17 Burst results for "Stephen weiss"

"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:51 min | 5 months ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Christ i mean. Is it time to retire. Pavel brady's jersey number. You didn't have playoff success. But he was so great. Had very tired. Any jerseys yellow wonga road lonzo just low. The beezer No not the bees and they can't ever do that now because abuser. remember his controversy. but not. You can't do that. I think the beezer is acknowledged in the debt of honor. But he's his jersey's not going to be retired about mellanby probably be rat man ali. I was actually looking through it. Maybe bom easter bomani sir. Probably the greatest defensemen franchise history This is kind of weird. Stephen weiss actually argument but they'd never had any postseason success. And you need those postseason moments where it's got to be off that ninety seven. Not that long ago had postseason success but he was very long tenured caddy. He held down the number one goalie position for so long. Like half the franchise's existence. What kind of audience do you think that. we're reaching. And i say this genuinely when the name scott. Mellanby said and greg cody gibson with a rat man and now. We're not only talking hockey. But we're talking hockey from twenty three years ago so a generation of people listening to this have no idea what we're talking about when greg cody gets in with man. Do you want to tell the story because greg you actually. That's the last time you personally actually cared about the panthers. I saw you at some pablo burry games. And i want to put on the pull gamma please at lebatardshow. Is it now. Time to retire. The jersey of powell. bere-. I don't know why mike is asking that today around that after. We started our dialogue about carver. Hagi they need to retire. Jerseys in that arena just show a little bit of their history something impa bells the best one they have i think. But if you put bomi sir pavel bure. It's basically a shining beacon to all the lack of success that they have i mean beret backed about three fifty goal season. Hurry was he was electric when he was down. Here is my favorite hockey player of all time. That guy was unreal. he was next level. But it was when you look at it like a two year run for florida. I don't know if it's enough to have your jersey retired. It is rare. Obviously that miami gets the guy who's best in the world right and that's what berry was looked at back. Then you're basically talking about. They've had lebron. James dwayne wade had shaquille o'neal they've had dan marino. They've had ricky williams cabrera. Miguel cabrera is another message Thank you michael jordan and That's right jersey retired at the heat's arena but pablo burry is a guy who streaked across the sky. Here was dating annakournakova. The russian rocket and royce to god's was just saying before we started this segment that he feels bad for you. He believes you to be not only the most famous hockey fan. The panthers there is in the united states but that on the pole. Guillermo at lebatardshow. Is roy the most famous panthers fan in the united states. Since spacey and that you felt sad for you roy. Because now you've got a whole lot of people on this cat wagon saying that it should be the pan waggin because you need to respect the integrity of the wagon and you been here alone for a long time. Nobody's been on this wagon with you roy. Yeah it's a lean times for this team. I mean when you've been to the playoffs like seven times over the past three years that tends to happen But yeah i mean at least a mall went to wall series but they've been to the playoffs three times anti history. It's just been just been lean times. Been sad i remember. I remember one season where the panthers had this terrible promotion where they would dress up as monks in there were ringing a bell and.

michael jordan shaquille o'neal James dwayne wade pablo burry Stephen weiss Miguel roy annakournakova greg cody pavel bure lebron dan marino Guillermo mike ricky williams cabrera twenty three years ago greg cody gibson Mellanby miami ninety seven
"stephen weiss" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:21 min | 6 months ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Both of them. With Donna Karen. Huh? Neither of those two times. Did I get the job right away, and I did end up spending nine years of Donna Karen, I often referred to as the 10 Year interview back in 2016. We did a show called the 10 Year interview. And I said at the time, it was a good show wasn't great that I'm gonna reconstruct it sometime, but For the moment I want to tell you I got a call one day from a headhunter search firm looking to find the person To become the CEO of Donna Karan. I get a phone call. I knew the person her name was morning. McBride. I'll never forget How Mark How are you? Morning. How are you? It's been a while. She's Yes, Mark. I have an incredible opportunity for you. Uh huh. I said I can't imagine. You know, I'm very happy where I am, But I can't imagine you have something that's gonna change my mind. And she said Mark, Here's the deal. Donna. Karen is looking for a CEO of her company, and I recommended you to her and they wanna meet you. She then went on to tell me the story of Donna Karen and what they wanted to do. And I must admit I was group vice president of the Time Executive Vice president Group vice president, So it really well at pvh. And I went in. They listen to it, and they impressed me. The money was huge. The responsibility was huge on the profile was huge. If you become the CEO of the Donna Karan company, everyone in the world is gonna know who Mark Webber's No often when you're working for big public company particular that time of executive VP, it's all about the brands, not the individuals. People in the industry knew me. But I wasn't a Media. I gone. You go to Donna. Karen, you're gonna be known because you're with one of the most powerful designer brands in the industry. That time I went, and I met with this person and she convinced me to go the next step. In the next step. I went To me with Donna. Well, let me be intellectually honest. I met with the board of directors. The lead director who was doing the recruiting. Met him at the 21 Club in New York at drinks. Great meeting. The guy wanted to hire me right there on the spot, but he couldn't The rest of the board to get on board. And of course, he had done it to get on board. C est If I would be willing to meet with Donna and her husband, I said Absolutely Next thing I know, Beautiful Spring night. Get invited to me with Donna's husband at the time. Stephen Weiss, who's subsequently passed away as a young man, and I met with Stephen Weiss, and he was a very interesting guy. He's a famous artist. In fact, his artwork is all around the country Anybody's ever been to the Wind Hotel in Las Vegas? There's a bronze horse in front of that hotel. Beautiful, credible. It's his Stephen wife Studios, where he created those things in downtown in New York is, um, is amazing guy and I had a very, very interesting conversation with him because I was impressed with his business intellect. For an artist discovers an artist and he knew everything there was to know about business. At least it seemed to me and I was really, really impressed with him. During the course of our conversation, he said something that I would never forget. And he said, I need to find a soul mate for Donna. I need to find a business soul mate. See when you're a designer. It's not enough to make money. It's not enough to enjoy every day of your life. You want to build the legacy that will live on forever, and that's what we're trying to do with Donna Karen, and that's why we're talking to you. I was taken aback by that. I thought about it. I was brilliant, and I loved it. We had a great meeting. Next one. I'm gonna be done a Karen Couple of days later. Meet Donna Karen at the Headhunters office. So that everyone secure so no one sees her coming and going this aside, Entrance aside entrance for me Meet with Donald comes in like a whirling dervish. He's got more fabric on her than I've ever seen anywhere wrapped around. It takes 10 minutes on wrapped like a like a top whirling dervish. Million things going on All this energy. All this excitement she looks at me. So who are you? Mark Webber? E said. Well, I might be your next CEO of you convinced me that I should come. Shouldn't be the other way around, Mark. No, it should be mutual. Donna and we had a great go of it. And we met and it was wonderful. That was my story until one day I get a call Beautiful Spring day from the CEO of our company. Mark. How about lunch? Sure. Picks me up in my office at a quarter to 12, he says. Let's walk. Our office at the time was on 37th Street and Madison, and he wanted to have lunch at the University Club, which is 54th Street. And Fifth Avenue and we started walking, and it was a beautiful day in my CEO and I have worked together for at that time 25 years you couldn't have had closer, more trusting, warmer relationship with anyone other than your parents. In fact, I often thought of this my business father. The guy was an amazing amazing father, Friend, Mentor teacher everything along the way, and we worked for you each other for 25 years. Every time he moved up, I moved up. We're walking and Justus we get Five minutes from the university club. He said. Mark I have a problem with what is it? I'll help you because I was offered a job. I'm deciding whether to take it or not. I said, I'm astounded. I can't believe you that you'd really accept the job from somewhere else. But I can't help but the offers.

Stephen Weiss Donald Karen Mark Webber Donna 2016 Las Vegas 10 minutes 25 years McBride 37th Street Fifth Avenue 54th Street Mark Both New York Justus Madison Mentor nine years
"stephen weiss" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:20 min | 11 months ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"So that's a That's a very good father. But I didn't do that response from. All right. So Dr Stephen Weiss it tha NK you political debate, Professor. Let's talk about the other thing. I did the laptop stuff. Do the 100 buying stuff. Stick it all. You know, that was that was kind of autumn bazaar. Everything was so normal for the rest of the baby. You know it was Trump's issues. Verses by issue was where the Republican Party is now for the Democratic Party. Now that thing came in there, and it was just here and the wave. He was presenting it and also the way that Biden was responded to. It was all very surreal to me, um, personal. He was saying such extreme things you know, It's not just 100 by now. It's that it's a whole criminal family. His brothers, Okay, right, right. And he's making millions and millions of dollars from China and the mayor of Moscow. And where is this all coming from? Right? And so? So if somebody is saying that kind of stuff about you, do you just look in the camera say not true. It makes you look like it is through the well. The outrage about those sorts of claims have either be that is so ridiculous. I can't even believe that's coming out of your mouth. Or let me tell you. Why would your saying is just like like, like ridiculous malarkey, right? Yeah, Nobody comes back. He says, Well, you have bank accounts in China. I'm thinking, you know, it's kind of multinational businesses. Of course, he's got accounts in China. Right, And you know something. There's a name for that, in argumentation called to quote quiet. It's a Latin term where Oh, you just got me with something, so I'll just get you with something back. It's an argumentative fallacy. It's not even considered a good argument. Tuesday. Oh, what You think what I'm doing is bad. What about what about this? Yeah, right. One of their point to that. I saw it as a good man. I thought your Biden it's you know, Hey, put this one up in the cheap seats like a hanging curveball. When Trump kind of stumbled into the hole, you know? Ah, illegal immigrants are immigrants coming in with low IQ. Yeah, I didn't even know what was What was happening when that would let you know, right? I like my job. I'd not to hit this one in the in the bleachers, but I don't think he did. Yeah, I'm telling he misses opportunities, and I think if you see the pundits, what they're saying is, he just did what he needed to do. You know he's playing it safe, right? But I I really don't believe that I believe again, and I'm not trying to be dismissive of Senior citizens like myself, By the way, I'm one myself is that he's just not as sharp as he used to be. He would have landed. I haven't watched Joe Biden every 90. You went back. You go back. It's your bike has been in Congress, as I said, since I was a baby on DH, So there's a lot of things you can review when it comes to debates and speeches and like in, you're a student of that You're a professor of that. And so you have. And you're saying that the job and you know we're all not the same person we were yesterday, even let alone 50 years ago. But you're definitely seen something on and I don't want to say cognitive because that's pretty awaited awaited word, but you know what I'm saying. Yes, on cognitive energy. Great. I mean, look, I have a lot of respect for the guy has this incredibly long career in politics. No to go that long without any really made any major scandals in your career. Fine. Um, but I'm just saying it's one of the reasons why, as we went through the primary crosses people were saying On both sides. Are these the best people we can really shouldn't We have somebody who's like in there thinking about the next 30 years, right? Right right that it gets. You know some of the more technical aspects that we have to focus on. So I I get that Professor Stephen Weiss. He's a professor of political communication, argumentation and debate at The northern Kentucky University always joins me to talk about these speeches. I was enjoyed to so love having me on and if the opportunity presents itself love to do that in future Okay. And then we leave you with one sword. No one thought. If Warren had been the nominee, you would have seen the greatest debate in the history of presidential debates. That is the true clash of all times. Elizabeth for Donald Trump. Just think about that, and then we'll talk to get it for you. Yeah, the ideologies, So you know where it's just more moderate right on, and even some of the stuff he's done is more conservative. But but Elizabeth Warren or Well what about Bernie? Well, but Bernie's not a good debater. Okay? He wouldn't. If you watch those primaries back clean people clock. She didn't get the nomination, but she can debate She was sharp shot, woman. That would be well seeing four years again. Stephen Weiss. Thanks again for time, Doc. Appreciate it. So let's all right be well. We'll get a quick time out of your thoughts on the debate. Who won, who lost and Joe Biden? That's interesting. Do you think last night was in the prevent defense or something else? That a cognitive decline slowly back with your calls in about six minutes on 700 wlw September.

Joe Biden Professor Stephen Weiss Donald Trump Professor China Elizabeth Warren Republican Party Democratic Party Bernie Moscow Congress northern Kentucky University
"stephen weiss" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"You know, people say, Oh, what a terrible defeat because they're not debates. They're not. They're political theater. Even things like how it's set up bother me like they wouldn't have had to collect the glass screen with him sitting at death. They should have had one plexiglass screen with them standing at podiums just further apart and have a debate. You know, you don't make it like Socrates and Plato, trying to have a discussion about the best way to run the country. Right? I get that doctor Stephen Weiss on the show from Northern Kentucky University is a professor of political communication argumentation a debate. And not picking sides. This is not a Republican talking points to Democratic talking points. This is a professor debate. A guy who actually breaks down what they're saying. I always find it so refreshing because, you know, by this time after debate, we're up to our ears and talking heads and I've got to point out to is that I texted you last night, and you're like How come you didn't ask me after the first debate? That was my because here's the thing Here's about 2020 is Weiss is we had the Reds on the radio that day and the day after, And so it was all pretty guy was on for an hour for the game was all pre game. We don't have a chance to talk about the debate not only before it and then after it, and I'm like, man, this is the greatest, but we should be talking to you for like, three hours and said, We have to talk about this team that they can't score a run in two games. So that made 2020 even worse, But, well, I can't talk to you about that. That that was it was just absolutely For his bad, absolutely miserable. Let me ask you this. Dr Weiss on I thought one another question where they were both evasive was the real. It was a really good one, because I think I was watching it last night and I get it. It's political theater. You're not gonna learn anything from the candidates on these things. Oh, but but about the awkward question of so when, when the next president dies in office, in which there's a good probability, whoever it is either Trump providing does you all ready to take over in jump in that chair and that it was funny because pants totally dodgy issue, But Kamala Harris said, Yeah, here's my resume, and she basically said, Here's my resume to be the next president. That's what she did last night. That was a really That was a good question, but it was really weird. Right, By the way, if you remember your history, that's exactly what Dan Quayle tive welcome into the trap of comparing himself to Jack Kennedy and then, Benson said. You're no Jack Kennedy. That's a very famous You know a moment from debate history and that that's what she was doing like. And answer to a question. Are you ready to get in there and do the job? Let me tell you my life story. Well, retail politics. That's what we're left with now. Quaint stories or ridiculous, exaggerated, untrue facts, right? It's talking point talking about it. And that's why when you ask if you ask a Republican talking head of Democrats, they decide. Oh my God, my guy blew it out of the water. Yeah. And you know something? I never got the chance to talk to you about so we didn't talk about the first date. One thing that these people have to admit is they may be politicians. They're going to communicating giving speeches. They worked with words their whole life. That's what they're all about, right? Some of them have even been prosecutors. They don't necessarily know, howto argue or to debate. Because their positions are just contra position, their positions in opposition to the other side. They're not working to try to get a third party to say my positions better than his positions. Just looking at each other and being kind of basically disrespectful and disdaining of the other position so in for him in the first debate, the first time Trump Sort of ran over interrupted and wouldn't let by speak if I'm buying if I'm really a debater, I look at the moderator and say, Listen If this is the way he acts in the Corona Virus task force meeting It's no wonder he's not taking their suggestion because he's not hearing or listening to anything. They're saying he's on ly listening to the sound of his own voice. That would be a great argument to make. No. One it would jump out and it has nothing to do with the facts of the data or the history or who's right or well, it has to do. It's a meta argument. It's an argument about how we're arguing. And and both these people at the presidential and vice presidents they had unlimited opportunities to do things like that with the argument. Really quick here. I got like a minute left Dr Weiss. But do you think we'd be better served if we haven't seen song time? And it's totally contrary to the primary debates, which you had 6000 candidates. Everyone talking and you couldn't get anything done. But what would be better to have a third party candidate like a libertarian that that would would that help? They keep things more honest. Would it be a better debate if you had a third party in there? Yeah. So we already have that experience. You know, with the time with Paro one we had three people debating ancient Lee. Unfortunately for me, debate is a binary activity. Okay, It's this this first of that, you know, like I had made the comparison the boxing before can of a boxer with three boxers in the ring, right? 11 position has to prevail over the other. You can't do the math and say Hope is what this guy's saying. Plus what this guy's saying. Taking out a little bit about what this woman saying. That's just the way it scored. I mean, I can't really conceptualizing that way. Right? Right. I guess that makes sense, too, because it seems like from a voter's perspective unless we become a parliamentary system, I think today. Fair enough. We'll pick up another time. Dr Stephen Weiss over at Northern Kentucky University, just breaking down the theatrics behind the theatrics here and the mechanisms of debate, which I was fascinating. We'll have you on again soon. Appreciate it. Be. Well, thanks coming on. All right. Great to talk to you, Monsieur Zakia. Next time, buddy. Here you go. Dr Weiss Scott's long show this is 700 claims.

Dr Stephen Weiss professor Northern Kentucky University Dr Weiss Scott Jack Kennedy Plato Dan Quayle president Paro Kamala Harris Monsieur Zakia Trump Reds Lee Benson
"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Daily

"And Marty goes off to Harvard law school. Ruth follows. And her early says it first year law student she's invited along with the eight other women in a class of five hundred and fifty people to dinner at the Dean's House and the Dean. Goes around the table these. Female. First year law students in each one of them to justify why she's there why she's taking a place. That's. Gone to a man at the Great Harvard Law School And Ruth says. Well I'm here you know my husband is a second year law student and I WANNA learn the law so that I can be helpful to him and understand what he doesn't his professional life. So. This is not somebody rocking the boat in these institutions and in this time. This is not somebody at war with the institution nor was she in the next phase of her life when Mardi graduates, he has to join the army because he'd been in ROTC and they go off to. Fort. Sill Oklahoma where he's an army officer and she needs a job she's actually pregnant with her second child James. She takes a civil service exam. She gets offered a GS five not very elevated. Position as a claims adjuster I think it was the Social Security Administration but she mentioned that she's pregnant and they say, oh no, we can't hire you in that position because you would have to travel for some training and they offer her a GS to position as a clerk typist, which is so far beneath her. Qualifications I mean it's just kind of a sick joke, but she takes it and she sees quoted as saying well. That's the way things are. And so the question of how we get Rifkin's birth to go from, that's the way things are too. That's the way things don't have to be is really the story of this woman's life. What is a key turning point in this journey? Of Ruth Bader. GINSBURG starting to challenge the institutions and the society around her. Well it really took a while and it may surprise people that took as long as it did. She, graduated the very tough for law school class. One of. Very senior professors recommended her for Clerkship Justice Felix Frankfurter on the Supreme Court and Justice Frankfurter wrote back and said she looks great on paper. But I I, can't have a woman in my chambers. So, he was very explicit about Oh. Yes. Very, and all that was kind of going along. Then she took a job in of all places Sweden. This goes back to sixty, two, sixty, three. Women were perhaps five percent of the law students in our country. They were twenty percent in Sweden. She had a project to study and write of volume on the Swedish civil justice system for what she learned Swedish. And what she noticed how Sweden? Is that it was a startlingly egalitarian society. I watched one proceeding it was it was a trial court. In. Stockholm and presiding judge. Is Eight months. Pregnant. This time in the United States where if were teacher and you began to show you have. Out. The classroom. Fair to say, it caused her to question the whole Organization of the society in which she had grown up. which she had excelled. And, a wish she was being roadblocks for professional advancement because of her sex. So that was. Really. I. Didn't do anything with it immediately because nothing. To be done in the United States. But we saw back. And then when it was while she was in Sweden she read in a magazine. Feminists said. Men. And women have one principal role. That of being people. that. became an organizing principle and as we move with her into her litigating career. She paid as much attention to the rights to equal protection of men. As she would for women because men and women had one principal role. People. But it was still kind of a radical idea back in the US that women just as men had one roll, which is to be fully realized people. It was a radical idea in society and it was a radical idea in the constitution. Because the great. Earl Warren Court. The famous Progressive Supreme Court that brought US Brown against sort of education and. For criminals, defendants, and so on. Never once in not a single case. Looked at the fourteenth amendment's guarantee of equal protection in the constitution as having anything to do with women anything to do with sex discrimination they just it never occurred to them. They just never saw. So what's the next chapter in the story of Ruth Bader Ginsburg? How do we start to see these new principles come to the fore back in the US? She decided to go into academia. She looks for jobs at the very top law schools doesn't get one she started teaching at Rutgers. In New Jersey, she begins taking cases that people bring her women bring her involving discrimination women's rights. And she's eventually invited by an old camp printer I, Melvin Wolf who was. Officer at the American Civil Liberties Union the ACLU to help them handle a couple of cases you eventually becomes the head of. A new project at the ACLU, the women's rights project in from that base she. Uses litigation campaign that really resonates with the campaign for equal protection on the basis of race that. Thurgood Marshall ran in the nineteen forties and fifties for the N. Double ACP Legal Defense Fund ecorse good. Marshall Benchley ends up on the Supreme Court but he was famous for. Thinking ahead and designing a campaign that would kind of serve up to the courts especially to the Supreme Court one case that time in each case in our common law system builds on the cases that went before she did the same thing what she did she found nail plaintiffs who had been discriminated against on the basis of being men. Mr Justice and may at least the court. The case she was most attached to I. Think was the case involving a mail plaintiff Stephen Weiss Infield, Stephen, wise, and fellow case. Concerns The entitlement of a female wage earner. A female wager and his family. To Social Insurance of the same quality as that accorded the family of wage. Whose wife had died in childbirth and he wanted. To be able to stay home and raise the child underlying assumption was wives I typically dependent. Husbands. On. month. And the statutory scheme in this case. Favors one type of family unit over another and in both cases. The basis for the distinction. Is that in the favored unit. The. Husband's employment attracts the benefit. In question. The real legal question case was the assumption that. A man wasn't gonNA need childcare benefits because of course, the man was convey taking care of a child that's his work. It seems almost ridiculous to say that. He had to go all the way to the Supreme Court to say you know I am the caretaker of my child. There.

Supreme Court Ruth Bader United States Sweden Harvard law school Great Harvard Law School principal American Civil Liberties Union Clerkship Justice Felix Frankf Justice Frankfurter Earl Warren Court Social Security Administration Marty Stockholm Oklahoma Stephen Weiss Infield Thurgood Marshall army Rifkin
"stephen weiss" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Words Matter

"Yeah, that's about right. So one of the central missions of the ACLU women's rights project was to show that laws which on their face report to benefit women actually conserve to hold them back from full participation in American Life. Right the language you used was benevolent sexism and romantic paternalism exactly. And Unlike a lot of other forms of discrimination and invidious discrimination in American society it's sometimes hard to see if you're not digging deep, how laws like this can operate to hold women back because Hey oh, you're getting a property tax exemptions that really something that you don't want, and so part of their overall strategy was to show the court into show this. All male and ship justices that these laws can really operate to hold back both sexes from full participation in American life by really encouraging men to be breadwinners and women to be homemakers without giving much choice. So after immersing yourself in the Ginsburg tapes and all of her arguments over the years particular that decade do you have a favorite moment you alluded to? A favorite case I have plenty of least favorite moments. I really sticks out to me in hell no which is going to be the next full oral argument breakdown that the Solicitor General's office said that part of the reason for this case is that feminism is in fashion and feminists would just like to ride on its skirt tales. Wow, and so that was. A pretty while moment indeed and shocking that is the first time I have heard the phrase skirt tale that I'm come up in two, thousand, sixteen, I mean actually it's crazy I I also really enjoyed probably my my favorite case definitely was Stephen Weiss and felt case right but I just had so much fun with the near Beer in the middle tier of. Time and Ranger Fred who that was the only episode I've done where it wasn't Ginsburg arguing the case we had someone else I was arguing and he was really fun for me to focus on. So talk about your your favorite case fell case. So Stephen, Weiss and Feld was a young man who had lost his wife she died in childbirth and he wrote a letter to his local newspaper describing how a social security benefit that would have been available had the generals been reversed to his wife wasn't Available to him and he said at the end of his letter I I wonder if Gloria Steinem knows about this and Gloria Steinem might not have known about it but that letter connected him with Ruth Bader Ginsburg and so she represented him in challenging the Social Security Law that said.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Gloria Steinem American Life Stephen Weiss Stephen ACLU Fred Feld
"stephen weiss" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Realities everything apart. We have Dr temperatures that make sure that we have a safe work, environment and radio. You'll hear small business people just like you. Listen, learn. We're taking everything day by day. Right now We're just doing what we can G n and the wind trust business lunch at noon in uncertain times, fax conquer fear. Welcome back to the Sinatra hours. Once again. I'm Dave player. Our next song this morning is put your dreams away A 1943 song written by Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann and Stephen Weiss. Thanks to natural first recorded the song for commercial release by Columbia Records in 1945 having previously recorded it for a V disc for his radio show in 1944. It was during that period that Sinatra used the song as a closing theme to his radio. Siri's He recorded the song again for Capitol Records in 1957. Here's put your dreams away Way your dreams. Oh, for another. I will take you in. You're wishing Ah, never got you. So it's time, you know. A new star on your dreams at night for To let your kiss. This's so your dream. Your dreams at night for Then I'll have two door Let your kiss this's On your way. You must remember. On When lovers that you can break a CZ time goes by Light and love. No. Love will always welcome lovers. He's in a strange falling leaves a sycamore. Moonlight in Vermont. I see Finger way Ski train is on our mountains. No life in Telegraph cable shows they sing higher Travel each bend in the road, so people in this room except are so hypno type love. Evening summer agree. Wobbling of metal moonlight in Vermont. Telegraph cables how they sing. On its travel each bend in the road. People who me in this role are so hip Summer of Life for mom. As time goes by, as featured in.

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Ideas

"I'm now I add and you're listening to ideas on. CBC Radio One. You can also find us through your favorite podcast APP or you can stream us on the. CBC Radio APP Jess is in is an assistant professor of law at the University of Alberta. She recently finished her doctor of Juridical Science Degree at Harvard University on where animals fit into modern legal systems. Her claim is that our laws tend to be out of step with how he actually feel towards animals. And it's time to correct that in the second half of this episode producers. Tom Howell and Nikola look shit. Learn about traditional and radical approaches to dairy farming and lawmaking and PhD candidate. Just is in is back with us. She's in Edmonton right now. Hi Jess Hi. So what jumps out from what you heard. Stephen Weiss this is interview. I think it's important invaluable to draw attention to the cognitive abilities of animals. The kinds of evidence. That Stephen Wise is puts forward to prove practical autonomy which he suggests should lead to a finding that these animals have rights. But I think if we are focused on the circumstances of farmed animals. It's troubling to think about a theory of progress that has to start with elephants and Chimps and Wales with a much more uncertain place for animals that don't easily fit into human frameworks about what makes us smart and special we. We need to think not about proving the animals are like us but instead to think about what animals think and feel in their own right to look at a dairy cow on a a farm and understand it's experienced through the lens of understanding how cows care about each other and care about their young and understand the harms of dairying carrying through the Lens of the ways that the things cows care about are disrupted. So this is a very different lens from thinking about proving moving As a matter of logic that there's been something like a mistake in failing to include some animals in the categories of human person hood and instead instead take seriously the experiences of the animals who are worst off in conditions of human confinement. If we don't need to prove that animals persons uh-huh can we just go into our animal welfare laws and kind of give them a bit of a boost boost so in the introductory tape that you showed you suggested tested there is anti cruelty legislation. There are codes of practice in place but the reality of the situation that anti cruelty statutes don't apply to conventional all farming practices codes of practice. Don't attend to to the emotional. Lives of animals to ensuring certain kinds of social. An emotional needs are met. I've read though in the code of practice for dairy causes that they should have I contact right. They should have visual contact contact with other cattle. That's right this is a very minimal standard of social contact for animal that is extremely social. These are herd animals. More particularly the codes of practice are voluntary. These are not actually part of our law. There are some industry associations that voluntarily Alan terribly submit to audits relating to these but there. It's it's not quite right to say that we have laws that generally protect the interests of animals in their own social and emotional lives or even from some kinds of physical discomfort in pain. I think the frame of welfare laws is predicated on on the notion that we're going to ensure the physical hardiness of these animals so that they can produce for us what we want them to produce as long as that remains the frame. There's going to be serious limits around how far those laws can go. I think across the board the kind of transformation that needs to happen for animals in the law and for people's interactions with animals. More broadly is for us to move towards a way of thinking about animals as having their own kinds of interest and to develop laws that honor and reflect what animals seem to care about and value trying to understand the circumstances of animals on their own terms. uh-huh thanks so much we'll catch up with you later. Okay great.

Stephen Wise Nikola Edmonton CBC assistant professor of law Stephen Weiss University of Alberta Tom Howell Harvard University Wales Alan
"stephen weiss" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

11:54 min | 1 year ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Words Matter

"Douglas grew up 'em in a house where his father died when he was quite young and Kina siblings had to work help. The family rooks really. We saw his mother struggle. And so I think that's one of the reasons that he ended up going flipping in that case in saying that this property tax exemption was actually reconstitutional. Oh that's interesting. I didn't know that background on him. And I'm going to ask you about that case in a bit because I believe that was her loss right. That's yeah okay. We go through all of them. That would take a few more episodes but the last justice I really WanNa talk about. Is Harry Blackmun. Yeah now he was appointed by Richard Nixon in nineteen seventy windy and is a great example of how some presidents are disappointed court. Picks Justice Blackmun eventually became known as one of the most liberal justices on the court and was the author of the majority opinion. We know in Roe v Wade. But let's talk about Justice Blackman's notes. What did he write about? RPG after her oral argument in frontier. anti-roma Richardson Right. So these notes are available in the Library of Congress and so you can actually go take them out and hold them in your hands. Handwritten notes that he road which is a is a real pleasure and also can be surprising so after her first or argument he wrote that she gave her a C. Plus for her performance which she is a little harsher grade by he also wrote that. Aclu New York and then he had the letter. J which apparently is his notation for Jew. which which is really shocking? And I struggled to know how to even discuss on the podcast that he would find that relevant to write in his notes. But it's you know it's it's it's they're blocking. Yeah in your second episode the blind the lame and the widows which by the way I love all of your episode title at the Beer Middle Tier one is maybe my favorite but that that episode your Second Episode Examines. Connie shelvin which you already spoke about a little bit but it's the only in case that RPG lost after appearing before the court and you say the case is often glossed over an examination of RPG's career but explain a little about the case. And why you think it's just justice important to talk about her setbacks as her successes absolutely so. This case was about a Florida law as I mentioned earlier that gave a pro special property tax exemption to women who lost their husband and Ginsburg did not want this case to be her next up in the in the Supreme Court after Frontier Antero her first role argument. She was really hoping that my favorite case and her favourite case in just a wonderful fact case was going to be next now. A Stephen Weiss and belts but the Florida affiliate office at the Aclu actually didn't tell her that they were bringing this case and then end up getting granted which was not the overall strategy strategy and so she had to take take the case at that point when ashamed when that happens when a certain grant is not part of your overall strategy. Yes exactly and the reason why. It wasn't part of her overall strategies because she knew these were tough facts. These were going to be faxed at the justices. We're GONNA really struggle to see the underlying sexism issue. And so her. Her overall point was that by according women with special property tax exemption and special advantages. Perhaps you in the short term give women a short term benefit but in the long-term what these laws actually do is reflect societal values that women belong at home. Women are dependent pendant on men and then to codify those values in a system of American law but she knew that granting a property taxes jumps into the poor widows and Florida and justice assist Marshall even called out. He said the poor spinster in Tallahassee. We right was going to be just as effective as a very well off widow in palm beach so these were difficult facts but but she knew she had to take the case. And I think that this is important to look at not just when you think about the overall strategy of constitutional change but also in that no do one person's effort is going to be perfect and there is always going to be challenges right. You talked about that a little bit in the podcast. These laws that were helpful to do women at the time and in fact they argued as a part of or at least the ACL. You lawyer argued in the first case frontier. Oh that those laws was actually would be fine. And we don't need to apply scrutiny to those but we can look at the laws that may be created detrimental. Create a problem for women. Is that what he did. Yeah that's about right so one of the central missions of Aclu Women's rights project was to show that law said which on their face report to benefit. Women actually conserve to hold them back from full participation. In American Life Right the language you used was benevolent sexism and romantic paternalism. Exactly and unlike a lot of other forms of discrimination and invidious discrimination in American society. It's sometimes hard to see. If you're not digging deep how laws like this can operate to hold. Hold Women Back Because Hey oh you're getting property tax exemptions that really something that you don't want and so part of their overall strategy was to show the court into show this all all-male Bench of justices that these laws can really operate to hold back. Both sexes from full participation in American life by really encouraging men to be breadwinners and women to be homemakers without giving much choice so after immersing yourself in the Ginsburg tapes and all of her arguments events over the years in particular that decade. Do you have a favorite moment. You alluded to a favorite case. I have plenty of least favorite moments. I really sticks out to me in California which is going to be next full oral argument breakdown that the Solicitor General's office said that part of the reason for this case is that feminism is in fashion and feminists would just like to ride on its skirt tales swell and so that was a pretty while moment. Indeed and Shocking that is the first time I have heard the phrase skirt tale that I'm come up in two thousand sixteen. I mean actually. It's crazy I I also really enjoyed. Probably my my favorite case definitely was Stephen Weiss and felt case right but I just had so much fun with the near Beer in the Middle Tier and Ranger Fred who that it was only episode. I've done where it wasn't Ginsburg arguing the case we had someone else who was arguing and he was really fun for me to focus on so talk about your your favorite case. That Weysan fell case. So Stephen Weiss and Feld was a young man who had lost his wife she died in childbirth and he wrote a letter to his local newspaper describing how a social security benefit that would have been available. Had the gender roles been reversed to his wife wasn't available to him and said at the end of his letter. I I wonder if Gloria Steinem knows this about this and Gloria Steinem might not have known about it but that letter connected him with Ruth Bader Ginsburg and so she represented him in challenging the Social Security Law all that said that sole surviving mothers could be entitled to special benefits when they had a very low income. Something like fourteen thousand dollars a year in today's dollars but that that same benefit wasn't available to stay at home fathers who were sole surviving fathers and so Steven Weiss impelled was. Just this really wonderful plaintiff and I know that he and Ginsburg Burke stayed in touch throughout their lives and she even performed his marriage about forty years later at the Supreme Court. Oh Wow yeah. So Supreme Court oral arguments we know are not On video there is no camera in the courtroom. There's only audio recording available and we may be biased. Here do you think the podcast medium itself. The one you've chosen the one I've chosen is uniquely suited to be able to talk about and explain and breakdown Supreme Court arguments in their import. I definitely do and I think that with with podcasts. Something that's really amazing is that it's all about your ideas and your voice. We don't take into account visual judgments and it leaves a lot of of room for empathy and for trying to understand an idea for an idea steak. It's a very words matter concept. I think the same is true for oral arguments there such surely about the words. I'm surely about the ideas and those folks that is. Yeah that's something that's really very precious right. I was thinking about her and the concept up to having videos in the courtroom this week because as we know justice Stevens passed away and his very last day on the bench was a remarkable day eh for him but also for her and it was in two thousand and ten when her husband. Marty Ginsburg passed away the day before and she went on the bench to read opinions and was there that day. And the I believe the chief justice spoke fondly of Mardi and and Justice Stevens. You know gave his goodbyes. But she was there strong as ever the day after the love of her life who had been her career supporter and family supporter. Really her backbone. She was on the court. So Justice Stevens passing away made me think of her and wished that there have been a camera in in the courtroom that day because it would have been certainly a sight to see I think so in the modern world. There's a book there's a movie. There's a t shirt. There's so you know all bobblehead. There's all of this love and affection for her. But have you found through your work any criticisms or any room for improvement or Parts of her legacy that we don't put on the mantle yet I mean. Of course no one is perfect and no movement is perfect in history always allows you to learn lessons and I try not have my podcast hagiography but rather a place to really explore these ideas and I I think one critique of the overall movement I think was really a reflection of the laws as they existed at the time is that it wasn't entirely an inclusive set of arguments so okay. One of the central missions of the women's rights project was to show that so much of American law really codified and perpetuated. This notion that women belonged at home in men at work and I think that's obviously a very important in laudable objective but at the same time women of color have always worked in this country and so so it was almost coming from a position of privilege and also just reflection of the privilege that is part of American law. And I think Serena Mary who's a professor at U. Penn.. Dan has done a ton of important work. Talking about this connection between sex discrimination and race discrimination as a matter of legal doctrine and I really early like that sheeps pointed to some of the original statements of Eleanor. Holmes Norton Who's our representative as well as Pauli Murray who was a huge influence on Ginsberg's project and both of these. These women were speaking out at in this nineteen seventies contemporary with the GINSBERG's movement. Saying you know we should really look to communities of color as a source of strength and as an example Oh for how households can be more gala -Tarian Wall boost discussions. Were happening at the time. It's also important to recognize that not. Everyone was enjoying the fruits of this movement. Right same way right. It's still true today. Black and Brown women experience the world and even the feminist movement differently based based on the results and the fruits of her labor. But also it's setbacks as well so what's next for you you. Is there a Ginsburg tapes. Par To oh her on the bench or is there are going to look at another justice or is this just focusing on her six oil arguments and really spreading the Ginsburg Gospel now. But I'm definitely going to finish her to oral arguments that I haven't covered yet. I have so many other ideas of things that I want to do. I would love to do an upset on the year a doing episode on transgender issues. which you know all of these cases are so gender binary? I have a list of things I want to do..

Ginsburg Burke Supreme Court Justice Stevens Ruth Bader Ginsburg Harry Blackmun Stephen Weiss Florida Gloria Steinem Justice Blackman Richard Nixon Marty Ginsburg Library of Congress Douglas Aclu Kina Ginsberg Connie shelvin
"stephen weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Assembly here. I was a scientist once and I spend my days now writing about biological science but I'm struck by how little we know of non human animals or without knowing how little faith the respect we have for them. what is it like to be a bat ask the American philosopher Thomas Nagel. confronting the scientists in an attempt to argue the impossibility of objectivity in the study of animals objectivity is a view from nowhere that relies on no one's vantage point he wrote. but can we respect other animals without understanding their point of view. we have a tendency and science when we talk about the intelligence of animals to go for things that we are good at so we are good at language we're good at technology the capacity is that we don't have we don't talk much about so for example the echo location of bats is a very complex skill if you ask any engineer to design a radio system for an airplane because that's basically what it is it's a very complex problem and very sophisticated so the echo location a bath can find an insect in a room that is completely dark can catch it we are not impressed by that because that's not something we do so we don't talk much about it for example the camouflage of an octopus who can change colors and adapt them to blend in or to even mimic another species a look like in a species of animal these are very complex skills that we don't fully understand them we don't relate to and so we have this bias in our studies of animal intelligence if you have a talking ape like let's say cocoa or come see people extremely impressed or talking parrots for that matter but all the skills we don't care much about. how do we decide which animals will be given personhood I asked Stephen Weiss. so how do you go about deciding which animals deserve personhood and which animals you're going to represent then in these legal cases we came to believe a long time ago that when judges realize that we were seeking personhood and writes for non human animals that they would be uncomfortable with that so what we decided to do was to try to frame our arguments in a way that reflected the values and principles that the judges themselves say that they believe in liberty equality autonomy they think that a large part of their job is to protect the autonomy of human beings to allow us to make choices as to how we're going to live our lives within broad parameters and so what we then began to do was to speak to scientists around the world who studied non human animals who we thought were likely autonomous beings and if they said yes then we'd ask for their help we thought that the crux of the writ of habeas corpus was a deprivation of autonomy the ability to move around even. a writ of habeas corpus is legal speak for the right to challenge custody something hard won by oppressed humans it's something wise wants for happy the elephant and there's a community of scientists who will bear witness the thing is that elephants in captivity can't make any decisions about who they might meet to where they might go what they might eat. and in the wild elephants are making decisions every moment joys pool is an expert in elephant behavior there listening in to other Ella hi there discussing plans of action we members of their family and you can see this happen. for instance elephants have a vocalization that I called let's go rumble it basically means I want to go this way let's go together..

scientist
"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Players since nineteen when nineteen what year was that six ninety got the euro, ready nineteen ninety six was the year that they went to the final. Yeah. Yes. Since then how many players have they had you, give me the, the, the names, how many players hovel burry players who have who have crossed over and actually forced merely the people who care about south Florida's sports to pay. Attention. Stephen Weiss, yes, David booth. There's so many actually there aren't so many Mike true at all. Mike Longo and Beezer. Yeah. Now balk off barky. I feel like that ninety six team had a good a good number of people. Screwed Lynn Mellanby that nine these are these are honestly names that we just note because they improbably made it to a Stanley Cup. I know they were like journeyman, correct. That wasn't a good Barnes. I know. But, you know, but those guys Billy Lindsay, those guys were known those guys are the guys who crossed over because that's the only hockey team south Florida's ever had that when they walked into a diner individually people stood up and applauded during that run like hockey's never done that. But one time down here, I made the argument early that I think the face of the franchise for the Panthers. Steve Goldstein, and I was laughed at, and then we put it on a pull and, and the pulls laughing at me, also because he only has nine percent. But I still maintain the goldies the face of the pan Goldie doesn't have a hive Goldie hive, but then he pipe in poverty. He's not even the, the more famous commentator. Why wouldn't you make Goldie the voice instead of the face of the voice face, whatever, same thing. I'm just saying. When I think of the Panthers, I think, Goldie immediately. He's the first person, I think of women, put it on the poll is being the voice of a team and the face of a team the same thing. Yeah. I think he's like he's on the medal, San Goldie is. But I don't think he's gold or silver when it comes to voice the franchise because Randy molars, probably considered more of a voice for the franchise and Denny pop Ben, I think is a silver medallists there because he's been on TV longer than he just has a hockey name. The pop guy if he didn't have that hockey name. Goldies not a good hockey name, but he's a good hockey face and a voice like just the way his voice sounds fantastic. For hockey those doesn't it is. Are you meeting the Stanley Cup finals games? Like he does does does he does the Olympic artists working people in this business to be able and he'd tip like a legit climb with that franchise. And he's an every man you'll see him at a dolphins game. You'll see him at the Kentucky Derby. No, Kentucky derided mean. Like he was at Gulfstream has all they're there every man there, but no, every man goes, Kentucky, do the everyman Kentucky Derby just not like in the stadium. The middle of the Kentucky Derby was thirty two. Very different than the bleachers, the Kentucky Derby. Right. I guess they're not even bleachers, right? What would you? Call them stance grand said granules Cranston, pool. We go out to Royal Royal you're on the air. Hey, good morning. All right. So I got a pretty interesting one I was taking the road trip with Romberg but he one of the UM game they take you up at twin peaks. So we are drinking there for pretty good amount of time before we left, we get to get going onto the road. And next thing we noticed we're pulling up through the hard rock casino. He driver took us to the wrong hard rock instead of going into a hundred bucks. Median so by the time we get the about three people have to keep so bad on this bus, and they will not have a next thing we know we already block away.

Goldies hockey Goldie Kentucky Derby Panthers San Goldie south Florida Billy Lindsay Mike Longo Kentucky Stephen Weiss Lynn Mellanby Royal Royal Romberg Barnes Beezer Steve Goldstein Randy David booth
"stephen weiss" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Oh, Chaldean guy. I was a sniper attached to a small Coniston settlement. We went out to our recon that, that compound down on the Pakistan border that operation ended in a friendly fire incident that I was smack dab in the middle of. And I told that I told that the Stephen Weiss at the message like, we should probably talk man. And he was like, no shit damn. Yeah. Did you get like any further into now? So that'll be now. What will yeah. We can talk ultimate tease right? You can talk about it on air. Yeah, I wrote about the incident in my book. So if he's low, which which he, he was looking for. He said he was going to get a copy or I'm gonna ask Jack. And I said, well, we'll sort that he. Yeah. I I'd like to need to read Stevens book, and I could swap I. Yeah, we'll have to swap you know, you show me yours. I'll show you mine. Talking books people. Yeah. Why guys have through Herve's up? Why did you just go right? There is what I try to read, as many books written by our guests as possible. But I don't get to everyone by the time the interview comes up, and I just found out Steven was going to be on today. So. I'm afraid I haven't read his book yet, but Stephen and I I'm sure we'll we'll get into it on the interview. Oh, I mean, knowing that, now, this will definitely be a, they're all Muslims. But this one will be certainly interesting from the I it's going to be very interesting, just from because the personal connections, absolutely have in a very roundabout way. So thank you. Jeffrey coming on very much pre shaded and looking forward to having Stephen on before we go. Let me hit some ED's, so we can get paid be sure to check out creek club..

Stephen Weiss Stephen Coniston Jack Pakistan Steven Herve Jeffrey
"stephen weiss" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"New information this hour on the overnight officer involved shooting in west Phoenix sergeant Tommy Thompson says officers caught up with four on robbery suspect's at a convenience store near ninety first avenue in Camelback early this morning. One of the adult male got out of the nickel. He was armed with a handgun pointed towards the direction of the officers and started moving towards a convenience store. That's when he says officer shot and critically wounded the suspect. The other three were arrested. The four are suspected of robbing the Waterberg red dice art and damn beer in yesterday. New this morning. A Wisconsin girl missing since her parents were found murdered in their home last October has been found alive. Her aunt, Jennifer Smith told ks teepee that Jamie claw is expected to come home tonight, motto, happy tears who had tonight. So emotional we finally found any after eighty eight days. The suspect has been taken into custody. Police aren't releasing more details right now, but are planning to hold a briefing later this morning KTAR is on education. A new roadmap connects the areas in education that need the most investment the education group. Expect more Zona came up with the roadmap along with eighty education business and community organizations. Really? We hope that this is a lens to help focus the conversation about where dollars should be put I in the next couple of years the group's Christine. Thompson says the roadmap points to investments needed in all areas of education, not just K through twelve. For example, it costs for teacher pay raises more access to childcare and more funding for stem workforce development, either interconnected issues. We can't afford to invest in only one area and wait for the rest of follow grizzled. The Psotino KTAR news eleven African American football players are suing the Maricopa County. Community college district in federal court, they allege discrimination is the reason the district got rid of its football programs. Ryan Felker who coached some of the players at Mesa community. College tells KTAR they have a valid point. I'd come from this community. And I've seen it happen in other communities that did away with junior college football, and it had a huge impact down the road on certain classes of individuals the athletes role on scholarship, they claim getting rid of the football program ends those scholarships and violates their civil rights. They also say it prevents them from continuing their college football careers with no more community college football football fans across the valley rallying to find an alternative for young student athletes. Stephen Weiss is leading the whole com junior college athletic conference want to maintain the same level of integrity that we were playing with before they're hoping to create more private in corporately funded football programs to start playing this fall. We've had tentative conversations with multiple teams that are obvious geographical. Partners snow collared, New Mexico military institute. But where will they study we've developed a relationship with community Christian college, which is a community college. That.

football Mesa community community Christian college Tommy Thompson officer Community college district New Mexico military institute Phoenix robbery Maricopa County Wisconsin Stephen Weiss Jamie claw Ryan Felker Jennifer Smith Zona Christine
"stephen weiss" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"This morning. A Wisconsin girl missing since her parents were found murdered in their home last October has been found alive. Her aunt Jennifer Smith told ks teepee that Jamie clause is expected to come home tonight. Happy tears we had tonight. Ocean. We finally found any after eighty eight days, I suspect taken into custody. Police aren't releasing any more details right now, but are planning to hold a briefing later this morning happening right now Phoenix police on the seat of an officer involved shooting. Your ninety first avenue in Camelback and armed robbery suspect is in extremely critical condition. The suspect is one of a group of four police say robbed a fast food restaurant near dice. Art, Van Buren, all are in custody. No officers are hurt KTAR is on education. A new roadmap connects the areas in education that need the most investment the education group. Expect more Zona came up with a roadmap along with eighty education business and community organizations. Really hope that this is a lens to help focus the conversation about where dollars should be put I in the next couple of years the group's Christine. Thompson says the roadmap points to investments needed in all areas of education, not just through twelve. For example, it costs for teacher pay raises more. Access to childcare and more funding for stem workforce development, either interconnected issues. We can't afford to invest in only one area and wait for the rest of follow Griselda zetino, KTAR news. He eleven African American football players are suing the Maricopa County community college district in federal court. They alleged discrimination is the reason the district got rid of its football programs. Ryan Felker who coached some of the players at Mesa community. College tells KTAR they have a valid point. I'd come from this community. And I've seen it happen in other communities that did away with junior college football, and it had huge impact down the road on certain classes of individual athletes, all on scholarship. They claim getting rid of the football program ends those scholarships and violates their civil rights. They also say it prevents them from continuing their college football careers with no more community. College football football fans across the valley are rallying to find an alternative for young student athletes. Stephen Weiss is leading the ho- Holcombe junior college. Athletic conference want to maintain the same level of integrity that we were playing with before they're hoping to create bore private and corporately funded football programs to start playing this fall. We've had tentative conversations with multiple teams that are obvious geographical partners snow college, New Mexico military institute. But where will they study we've developed in a relationship with community Christian college, which is a community college. That.

Mesa community football ho- Holcombe junior college Maricopa County community coll community Christian college officer Thompson Wisconsin Van Buren Jennifer Smith Stephen Weiss Phoenix KTAR Jamie Griselda zetino Ryan Felker Zona Christine
"stephen weiss" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

"The broken hand grip of the pistol found at the clo dr murder site was shown to sergeant william lee of la pds firearms and explosives unit lead in need to check his manuals he immediately recognised it as belonging to a high standard twenty two caliber longhorn revolver ed lomax product manager for the company that produced the gun hurried over to the police academy to confirm lease assessment adding that it was rather a unique revolver only twenty seven hundred have been produced since its introduction two years earlier lomax further accommodated police investigators by providing a photo of the gun and a list of the stores that distributed it la pd felt they were finally working on a significant lead they would create a flyer with a picture and description of the longhorn and send it out to police departments and shops throughout california and beyond some even reached remote locales in canada follow up letters were sent to any gun shop that had received an order for a replacement hand grip for the weapon within weeks the majority of gun sold in california had been eliminated and this area of investigation had reached a standstill but just over the hill from los angeles the high standard twenty two caliber longhorn discovered by young stephen weiss remained in its manilla envelopes in a storage area of the van eyes division of la pd they had never received one of the flyers donald but nineteen the only thing charlie knows about sex is what he's learned in the dark calls and cold stalls of the reform the tories where he's been incarcerated it's about the strong in the week like so much of life you do to others or they do to you on the outside he watches the polite dance people his age do timid glances over milkshakes episode of crown hans grazing hands at the movies as if by accident he doesn't believe it for a minute he knows they aren't any different from him these hawking youds with their sloppy his courtship is raped by other means the boys play the big shots and the girls make like they don't notice everybody's out for something and pretending they're not at least in reforming tori everybody knew where he stood in the pecking order of want and submission there are games charlie plays and games he doesn't and he is isn't about to compete with farmboys.

william lee california canada la pd charlie murder ed lomax product manager los angeles stephen weiss donald tori two years
"stephen weiss" Discussed on SXM14

SXM14

01:59 min | 5 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on SXM14

"You're has been was an artist it was also the see ego of your company stephen weiss right and how hard was that for you to real live he passed away in two thousand three great he was sick for how long that seven years since his devin you blood cancer and how hard for out how about real living that in words because you're you're trying to can day it lives with me every day and that's why started the year been send foundation because i realized at that moment what was needed to take where with the karin health care you know they were taking care of this disease hit on cancer and is disease was spine but i had the ability to see the kind of people that he made it you need to to do got that he needed to do press work he needed to have the essential loyalty need to take ate properly so we had somebody working with him at all times so that it the process that he was going through with really p as spiritual or should possibly could and today i started the year been ten inch greatest therapist program so it's a person who works sort of like could do a lot for a woman giving birth but it's that person at your bedside who takes care of you and is not your nurse or you doctor but they also take care of nurses doctors patience in love ones and that's what really drove me to my year because then integrated therapist program but that's urban said it this is a you all i mean you also have a couple stores and it's a fashion line right as well right right but it started as a foundation foundation that has to do with caring for health healthcare and mein in and it's an education and preservation of culture it's all about the mine body in spirit and health care in education they've missing links of what i believe this missing an education.

cancer stephen weiss seven years ten inch
"stephen weiss" Discussed on SXM2

SXM2

02:40 min | 5 years ago

"stephen weiss" Discussed on SXM2

"You're has been was an artist it was also the see ego of your company stephen weiss right and how hard was that for you to real live he passed away in two thousand three great he was sick for how long that seven years since his devin you blood cancer and how hard for out how about real living that in words because you're you're trying to can day it lives with me every day and that's why started the year been send foundation because i realized at that moment what was needed to take where with the karin health care you know they were taking care of this disease hit on cancer and is disease was spine but i had the ability to see the kind of people that he made it you need to to do got that he needed to do press work he needed to have the essential loyalty need to take ate properly so we had somebody working with him at all times so that it the process that he was going through with really p all the spirit alicia possibly could and today i started the year been ten inch greatest therapist program so it's a person who works sort of like could do a lot for a woman giving birth but it's that person at your bedside who takes care of you and is not your nurse or you doctor but they also take care of nurses doctors patience in love ones and that's what really drove me to my year because then integrated therapist program but that's urban said it this is a you all i mean you also have a couple stores and it's a fashion line right as well right right but it started as a foundation foundation that has to do with caring for health healthcare and mein in and it's an education and preservation of culture it's all about the mine body in spirit and health care in education they've missing links of what i believe this missing an education is you know that meditation i think to be very important can imagine you know the stills and god only knows with reading if you got them to briefs correctly and take a little meditation before their school they'd be learning so much more right and in preservation of culture i know you know about the work that i do in haiti out from the it's about you know the world is becoming so hello genius to get everything is a like you gotta passion go to london got ailing it's all you know she the same things all over the place but where do we go to find that inspiration you know in africa in india all over the world and i find the our defense there are extraordinary.

cancer africa india stephen weiss haiti london seven years ten inch