17 Burst results for "Sterling Johnson"

"sterling johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:49 min | 5 months ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The climate warms and the threat of water scarcity grows a native government nonprofit in Arizona is working to bring back indigenous crops that are adapted to hot dry conditions The ajo center for sustainable agriculture trains indigenous growers in traditional farming methods and it shares seeds for a range of crops including drought tolerant varieties of squash beans and corn I have watched a hundred apprentices growing them and appreciating them and growing them for their families and taking that knowledge to learn from me as an apprentice to share through their kids Sterling Johnson is the group's farm manager and a member of the Tana automation For him for claiming native farming practices is not only about building a more climate resilient food system It's a way to recover elements of native culture that the U.S. government attempted to suppress or destroy through many years of forced assimilation For hundreds of years we fought hard and still fighting through this day to reclaim things that were ours to begin with because these seats are important So he helps that reviving and passing down indigenous farming knowledge will help his community thrive Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication To hear more stories like this visit climate connections dot org Attention individuals and businesses struggling with tax debt during the COVID-19 pandemic The IRS deputy commissioner is just announced the taxpayer relief initiative United tax will help you settle your tax bill for an amount you can afford remove or reduce penalties stop negative collection actions and negotiate affordable monthly payments For a free consultation call 803 9 zero four zero four three That's 803 9 zero.

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably. But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its curious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 19 Oh, one Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 19 Oh, one. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that the United States they couldn't that they started calling and things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and The artist was Francis burrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to Burrows, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and at some point transfer that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 19 Oh, one, and even though it grew out of an older company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment. But first, let's take another quick break to remind pet owners that progressive covers pets and or auto policy at no extra charge. We're making a really cute pet themed radio commercial. You got to see this dog. It's a little tough ball. It looks like a piece of cotton candy, but I could just eat up. Oh, and it waddles when it walks Little doggy dog. Oh, I wish you could see it..

Frank Seaman Mark Mark United States Radio Corporation of America £100 Francis Berliner Johnson 1919 Nipper His Master's Voice Sarnoff Berliners 18 99 first Victrola both October 3rd. 19 Oh 19 Burrows
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its curious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 19 Oh, one Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 19 Oh, one. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling and things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and The artist was Francis burrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once bill out to Burrows, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 19 Oh, one, and even though it grew out of an older company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

Frank Seaman United States 1919 Mark Mark £100 Radio Corporation of America Francis Nipper October 3rd. 19 Oh both Sarnoff Frankie first Berliner His Master's Voice Berliners Victrola 18 99 one Johnson
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones Now. Previously, those gramophones had relied on hand cranks so you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device. And turn the platter so that you could listen to the disc being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank C man. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller, a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. For nearly a decade, Comcast has been helping students get ready. We've connected four million low income students to low cost high speed. Xfinity.

Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company Berliner victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Comcast Radio Corporation of America Nipper salesman Frankie Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank C Eldridge
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company. That took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not Be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to be roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of an older a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

Emile Berliner Berliner Gramophone Company Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Philadelphia Radio Corporation of America salesman Nipper Frankie Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank Seaman Eldridge
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to be roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. His old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and Even though it grew out of an older a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. Saint John Paul, the second national shrine provides hope to all seeking spiritual growth visit us virtually to learn more about our great patron,.

Emile Berliner Berliner Gramophone Company Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Philadelphia Saint John Paul salesman Nipper Radio Corporation of America Frankie Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank Seaman Eldridge
"sterling johnson" Discussed on 990 The Answer

990 The Answer

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on 990 The Answer

"Dollars in rent for the privilege of looking over the pantsless heroin addicts? Mayor Kenny wants to negotiate with like to remember the U. N You wouldn't And so you say. Screw it. I'm leaving. And he knows it. These big city mayors are starting to wake up and realize. Oh, crap. If we lose the rich white folks. We had no tax base, and we're already hip deep in debt. This time around, Kenny said Encampment organizer's continually shifted their demands. The man's they have demands. And he's actually entertaining demands. Have some demands of the city. You know, I paid a wage text for a long time. Where I lived before I moved out of Philadelphia proper I had I had some demands. I don't think he cared to listen to those. When I stepped into these discussions can, he continued, I voiced the hope that a resolution was possible. I now no longer harbor such hope. We were close to an agreement, said the attorney, Sterling Johnson, one of the organizers of the encampment. Negotiating with the city. The pantsless heroin addicts have an attorney. That's something What do you What do you find That guy? Where's the pantsless? Heroin addict Find find an attorney. Doctors without borders or lawyers without balls huddle. Yeah. Do you or someone you love crap in the street. Need representation? Call me. What But the attorney for the encampment said both sides would an impasse again. Black and Brown bodies are just not a priority for this administration. Jennifer Bennet. Another organizer. Said the city That's another thing. You can have it called an organizer. All you have to do is throw up a tent and take off your pants and you're an organizer. Congratulations. Put that on a business card. You've soiled yourself, sir. Organizer. Look at my business card. Shuttering. The encampment is disheartening and disturbing, she said. Where does the city expect human beings to go? Just disappear. Angered by the city's statement that organizer's thwarted negotiations by changing their demands, Bennett said the city is lying. Our demands have always been the same. These air the demands I've had as an activist for years getting people housed. Now that the city has announced its plans to end the encampment today, Bennett said that she is very concerned. The scheduled clear out may not be peaceful. Oh, It can be scary, she said. The police can be very brutal. Asked about how encampment occupants will handle being ordered out of the ball field organizer Alec Stewart. Lots of attorneys in organizer's for Pantsless homeless people. The workers Revolutionary Collective. Is his organization to get that the workers revolutionary Collective said that while I can't speak for the people for those who choose to stand and fight, we will support them. We don't want violence on the already oppressed. But If violence comes, it's a decision made by the power structure. Mm. City spokesperson said yesterday. They're hopeful no one on the site will refuse to leave. We strongly believe that those in the camp will voluntarily decamp The spokesperson said the city will provide storage for personal possessions and other transportation to encampment occupants to housing and service options. At the parkway yesterday, Occupants and organizer's were working through their next steps. Yes, like Patton, plotting their next move through Luxembourg. Thistles. Otherworldly folks. Okay, so they're promising violent. We don't want to be violent. But we know how brutal the police are. So we the what did they call themselves? The workers occupying Force of America, One of the We don't want to be violent, but the police are probably going to make us violence, so we'll apologize in advance Workers revolutionary collective fast, Eddie, This is this is 2020 in Philadelphia. Yes, Chris. Indeed. It is so right now we're gonna take a quick commercial break and we will have another Philadelphia story when we return on the best of Philadelphia's morning answer with Chris Stengel. I'm fast, Eddie Kaya, So we'll be right back here on Philadelphia's Am 9 90 the answer. Everything you need is waiting for you at 9 90..

attorney Heroin Philadelphia Mayor Kenny workers Revolutionary Collecti Pantsless Eddie Kaya Chris Stengel Bennett Sterling Johnson Jennifer Bennet Alec Stewart Force of America Patton Luxembourg
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you've heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I had to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disks were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space and as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company. That took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to be roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller, a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. In a country where the color of.

victor talking machine company Emile Berliner Johnson Johnson Berliner Gramophone Company victor company gramophone Company Victor United States Jonathan Strickland Francis Radio Corporation of America salesman Nipper Philadelphia Mark Mark Frank Seaman Sarnoff Frankie Eldridge
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship, and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders did as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. No. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the desk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. What Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. Imagine.

Emile Berliner Johnson Johnson Berliner Gramophone Company victor talking machine company victor company gramophone Company Victor United States Jonathan Strickland Francis Philadelphia Radio Corporation of America salesman Noller Nipper Frankie CIA Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank Seaman
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. With Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into I'll explain more in just a moment. But first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company Berliner victor company Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. No. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the desk being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably. But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. What Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can't take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company Berliner victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Nipper Radio Corporation of America salesman Eldridge Frankie Noller Frank Seaman Mark Mark Sarnoff
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company victor company Berliner Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. With Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company victor company Berliner Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff CIA
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization, and this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business. History shows a dog specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 Sterling Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company Berliner victor company Sterling Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff CIA
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company. That took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd, 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not Be born until 1919. Tsarnaev looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although it isn't called that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 Sterling Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company victor company Berliner Sterling Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller CIA Tsarnaev
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the desk being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably. But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its furious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization, and this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones essentially over Busan called that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can't take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 Sterling Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company Sterling Johnson Berliner victor company gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Radio Corporation of America Busan salesman Frankie Mark Mark Frank Seaman Noller Sarnoff CIA
"sterling johnson" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"sterling johnson" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Homes. So we're over here, right across the street from the forty five million dollar housing authority headquarters where we just broke at news and if you look over and. Begin, public? Housing? Authority owned properties are Housing Authority as I? Say earlier is processing applications from twenty ten has stopped applications in two thousand thirteen, but there are just baking properties. Who Three right here? There's two more. Down there at the end, all of these lattes are also owned by the Housing Authority. That's Jennifer Bench. Front of all these closed homes boarded poems. Sterling. Can you tell us? WHAT IS THE PHILADELPHIA Housing Authority? How many homes does it own? How many are empty? So the Housing Authority as the largest. Housing provider in the city of Philadelphia they have a weightless where nobody has moved. Well that has been closed since two thousand thirteen they are a group that has a history of Mathewson's has a history of corruption of using money for other. For other. For to make market rate housing, they have a history of properties. They have a history of taking black and Brown homeowners properties and giving them. dimes on their for their properties, for they have a history of also putting money into their headquarters, which is forty five billion dollars, and and not really focusing on the people that are around them. The Housing Authority has about five thousand vacant properties right now. We want to use them to creates. Actually Land Trust what they want to do. Is You auction them off to private developers every single year? So, they can. Act as a private rental company a real estate company. We have decided to occupy those homes. We don't believe that it's a crime to place a family with small children into a home, so they can sleep safely and soundly. Those aren't crimes. That's an act of love. You know it's. It's really important to see what the Housing Authority in Philadelphia and not only Philadelphia, but other other housing authority across the country have been doing to. Privatize, public property this is. Public property. So Sterling, I want to ask you about the resignation. This week of the Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney second-in-command managing. Brian Abernathy who face criticism for his handling of homeless services and policing. It's been reported investigators from a police counter terrorism unit. visited the home of a Philadelphia Man Jose DeMarco. WHO SENT FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS TO ABERNATHY? As part of a demonstration to call attention to the Cova death of a man living in a shelter and the city's affordable housing crisis talk about the resignation. And what this was all about? It's very important to to see the response to legitimate. Legitimate protests. Jose DEMARCO is an organizer for active Philadelphia. We are coalition of groups that. Talk to the of services and talk to him specifically about all the trouble that people are going to. Have staying at home due to Covid nineteen. They continued to increase the budget for the police. They continued to say that they were doing what they could for homeless services. We know that's not true when they cut the budget by twelve million. We have a call to defend the police and invest in housing. Invest in the people that are here invest. Don't take a federal money. That's supposed to people experiencing homelessness and give it to the police. That's very simple very simple as Sterling, Johnson talk about what's next. The Philadelphia Mayor says he plans to meet with the in campus organizers. Directly, next week, will you be there? What do you plan to tell him? You're standing in front of this tent encampment. It's not the only encampment to say the least and Philadelphia and will you also be able to meet with Kelvin Jeremiah CEO of the Housing Authority and we just have thirty seconds. Yes. They both said that they will meet. Kenny and Jeremiah have said that they will meet with us. We will tell them that this is not for us. You're not the beneficiaries of this. We have a deep deep love for everybody that is low and no income. We're not asking for affordable housing. Housing for no income, people for disabled people I'm a disabled person. We deserve every right to stay in this city and to live peacefully and sterling. How are you keeping safe? I see you've got a mask that you've pulled down just for this interview. How are folks staying safe in this last ten seconds? Yes. We have regular testing. We have hand washing. We have hand sanitizer little medic tents. We care about everybody in this community cares about each other in might shock people to know the CDC recommendation. Is that Peon House people not be moved from encampments like yours five seconds sterling. Of course, yes. Build Avi has rejected. That has told us that as one bands opinion. We have that on video sterling, Johnson I want to thank you for being with us. Organizer with Black and Brown Workers Cooperative in Philadelphia spokesperson for Philadelphia Housing, Action. That does it for our show. Wear a mask. Stay Safe and save lives I'm Amy Goodman. Thanks for joining us..

Housing Authority Philadelphia PHILADELPHIA Housing Authority Sterling Brian Abernathy Jennifer Bench Jose DEMARCO Amy Goodman Peon House Jose DeMarco Mathewson Kelvin Jeremiah Land Trust Cova Covid Brown Workers Cooperative CDC Jim Kenney