31 Burst results for "Sternberg"

"sternberg" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"And so if one person is getting their cup filled just being able to express themselves and share they may feel like that intimate connection or that intimate love alone is enough but if someone else's coming from this place where they want that passion then you can start to see how we're even speaking different languages of the word love and commitment alone as according to sternberg can feel like empty love so sometimes we that we just have this commitment to each other. Is that part where we feel like we're roommates or it's this just in it for the long haul so where this really becomes. Fascinating is the triangular part of the theory. Because that comes from the fact that you can combine any two of these components to inform a more complex type of love and then each combination forms. It forms. A different side of this triangle. This love triangle. So when you have a relationship that combines for example passion and intimacy then you get romantic love or intimacy plus commitment can give you what he calls companionate love while fatuous love is born where commitment meets passion and he said and then there's consummate love which is the combination of all three components and it's often seen as this this perfect ideal form of love because when you mix this fire of paddock comfort of intimacy and the security of commitment. Then have this healthy happy. Long lasting romantic love filled relationship. And it's so important to note that this triangle does not have to be this. I was never good at. The geometry. does have to be this equilateral shape because usually these components present themselves in different times different in different levels again isn't the all sides don't have to be equal but what you're really trying to focus on..

sternberg
"sternberg" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So i've shared on many many occasions that i spent ten years in the computer industry before i went back to school and got my masters in counseling which started me on the journey where i am today and while i can't even imagine what would have happened if i hadn't changed careers almost twenty years ago. Now i'll admit that there were some fun times in the computer industry. Sometimes i feel. I can make it sound like. It was all horrible but i got to travel. I travel the time. I traveled the world literally. I know i. I went to japan over thirty times. And i went all throughout europe and china and russia and back and forth across the united states. More than i would even cared count and there are some good stories that went along with that too. I had an experience once in the world renowned japanese fish market where the sushi was so incredibly fresh that once while i wasn't really paying much attention as it was being handed to me. I was handed a piece. That when i brought it up to my mouth part of it. I don't know if it was the tail. Or something moved smack my hand and i a screamed and then i be through it across the room which was much to the delight of my host mr rashid assan and the dozens and dozens of guests in the restaurant or there was a time where i was staying in a hotel in southern california and clad. Only in my underwear bottoms. I looked at my room through the little people only to see that. I was lacking my my usa today. Newspaper in at the time..

japan russia mr rashid assan europe china united states southern california
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously then you realize that you know the only person hey destroys yourself in the end. The peter's are you know eating away themselves in that if you take on the notion that instead of trying to destroy others if we all believe it had a rising tide raises all ships if we all tried to embrace each other instead of stab each other in the bag we wouldn't have to deal with haight would have so much of a better world. Ain't that the truth. I remember I'm i remember the for the first year in grad school Karen who is now your wife. But i remember. She was working on the theory of hate around that time. I think she came from germany because she was interested in working on the heat. Work if i remember correctly yes entered dissertation on. Hate the book on hayden and edited book under eight. But i think the add shows this further shows the bankruptcy of her current notion of intelligence that you know as the world has become smarter. It's also we have growing authoritarianism. We have greater you know off. Never seen the country at odds like it is today. I mean this is like getting close to civil wartime and people are using their cues to foment dissension in hatred and unfortunately social media companies have been mostly focused on profit and negative posts. Get spread around more. They're more diffused. And so what's happening. Is that our intelligence. They actually working against us through social media. I mean you know. Very smart people put together to maximize the profits of the social media company. But it shorts hell isn't helpings civilization as we know it so we have to start getting wise. We have to be more creative and we have to realize the importance of love instead of. Hey i'm in i'm in. I love what you're doing. And i'm so glad that you expanded your research to this realm. It's so important. I have to ask a cheeky question though. Why do so many of your theories have three components to it. Do you three reasons for that. I would say that you know it. It has gotten ridiculous. I mean like not only have three reasons. I have triplets. I mean this is something about you and the number three you choose to have trip was just kind of happened. Actually though that's less true in current times the theory of adaptive intelligence new cambridge university. Press book isn't really about it. If it has elements it as creativity analytical skills practice wisdom in as four but. I think that the important thing isn't the number of but rather what we need to be doing is as i said for guessing on whether it's through of or wisdom or daft of intelligence we need to be focusing on making the world a better place and we're not doing and we had of people in the country today seem more. Intent on developing aggression grudges. And whether that would regardless of what. You're studying that that doesn't hold up a good future for humanity or for other species to where we're also killing other species so i think that you know adaptation in a broad sense isn't just about changing yourself to fit. The world is also bad changing the world to be a better place It's about shaping. The world were running at a time to shape the world. I mean you know at some point. Global warming will be so out of control. If there's nothing we can do and the income disparities at some point when people feel totally ripped off you begin to get violence against civil war. In at some point you begin to realize that your unwillingness to use your intelligence wisely is is literally is destructive in the sense that sperm counts like half of what they were. Nine thousand seventy You know why is it. Plastics or other Chemicals in the arraignment. But is that smart. And even if you look at this solely in terms of reproductive success were a species that is self destructive can so if we keep thinking of you know when when the pandemic was at its height while we're people worried about well how can i take the act or this. I mean like is that good in. We're worried about him. Where my testing center. This is the wrong way to go. This is just not where you want to be. I'm so glad that he wrote this book. Adaptive intelligence and i really hope people read it. The subtitle is surviving and thriving in times of uncertainty. Boy are we in times of uncertainty so the times to buy the book for sure. I have to end this by thanking you for your huge huge part of the reason why i'm in this field. Perhaps the biggest part of the reason. I was sitting there sophomore year of college reading Cognitive psychology textbook and got to intelligence chapter. I was like who wrote this. I got this is amazing. And i see robert sternberg gayle. My whole dream in life was to work with robert surgery retail and study intelligence. And i just had the thank you so much for what you've done inspire me and my field and i know a lot of other people in the field so much. Thank you grayson. Students who've done better than you have so our honor to have had you as a student into you know the best thing that can happen to you. Is your students do better than you. Just like your kids. You know you want your kids to do better.

hayden Karen germany cambridge university robert sternberg gayle robert grayson
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously the only person hey destroys his yourself in the end. The peters are you know eating away themselves in that if you take on the notion that instead of trying to destroy others if we all believed it had a rising tide raises all ships if we all tried to embrace each other instead of stab each other in the bag we wouldn't have to deal with haight would have so much of a better world. Ain't that the truth. I remember I'm i remember the for the first year in grad school Karen who is now your wife. But i remember. She was working on the theory of hate around that time. I think she came from germany because she was interested in working on the heat. Work if i remember correctly yes entered dissertation on hate the book on hayden an edited book under eight but i think the add shows this further shows the bankruptcy of her current notion of intelligence that you know as the world has become smarter. It's also we have growing authoritarianism. We have greater you know off. Never seen the country at odds like it is today. I mean this is like getting close to civil wartime and people are using their cues to foment dissension in hatred and unfortunately social media companies have been mostly focused on profit and negative posts. Get spread around more. They're more diffused. And so what's happening. Is that our intelligence. They actually working against us through social media. I mean you know. Very smart people put together to maximize the profits the social media company but it shorts hell isn't helpings civilization as we know it so we have to start getting wise. We have to be more creative and we have to realize the importance of love instead of. Hey i'm in i'm in. I love what you're doing. And i'm so glad that you expanded your research to this realm. It's so important. I have to ask a cheeky question though. Why do so many of your theories have three components to it. Do you three reasons for that. I would say that you know it. It has gotten ridiculous. I mean like not only have three reasons. I have triplets. I mean this is something about you and the number three you choose to have trip was just kind of happened. Actually though that's less true in current times the theory of adaptive intelligence new cambridge university. Press book isn't really about it. If it has elements it as creativity analytical skills practice wisdom in as four but. I think that the important thing isn't the number of but rather what we need to be doing is as i said for guessing on whether it's through of or wisdom or daft of intelligence we need to be focusing on making the world a better place and we're not doing and we had a lot of people in the country today. Seem more. intent on developing aggression grudges. And whether that would regardless of what. You're studying that that doesn't hold up a good future for humanity or for other species to were killing other species so i think that you know adaptation in a broad sense isn't just about changing yourself to fit. The world is also bad changing the world to be a better place It's about shaping. The world were running at a time to shape the world. I mean you know at some point. Global warming will be so out of control that there's nothing we can do and the income disparities at some point when people feel totally ripped off you beginning to get violence against civil war. In at some point you begin to realize that your unwillingness to use your intelligence wisely is is literally is destructive in the sense that sperm counts like half of what they were. Nine thousand seventy You know why is it. Plastics or other Chemicals in the arraignment. But is that smart. And even if you look at this solely in terms of reproductive success were a species that is self destructive can so if we keep thinking of you know when when the pandemic was at its height why we're people worried about. Well how can i take the act. Or this i mean like is that good for. We're worried about him. Where my testing center. This is the wrong way to go. This is just not where you want to be. I'm so glad that he wrote this book. Adaptive intelligence and i really hope people read it. The subtitle is surviving and thriving in times of uncertainty. Boy are we in times of uncertainty so the times to buy the book for sure. I have to end this by thanking you for your huge huge part of the reason why i'm in this field. Perhaps the biggest part of the reason. I was sitting there sophomore year of college reading Cognitive psychology textbook and got to intelligence chapter. I was like who wrote this. I got this is amazing. And i see robert sternberg gayle. My whole dream in life was to work with robert surgery retail and study intelligence. And i just had the thank you so much for what you've done inspire me and my field and i know a lot of other people in the field so much. Thank you grayson. Students who've done better than you have so our honor to have had you as a student into you know the best thing that can happen to you. Is your students do better than you. Just like your kids. You know you want your kids to do better.

peters hayden Karen germany cambridge university robert sternberg gayle robert grayson
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:48 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Or what can i do in. My kid is not re-. I'm pretty sure he's not telling me what he's really doing. When he goes out at in doses uh-huh we rarely facing like they don't have abc abcd e. answers Their high stakes. They're mostly involving their unstructured problems. Often it's hard to figure out what the problem is. What we try to do is cree problems. That are like the problems we really face life. And the reason that's important is you can get people who are very good at solving this. Highly structured academic browns. And that's what they're good at. You know the joy mentzer you know. They got a good school in. The emphasis are put in my most. Recent work on adaptive intelligence which is like about the fifth iteration as theories. Intelligence is so tell us this has always been defined as the ability to adapt to the environment. It's like you know. How well can you get along. Not on a standardized tests but in dealing with the world in species. That don't adapt disappear right. I mean they're gone in. Somehow that got lost in the intelligence business said what we need is people say. Let's take the real challenges. The world faces. I ca- look at the mess we made with cove. Nineteen i mean you know with all these thirty iq points european union still. Can't get the vaccine things straight in the united states For about a year there was totally at sea. In income. disparities are totally like crazy out of hand. And so what's happened is people. are you know. I q isn't about doing something that helps. The world is about honestly. It's doing something that helps yourself and we have an awful lot of politicians who went to very prestigious schools in all they care about is themselves and getting reelected in. How can they make more money. And it's not just in the united states across the world we're seeing an increase in leadership of authoritarians and people who want to be authoritarian. Some succeeds some note in once you get one of those in power long enough. It tends to be a one way street. And it's pretty clear that i happen very much. Some of the smart. I q people are the ones who are most contributing to it because they can profit for so my argument is we need a notion of intelligence that makes the world a better place that somehow chooses people are going to make a positive meaningful and potentially enduring difference in the world not people who were going to go into congress and like it's one scandal after another whatever their i q may be and i'm not talking about scandals on those just of sexual behavior. I'm talking about ski on those. Where there's only one person they're looking out for. They're not representing a constituency. Himselves so cool. It's so coy. I love the your This idea emphasizing. That intelligence is not just about the individual. I mean it's actually pretty novel should. It shouldn't be but it is in my book adaptive intelligence which just came out. What i point out is that we need to think of intelligence collectively because we're at risk if global warming continues the way it has been. They'll come a time. when you know. Era cues may continue to go. We may have sky. I is but we won't be here. The only ones that are going to be here teary viruses. The cockroaches in yes someday beings from some other planet come here and they discovered bacteria viruses and cockroaches and the pathetic remains of human civilization. Are they going to command human civilization For being so at the top of some kind of lovejoy great chain of being when it's the only species that in record time managed to destroy itself. That's us in. If that's more than i don't know what stupidest that's a great quote quote there may put that at the top of the show notes that quote right there make a note of that okay Fifty two okay. Yeah so how. Does this relate to. Because i see a link here between that land and research and then your work on hate. I mean there's so much heat in the world today right. How can we apply our intelligence to transcend hates and have more love in the world. Well that is a different line of research but it is related. It's not that different related. When i've been asked how you combat hate said there in three things you really can do. One is just have people really get to know each other. You know you often the people. We hate our people. We don't even know it. All fleeing jews never met a jew. Their people hate muslims who never met a muslim. It's you know so just really engaging. Second solution is wisdom. Which is if you syria. If you take seriously the notion of a common good you can't just say it's about me and people like me my tribe. You can't do what the nazis did in world war two or some people are doing today in saying it's my skin color or my religion or the religion i claim a half or People who live in my part of the country are my community. Coming good means. Are you helping other people besides yourself because they kind of situation we have in the united states utterly untenable where they're just is become two countries and that's smart. I mean like you know having to groups of people at war with each other that's what high iq is. So i think the second stations wisdom in the third is the pointed out is a love as you know. My wife karen. I actually have a website. I love multi-diverse dot com which is all about love. There's something i study and the idea of is that and it comes you know for us. It comes out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously the only person.

mentzer united states browns abc european union congress syria karen
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I do in. My kid is not re-. I'm pretty sure he's not telling me what he's really doing when he goes out at in doses uh-huh we rarely facing like they don't have abc abcd e. answers high-stakes. They're mostly involving their unstructured problems. Often it's hard to figure out what the problem is. What we try to do is cree problems that are like the problems we really facing life. And the reason that's important is you can get people who are very good at solving this. Highly structured academic browns. And that's what they're good at. You know the joy mentzer you know. They got a good school in. The emphasis are put in my most. Recent work on adaptive intelligence which is like about the fifth iteration as theories. Intelligence is so tell us this has always been defined as the ability to adapt to the environment. It's like you know. How well can you get along. Not on a standardized tests but in dealing with the world in species. That don't adapt disappear right. I mean they're gone in. Somehow that got lost in the intelligence business said what we need is people say. Let's take the real challenges. The world faces. I ca- look at the mess we made with cove. Nineteen i mean you know with all these thirty iq points european union still. Can't get the vaccine things straight in the united states For about a year there was totally at sea. An income disparities are totally like crazy out of hand. And so what's happened is people. Are you know. I q isn't about doing something that helps. The world is about honestly. It's doing something that helps yourself and we have an awful lot of politicians who went to very prestigious schools in all they care about is themselves and getting reelected in. How can they make more money. And it's not just in the united states across the world. We're seeing an increase in authoritarian leadership of authoritarians and people who want to be authoritarian. Some succeeds some note in once you get one of those in power long enough. It tends to be a one way street. And it's pretty clear that i happen very much. Some of the smart. I q people are the ones who are most contributing to it because they can profit for so my argument is we need a notion of intelligence that makes the world a better place that somehow chooses people are going to make a positive meaningful and potentially enduring difference in the world not people who were going to go into congress and like it's one scandal after another whatever their i q may be and i'm not talking about scandals those just of sexual behavior. I'm telling you about ski on those where there's only one person they're looking out for. They're not representing a constituency other than themselves so cool. It's so cool. I love your idea. Emphasizing that intelligence is not just about the individual. I mean. it's actually pretty novel should. It shouldn't be but it is in my book adaptive intelligence which just came out. What i point out is that we need to think of intelligence collectively because we're at risk if global warming continues the way it has been. They'll come a time. when you know. Era cues may continue to go. We may have sky. I is but we won't be here. The only ones that are going to be here teary viruses. The cockroaches in yes someday being from some other planet come here and they discovered bacteria viruses and cockroaches and the pathetic remains of human civilization. Are they going to command human civilization For being so at the top of some kind of lovejoy great chain of being when it's the only species that in record time managed to destroy itself. That's us in. If that's more than i don't know what stupidest that's a great quote quote there may put that at the top of the show notes that quote right there make a note of that okay Fifty two okay. Yeah so how. Does this relate to. Because i see a link here between that land and research and then your work on hate. I mean there's so much heat in the world today right. How can we apply our intelligence to transcend hates and have more love in the world. Well that is a different line of research but it is related. It's not that different related. When i've been asked how you combat hate said there in three things you really can do. One is just have people really get to know each other. You know you often the people. We hate our people. We don't even know it. All fleeing jews never met a jew. Their people hate muslims who never met a muslim. I mean it's you know so just really engaging. Second solution is wisdom. Which is if you syria. If you take seriously the notion of a common good you can't just say it's about me and people like me my tribe. You can't do what the nazis did in world war two or some people are doing today in saying it's my skin color or my religion or the religion i claim a half or People who live in my part of the country are my community. Coming good means. Are you helping other people besides yourself because they kind of situation we have in the united states utterly untenable where they're just is become two countries and that's smart. I mean like you know having to groups of people at war with each other that's what high iq is. So i think the second stations wisdom in the third is the pointed out is love as you know. My wife karen. I actually have a website. I love multi. Verse dot com. Which is all about love. There's something i study and the idea of is that and it comes you know for us. It comes out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously then you realize that you know the only person.

mentzer united states browns abc european union congress syria karen
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:09 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Today. Go to word. Tuned dot com slash psychology. And so we get. There is sitting the results. Who are that. If the analytical test if you add the creative and practical tested the analytical test you could more than double the prediction just a first year college grace not even looking at broader. Think just straight gpa. In other words even for straight gpa adding creative and practical tests matter and not always. Did you double more than double prediction. In terms of percentage of variance academy for you also have substantially decreased ethnic and socially defined racial group differences. So that was a great finding. Because usually you don't get that usually get this kind of increase in prediction together with a decrease in racial ethnic group differences. What that suggested is that the students of diverse racial and ethnic groups brought to the table. Different skills that were performance relevant but that additional tests word measuring so when we got those as a result they were published lead article in what i think is the top journal in the field. They got some publicity. It looked really good. And then the i should have known this. I'd say coming. The organization the destiny organization that was funding cutler funding. And you know i. I don't know why didn't see coming other people had told me you know you better watch in. It's all. I think i mean my opinion but it's a little light drug companies. If your results support their drugs they give you more funding. The results done support their drugs. Good luck to you. Our food companies. If your results they how healthy now rotten ships are for you then they keep funding you and if they show that rotten chips was health. Decreases your so now they. Of course that a difference or predation. They said that are tests could be up. Scaled used on larger samples. So at that point. I was in a career crisis. Because during my years at stanford as a grad student in yellows the factoring always saw myself as a faculty member. I mean i never imagined doing something else and now i felt that reached the dead. No commercial company for testing was going to touch me because these results were not what they wanted to find her. At least that's the way it looked. So so i made this decision to do a career change and go into administration And i went to tough since dean of arts and sciences and we started a project cold the kaleidoscope project which was not just a you know get a low stakes. Let's do this project can see what happens. It was a useful admissions for arts and sciences and engineering at the undergrad level. So wall students. Applying to tusk for undergraduate had the option. It wasn't required Doing essays in that were motivated by what had become a theory of successful intelligence which also included wisdom so ed creative analytical practice based in wisdom based bill the idea being that you need creative skills to come up with ideas you need analytical skills to say. If they're good ideas he need practical skills to be able to apply your ideas in to sell them to other people. Don't like them. And you need wisdom base skills to ensure that they help achieve some kind of common good in. I spent a year sort of trying to pave the way to do this project. I had a great collaborator in. The dean of undergrad admissions. Whose name was kaufman was only cost but it was close to kaufman. I just had to say was coffee. Maybe there's something about that cough part. Anyway james kauffman was another student of your coffins. Love you they love you. i know it just. I was just reading a paper by alan kaufman this morning so it just seems to be the right name. I mean just heights. I could've raised with my last name. Were with And instead it really good. So i just i've been so limited by my. I wonder if i could sell jason anyway. So so we Use these items and they were not multiple choice at all. They were performance-based so they measured creative analytical practical wisdom creator vita might be something like you know write. A short story is such as the end. Mtv or from the mysterious lab or the professor disappeared or suppose that the nazis one world war two. What would the world be like today or you could have analytical questions like analyze their favorite book or you could have practical questions like solving a world problem or how can you convince a friend of an idea that she or he didn't initially believe in and then we had wisdom based problems which lane beasts thing like you know. How could you later in your life. i'll make the world a better place in. We found again that we were able to expand the horizon to increase prediction and decrease quite substantially ethnic so in socially defined racial group differences. And so during the time i was dean there. A week continued with this project it was always optional in a resulted in students being admitted to tops who otherwise wouldn't have been admitted. And the idea was that you know if you had a great record fide if he had a terrible record you probably won't get in but if you're kind of in the middle showing did you excelled in creative or practical or wisdom. Base skills could make a difference. And then i published a book called college admissions for the twenty first century published by harvard. That was based on this. And then i went to oklahoma. State is provost and senior vice president and We did a project there and that was called panorama and we got really great results there too in changing the procedures so what we showed in on contrary to what our testing organization it said. We were able to upscale to very large numbers eventually. Tens you know. Tens of thousands of people were able to upscale and it changed to we admitted and the people were successful in the idea. Was that if colleges. Say as i believe they should that they want people who are going to make the world a better place. You're not gonna find that out by looking at kids. sat scores. I mean that is so not the way to find out who's gonna make the world better place than what we're trying to do is introduce admissions devices that would address that quest. It's heat like the difference that what makes you unique in. The space is that you're still into tests. You're still in the testing though. And it's a subtle difference because so many people right now are talking about you know sat optional. And they're all for it. They're saying down with the system down down down but your tests are still tests your creative and practical. I mean the expand the realm of over testing. But it doesn't sound like you're saying dowd with testing am i right. Yeah that's true. My argument has been there. We should expand testing. And i'll tell you why the from the people who started with testing you know. In the early twentieth century people. I can reach on c. and winquist and conan. They actually had a good goal and the goal was the recognition. That if you don't use tests you risk creating a hierarchy based on seeings that maybe i want to create a hierarchy. Be sound like how much money your parents have or what color your skin is or what you know who your social group is so. The idea of testing was to go beyond that. The problem that they didn't.

kaufman james kauffman alan kaufman cutler stanford cough Mtv jason dean harvard oklahoma winquist dowd conan
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:01 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"The results. Are that if the analytical test if you add the creative and practical tested the analytical test you could more than double the prediction just a first year college grace not even looking at broader. Think just straight gpa. In other words even for straight gpa adding creative and practical tests matter and not always did you double more than double prediction in terms of percentage of variance accounted for you also have substantially decreased ethnic and socially defined racial group differences. So that was a great finding because usually don't get that usually get this kind of increase in prediction together with a decrease in racial ethnic group differences. What that suggested is that the students of diverse racial and ethnic groups brought to the table. Different skills that were performance relevant but that the traditional tests word measuring so when we got those as a result they were published lead article in what i think is the top journal in the field. They got some publicity. It looked really good. And then the i should have known this. I'd say coming the organization the destiny organization that was funding us follow funding. And you know i. I don't know why didn't see coming other people had told me you know you better watch in. It's all. I think i mean my opinion but it's a little light drug companies. If your results support their drugs they give you more funding. There results done support their drugs. Good luck to you. Our food companies. If your results they how healthy now rotten ships are for you then they keep funding you and if they show that rotten chips was health. Decreases your so now they. Of course that a difference or predation. They said that are tests could be up. Scaled used on larger samples. So at that point. I was in a career crisis. Because during my years at stanford as a grad student in yellows factoring. I always saw myself as a faculty member. I mean i never imagined doing something else and now i felt that reached the dead. No commercial company for testing was going to touch me because these results were not what they wanted to find her. At least that's the way it looked. So so i made this decision to do a career change and go into administration And i went to tough since dean of arts and sciences and we started a project cold the kaleidoscope project which was not just a you know get a low stakes. Let's do this project can see what happens. It was a useful admissions for arts and sciences and engineering at the undergrad level. So wall students applying to tusk for undergraduate had the option. It wasn't required doing essays in that were motivated by what had become a theory of successful intelligence which also included wisdom so ed creative analytical practice based in wisdom based bill the idea being that you need creative skills to come up with ideas you need analytical skills to say. If they're good ideas you need practical skills to be able to apply your ideas in to sell them to other people don't like them. And you need wisdom base skills to ensure that they help achieve some kind of common good in. I spent a year of trying to pave the way to do this project. I had a great collaborator in. The dean of undergrad admissions. Whose name was kaufman was only cost but it was close to kaufman. I just had to say was coffee. Maybe there's something about that cough part. Anyway james kauffman was another student of your coffins. Love you they love you. i know it just. I was just reading a paper by alan kaufman this morning so it just seems to be the right name. I mean just heights. I could've raised with my last name. Were tough with And instead it really good. So i just i've been so limited by my. I wonder if i could sell jason anyway. So so we Use these items and they were not multiple choice at all. They were performance-based so they measured creative analytical practical wisdom creator vita might be something like you know write. A short story is such as the end. Mtv or from the mysterious lab or the professor disappeared or suppose that the nazis one world war two. What would the world be like today or you could have analytical questions like analyze their favorite book or you could have practical questions like solving a world problem or how can you convince. A friend of an idea did she. Or he didn't initially believe in. And then we had wisdom based problems which lane beasts thing like you know. How could you later in your life. i'll make the world a better place in. We found again that we were able to expand the horizon to increase prediction and decrease quite substantially ethnic so in socially defined racial group differences. And so during the time i was dean there. A week continued with this project it was always optional in a resulted in students being admitted to tops who otherwise wouldn't have been admitted. And the idea was that you know if you had a great record fide if he had a terrible record you probably won't get in but if you're kind of in the middle showing did you excelled in creative or practical or wisdom. Base skills could make a difference. And then i published a book called college admissions for the twenty first century published by harvard. That was based on this. And then i went to oklahoma. State is provost and senior vice president and We did a project there and that was called panorama and we got really great results there too in changing the procedures so what we showed in on contrary to what our testing organization it said. We were able to upscale to very large numbers eventually. Tens you know. Tens of thousands of people were able to upscale and it changed to we admitted and the people were successful in the idea. Was that if colleges. Say as i believe they should that they want people who are going to make the world a better place. You're not gonna find that out by looking at kids. sat scores. I mean that is so not the way to find out who's gonna make the world better place than what we're trying to do is introduce admissions devices that would address that quest. It's heat like the difference that what makes you unique in. The space is that you're still into tests. You're still into testing though. And it's a subtle difference because so many people right now are talking about you know sat optional. And they're all for it. They're saying down with the system down down down but your tests are still tests your creative and practical. I mean the expand the realm of over testing. But it doesn't sound like you're saying dowd with testing am i right. Yeah that's true. My argument has been there. We should expand testing. And i'll tell you why the from the people who started with testing you know. In the early twentieth century people. I can reach on c. and winquist and conan. They actually had a good goal and the goal was the recognition. That if you don't use tests you risk creating a hierarchy based on seeings that maybe i want to create a hierarchy. Be sound like how much money your parents have or what color your skin is or what you know who your social group is so. The idea of testing was to go beyond that. The problem that they didn't.

kaufman james kauffman alan kaufman stanford cough Mtv jason dean harvard oklahoma winquist dowd conan
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:44 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Of howard gardner's theory Tells his book comes out. frames of mind comes out. Nineteen eighty four. So so so. So you seven these. Yeah so you're his book comes out and you look at his book and like what do you make. What do you think of it. How does it relate to your multiple intelligences theory. I mean. I know the answers. But i want i want. Our listeners was good you know the answer. You tell me ridge. No impression was the same as that of many people in the field and that is that they were competing modern theories that they were sort based is off. Put it on a different metaphor than that. Is that these. Were more systems theories rather than just the psychometric factor this kind of geographic thing. Then it's over here. In this fact today. I would say that. We dealt with different aspects of intelligence. He was dealing with different domains in other linguistic domain. The quantitative to main to spatial domain the musical there and at that point i was dealing with processes and i actually just published recently Paper on musical intelligence. Where showed that you could actually cross his domains with the processes in my theory disagree on some things like some of his intelligence as i probably wouldn't see as intelligence as he probably has some problems with my theory but i think what we were both trying to do in. Different ways is to expand the way people look at intelligence. I think that was a common goal. I mean it seemed like something was in the air. Then you know. The michael jackson era like you there so there was something in the air then about you know. It's time to go beyond standard metrics of intelligence. I'm not really that to michael jackson. And the i'm thinking about that timeframe eighty four. It was what i was working. I working on this in the early eighties. And then he picked it up to but a lot of people you know. The time then became more conservative. I think in a lot of people in the field when back to g and you know it's i think it's rally a mistake and the reason i think it's a mistake is you can see in the world today would be his bod- if i can change the topic just a little. Can you tell people what she is. I mean our audience might not deligence right. It's it's what you know. It's it's a a large portion of what you get out of an iq tests that you get a few other things that have been iq tests but it's kind of related to what you measure and the problem is that during the twentieth century g general intelligence actually went up. I mean you know. They slightly broader thing. Iq's when our thirty points it wasn't all g it was other things too. but i he's went up thirty points in the twentieth century which is so called splinter fact and the only reason that average cute and go up to under thirty is the test. Publishers kept. We norm ming the test. To make the average hundred so an iq of a hydrate in two thousand meant very different thing from what it meant in one thousand nine hundred and i q one hundred and two thousand would have been about one hundred thirty nine thousand nine hundred incredible difference in what bothers me about our fixation on iq. Is that if you look at the problems facing the world today. Iq shire's and saw him. I mean you know like with god so many different kinds of problems in the world and we have these high. Iq people who go to prestigious colleges and universities and get very impressive degrees and then when it comes to solving roller promptly. Make massive them. So i really wish that. The field would broaden their consideration of what intelligence is because you know high key. People are good at solving multiple choice problems and that are very well-structured. You know they have a beginning middle and end you you you know you read the problem with contains all the information you need. The information is valid. it's not emotionally arousing. It has no real world these just kind of like this area academics think and that's so different from solving problems in the real world and we know that in problem solving the fact that you've got at one kind of problem solving another kind of prior. I mean. Some people are good at work in their terrible in their personal relationships. Some people are getting their personal relationships in their terrible at work. And so we're asking for a level of generalization from iq test sinisi tease sat's gre's and m cast and so on that just doesn't so we're picking the wrong people time and we're getting people who are good as long as give them five choices and emotionally on arousing problem with no real world consequences. But they're not necessarily people are good at solving real bombs. What do you make of like linda. Goffin since arguments. She would disagree with that statement right. She would say that That general intelligence has shows a lot of strong correlations in everyday life Especially in the workplace that The correlations are actually very strong. What would you say well. A few things. One is of never been someone who said that. Iq is worth us. I know some people do. I'm not one of them In fact i q tests mostly measure knowledge then analytical reasoning skills and. That's part of my own theory. So i am not anti accused. That's my problem is that is that. That's not all there is doing is that's part of it So you would expect iq to show some correlation with lots of things in life because you need to do analytical reasoning In your life. So i don't have any disagreement with in terms of fairly strong correlations. I i don't know if you'd say they're strong. A lot of the correlations you read about in the literature are corrected which means that. They're raised to account for unreliability of test in restriction of range of attest that whatever else so they're not the original karoshi some people would say those better. But they're not the actual correlations get from the test but the fact that there's a correlation of iq. With a lot of things. I don't find surprising. And it's not contrary to my theory to the extent i ever complaint is that you know if you get a correlation say of point four. Sometimes do that. Seems like a fairly typical median code. You're talking about accounting for sixteen percent of the variants in the criteria. So if you're predicting i dunno income or you're printing grades in school or you're predicting how quickly a graduate so what brings for sixty percents various. That's that still leaves. Eighty four percent left. that's not real high. Just a second problem. Which is a bigger problem in. The bigger problem is that the correlations don't take into account that the fact that you did well on these tests give you opportunities to succeed. So that the correlation would go off. Let me explain what i mean. This is important. Let's say we selected people in our society to go to college not on the basis of sat's and grades. I mean you know. Those are so subjective but on something really objective height because you can measure objectively. Everyone agrees that you take a tape measure. You don't argue about testses so now to get into harvard yes to be six five sixty five inches talking into yale. Maybe six four to get into dipsy doodle. State may be have to be a three seven..

michael jackson howard gardner norm ming sinisi Goffin linda harvard
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:24 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So let's let's get into some of the meat and potatoes here One question i have is you know. What do you see as the What is the relationship between the confidential theory and the arctic theory like at what point did one morph into the other. Well i started off with what. I call confidential theory and what i was doing. Starting in grad school is. I'd take a problem for iq test. Like i started with analogies. Then what do is time you solve the analogies in a decompose the reaction times into the underlying processes used the solid instead of for example in an allergy to encode the terms. And then you have to infer the relation between a and b and then you have to apply to. And i did that because i thought you know the problem with a lot of the items that i q tests. They don't measure what they're supposed to measure so for example verbal analogy which is very common. Mike you know you'd see this. They on the miller. Analogies tests like mitigate is through us wages exacerbate as to what well that's supposed to measure verbal reasoning. But it's pretty much straight for cab yards us and the idea was that there were people who were really smart but it would look like. They're not because they didn't have the opportunities to gain the vocabulary or the math skills or whatever. So that's what i started doing. The research work well in terms of what i was looking for but as time went on i realized there was something wrong with it. And it's been my whole career. I'm out whole career is coming up with theory and then rising certain wrong with it and then i come up with a better. I always a better there. And what was wrong with that. I came to know was that it was all based on iq tests so although it was process models of iq was still iq tests. And then what happened is when i was director of graduate studies in psychology yell i there were some students who applied to our program. One of whom i refer have referred to his allies was very smart company. Intially your analytically or high g or high q. Just real test smart. I mean she had really high scores and test but when it came to coming up with their own idea she wasn't so great and then another students who have called barbara. Who was who. Actually we didn't get in because she was gave better test. Scores were charitable and even though she got breath letters of recommendation. No beside me. Want to admit or so I actually hired her and had her as a research associate for a couple of years and then she got his top pick but she was really creative. It just didn't come out in. Gre's sat's and act's and those tests measure creativity you very creative and taking those tests while here screwed you know you. Can't you just fuss pick. Abc theory and then there was a third student. I called celia who wasn't as good analytically. As alice wasn't as good creatively as barbara but when she went on the job market E- she. She wasn't yeah. She doesn't the greatest grad student in the whole world. But she got every job she applied for so she knew how to do a job interview. I could say that. I mean i never got every job i applied for so when i came to realize is that i realized the mistake i was making the mistake. Was that the reliance on iq tests that. The you know. Barbara was creatively. Intelligent in celia was practically intelligent but the iq tests were only looking alice. smarts which is how analytically smart. You're in so. I expanded the theory to include creative and practice. Mars is an article smarts. I think the pri- if i can save this the problem the field of intelligence is that it narrower kind of move beyond nineteen four which is when spearman road is first famous paper on general intelligence objectively determine measured in. You know. now it's i think it's two thousand twenty one or something like that. I may have iraq. But that's a long time like this over a century and we're still doing nineteen o four stuff and so. I think that it's not that general intelligence in aikido matter. It's that there's more to intelligence then just that and somehow we got stuck in this Very academic notion of intelligence. So i expanded to include these other things but the thing i would. Emphasize is that in science I i've tried not to do what the field of intelligence i mean. You know these theories. They're all wrong. I mean you know eventually you hope you get closer to the truth but it has to be a process where you say look you know. We've had this theory for. Why is it really perfect or is there more we can do. And so that's when it came up with troy arche theory which eventually itself replaced. What year was the track theory. Like what ron. What time was that credit. Let's see it was seventeen sixty. Now the was at the seventies now. The i i started. My dissertation was published in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven and the first big paper on the track theory was in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. And then my buck was one thousand nine hundred five beyond thank you. Hey everyone. I'm excited to announce that the eight week online transcend courses back this interruption of the chorus which will run from september fifth. Tuck told her twenty four th of this year. We'll use science to help you live a more fulfilling meaningful creative and self actualized life. There will be a limited slots available so saver spot as soon as possible.

celia arctic barbara allergy alice miller Mike Abc troy arche Barbara iraq ron Tuck
"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 3 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

cornell university sternberg arctic Rick bob
Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 3 months ago

Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

Robert Sternberg Sternberg Cornell University Arctic Rick BOB Gallotti
"sternberg" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"sternberg" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Her husband's efforts to get her medical attention. The effort to resuscitate her was unsuccessful. Mitchell was 16 weeks pregnant and now doctors are looking into the cause of her death. ST Louis is getting ready to start a new program that will direct mental health calls away from 911. The city is partnering with behavioral health response to hand over certain 911 calls to mental health therapists. ST Louis will be the first city in the U. S. To divert such calls outside the 911 system. Officials are hoping to kick off the program in the first two months of this year. Swedish climate activist Greta Tune, Berg is an adult. Now. She celebrated her 18th birthday on Sunday, Sternberg told the Sunday Times One of her birthday wishes was quote a promise from everyone that they will do everything they can for the planet. She also wanted replacement headlights for her bike. Ask for any plans on her big day, Finberg joked on Twitter that should be going down to a local pub to expose quote all the dark secrets behind the climate and school strike conspiracy, as well as all of the evil handlers who can no longer control her. Reporting from my news. I'm Jesse Paniagua. Doc. You got to give it to me straight, right? Because I'm dying here. I mean, take a look at this letter from the I r arrest. Oh, man, this is killing me, Doc. I tell you, it's killing me share up my friend attacks. Doctor is here. My diagnosis tells me that you're going to be just fine really taxed out there will not rest until we find you the best possible tax settlement. Really, doc, guaranteed. If the I R s claims you owe them $10,000 or in business or personal back Taxes. Call.

Greta Tune Louis Sternberg Finberg Mitchell Jesse Paniagua Twitter Berg
2 Boston restaurants to close permanently after not following COVID-19 precautions

WBZ Midday News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

2 Boston restaurants to close permanently after not following COVID-19 precautions

"The Boston licensing board ordering seaport in South Boston restaurant owners in for emergency hearing to address complaints that the restaurants of both district haven't been adhering to Corona virus regulations. Restauranteur Lena Sternberg says businesses are failing to follow safety restrictions, and they're only hurting themselves down to consumer confidence that the only thing that's restaurants alive this winter, so you know for them to not follow these guidelines is ultimately hurting them. As well. So you really think the majority of them were taken seriously violations, including lack of social distancing and failure to comply with a six person limited tables?

Lena Sternberg South Boston Boston
Belarus concerns lead opening session of Human Rights Council

UN News

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Belarus concerns lead opening session of Human Rights Council

"U. N member states gathered in person in Geneva on Monday for a new session of the human rights. Council it's work began with a decision to hold an urgent debate on the situation in Belarus leading the request the European Union delegation highlighted what it called a steep deterioration of the human rights situation in the country before and after the disputed presidential election in August the development follows condemnation of violence against demonstrators in Belarus since the August presidential election by you and rights chief Michelle Bachelet over the weekend UN secretary. General. Antonio Guterres also expressed concern about the use of force against peaceful. Protesters and detentions. The delegation for Belarus rejected the proposed debate citing outside interference. Here's at Germany's ambassador Mikail von ongoing. Sternberg. Representing the European Union the enforced disappearances force abductions and expulsions and arbitrary detentions continue to take place every day in Belarus in past days, we have witnessed a further escalation of violence and intimidation against members of the Coordination Council and other representatives of civil society. The opposition leader Maria Kolesnikova was abducted and journalists lost their accurately -tations. Therefore, the situation on the ground clearly warrants an urgent debate the Human Rights Council should not stay silent on this matter after a successful vote, it was decided to hold the urgent debate this.

Belarus Human Rights Council European Union Michelle Bachelet Maria Kolesnikova Geneva Antonio Guterres UN Coordination Council Secretary Sternberg U. N Germany
Long-term unemployment is looming

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Long-term unemployment is looming

"Everybody, we are going to do a little labor market one, two, three by way of getting going to de. Item One this morning, the private payroll processor ADP gave us. It's guests is dominy jobs. The economy added last month four, hundred, twenty, eight, thousand, which is a nice hefty number but well, short of what everybody had been guessing, which was closer to a million speaking of million that gets us to labor market marker to the weekly report on new unemployment claims that will come tomorrow it'll be at or near a million people freshly out of work as it's been every week for five plus months. And speaking of months Friday morning, we'll bring the August jobs report. That's item three. We probably added jobs and the unemployment rate probably went down there end if the predictions. But there's a common thread that's running through the American labor market right now once you get past all the data and the indicators. As marketplace's Mitchell Hartman reports millions of Americans are facing the prospect of long-term unemployment. covid nineteen has not been good to the Life Events Business Rock Concerts and festivals pretty much shut down on a dime in early spring. That's when Jason George of Benton Harbor Michigan got laid off like many of my co workers in the industry we've been furlough for very long time initially, George was on temporary layoff from his job managing shows for a big event promoter. He got on unemployment his employer paying his benefits and he waited for a callback but summer still no concerts or call backs, and as of yesterday Georgia's employer has made his temporary layoff permanent benefits stopped at the end of the month it does feel different because there's not that safety-net. Could possibly go back sooner rather than later. So does feel official election we're kind of on our own to figure things out for ourselves. A lot more workers are likely to end up like Jason, George in coming months. It's very unlikely that if you've been furloughed for this length of time that you're going to go back, Daniel Sternberg is a data scientist at Gusto, an HR platform for small businesses he says. Furloughed back in March there was a thirty percent chance. You'd be called back by April because your company received funds or was able to reopen in some capacity. But then if we go out into future months smaller and smaller percentage is portraying tour and by July, a majority of furloughed workers were still waiting to be called back. And people laid off early in the pandemic are now approaching the Labor Department defines US long term unemployment more than twenty six weeks without a job jobless benefits start to run out people go through their savings to pay the bills and long-term unemployment decreases workers, chances of getting reemployed. Harvard economist Gabriel Chorro Reich and a colleague at the Fed have been projecting this out in our baseline stimulation in early twenty, twenty, one four and a half million people unemployed for more than twenty six weeks. More pessimistic scenario that number rises to one in five million that would still be fewer than the peak of six and a half million caused by the great recession. Recent polls have found that only a third of laid off workers think they'll be able to return to their jobs and a quarter of those who are still working worry. They'll lose their jobs as the pandemic drags on I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace.

Jason George Mitchell Hartman Labor Department Daniel Sternberg ADP Gabriel Chorro Reich Benton Harbor Michigan FED Georgia Harvard Official Gusto Scientist
"sternberg" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"sternberg" Discussed on KCRW

"Day you're out. Scott Sternberg is the designer behind entire world. The company he just found it two years ago. And he joins me now. Hey, Scott. Hey, How you doing, doing pretty well, thank you. So let's just jump into. It's what pants are clearly having a moment. I recently ordered some and when they arrived, I literally heard myself say out loud like these will be like my nice sweat pants and I was like What did I just say? Like what? People are loving like the comfortable where and that's we're working out pretty well for you at entire world. Is that right? Yeah, it is, And you know, it's it's kind of always been our thing. We didn't We didn't like pivot to the pandemic or anything. But, yeah, the idea was to kind of make your nicest Paris my pants. Nice. Well. Part of the company's success is that it sells direct to customers or DTC. So you are essentially cutting out the middle person of a department store, for example. So what are the pros and cons of that? Why do you sell directly to customers? You know, I spent about 12 years I had a business called Band of Outsiders, and we worked inside the fashion system with Primarily a wholesale business, and there's so many good things about it. It really helps to finance your business, and it helps to define what your brand is through the adjacent seas. For the other brand. It's friends it sells with and you could become global pretty fast, but it also makes the product just instantly more expensive because there's a There's this artificial mark up from are also priced our retail price and with entire world. I didn't want to do high fashion. I wanted to create something that was really wonderfully made product with a lot of value in it. And not just sweat pants. You know, we make everything but kind of making easy clothes feel really comfortable And to do that, in a way where the price would really aligned with what the product is. You have to go direct. You can't really That that extra market just sort of screws it all up one part of this that we haven't really talked to my dad in the entire world is based here in l A. And why did you want to base the company here? I mean, it's my home. It's been my own for over 20 years, and you know, I find I find Los Angeles just as a creative person just really just so well suited to sort of harboring ideas, and especially being in fashion, just being totally outside of the bubble that is New York or Paris or London. I'm along for that matter where most fashion brands are based, So what I'm doing and when I'm looking at and what's informing my work is just so different from what's informing someone you know the mainstream of apparel in fashion. Is there a lot of competition here in L. A in the fashion industry? Um, I wouldn't say I think we're all kind of doing her own thing at all different levels. You know, for years, it was a denim town, and it still is, to some extent, Denham in T shirts just in terms of the manufacturing base, But you know, it's I wouldn't say come, I wouldn't I would say Piers versus competition. But it's it's desperate, just like everything in L. A. It's pretty spread out. So there's there's a disparate community of Pierre's got so much competitors. Well, the pandemic has really affected almost every single industry in the fashion industry has really not been immune. And folks just aren't going out buying seasonal couture and even their knockoff handbags since we're all stuck at home for the foreseeable future. What are you hearing from other designers and brands these as a kind of freaking out? Yeah, I think everybody's freaking out on on different levels. I mean, just just cost consumer uncertainty. You know, market uncertainty. That's really scary when you have any business and I think what's really compelling about this pandemic, its within the moment of it. Of course, it's a complete shift in how we spend money and what we wear and all of that, But beyond the pandemic, it feels like there will be a shift in values. Consumer values. Just just you know how we go through life and where we will report our dollars. What's important to us all of that, So I think that's the initial reaction is the freak out and And probably the subsequent reaction is to get creative and on DH shift. You know your approach, If you're if you're making things, whatever it is clothing, or, you know, whatever. I'm curious about how entire world has had to adapt its. You've already been director customers, so I'm sure that's been helpful. What other ways have you had to adapt during the pandemic? We're gonna world working from home. So that's weird because we make things there's a physicality, tar tar work. So, uh, you know where there's lots of just sort of driving around count and dropping things off from afar and Everybody's just forced to be much more hands on with what they do. And you know, our sales are great, but we're a young start up sort of working into this. Price point, which is a you know, mass luxury price point, not a low price point, but not a high one. So we rely on investors we rely on outside capital. And that dried up right at the beginning of the pandemic, at least hopefully temporarily, So Ida layoffs and people is well, which really sucks and makes things more challenging, just in terms of Everybody's wearing yet to more hats. To the 10 that they were already wary. Right? So I read that entire world is based out of your backyard these days. Do you have any sense of what the future for the company may hold as we go forward. I mean, it really is. Um yeah. I mean, I I You know, I remain hopeful and optimistic. As I always have been, and I think we'll you know we'll get back to it and and soldier on pandemic or otherwise, you know, I think that the milestones that that a fashion brand on a tarot brown used to set for itself would typically be let's open a store and that's how to grow the business. And that's never really been, Um you know, something I thought of you, as like a milestone of success necessarily think it's a way to reach a lot more people. But what's interesting about the pandemic has just focused us so much on How to reach people digitally, So I think there's just there's a lot to do there. And there's a lot to do creatively vigil visually just connecting people to this product and this brand message in terms of the broader picture. Do you think the fashion world is going to have a crisis of confidence and look different on the other side of this? Or is it seeming pretty rigid? What do you think of It's interesting. The fashion world has been challenged since really since the 2008 financial crisis. He's in America, especially and has been resistant to change for quite some time. The fashion media has been challenged by whatever media companies been challenged by in terms of, you know, advertising dollars shifting to digital on DH people just not being conditioned to pay for content. You know, uh, department stores, you know, critiques like online sales with e commerce. Like suddenly everything is available everywhere and People were slowly adjusting to that, But I think what's gonna happen with the pandemic is there's just going to be a correction and a reduction and sort of channel and and.

Scott Sternberg Paris DTC Los Angeles America Denham director Pierre New York London
Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

Ask Me Another

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

"Oh! So what a great! Hello! That is! That makes a nice with. Commerce exactly. How's it going John? I've just turned the fan off in my office so that we can record which means we are counting down to the point when my body goes past one hundred and five and I pass out I. Know this this room to this room to is like freezing with the air conditioning on, and you turn it off and five minutes later. You are basically able to bake sourdot Brennan. Yes, and you know I I have ways of cooling fans. Air Conditioners can't use them well recording now, also I have to keep. The door closed in this room. Because let's just say I. Have A feral cat living in my office right now. So. We can't have the door open. Your that. Yeah. That's a meal. You're feral cat. Theory is that's betsy that sense? Betsy sounds okay. He's all. Right, now he's at the window and he's meowing I. Think what he's saying is help. Your. Guys. Your barrel cats. Maybe he say free food and here. Really Awesome. Sleep all day. Any Food I love it. Yeah. He's he's. He's doing great. As you know as you know, I have started taking care of the feral cats in my backyard, but the feral cats are now not in a crate. They are not in a basement. They don't have a towel over them. They are roaming freely in US recording studio. One has a skin condition and is staying with me awhile until the skin condition is soft, and it may not be solved I. Don't know I may not be solved, I'm not sure what's going to happen. Maybe he's going to be an indoor cat. Who knows at the window? Your indoor cat. Let's let's. Let's let's make it personal. It's not an indoor cat. You notice that. I'm trying not to say it because I've become too attached to this cat. While the cat does deep deep, deep, deep, deep, deep in its feral mind and heart. Can, you can see Betsy Beth. Everybody Radiator Watch I taught him a trick. Betsy. Betsy I. Do that looks at me, Really Cute, a loud noise and ahead turn studies Ya. Predator, so it looks at. The first sign of like threat approaching. I make that noise and he's like. Again. Once again we have nothing to. Show for you from the Netflix series working moms with the show's creators and stars Catherine Reitman and Philip Sternberg. Then we talked a longtime friend of mine comedian Baron Vaughn, and he shares with us his innermost thoughts on. Be Better, roommate, the hulk or Wolverine? But I. Really get things going with Alex Newell and Jane Levy from. The NBC Musical Dramas Zoe. Extraordinary playlist to show is about a woman who discovers she is the ability to hear people's thoughts as songs, so everyone on the show is a triple threat. They can act sing and dance, but Jonathan can. They won't their way through an asking other trivia game I hope so. I always thought triple threat was acting singing and Trivia. Would you say it's acting singing and dance interested? You know what? Maybe maybe it is. Maybe maybe Trivia is just woven in there. We'll find out. And like magic here. They are Jay Levy Alex. Newell thank you so much for being part of Ashby another. I have been watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. Okay? No, that some of the cast are professional singers dancers like you Alex but the show features a lot of choreography that I assume you don't get a lot of time to learn. What was that like for you, Jane Yeah. There's a there's a an array of experience throughout the cast, Alex Newell comes in, and just does one kick and is like I learned it. It's fine. Under some of us who get eight rehearsals because it's a lot harder. Yeah. I do I do learn I have learned a music number. The day of but Jane has as well. While yeah, but mine are usually. My characters in every single dance number every musical number, because it comes through her superpower, but most of my choreography. If you WANNA, call it that in those numbers or just me like walking in a straight line so I can learn those on the day. You have a dance background. Don't Eugene. I danced as a kid. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, so you're not afraid of it. No I love it. I'm much more afraid of singing singing is. Really difficult for me. But she meals every time that's. After, the but but. Every time a period. Wow, thanks, Alex, but dancing is just fun and I care less about being good about good at it right? Yeah, because you can move and that's the most important thing. It's the rest of us who are when you start dancing cooper like oh no! Her dancing, Lake when we do the. Of The second episode when she was like. They were like nothing. Like dancing can. Like five steps. That's when I was in shape. So we have a couple of great games for you. Let's let's play some games. Okay so this first one. You're going to be playing against each other. We're going to go back and forth. This is a this is a game about characters every answering. This game is a famous character. Jonathan I are going to read you an excerpt of how the author described the character, and you just have to guess who is being described. Great Okay. So Alex will start with you. Here! Her stepsisters ridiculed her. AP's. stepsisters right? How many? How many. Honestly I, I wanna read the rest of it just for our listeners, and also because I did not when I, heard this description I had never heard this particular version that her stepsisters ridiculed her, and scattered peas and lentils into the

Jay Levy Alex Alex Newell Betsy Jane Yeah Jonathan Betsy Beth Betsy I. Air Conditioners United States John Baron Vaughn Jane Levy Netflix NBC ZOE Catherine Reitman Jane Eugene Ashby
"sternberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"sternberg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The John Batchelor show I got a London my colleague Joseph Sternberg a member of the editorial board of the Wall Street journal he writes the political economics calling from London and very good news from the United Kingdom which has much to celebrate if this proves to be global ads right now suggest a new over the counter I believe it's available everywhere sterile with a challenging name that begins D. E. X. dash is said to be extremely effective for a large percentage of the most ill suffering with the virus and also for a large percentage of those who are just on oxygen and I haven't been ventilated yet that would describe conditions similar to Boris Johnson's which he recovered from a Boris Johnson in fact embraces this news that comes from an Oxford study and says this is the biggest break there yet Joe a very good evening to you in London I'm going to guess that London media has gone with this report very large what are you learning about how they're responding are they cautious are they hesitant to or in some way are they ready for good news good evening to you hi John I think that everyone is ready for good news right now and of course I think the nature of science and the scientific research that has to go into finding treatments for new agencies like the current current virus and even when you have early signs of a breakthrough you always have to take it with a grain of salt in hopes that it's confirmed for subsequent tests but this does seem to be some of the the best news that we've had so far and I mean one of the reasons I think that it's encouraging in a global sense not just in the UK is live course we've assumed your we were told by so many public health authorities the only way out there the situation was going to be a vaccine to prevent people from touching the disease that still remains a long way off of it there's a lot of research into vaccines going on here U. K. E. R. as well as elsewhere but in the meantime if there is a treatment we're people here understand that even if you do catch the disease we have effective ways of treating at home that it won't be a death sentence even for people in vulnerable groups that also could have a big impact your first and foremost and people's health and also on the economic reopening on people's willingness to go back to work to go out to the shops to leave their homes in general so I think that for for all of those reasons this is a very big news of the people there specially here the U. K. you're treating it as such dexamethasone is the best I can try and Joe and I are now going to practice because as a we've been struggling with how to clock Hydroxycut lower queen these last weeks now caught up in the scandal and we leave that aside and celebrate the good news so far but remember it's very early it's a study this drug has been available since the nineteen fifties I learned from reporting is it and the off patent treatment include skin disease arthritis and disorders balle disorders but it's very inexpensive roughly five pounds in the UK in as little as a dollar in countries such as India that is part of the challenge ahead whatever is developed for the virus needs to be a needs to be a comparably act in expensive for governments everywhere however we turn from the positive news from London to a story that is well it needs a steroid and that would be brexit joke brexit well it was a casualty of the virus and that nobody much worried about it except for has been revived recently and if I read the reporting correctly and I'm following the editorial board of the Financial Times right now there's a new momentum but the new momentum is running in with the new indifference so how to measure this what the two sides were some weeks ago resolved to stick to their original positions and not concede in any fashion do you sense in London that London is more interested in making a deal with Brussels than the other way around well I think first I your first we should probably explain what's going on here because a lot of people probably thought the brexit already happened back on January thirty first of this all this excitement about Boris Johnson winning this huge majority in last December's election and Sir you're getting breaks a ton of notes are a lot of people listening to this probably take with that already happened we're U. K. yes right now is actually a form of limbo legally Britain is outside of the European Union but right now we're in a transitional arrangement so water years economic regulations still apply to the U. K. on it till December thirty first of this year and so the negotiations with happening now what kind of trade deal the two sides will have permanently after this current transition period ends and the negotiations have been difficult I mean it was always going to be very difficult because you're talking about technical negotiations those tend to park down the technical details of water free trade agreements take many years to negotiate and they were struggling to do this or the accelerated timetable and sure enough they've been running into a lot of problems for there are some pretty substantial technical differences between the two sides to do with some of the finer points of economic regulation on the two sides of the channel issues to do with fishing rights are turning out to be very controversial rules surrounding government subsidies for companies are turning out to be very controversial and healthy to sites differ on ways to enforce the terms on which this week as a new intensity on the part of prime minister Boris Johnson in the U. K. to try to push forward with the deal but also the U. K. has been signaling that they are prepared to take a bit of fun into the unknown come January first well I exit this transition period without a trade deal on that it is a feeling the pressure I think on both sides to see what they can negotiate with these very complicated you know set of criteria they have to deal with before the end of the year I read the non Tory press so I've I've meant that I mention that cabinet before I plunge into this question is it understood the Johnson needs a win in any fashion with brexit in order to offset he is said to be defeat with the pandemic is that a formula that you hear on the telly what we're eating yes but it really depends those with so many things politics it depends on how you define victory and I think that sense is if we student in conservative circles right now that the most important thing is this transition period and on schedule in December thirty first because as this has happened to so many stages in this process technically the UK could ask for an extension of a year or two and Brussels would probably be very happy to give that so that they could report the cliff edge and I think that was of course Johnson the government has been signaling the past few weeks is that deal or no deal they are prepared to leave on the thirty first of all because they think that that is the one thing that has the politically most important for them yeah they seem to be hoping that that will light a fire under muscles to really come back to the people and make some concessions on this but I think the you know right now we should probably assume that something is going to happen you're in the new year we weren't there yet what it is but I I think that you know forest is anxious for you know that great to recover do they play the villain card that meaning that if you you if you weaken the E. U. that'll please the bogeyman in Moscow and Beijing they talk like that no I think the third you know it's interesting that I think that these discussions of her we moved into a new phase in some ways now that the UK has we believe what you're hearing and I think that there isn't so much argument about trying to stop that because it's becoming much more of a business or a trade negotiations between the two sides now that doesn't mean that it's easier that doesn't.

John Batchelor London Joseph Sternberg editorial board Wall Street journal United Kingdom
"sternberg" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"sternberg" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And he was going fishing I think I just saw a big bottle of Tito's some fish and stuff we all are gone Fishin that's when he's not at home temporarily out of business from fish that's what my drums Sacramento area yes the back in that arena I'm not sure I'm assuming he is but I I don't know the teachers are with him I remember is is that fishing trip and I think we had a mon right at the beginning when all this was going on as far as your broken Dimmick strip poker Jack Lee Sternberg with the wife so they're gonna I have to ask him I have I can't remember exactly but I think Joe Buck did play by play on it with that was that they did because doing play by play on and my cat like you have so many layers on you think he was going to Lambeau that's how I would do it he was gonna lose the poker game absolutely I played strip poker in college and have tons of stuff on you're kidding me I have an advantage here Mike Pereira with his beautiful wife Gail he obviously married outside his league playing cards during this quarantine I spend three and a half hours with Mike at a time and it's a lot por Gail any lost he lost their hand of Jan and he pays up fast pay makes fast friends now they're playing I don't know domino's whatever that is any pays in toilet paper strong move the two people were clearly love each other and all the innovations are gone now they're playing pose some sort of strip poker queen Mike has lost his pullover Gail the shooting vast and now what's next in fact I don't really want to know.

Tito Jack Lee Sternberg Joe Buck Mike Pereira Gail domino Sacramento Dimmick
What could TE Austin Hooper bring to Packers offense?

Establish The Run

02:14 min | 1 year ago

What could TE Austin Hooper bring to Packers offense?

"Was a report from. I think it was robbed a mosque. Who covers the Green Bay packers and he made you know at least the packers are aware that they need more pask actors? They reportedly planned to add two of them via free agency and the draft. And you can certainly get a bunch. But I'm not sure that the guy that he talked he said they're played into. Target Austin Hooper. I'm not sure that's what Aaron Rodgers really needs. I would rather see somebody more explosive. I don't know what you think about that but either released Jimmy Graham who's just Zaslov signing for them. I would note that Matlin. Flair was the Falcons quarterbacks coach when Austin who was a rookie in two thousand sixteen in Atlanta But Yeah I. I don't know I'm not sure awesome. Hooper is exactly what fixes. What's wrong with Green Bay right now? Which is clear. It's Green Bay at margin only feels comfortable throwing to Davante Adams. Yeah I think they're awesome. Hooper would be fine signing You give the packers a solid possession tight end just really reliable. Almost eighty percent career catch. Ray Can block enough from a dynasty standpoint. He would block J Sternberg who drafted in the third round. This past year in. I mean I really liked him coming at a at a Texas. A&m But you know. Yeah he he would be a big roadblock in the way of j Sternberg. I'm completely with you. Though in Syria I mean I. I think that they should sign two guys. I mean I think that Al Having Allen Lazard as your number two option. The passing game isn't good enough and I think that even if they signed someone like Austin Hooper. I think should go robby Anderson. You know I think that Robbie Anderson Opposite Davante Adams would give them Just a completely different dynamic in their passing game. I think that they need some any they I think they need an explosive field stretcher. And Yeah if I was. I would focus on a guy like Robin Anderson. I mean mark has vowed is scant laying in theory had the skill set to be that guy but he just did not take a second year. Yeah there were some reports from Our friend Matthew Berry had noted that era jittery like Salazar staff-related Allen. So I think they're going to add a wide receiver for sure. But for now I would consider Allen Lazard the front runner for the number two wide receiver job. Assuming they don't add anybody which then was certainly

Green Bay Packers Austin Hooper J Sternberg Green Bay Al Having Allen Lazard Allen Lazard Davante Adams Robby Anderson Salazar Staff-Related Allen Aaron Rodgers Jimmy Graham Robbie Anderson Matthew Berry RAY Texas Syria Mark Flair Atlanta
SoftBank keeps walking away from startup investments

Techmeme Ride Home

02:25 min | 1 year ago

SoftBank keeps walking away from startup investments

"This morning Dan. premark revealed that sources have been telling telling him that Softbank's Vision Fund has actually walked away from several investments in startups over recent weeks these startups had all received term. I'm she tes already. From South Bank to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars Softbank had delayed some funding around concentrations. Recently after the whole we work turmoil but reportedly Softbank had told the companies involved that the closing delays would only be temporary. Apparently that turned out not to be true to say. It's highly unusual for an investor to ghost after delivering a term. Sheet would be putting it. Mildly here are just two examples quoting Dan. Honor is a San Francisco homecare company for older adults. That's raised over one hundred million dollars from firms. Like Andriessen Horowitz. NASCAR's and thrive capital. It received a term sheet from Softbank in mid-november with subsequent reports putting the deal size at around one hundred fifty million dollars Softbank CEO Masayoshi sewn gave his blessing during a meeting at his woodside. California state with honor. Co Seth Sternberg per a source familiar. Softbank kept saying it had to run some process stuff before getting the term sheet fully signed nine but said they wanted to get it funded by year end. So it started confirmatory due-diligence law firms background checks iwo going through stuff etc.. There was no reason to think there was going going to be a problem and quote. Softbank Killed The deal one week before Christmas telling honor that son had changed his mind. Sawn did not personally communicate his decision. Decision or rationale to the company and quote and Creator is a San Francisco based developer of hamburger making robots whose backers include Google ventures as an KHOSLA ventures. Softbank signed the company to an exclusive six-month term sheet for a round that was many multiples of the twenty five million dollars in it raised to date quote. Totally screwed screwed is how one source close to Creator refers to what happened next like with the other examples it was unexplained delay after unexplained delay and at one point said it wanted wanted to add a co lead investor. The company pushed back and Softbank agreed to wire between ten million and fifteen million dollars a show of good faith but the hurry up and wait persisted with multiple sources telling me last month that the original deal was dead. Things may have since changed however as a source close to Softbank says negotiations remain remain active and quote.

Softbank San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz Premark Vision Fund South Bank Seth Sternberg Nascar DAN California Khosla Ventures Sawn Woodside CEO Masayoshi Google Developer
Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

60-Second Science

02:47 min | 2 years ago

Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

"At Toyota we believe that American veterans have the strongest credentials on earth especially when you consider that they spend years gaining valuable experience by putting their lives on the line to protect the country they love and the people that live here but that doesn't always mean finding a career path is easy. That's why Toyota has partnered with hiring our as Europe's to help over one hundred fifty thousand veterans and military spouses connect with employment opportunities. We are Toyota. USA. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata in the science. It's fiction story June. The Desert Planet Iraq is inhabited by enormous fearsome sandwich shops they blast out of the dunes to swallow vehicles the whole they also look familiar to Caltech geneticists Paul Sternberg. We look like nats anything in pop culture has relationship doors. We follow nematodes toads of course are much smaller than sand worms most never told you can just barely see and there are a lot slower these worms are probably take one hundred years to get across the US if they could could do it and they went continuously day and night even so they're pretty scary when you look at them up close. Sternberg and his colleagues had a hunch they might find nematodes lurking in one of California's most extreme extreme habitats Mono Lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada it super salty alkaline and loaded with arsenic and previously known to harbor only two animal species easies brine shrimp and Alkali flies so the researchers took soil samples at beaches around the lake and indeed they found eight species of nematodes living there so we just I went from two animals to at least ten species so that's Kinda striking so are they going to be others the lake yeah people should go look photos and details are in the journal current Biology Sternberg. His colleagues were able to culture one of the worm species in the lab and they discovered it could survive five hundred times the dose of arsenic they would kill a human but they also found that even nemo toads that weren't from Mona Lake seemed to have the genetic ability to resist the lethal element meaning. The worms may be Natural Boron extrema files us from the worms perspective invading a host. That's a harsh environment so I think there's some general ability than Emma toads to adapt to harsh environments like Doc. Maybe Mars I have a fantasy that we should send Amadou's. We really interesting. He could get the codes to photosynthesis or carry photosynthetic organisms and then worth talking about of course that's scenarios in the realm of science fiction for now. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dunya.

Toyota Paul Sternberg Mono Lake Christopher Dodd Yata Mona Lake Journal Current Biology Sternb Christopher Dunya Europe United States Amadou Usa. Emma Sierra Nevada California Sixty Seconds One Hundred Years
Solheim Cup 2019: Europe pip USA in dramatic finale

GOLF.com Podcast

07:07 min | 2 years ago

Solheim Cup 2019: Europe pip USA in dramatic finale

"The European Solheim Cup team beat the Americans fourteen eighteen and a half to thirteen and a half it came down to the final putt which almost never happens which is too bad because I feel like we're now do for like three decades of not very fun. Suzann Pettersen made about an eight footer to win and she promptly retired after doing so it was a fascinating day it started in Thai eight to eight matches flipped back and forth all over at Gleneagles. Five matches reached the eighteenth hole which also almost never happens. How many matches reached the eighteenth breath at the Ryder Cup last year. I think it's it's something like it's one out of five or six matches reach eighteen so this was exciting all over the board. I I mean this was back and forth there was tied going to Sunday and then it kept being tied points on Sunday. It was eleven eleven and there were six matches on the course course it looked like the US was gonNA win. Honestly my gosh at one point. Everything needed to go. Europe's way the US posted thirteen and a half points. They just needed that that last half point in could not get it yeah thirteen and a half they would retain the cup with fourteen which no one loves a tie. I Know Stina Sternberg. She is is very proudly European and she was like you know. It's not a good rule that fourteen and a tie retains the Cup for a team. It should have a playoff and I'm like like wow. It sounds like she's kind of being defeatist. She's accepting the fact that the Americans are probably going to grab that fourteenth point and win in Thai Lo and behold everything and went their way. What's crazy though is that Peterson was almost not even in position to make this thing happen. I mean she could have lost him. The seventeenth hole because Marina Alex had like a twenty foot Putt to win to end the Solheim Cup right there then she flares drive into the rough on eighteen which means that even though she's plenty long if she'd been in the ferry she got up near the green she couldn't because she was on the Ralph so she has to lay up. Marina Alex has kind of do the same name and basically it's just like a wedge off from there and she almost freaking holdout from was eighty nine yards. She almost holes out. She spins it back with a wedge and gives her about eight feet now. This is where our just on edge because on the seventeenth hole Yep Bronte law just. I don't know if she's basically she's away from everything. She's away from everyone and yet she's just as important like if she doesn't finish out. If she ends up bringing her match to eighteen and then they have the tie. It's over. That doesn't matter yeah. Everyone's doing what they had to do. The thing that had me on edge is is the fact that I ended up hoping that this would go in ooh. I'm American. This is a pro-american podcast love. That Danielle King joins US last. This week was all about it but if you're talking about an eight footer to win if it goes in to lose if it doesn't how awkward is that if she misses law wall it's it's do or die. I mean it's awkward but look we've seen plenty of that. In these team matches before you know sometimes as you miss a Putt and then that's what ends the match it would be brutal no doubt about it. At least it's an eight footer in not a three footer. It's actually kind of the perfect perfect pop writer on the distance just outside the distance of fifty fifty coin flip of Michigan make this or is she not so if she misses it's not it's not that that she's choking an eight footer for Birdie. I Miss Plenty of eight for Birdie in my day and I would miss that one. She pureed it though right in in the Senate right in the center which was great because I mean it was uphill. PUTT so it would probably be the easiest eight footer he could imagine but this is definitely a win for Mark Brody. If people appreciated that it could go in it could go out it could win for you could lose it for you but that is one of the things that we need to discuss about the Solheim Cup this Cup the Ryder Cup is always grounds for a revival of someone's narrative and Suzann Pettersen like it brought her back to the peak of the game. After a long break she had not played a lot of Gulf this year. She was given a captain's pick. She played pretty well throughout the week but who knows where she's she's. GonNa go years from now or three weeks. From now like she was very uncertain about her career and four years ago she was at the center of the game because she did concede a short putt that led to a winning match that led to a very very contentious Solheim Cup. All I'm saying is that it gave her an an opportunity and that's what these things do like it gave Martin Cameron Opportunity in Dina to win the Ryder Cup and that adds to his all fame resume this added to Suzann Pettersen Hall of fame resume. What matters here is the Gulf like that. That is what's great at. It is something that means nothing and yet it means everything well. How much does this echo also just from last year team. Europe throttled the US in the Ryder Cup yet Ian Poulter and Sergio Garcia Henrik Stenson Henry guys that didn't seem on paper like they were logical picks guys that would not end up on an American equivalent team here you've Suzann as in Pederson. Hardly played golf has controversial past what more perfect way for her to finish then to drop her putter halfway when the boss still halfway to the whole sure she was nervous but she looked plenty confident. She looked like she was trying to make the pot rather than you know the moment being too big for her or something something it was just such a cool morning because look we love Sunday early golf. You know we love that. Being the state's waking up some Gov actually had a nice little Sunday seven twenty teatime. Nice my hometown Williamstown Massachusetts finished up just before ten thirty went down down how quick sit in the in the grill and and just flipped on the Solheim Cup Danielle Kings match was just coming down the sixteenth hole and just had an ed really nice next few hours. Yes I stayed right there. How great is that. When multiple hours of golf can go by and you don't even notice because not feel like the action kept continuing. That's why these matches are so cool is because like okay. Here's another close match coming down to the wire and people were coming by you know coming coming in and out of the the grill and saying. Oh yeah what's going on in the Solheim and stopping and watching for a few minutes then going about their day but people were invested. Did you could tell you know whether it was just on social media whether it is in real life people were dialed into this tournament what I hope is that the TV ratings I agree with that. I hope that allow people watched. I had the feeling that a lot of people were watching. It cannot get more exciting what happened on TV on golf. Channel Channel could not get more exciting than what happened yesterday.

Suzann Pettersen European Solheim Cup United States Solheim Cup Europe Solheim Suzann Pettersen Hall Marina Alex Stina Sternberg Thai Lo Golf Channel Channel Danielle King Peterson Williamstown Mark Brody Writer Senate Ralph
Where'd All Those Rave Reviews Go for 'Where'd You Go, Bernadette?'

Filmspotting

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Where'd All Those Rave Reviews Go for 'Where'd You Go, Bernadette?'

"Where are all those positive reviews for where you go bernadette. We've got you covered. She disappeared d- bernadette what she didn't just banish my gear virga. Josh neither of us read maria semple bestselling book. Where'd you go bernadette when it was released in twenty twelve nor did we catch up with it before seeing in sitting down here to review richard linklater's adaptation asian starring cate blanchett as a once brilliant architect living in seattle who adores her fifteen year old daughter be is disconnected from but still loves her tech mogul husband elgin and and loathes pretty much everyone else.

Bernadette Maria Semple Cate Blanchett Richard Linklater Josh Seattle Fifteen Year
 Rays owner says shared season with Montreal is best option

Lewis and Logan

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Rays owner says shared season with Montreal is best option

"For the first time since gaining limited permission from major league baseball tampa bay rays owner stuart sternberg spoke to reporters about the proposed plan to explored splitting the teams home games between tampa florida and going back to montreal generational commitment to both communities both communities secure that major league baseball will be played and thrived there for hours and the future generations and because of it a deep and powerful connection between two regions conform with baseball at its bond at its core tampa bay's averaging less than fifteen thousand fans of game at agreement between the raise in saint petersburg port tropic can't field runs all the way through twenty twenty seven and saint petersburg mayor has shot down the two city proposal but baseball mr rob manfred said the rays have broad permission to explore what's

Stuart Sternberg Florida Tampa Bay Rays Baseball Tampa Montreal Saint Petersburg Mr Rob Manfred
"sternberg" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"sternberg" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Clearwater w. two six five c._t. and that point to thirty three av gulfport to nine zero b._j. west tampa good afternoon i'm dana mills our top story at five race owner stuart sternberg and team management held a news conference in saint pete today to say they are on board with the proposal to split the race season between tampa bay and montreal sternberg said the plan for the race to play home games in tampa bay early in the season and the rest of the home games in montreal makes sense and would create what he called a new norm eighty one home games is a lot of games does a community need to host eighty one home games for that affinity for that connection no other professional or amateur sport comes close to providing eighty one home games in a season sternberg says this is about economic opportunity for both cities and not about moving the race out of tampa bay to be clear this is not a staged exit that thought has never entered my mind this is not taking even one glance towards a relocation to montreal i rejected that idea years ago and i continued to reject it today but this fan was convinced this is the beginning of the end of the raise in tampa bay he was removed by security sternberg said the plan would include two new belt ballparks ready to go by twenty twenty four but that no financing is in place yet sternberg said talks on the sister city proposal will begin in the near future in a statement after saint pete mayor at christman said if mr sternberg wishes to formerly explore this concept with me i am willing to listen coming up honoring an.

stuart sternberg saint pete tampa bay montreal christman Clearwater tampa twenty twenty
Welcome, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor!

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Welcome, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor!

"Not during a scene with her finish said later, my new I was acting, but my heart didn't and my body. Certainly didn't I won't discuss it more because of the degree of intimacy involved. That was Finney the chemistry between the two is unmistakable Harris writes, and perhaps at its most powerful during the scenes when you're wondering whether Mark and Joanna should stay together at all a counter to your point about the Manzini score. He says, Don and gives their dilemma a great glossy coat from the gorgeous animated opening credits by 007 genius MAURICE binder to what may be the most melancholy romantic theme, Henry Mancini ever composed and then on its poignancy. He says undone in steady hand to for the road. Does what only a Hollywood movie can do it convince you to beautiful movie stars tooling through France and car are just like us. It's everybody's marriage. That's on trial in this film. If you've ever failed to let a fight go or said one thing too many or kept silent rather than apologize. You're likely to recognize a bit of yourself in the shards of the Wallace's the point about how they're just like us the scene that I think does that. So well is when they are forced to stay in the chichi hotel and have to kind of dodge around the fact that they can't afford to tell the restaurant. I mean, those charged for it is just a great secret. So fun so two for the road, my choice. Maybe Mark Harris's choice. If indeed he was participating in the marathon Thanos pick. I know it's not your choice though, Josh. And you know, what it's also not the choice of another guest. We have teased at last week that my daughter Sophie has been watching all of these films with me the first film finding marathon any of my children have fully participated in. And she wanted to play along and weigh in with her choice for best picture. I'm Sophie Manar in my awards for best picture goes to funny face. I was sucked in soon as the bundle of pink fabric hits the camera during the opening number it sets the tone for the whole movie fun wins ical, vibrant that. Coupled with an excellent performance from Audrey Hepburn led to experience where to quote, my dad. I couldn't wait to rewatch it as I was watching it. So there's my daughter quoting me quoting same van Haldeman? But that's fine. We'll go with it all goes round and round. Well, I knew Sophie was sharp. But this seals the deal. I mean, she she got the pick. Right. Funny faces the best picture of this marathon. I'll admit I probably enjoyed charade as much while watching it. But I think for me funny face has those musical production numbers that just are going to put it over the top. If you're comparing the two not only what I've already mentioned in these awards, but how about on how to be lovely that satirical, duet with Hepburn and Kate Thomson. I think that one really is crucial because it undercuts some of the movies fashion fascination that that they got into labout. That's great. Irene George Gershwin's. He loves and she loves I don't think we talked about this when we reviewed it at all. But this is where Hepburn an Astaire are at an. Outdoor wedding photo shoot. And they dance their way across a stream by lightly stepping onto a floating raft. I mean, here's another almost over the top Don touch could have been a pick for physio seen as well. So funny face. It's just stuffed with production numbers. Most of them quite delightful. Domine, of course, will forever be known for co directing singing in the rain. But I do think funny face has deserves a place in the top tier musicals conversation. Well, it's my runner up certainly for this marathon film. I did enjoy and has so many of those great done in moments. And touches that's our marathon. Are thanks again to Sophie to Nathaniel, of course, for all of his insights and launching all of these conversations. We hope you enjoyed this marathon whether you were following along or not and able to watch every film, we do have another marathon coming up. We don't have the date set exactly for when it will commence, but we're going to take a look at the work of Josef von Sternberg and Marlene Dietrich that collaboration. You can find. More information about all of our marathons, including listening back to all of these Don and conversations at film, spotting dot net. And just click on marathons at the top of the page.

Sophie Manar Audrey Hepburn Mark Harris DON Henry Mancini Irene George Gershwin Maurice Binder France Hollywood Josef Von Sternberg Finney Van Haldeman Wallace Josh Marlene Dietrich Joanna Domine Nathaniel Kate Thomson
How the Expos can finally return to Montreal

The Big Story

10:29 min | 2 years ago

How the Expos can finally return to Montreal

"The Montreal Expos never went away. Expos take the field here at Olympic stadium in Montreal the second game before game series, the Expos left. They left Montreal. They became the Washington nationals. They went off to play baseball in DC while Olympic stadium. Their former home sat empty and decaying the teams famous mascot UP even went to work for the Montreal Canadians because even furry orange monsters gotta eat. The idea of the Expos of a major league team in the heart of Montreal the modern monument to a sport with deep history in the province that never entirely vanished. There were always a few people some of them loudly and most of them very quietly keeping the fires burning mostly they were dreaming. But sometimes they were planning for the Tim's eventual return, and somehow that return might happen. The sport of baseball has changed. The city of Montreal has changed the business of sport in general has changed an unbelievably as cities around North America. Celebrate baseball's opening day today. It is beginning to seem like the team that never really went away is suddenly very close to coming back. How did this happen? How real is it? What does baseball mean to Montreal to Quebec or to Canada? And we'll those fans who refused to abandon their team. Even after their team, abandoned them finally get their happy ending. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Jeff Blair is the host of the Jeff Blair show on sports net. Five ninety the fan. He is the co host of the lead podcast with Stephen Brent knows a lot about baseball in Montreal because he covered the Expos for the zette for about a decade and for the global mail after that so it's opening day to day. There's no baseball in Montreal today. Not yet. But Montrealers are very excited this week. Why is that? Well, I think they should be excited. I mean, I covered the Expos from eighty eight to ninety seven on a full-time basis. And I was there when when the team ended up leaving town part of a franchise swap that saw the Expos go to Washington and saw the ownership of the Boston Red Sox in my and Miami Marlins change as part of the process at that time. There was very little support from the local business community. There were there was a very small collection of minority partners who were in for maybe million two million dollars a year, very small. They had been effectively bought out in a leveraged buyout by Jeffrey Loria was a New York art dealer who came in and saw that I think at the end of the day ended up putting in about twenty five million US of his own money into that team and that up buying it. And then when he sold the Marlins that was for one point three billion any that's but at that time. Time when when the Expos left the Commissioner was committed at the time, but ceiling was committed to bringing baseball back to Washington. It was it was a legacy thing for him. The Expos has I mentioned had no local corporate support. There was no political support. I mean, they didn't have a political champion in the mayor's office. They they had no political champions provincially as a matter of fact, when you know, I think when you talk to people who are involved in sort of the post Charles Bronfman area era, the expo is one of the things they'll say is that they were affectively screwed by p q government. There was just there were there was there was there was no reason to keep the Expos and much there. There is a plan to build a new ballpark was completely stillborn. So there was absolutely no reason for the Expos to stay in town. And of course, attendance it had had decreased while fast forward. Now, you have a new Commissioner rob Manfred. Who also even though he's only been inter for few years. Just thinking of his legacy and his legacy is in. Internationalizing the game. You've seen baseball games. Played in Japan. Baseball will play a game at Lord's Cricket Ground. This year the Red Sox and the Yankees. And rob Manfred has said that he thinks Montreal is a viable baseball market. He also thinks Mexico City's viable baseball. Mark in Montreal itself. You have a really well-funded core ownership group, Stephen Bronfman of Claridge investments, the son of Charles Bronfman and Mitch Garber who's kind of a fascinating guy. Mitch when I first met him. He's a lawyer his uncle was a lawyer who represented a lot of Expos players in and around Montreal Tim Raines, he keeps kind of a fixer for them. And I I mean that in a positive way Mitch also hosted a radio show late night. I mean, he was a dabbler really talented guy. He is now president of Caesars acquisitions international, essentially lives in Monaco. And he's on the French CBC French language version of dragons. Dan. He's he's he's a very he is shaker and mover. He was I believe I don't know if he's still as he was CEO of Cirque du Soleil at one point he's got a lot of money scuttle resume. He's got and he's and he's and he's a billionaire. He and Stephen Bronfman both known each other for while that they have they've kept the dream of baseball in Montreal alive. They done it very quietly as is their manners people. They're both fairly quiet, quiet. People very quietly. They had Denny co dare when he was mayor of Montreal who is a huge baseball. I mean, he's an he's a nut. But he's a huge baseball fan. And he you know, he was show up at every baseball event. The all star game the World Series it show up at the Commissioner's office. He he'd go to the Expos or the Blue Jays games every spring spring training just to kind of fly the flag and lobby for and lobby for a team to return to Montreal and the provincial government, both the liberal government. And the new government are very the very comfortable with the idea of entertaining, some sort of public private partnership. So what we have now is. Commissioner who views internationalizing the game as an important part of his legacy. We have people in Montreal ton of money. What we don't have as a team revolt park. Obviously we have Olympic state, and we don't have a team or ballpark. Well, this is going on the tap. The Tampa Bay rays have been have been trying for twenty twenty-five years to get a ballpark built. They play at Tropicana field in Saint Pete. So horrible ballpark that, you know, their their attendance is routinely the worst in the league somewhat bizarrely. They have one of the best TV contracts in the league. But their attendance is generally pretty poor. They have attempted to build a ballpark in different parts of Tampa. The the providence Saint Pete right now is that Tampa's where the growth there is in the area east of Tampa north Tampa. That's where the growth is. Unfortunately to get the Saint Pete you base give a choice of two bridges. So during rush hour access to Saint Pete from Tampa is essentially it's the worst place you could imagine in the region right ballpark last year. There seemed to be finally at least for the people in Tampa. There seemed to be memento. Adam behind building a ballpark in ebor city, which is to to the eastern part of the city. It's an old old warehouse area. And I I hadn't been paying attention to it at baseball's winter meetings or something happened it collapsed. I don't know what I don't know the exact majority just collapsed. So the winter meetings in baseball where everybody in baseball gathers media general managers owners, it's it's kinda like a swap shop trades or made sometimes free agents or talked about and all that there was a news conference call by Stuart Sternberg with the owner of the race and his president, which if you've got something you wanna float as if you've got a trial balloon you wanna float in baseball. You do it at the winter meetings because everybody who writes talks thinks about baseball is there, right? They held a news conference. You know, blah, blah, blah stadium issue in Tampa. We still have a lease at Tropicana field the twenty twenty four twenty until twenty twenty-seven dot that up. But and this was was was very subtle. And I probably wouldn't have noticed if I hadn't been tipped off about this by a raise official the raise owner. Said listen, we're not getting a park built in tap. We do have a lease right now until twenty twenty seven Saint Petersburg prime real estate in terms of building condos mixed business residential area. I mean, it is a it is a gold mine for raising tax. If there's a crappy building city there's a crappy building sitting on it that we're going to be gone from an in in ten years. So what he did what Stuart Sternberg did was he kind of flipped it a bit. And said, here's the thing. Yeah. We could be here twenty twenty seven. But man, if you guys get an offer between now and then for this parcel a land who knows what the economy's going to look like in twenty twenty seven right? Could be better could be worse. So centrally what he said is. Hey, if you guys get a good offer for this. You know, I'd be willing to cut you deal here to to to help you finish this off. Please. Let me go, please. Let me go. So well that's going on, you know, the folks in Montreal again, very quietly quietly, very diligently. Claridge investments is involved in purchasing land in Griffin town part of Montreal. Which is. Near the peel basin. It's it's kind of an area that's undergoing gentrification. So you've got that. Now, you've got a Tampa Bay rays owner. Who knows he's not gonna stay there? Now, you've got people with money in Montreal in a ballpark. You've got a Commissioner who is committed to this one of the things the tappan though as well, as in addition to all that sort of falling in place, one of the things rob Manfred, the Commissioner says look I realized the reality of the situation now is I'm not going to ask you to build a ballpark. And then give you a team he cited Quebec, cities, and example, building an arena. No NHL team. You said not gonna do that. I just need see the plans. I didn't need the shovel in the ground show me the financing show me the plans haven't nailed down. And we'll try to get a team in. Montreal. Stuart Sternberg owns the raise lives in New York. So what kind of happened in the past couple of months? People started to realize well who says Stuart Sternberg has to sell the raise or Montreal has to get an expansion team. What a Stuart Sternberg said moved the race to Montreal. I live in New York. It's not a big flight. Maybe. I wanna be a majority partner. But maybe I want twenty percent. Maybe bell media comes in for twenty percent char or Stephen Bronfman and Mitch Garber have thirty percent each and away we go. So all these things have kind of have fallen in place if you'd asked me for years ago. I would've said there's no chance of baseball returning to much you're on my lifetime. Now, I'd be stunned. If there isn't a major league team in Montreal within the next six or seven years five years might be a little tight, but just sort of planning this thing out of that. I can see baseball back in Montreal in six seven years at the outside. I'll be surprised if it isn't

Montreal Montreal Expos Baseball Stuart Sternberg Commissioner Tampa Stephen Bronfman Rob Manfred Tampa Bay Mitch Garber Tim Raines Charles Bronfman New York Tropicana Field Marlins Boston Red Sox Washington Nationals Olympic Stadium Saint Pete Washington
"sternberg" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"sternberg" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Her. And actually, I talked to my teacher because we have like sometimes women's history women's history. We have like we can do women. And so I made a note if I could do hung on it and said, and and yeah, I can do. And I just think she's really awesome. That she shows no matter how small you all you can make a difference. And she just is. And rio. So I start how I started was. I was sort of in depression thinking about how humans have been living on this earth and stuff and I- channeled my emotions into action, and she Greta Sternberg was one of the people that inspired me me, and my sister, and my mom watch the video a video of her, and it really inspired me to take action and use my voice. So that's actually how we created the bay area or scarred aims crew. So finally, what's your next step? You confronted Senator Feinstein. We'll see what happens whether she will alternately support the green new deal. Probably because of what you did. What are you gonna do? Now. Well, there's going to be us climate. Youth like global climate strike led by use and mainly school children who will be walking out of schools on March fifteenth the the website that at is called youth climate strike US dot org. And if you're watching then you can go to that page, and if you want you can participate, and you can use your voice and promoting that idea that's going to be pretty much our next step of action and last comment Magdalena. Well, I think the next step of action. Well for me my step action. I think before this is. Well, I mean now too. But like this is really important to me is getting people to actually believe there is climate change. Because how are we gonna fight for something that some people.

Greta Sternberg Senator Feinstein US rio
'Hunger Games' actress Amandla Stenberg comes out: 'I'm gay – not bi, not pan, but gay'

Colleen and Bradley

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

'Hunger Games' actress Amandla Stenberg comes out: 'I'm gay – not bi, not pan, but gay'

"Now is the time when the when the actions are like that and finally amandas sternberg is me stemberg is out and proud the talented nineteen year old actress is now for b is known for being an exemplary voice of her generation inspiring young people would like to speak up and speak out about their passions recently came out officially as gay in an interview with wonderland magazine and discussed what she loves about in has learned sexually the hunger games star who was previously come out as penn sexual share to post on instagram that she's so happy to say she's gay and official print she says she drew inspiration from ellen degeneres it's so it's so interesting to me that here we are in two thousand eighteen and there still is sort of a journey yeah that a person in the public eye goes through before they're ready to really come out.

Wonderland Magazine Ellen Degeneres Amandas Sternberg Penn Official Nineteen Year