an in economy like argentina where you import a lot of things that means inflation that means the price of <hes> just about everything from food to clothing petrol the people putting their vehicles goes up so the government is in a situation where you know they've got a lift interest rates high to prevent the currency from falling but by lifting interest rates they also squeeze out any prospect of economic growth. There are simply no good options options for this government at this point indeed. This is a country where inflation was the twenty two percent in the first half of this year. Three million people are falling into poverty in the last twelve months. I'm the economy shrank by six percent in the first quarter of this year. This is not a beneficial environment for a politician seeking reelection. No i mean this is a catastrophe for for everyone involved. This is not how the story was supposed to play when makkari came into office in two thousand fifteen the idea was you know he had inherited this disaster astor from his left wing populist predecessor cristina fernandez de kirchner who was facing indictment for

Argentina Cristina Fernandez De Kirchner The New York Times Steve Goodman Pacers President Trump Sixteen Billion Dollars Twenty Two Percent Billion Dollars Twelve Months Thirty Years Six Percent
"steve goodman" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"And other cliches which I in fact have delivered to commencement addresses that I've given. We're talking tonight with Steve Goodman the author of college success stories that inspired lessons from inside and outside the. Classroom we're talking some about the actual rationale for this four year and multi thousands of dollars experience I. Have put forward a thought of this program that it might be appropriate at this time to to address I suppose that would be that while certainly there are any number of reasons why individuals go to school government has only one, vested. Interest in that is that you, become productive citizens and to the extent that people go to school and let's, say major in the trust could literature and wind up being the most literate barista at Starbucks That was a waste of any government money given to you, that in fact I believe that student aid should be directly proportional to the percentage of people in, a given major who wind up with the full time employment in that major within let's say, a year of their graduations otherwise you know if you wanna find yourself do it on your own, dime would be take and I note in conclusion that there is a reason why. There are so many bowling leagues in this country and that is because a lot of people. Like to bowl and would love to be a part of the professional bowling association but they're not good enough. And they have what we call a hobby but during the week they have a real job and presumably. The skills necessary to acquire that job and if you happen to have a passion in higher education that is not going to pay you then either you need to start considering it a hobby and get yourself a career is that The two to drastic at. Approach Seve Well it's. An approach I'll give you an example if I may about someone in our book who did exactly what you suggested an and I think. There's an element of truth to it I with all. Due respect it, maybe a bit overstated but for instance if someone in our in our book who went to Calvin college and studied business Mandarin and is now teaching. In China and enjoying it very much I would argue that that is a very fine job for someone. Who studied business and. Mandarin in college he found a job I mean that that may that meets my criteria It's a woman. Who look at, Calvin college which is a school in Michigan and she's teaching ESL and that's terrific now of course to delve a little deeper into your question No. Not every body are either house those language skills or not everybody knows exactly what they wanna do when. They use some of. The time in college to explore so in my Your question I think you, also have to look at the fact that different people mature at different times different people discover their interests and their talents at different times we certainly, don't want to have the government or parents or people go into hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt for people to. Explore their passions and to take, twenty years to do so but on the other, hand we also don't want to do it in such a way where you. Have to, make up your mind right now when your, age sixteen or seventeen. Or eighteen out giving students the opportunity to explore what it is they could like and. How they could contribute to society by the, time I would agree but by, the time you're twenty, or twenty one. It's, time it is not to say that you can't change? Down, the road in fact I've heard it said that today's college. Graduates you certainly cannot graduate let's say these days from from high school at age eighteen then put. In your fifty So well not even fifty say you're you're forty seven years as a highly. Paid worker with the union, benefits and then get your gold watch that doesn't happen anymore these days you will wind up entering several different not just jobs in your life but, different careers more and more people may in fact actually wind up freelancing to say you work for no one really but. Yourself and you just sort of, flipped from job to job it's not something that, would appeal to me but then again if those are the new realities that. Then so, be it so no I I would agree, and I don't know. Used to be the European system of secondary education and and if you hadn't pretty much Set a course by, let's say the age of eleven, or twelve the standardized testing there would send. You in, that course you're going to be a plumber or an electrician and, you are going to Oxford and and that's the way it is. And you're stuck there though but as I, said by by, twenty or twenty one you better have at least an idea. The something, you're, going to try, maybe it isn't where you'll wind up but it's where you're going to start out is that asking too much No I, think that's fair the question is how one does that for. People who haven't been exposed to lots of things in, the past so let's let's assume you, take someone who did not go. To a great high school or did, not have a great writing instructor did not. Create have category maps instructor It's asking a lot for them all of a sudden to be. So, incredibly motivated that they are going to rise to, the top and then come to think of all sorts of creative careers based on things that they really have an accelerated I think that's a little too much. To ask too much to, ask on the. Other side. To have society underwriting people forever exploring no. I think it's a fair point, that, you, make, but, there's somewhere in the, middle there where we want to incentivize students to learn things. That, perhaps some day could. Contribute wildly to, the world in some way and on the other hand be fiscally responsible all right we'll come? Back and we'll talk some more we'll take some more calls one eight six six five zero JIMBO Steve Goodman college success stories that. Inspire back with more in a moment Morning. Noon and night talk six fifty, gives, you, the, food, to feed your brain, literally taking the constitution and putting.

Calvin college Steve Goodman instructor Starbucks Michigan China JIMBO Oxford forty seven years twenty years four year
"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The great eddie holstein spoon river on wgn's nocturnal journal so tell us about that song michael smith steve goodman populated steve was working in coral gables florida and he was opening for mike and barbara smith and steve had a little baby at the time so he got up early in the morning and he always felt that if he had to do it all his you know lowlife friends she'd do a too we didn't have babies he was he called me one time out all night frolicking and he said steve you know it's eleven fifty five in the morning just came home you gotta hear this song and he played me spoon river over the phone from miami or some coral gables rather and he just a crazy for michael and michael is one of the great songwriters of all time lives right here in chicago and has done so much so many great songs and there you go came very close and wrote some songs together and this is one of that song gives me goosebumps another one that went through good members that that's been oh how will smith he was he goes back all the way to nineteen sixty six he'll spanking our game recorded some of the song yeah he's really talk about a legendary guy he's there and he's so literate i can't say enough about michael smith sense of humor then he do buffet throwaway fortyfive hysterically funny guy yeah yeah so i think this is really really interesting and we're talking during the break so you're going to be teaching the steve goodman songbook eight mondays at six thirty pm starting on june twenty fifth this is a great idea no one i was look look you know i did my stuff steve this stuff i always did this and and there's a chicken cordon bleu i'm doing a update on that i wanted to learn i thought close to the mic yeah and blues i i talked to class today actually that and and the vessels song yeah para learned but then he did he he wrote chicken cordon bleu and lincoln park pirates somebody else's oh daily beat yeah right piracy's even when he did that song in cambridge massachusetts people got it he's everyone has tony problem and i used to love to go to the great restaurants seminary lounge on fullerton lincoln it was my home and i a there almost every day usually late at night because there was three hundred and my friend was was who's a wonderful guy and he came out at night but i sometimes had supper there and i'm having dinner with steve and i look across the room and there's russ casio and i thought yeah he hung around their revenues yeah yeah well this is the end of and finally we go he's there and he's staring at us he's got a big cigar in his mouth and i said steve listen don't look now of course did casio is staring at us and goodman was to the side yellow big time big time because he was one of the owners chris who was his friend and some of the drivers hung around there somewhere my friends some good guys but so he's with chris one of the owners and they hung around there a new go steve was and i said to the waitress k i said can i have to check he said it's on ross and before i know ross casio is standing there shirts white guy and he says the good guy says i want to thank you i can't tell you what you and reiko differ my business get went up forty percent because they both the song and then the column mike royko dead showed that these were very effective guys so people who have parking last feel there's two sides to this thing i wanted to get rid these are the guys who go to and he's he bought us dinner and then he came to their oval town and watched him perform didn't know that star came here with some of the guys from the seminary whatever he was jeremy pentagon and he loves steve you know go ahead go ahead i thanks virus at night in brussels on the floor i was lucky i interviewed steve wants i saw him a few times and i've talked to other i've talked to buffet about this a little bit but talk about what steve did i don't feel talk about this in the class but steve to entertain her and he i.

eddie holstein spoon river wgn nocturnal journal michael smith mike steve goodman coral gables florida forty percent twenty fifth
"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The great eddie holstein spoon river on wgn's nocturnal journal so tell us about that song michael smith steve goodman populi popular yes steve was working in coral gables florida and he was from mike environment smith and steve had a little baby at the time so he got up early in the morning and he always felt that if he had to do it all his lowlife friends should do it to have babies he was he called me one time out all night frolicking and he said steve you know it's eleven fifty five in the morning i just came home you got to hear this song and he played me spoon river over the phone from miami there's some girl gables rather and he just crazy for michael and michael is one of the great songwriters of all time lives right here in chicago and has done so much so many great songs and there you came very close and wrote some songs together and this is one of that song gives me goosebumps another one that went through that that's been oh he was he goes back all the way tonight sixty six spanking are gay recorded some songs yeah he's really talk about a legendary guy he's out there and he's still literate enough about michael smith then he do buffet throwaway forty five or so very funny guy yeah so i think this is really really interesting and we're talking during the break so you're going to be teaching the steve goodman songbook eight mondays six thirty pm starting on june twenty fifth this is a great idea no one i was i was look i look i did my stuff stupid stuff i always did this and there's a chicken cordon bleu doing an update on that i wanted to learn costa mike yeah gordon blues i taught i taught the class today actually the and and the vegetables song yeah peril martin did but then he did a he he wrote chicken cordon bleu and lincoln park pirates somebody else's cubs go diddley beat piracy's even when he did that song in cambridge massachusetts people got it is everyone has a problem and i used to love to go to the great restaurants the seminary lounge fuller lincoln it was my home and a there almost every day usually late at night 'cause there was three and my friend was was peace who's a wonderful guy and he came on at night but i sometimes had supper there and i'm having dinner with steve and i look across the room and there's russ casio and he hung around their revenues the lincoln park yeah well this is the end of their run finally we go he's there he's staring at us he's got a big cigar in his mouth and i said steve listen don't look now of course you did casio is staring at us and goodman was to the side yellow big time big time because he was one of the owners chris who's his friend and some of the drivers around here somewhere my friends some good guys but so he's with chris is one of the owners and they hung around there a new who steve was and i said to the waitress k i said can i check and she said it's on rush and before i know it ross casio is standing there shirts white guy and he says the goodman the big guys i want to thank you i can't tell you what you did for my business went up forty percent because they both the song and then the column that michael dead showed that these were very effective guys so people who had parking lots there's two sides to this thing i wanted to get rid these are the guys who go do and he's he bought us dinner and then he came to town and watched him perform i didn't know that story really came here with some of the guys from the seven years whatever he was jeremy penny guy he loves steve you know go ahead go ahead thanks that night in brussels on the floor i was lucky i interviewed steve once i saw him a few times and i've talked to other i've talked to buffet about this a little bit but talk about what steve did i don't feel talk about this in the class but stephen such an entertainer and he i.

eddie holstein spoon river wgn nocturnal journal michael smith coral gables steve goodman forty percent twenty fifth seven years
"steve goodman" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"It was was not we flew all the way up there for three rounds two and a half rounds of boxing and caught that mazing trip it's a little bit of momentum behind churchill management and our boxes now wrote he has a hit the boxing world is a burs i thought churchill box stable weirdly they sort of aren't and it was i thought this was going to be a loss leader but once again this could be another billion dollar business this could be another stop printing cam i don't want to affect the economy if i print through much cash i don't wanna print too much time you spend in crew box yeah this doesn't have a lot to do with crew box of my mates would not like you saying that for various reasons but check out on youtube regis pro gray alex ada amazing fighters very very good wins another slightly less economically pecuniary news we got a book out the book we financed in the self publishing it's what i'm now it is it is up on does the actual cover up there still temporary royd cup publishes take the extra step of putting the world's first tweet book cover i mean since steve gutenberg bible the first thing that was printed in the foot here's steve goodman pinta this bible not think it was steve is not he had a career about that there has not been a tweet book cover in the books who is now a tweet book kept but why would the publisher take the step of putting on amazon then they prefer read the kind of nothing to see here move on the generic book cover.

churchill management publisher steve goodman amazon billion dollar
"steve goodman" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WCHS

"Rich cohen our guest author of the chicago cubs story of a curse is that song oh really the greatest sports athlete of all time well just because the fans made it that way the story that by steve goodman with basically hired i think to write a song for wgn and it was almost like a jingle you right now the great song achieve goodman whose travelled everything of cochairing can travel is a song dying comes sandblast request where he had the unbelievable line um the law of averages fit everything will happen that can canned the last year the cubs won a nationally and in a year we dropped a bomb on japan well net to song about how we want you to be you know he that burned uh cremated uh at wrigley field inhabit ashes scattered in the prevailing 35 on our southwest will and and um he uh he did he died in 1984 i just as he was doing all that and there was a debate when i was a kid about whether or not he should actually you know be buried or something happen with an at wrigley field it was a very great guy here the wrigley field by the way covina rabbin there it is is a beautiful beautiful place the ivy and the like an as we go to a call here for a rich cohen i have to ask you the pro i were parttime for cnn in chicago in 1980 when they just started they really were chicken noodle news the first i did feature pizzas loves sports pizzas at it a piece for example on the of the northwestern university football team would you can imagine how bad that was but were you ably durbam rich going i was i mean starting when i was thirteen or whatever when i could go alone i would take the train from where i grew up as on the northshore and go down and i think i dunno spent five box yeah and fit always in the left you'll be left field bleachers i was those version piece i ever did for television was was on the bleacher bob that was a grip i gotta you well gives you were at the.

steve goodman wgn cubs wrigley field cnn chicago japan bleacher
"steve goodman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"steve goodman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Winners clearly they have famously not been to the world series since 1945 haven't won the thing since nineteen away i have a theory a bear with me here i think one of the reasons people love the cubs so much is that the cubs make us feel better about ourselves traditionally speaking no matter how bad you have been at being a person the cubs have tended to be worse at playing baseball i've always love that great steve goodman song you know the the do they still play a little loses chicago when bears season roles on but no mr goodman they don't not even one person has played the is in chicago since the top of the ninth in game five against the giants on tuesday and now we're the favorites in our second straight nlcs we don't know how to feel about that you just bought i digress i'm sorry we were talking about fall willie falls only achilles heel is that every four years without fail it gets hijacked by an american presidential election you knew it was coming didn't you thought we could avoid it but we can't there is no avoiding this one i should say i i would be i would be hypocritical firms to criticise either candidate for things that i myself have done for instance i use and insecure email server on the regular and i went through a stretch where i didn't pay income taxes for eighteen years after which i graduated high school and got a job.

world series cubs baseball mr goodman chicago giants nlcs willie presidential election steve goodman achilles heel eighteen years four years