17 Burst results for "Stephen Stockwell"

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

09:04 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC. Podcast super choosy for nothing. Fire Away if my little sister Valerie. And I'm Jo's husband No. They switched off no matter which way you put it. Joe Biden had a very good time on Super Tuesday former vice president. Joe Biden making a remarkable political comeback Associated Press declaring Joe Biden the winner in Texas Alabama will go by the state of Oklahoma Protocol in the State of Massachusetts. And it's Joe Biden. It seems so unlikely just a week and it's changed the shape of the rights to the White House. I'm Angela I'm Stephen Stockwell. Today on the signal. How results went so well. The script and what happens next joining us now. National Co Chair for Senator Bernie Sanders Campaign Nina Turner Nina. It is on tomorrow more than thirteen hundred. Delegates are at stake. How do you see it? Shaping up for the senator is all on and Poppin Stephanie. And I see it shaping up very well for us. We are motivated energize. We believe they were going to have a great showing. Super Tuesday states like California Massachusetts. I'm in North Carolina right now. We believe we're GONNA take this state as well Virginia so we are really excited. I feel like they jinxed it or they're totally I mean in fairness to him. He was the front runner but then choose the happened. Let's take a look at the national map. Died in one nine states in all with an unbeaten streak across the South including the second biggest prize tonight Texas along with Massachusetts and Minnesota at this hour by grabbing the most delegates so we called Chestnuts Lucia della from planet America. Now TV show end day. Podcast IF YOU WANNA know why Super Tuesday went away indeed. You need to know what happened last weekend. First of all have South Carolina which was only four days ago but it feels like it was about four hundred years ago. Joe Biden was ahead in the polls by five points maybe ten points he won by about forty points and all of a sudden everyone was highlighting the comeback kid even though he's about one hundred and fifty years old at that point in time. People are saying. Wow Joe Biden is the guy to vote for if your not a Bernie Sanders Fan. It's same because he's all of a sudden gone well and that's that's a big deal because up until that point no one has nine. Is it going to be Biden's J.J? Or Bloomberg? Aw Club and is right and at that point in time for the judge drops out entirely even though he still was doing all right. And the endorsements Biden. I'm delighted to endorse and support. Joe Biden for president and then drops out and endorses. Baden Jesus for dignity heart for our country and then everyone endorses by then. All of a sudden he appears to be the massive five then. We got the Super Tuesday which Benny Sanders was due to dominate. And at the last count Joe Biden still still in front as far as delegates. They still counting. But Joe Biden is turned I what could have been on asylum lead from Bernie Sanders into potentially an unassailable laid by Joe Biden. Okay so two. Big things happened right before. Super Tuesday Biden smashed South Carolina and every other serious moderate candidate except Mike Bloomberg dropped out. Where were the upsets? Where did where did Baden kind of do better than we were expecting today? Well first of all. I can't emphasize enough. He did everywhere. No one was expecting to get more than a couple of sites as of three days ago. The biggest upsets were first of all Texas Bernie Sanders really focused on Texas. Texas Very Sans has been campaigning for a long time months and these added Love TV ads. He's Legrand game. He basically spent the last four years building. His Latino buys for Texas and Somehow Joe Biden ended up winning Texas by lot but now unexpected that And that's also with a Lotta delegate. So that helps the probably for me. The biggest upset actually didn't involve Bernie Sanders is involved Elizabeth. Warren which is Joe Biden. Somehow one Massachusetts which is Elizabeth Warren's Home State even though I'm pretty sure he didn't spend a sense there or visit their wants so that's that's a pretty cool way to win that election both Elizabeth Warren and Bernie. Sanders had been campaigning. Hard IN MASSACHUSETTS BECAUSE WARREN was L- worried about losing her to Bernie Sanders And Bananas. Though he was the one who could beat her and he did but he came second to buy them so that was probably the biggest upset of the of the non. Okay so we did Bernie win. Well Bernie's big win was always going to be California and it continues today. This is the state that takes. The longest account is still counting. That route. Probably be counting for awake because they have a lot of mailing votes in California which take a while the dribble in but at this point in time very has about a ten point lead in California which equals a lot of delegates. That's like seventy eight hundred delegate lead when all things are said and done another. The state's really DID REALLY WELL IN WAS UTAH. Which is a very small state but he did very well in that and he basically doubled by. Colorado. He did pretty well and a surprise surprise he wants Vermont Day. That's it and you mentioned some of the big names that dropped out recently again in the lead up to Super Tuesday. Let's talk about Bloomberg though what what's happening you well. Hey dropped out the day after. I've always believed I've always believed that. The Feeding Donald Trump starts with uniting behind the candidate with the best shot to do it and after yesterday's vote is clear that candidate is my friend and a great American Joe Biden and that was probably day to light to be on. This goes even his campaign people assigned to him. They thought he should drop out what he's saying. He had no powerful the die of the Super Tuesday and as it turns out that rise he had a terrible super Tuesday in fact the the UAE attends to work with these promises. You need to pass a barrier of viability which is fifteen percent before you get any votes and Bloomberg he passed fifteen percent just in Utah. Just in Arkansas and just in Colorado and that is it that's not wasn't wasn't a great effort from Bloomberg I've role for five hundred five hundred billion dollars okay. So it's a point that we we WANNA start to ask why and there are two big questions that you have when you look at this result right why did so well and and perhaps where the Sanders Campaign might have stumble. Let's start with Biden. What does his success here? Tell us what is it that they really did right in the lead up to these. Well this is one of those times. When was rare rare times and the conventional wisdom was absolutely spot on when over moderates dropped out? Baden lots of so. That's kind of indicated. That is what happened so the answer to your question. What has Biden down the Doodoo? I'm not sure it's by them. That's Bam to do anything I think. Just the Democrat Party as a whole bud and really. I don't feel as actively done anything. He stumbles around. Like Mr Magoo House liking gaps and Joe by and start happens around him but the forever raisin he has once again completely consolidated the blackout which I talk about every time I talked to you because it is the most important vote in the Democratic Party by a long way and hey was winning sixty to seventy percent of them yesterday which is exactly what Hillary Clinton did in two thousand Sixteen Bernie Sanders one more non black votes and Hillary Clinton did in two thousand sixteen the reason why Bernie Sanders was dominy was Hillary Clinton smashed him with black vitamins. And there's a lot of them and now Joe Biden is doing.

Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Texas Massachusetts Bloomberg Benny Sanders Baden Jesus South Carolina California ABC Sanders White House Mike Bloomberg UTAH Stephen Stockwell Hillary Clinton Valerie Elizabeth Warren Jo North Carolina
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC. podcast won't keep your impressions on the Collinsville as ability studied viable. I do believe in the past I would have a very good chance of stacking up. In a business is so new coal-fired power could would be back on the table for Australia. The government is spending six million dollars on studies to answer the question of whether or not. It's a good idea. That's reignited the political debate in a big way and with it the argument that we wouldn't be the only ones in the world investing in you call because also the story goes. China is currently in the process process of building dozens of new coal power plants. So is that true and if it is what does it mean. I'm Angela. I'm Stephen Stockwell Oakwell and today on the signal. We sought the reality from the rumors about China's alleged. Love of called. Coal seems to stop a lot of fights in Australia. Yeah literally anything to do with this tough seems to be grounds for a political war including the question of whether or not it even makes financial sense to build new coal fired power. How plans right now? which is how we ended up here with the government? Commissioning to new feasibility studies for new coal fired power and famously vocal nationals backbencher. Bobby Joyce is A big fan and has other stacks apple we have to go and inform the Chinese and the Indians and the Japanese people in Europe and across the world that they're all stupid and waste not not because they building How admissions hi sorry high efficiency low emission call fall out plants and apparently where the one country that we want to export the product want us their selves Labor? On the other hand is not a fan. The opposition Anthony Albany. Easy was very clear about that on Radio National Breakfast this way. Should the government be funding. A feasibility study for new coal fired. Power Station now exclamation mark This is quite right. Hey we have have essentially the government pretending That the world is charging what we need is a transition clean energy economy. So it's not the first time we've had this conversation nationally. No it's like a play you've seen before and everyone is back with a usually stand saying they usual lines and one of the classic line from this favorite play is. There's no point in Australia. Tearing its hair out over one or two measly power stations because China is. He's busy building fifty more as we speak right. which is the exact opposite of the other story the year about China? And that's that it's renewables. Powerhouse in the whole country is getting out of coal so we figured it's not actually possible for both of those things to be true so he called the most enthusiastic call. What should we know? Tim Buckley. I'll get you to introduce yourself if you don't mind. Suddenly Tim. Buckley Director of Energy Finance Studies Australasia. At Aida for is the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis China's energy sector very closely and Tim says that story about China being a renewable power house didn't just appear to the're so for the last thirty is China's economy has been growing at this. Just wild pice along with its emissions but about seven years ago I saw the writing on the wall about call seek it having shocking air quality and decided to change things up. Two thousand thirteen is the absolute point of pivot. That was the moment and that is win. Renewables started to become the absolute center of Chinese Energy Policy. It was the commitment to zero emissions alternatives. But it wasn't just wind and solar who's also nuclear hydro use anything boss Cole and to finish the Chinese premia talked about a war on pollution in twenty fifteen and so that reinforced. In other words he realized that the economic growth miracle that he was in charge of. Who's WHO's actually killing these people and so he announced a war on pollution is sick and most important priority? Air Pollution is on the rise in China in Beijing. You're stepping up efforts to tackle the problem this year. The theme for Wireless Day in China is declare war on pollution near Lee on Wednesday said. The government will fight pollution with with the same determination has used poverty war against the pollution's bidding wage across China north China's Hubby province polluting irons do and a similar EMINEM. Factories are being torn down Warren Pollution. Yeah it's catchy right. Sure but it's one of the pollution is the the second highest priority. The number one would be the economy always which is why the US China trade war has everything to do with why China's switch it's directions trump started tribal with China and everything. I've studied China. A decades. Everything about the Chinese leadership is sainted on their number one priority economic growth if they can grow the economy at a level sufficient to keep everyone remotely happy. That is the top Paul Priority. So if you look at anything that President Lee says economic growth of at the moment seeks is what he's talking about sixty percent saint growth per annum is the goal and everything else is subservient to that so when the economy was growing year to for years ago it was growing at seven percent per adam he was sitting pretty and they were very happy to have his second and third and fourth priorities. Now what he might very clearly. Three years ago was clean air. The war on pollution was he second highest priority now. It's very easy to prioritize you number two when you've got the number one in the bag but then all of a sudden puttin trump comes along starts a trouble with China and the tribal has huge implications for the Chinese economy. Everybody you know as John has been ripping off the United States along with almost every other country in all fairness and we're changing it pretty rapidly. You see what's happening China ks less than it used to about its emissions. It's just the before there was no direct threat to its economy. Yeah and now that they ease Cole has come back into to play. The recent information out of China shows there has been a step in the construction of new coal fired power plants in in the last night in months and that data point in isolation is certainly wearing. It's contrary to signals. We were getting factual signals. We have been getting the the last three or four years prior to two thousand nineteen but it certainly wiring trained. But they're certainly a lot of factors factors around it. It's not a Cot China's going back to coal. That is certainly not the conclusion I reach. Okay so when we say building mall aw can you put it in context of quantity we tara hair out about one or two. Call Five power stations here in Australia. But when we say they building more how many do we anything will they have built on Ow Stat. Sitting pretty accurate I would. I would say the most accurate stats available. Globally that that China has built forty-three thousand megawatts forty-three gigawatts of new coal. Over the last eighteen months to June two thousand nineteen so that is a very significant number. It means they have built. Will have commissioned a new coal fired power plant every two weeks in the last item in months.

China Australia Power Station Cot China Financial Analysis China Buckley Director of Energy Fin Warren Pollution President Lee Cole Tim Buckley Collinsville US Chinese Energy Policy Bobby Joyce Stephen Stockwell Oakwell ABC. Paul Priority Europe
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. The Minister has tended her resignation to me the afternoon. And I would asai couple things about that. Mr McKenzie has shown a great respect for the statement of standards. She's all those that Stipe Standards and the decision that she has taken to die by by offering her resignation to me the soft and they two weeks theropod flato. Mackenzie has quit the French. All sports wrote scandal. I'm Stephen Stockwell and I match up and down the signal. Why now and does this actually solve anything okay? So this isn't the episode that I thought that we would be doing. No no not at all. I mean we were going to be talking about the Democratic Democratic primary in Iowa. We probably still will this way but I we we do have to talk about perjury McKinsey and we we do separate. McKenzie did the thing that we didn't think that she was is going to do at all. Yesterday she resigned this and it's all because of the sports world scandal which has been in full force since about mid January in a nutshell. It's about a one hundred million dollar grants program for Community Sports Clubs. The government got all these independent advice about how to distribute the money then ignored that advice and spend it in marginal seats in the lead up up to the last election instead or at least. That's the picture that he painted in the savage report from the auditor general from a couple of weeks car right and bridging. Mackenzie was the one I was seeing this whole L. program which is a bad look but the government dug in and it seemed like she was actually GonNa Rotted House except journalists. The political editor Andrew Probyn kept on doing these stories stories. The few things happened last week. And that is this extraordinary Leak that I obtained this amazing color coded spreadsheet of all of those projects and. He's quite clear. How politically charged was these? These documents have big thick documents that we obtained Just the the the way that it goes through every single grant in those colors I I didn't realize what I head because I when I first looked at this document I could. I could only see the projects the worst successful But buried in this amazing document. The vibe was actually the ones that had been not successful at least in the first round so this was a real treasure trove of departmental thinking. Ministerial thinking you could see these. Are these these projects had with March read for being Labor Sake blue for being liberal Green for national and yellow. A yellow was the color for independent. Sates now some of the independence as it were quite significant because they might be for example. Lock in Victoria a seats that the coalition sort. It had a chance of winning as soon as you start saying that the sheer Shia politicized Nitra of this kind of project. Fi that he'd been compromised from the stock removed from the start. You realize that if you're in government mar goodness week got a problem..

Mr McKenzie Mackenzie Stephen Stockwell Community Sports Clubs Stipe Standards ABC perjury Iowa Victoria political editor Andrew Probyn auditor
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. Today I we will make history delivering articles of impeachment against the President of the United States for abuse of power and of suction of the the house. Beach son of a bitch. Can you blame Donald. J trump has abused the powers of the presidency. Missing is a big hoax. It's a big hoax. It's been a long time coming and Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins tonight. It's the final stage of the Democrats attempt to remove moved president from office. And this very interesting last minute evidence. That's just come out from a guy who used to Donald Trump's biggest fan four and a half million Americans Americans tuned in to watch parts supporters. Left Parnis left Parnis lovelock here and I'm Stephen Stockwell and today on the signal. The men with a mountain wanted evidence against Donald Trump and why does trial matters even if the president survives it using the powers of his high office us. President Trump solicited the interference of a foreign government Ukraine in the two thousand twenty United States presidential election president trump thus warrants impeachment and trial removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor trust or profit under the United States richly. Go to yeah so the months and months and months of talking about it we have finally at the pointy end of the trump impeachment. It's all to to do with these accusations that Donald Trump held back millions of dollars in aid from Ukraine in return for announcing an investigation into his main rival. Joe Biden and tonight that trump begins in the republican controlled Senate and it really is a huge moment so we wanted to get an idea of what might happen next. Hello and Stephen. I'm ah even of the PODCAST Russia if you're listening end of Aaron Breakfast as well where I am. The news rate of their excellent Well look I was hoping you could just remind us because it has pain some. Where did we lost late? This like when was the last time that people might have heard headline headline about Donald Trump's impeachment when he was impeached probably so donald trump was officially impeached in mid December meaning invent a majority of the House of Representatives found that he had committed an impeachable offense. Okay and right now. We're on the brink of the very crucial L. stage. It's about to hit the Senate just briefly what is happening this week. Okay so in the context of an impeachment the House so representatives just kind of like the prosecutor so they've gone through the process of gathering evidence and that sort of thing and that was the impeachment inquiry. They've decided to charge the president with a crime. That's the impeachment bit and then they need to take it to court to try and prove it in front of jury and in this context what happens is the the Senate the. US Senate becomes a courtroom. The hundred senators become the jurors and the chief justice of the Supreme Court sits there is was the presiding judge and they have kind of a trial where the prosecutors make a case. The president's defenders make a case and then the senators decide whether or not they're going to remove trump from office and it's been like a month between these two things so in that time which is a long time in the world with Donald Trump What's coming out? What have we eland? The biggest bombshell to come out kind of last week and another new trove of evidence has been released by House. Democrats Democrats courtesy of love park a fellow named live palace who nobody but the most ardent trump followers had ever heard of decided to do a couple of TV interviews and tell his side of the story and talk about his role essentially as trump's bag man in the scheme which got trump impeached. Things happened that need to get out. I think the world needs to know so if bag man manage the informal terminology for partisan his job. What's his actual title like? Where was live pot? Please tell me more okay. So live is is a Ukrainian born Florida businessman who when Donald Trump was elected president started making big political donations to to trump to super pacs around donald trump. Basically tipping money into trump's political coffers and that got him access to trump trump. But the thing is that some of that money was coming from Ukrainian politicians according to the government who you Israel. If you're a foreigner unilateral donate to American politicians even through a third party so this eventually got live in trouble but before it got him in trouble he got really close to Donald Trump. If you believe live partners he was a really close friend of Donald Trump. You look president trump. You Love Them. I mean I ahead pictures although I mean I idolize them I mean I thought he was the savior. You did you think you were friends. Absolutely I mean again. I went from being a top donor from being events where we would just socialized to becoming a close friend of Rudy Giuliani's but trump says monje on June. He's some random. Dude who has no recollection of meetings. I don't know him at all. Don't know what he's about don't know where it comes from nothing about him right. Big Difference back breath now. Essentially they've been meeting trump on and off since early twenty eighteen and let us live and he's Associate Ego Fruman Airman Levin Eagle Right. They've been meeting Donald Trump ever. Since the beginning of two thousand eighteen and originally their mission was to try and get him to fire the US ambassador to Ukraine. Marie Ivanovich advantage who their friends and Ukraine didn't like essentially and approach Donald Trump. Apparently trump immediately fired her. Ah asked him to. He fired her in front of you. Correct what what happened That was the first interaction about her We had It was a dinner at the Washington. DC At the trump hotel and in the conversation. The subject of Ukraine was brought up. And I told the president that she is bad bothering him and that she he was. You said that at the table. Correct where the president. We're correct. He looked at me. Got Very angry and basically turn around to John Destefano and said fire her but apparently trump find her for like four or five times in front of live and couldn't get her. What do you mean so sorry? This is we digress aggressive little here but I'm just really interested in that. Both trump said to various AIDS can fire this woman and and somewhere along the line. The AIDS refused to do it but anyway okay now worked in the Raji to get five eventually like the time but basically while they're on this campaign trump said look warrior hanging out and talking about Ukraine. Could you possibly give me a hand. We've something else. What I need is Ukraine to announced investigation into Joe Biden and they went? Yeah look sure. We'll do that. And they went to Ukraine and I spoke to various people and made various threats in order to try and get that job done and and that's what's Donald Trump end up getting paid.

President Trump Donald Trump President Ukraine United States Senate Joe Biden Stephen Stockwell ABC AIDS House of Representatives Parnis Parnis lovelock Supreme Court John Destefano love park DC Russia
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"So obviously we wanted to test this out and we figured where better to start than with Stephen Stockwell. Because when were you born nineteen ninety-six six. Sure yes which means I am thirty three okay. So how much could things really have changed in thirty three years. Your your kind of pretty young in this game things in this temperature change but The year you were born astray was sort of point to a degree of above average or point to one degrees and that's one point one two degrees cooler than Australia's hottest year on record so just in your lifetime. We've seen that one degree increase in temperatures and Y- that that's Eileen sort of thirty three years if my math zero I've never seen a year below the average temperature. Never there's a few where you sort of its point of the two of a degree below so you could maybe argue that but that's pretty much just an average year and I think that's probably one thing that's worth noting here. Is that way comparing it. To temperatures between an average of temperatures between ninety and sixty and ninety ninety some with that warnings already kind of baked in if we were comparing it to temperatures say pre industrial era temperatures or the first half of the twentieth century that increase would be even been more stock but even with that fairly kind of you know recent comparison. You haven't experienced a year where temperatures are significantly significantly below average and you've also experienced a significant rise in temperatures just in that three decades Ninety ninety nine temperatures are above average. A you're still got a year in there where it's about an average temperature Gotcha and there's an it's an significantly COA whereas you'll still hang on let me have a look. Sorry guys So the year you Abon who was actually actually a little bit cooler and PSI. It was one point three six degrees cooler than Australia's hottest year on record which was twenty thirteen. So even an someone as young as you has already experienced that Roy's in their lifetime just to get a sense of scale. I DID WANNA run. My Mom's situation passed to you so she grew up on the northern beaches. Sydney would spend long days at the beach with her seven brothers and sisters and her mom and and she was born in fifty six. Sorry mom amounting you. And she does listen every day and so she would have pain. I guess going to hobbled and places like that in the sixties from this sort of mid sixties early sixties onwards. What kind of changes his someone like? My Mum saying over the course of their life in Australia in the why they experienced the climate. She's really smack. Bang in that experience where you probably say a her early life is maybe inexperience of what kind of normal temperatures were in in in for much of the twentieth century and and going back further data where the issue was born it was it was cooler than average and then in the first five years you know there are a few years where it caught got a little bit higher but you know for most of her formative years. There was that variation where some years we're warmer and some years Cola Ella and you compare that to sort of your formative years. All that variability is gone. It's a close to average walmart so that increase of more than one degrade just in the course of our lifetime is not good but also out of context it doesn't sound super shocking As in if you're standing in a room you probably wouldn't notice the difference if someone crank the heat of from twenty one to twenty two degrees but that change means something totally different in the context of the climate system and as an average as you say it'd be nice if one degree increase was every day was one degree warmer. But what actually is happening is that you're seeing a an increase in the extremes. You Guy from a situation where in the first half of the twentieth century you get. Maybe I I five Max. Ten days of this extreme. Hate where it's like Above the ninety nine th percentile of h month so that means like you average out temperatures for a month and in a year. There's maybe a couple of days where you exceed that flash forward the united twenty thirteen. And you've got almost a month of that and and that month would be you know likely to be concentrated around on summer and that's that's what's really scary about the stuff. Yeah I mean the the government is said quite famously. At this point I think I think you know now is not the time to talk about climate change referring to the bushfire crisis across the eastern seaboard right. Now we've had pause Austrailia since well from since Tom Begin and what people need now is a little bit of sympathy understanding and real assistance deriving some pure in London wanting to capitol CD greeny and the prime minute that describes for anyone to be told him that common. While we've lost lives and acted you've just been through this process of really forensically charting. The temperature increase over the lost decades and the link with weather weather events. What does that data? And what do the experts tell you about the link between those things yes. So there's there's a fairly as I said a very very strong link between these increase in temperature and a drawing out of large pots Australia and an increase in bushfire risk and and that's mapped either the decade okay. So how dare we ask. What about the kids? who were born now? Well obviously that depends on how quick humankind is at decarbonising the global economy but on the current trajectory. It's not pretty by the time. A child born today is twenty the sort of law Somma we sell sweltered through. which you you know in the eyes of a lot of people is extreme summer that that that would be considered a mild Australian? Some and You know I sort of I know now I talked about the Rafer earlier or something. That's outside of the normal experience but you know by the time. A child born today is thirty in a business as usual. Scenario are they looking at like bleaching every year and you know that that gets pretty scary and then say they you know by the time they fifty By this point these fairly severe temperature rises locked in. And you know there's a study that came out recently which talks talks about. You know the some of the possibilities under this modeling and we're talking fifty degrees dies in Sydney and Melbourne. And that's I'm sorry. What a scary stuff right? So that's the kind of if we don't do anything insane. I had a kid in a week's time which would be surprised I'm not pregnant but Say had a baby. How different in concrete ways would that child's Childhood Bay from the one that my mother experienced in nine hundred sixty Sydney what are some of the tangible concrete differences in how they would later day-to-day lives? I've got two young kids. I think about this abate it and I think for me. The most tangible increase the mice tangible example of this is that increase in extreme heat. And and your mom in her formative years didn't experience very much of that whereas you know my six year old daughter. That's her experience of some. You know we. We had a forty two degree day on Saturday and we were inside with the air conditioning on now out. Brisbane and Sydney have had forty two degree days before. And that's not to say that I didn't exist but what's happening is the frequency of those days is increasing and that I guess more time spent indoors Greater risks associated with exposure exposure to that kind of hate something like sunburn or. You're living in certain parts of Australia. Risks like push FIS. Yeah definitely definitely. You've got great fog right a chance. A kid born today is going to be as kids. Insignia spending a couple of weeks inside during spring because bushfire risk and then a fog right a chance that a kid is going to be experiencing those really extreme hot days is where they're going to be stuck inside and that's the thing this is just the situation that kids are currently living with. These is just the past. Six years is and that's a one degree temperature increase. Where currently on track for maybe four degrees descend jury so I don't think anyone has a clear idea of you know it's very hard to know exactly sort of how those changes will play out on humanity? They very very clear about you. Know what's going to happen with the temperature and all the modeling has been depressingly accurate but I think the thing is what we have to start to work at. Is that impact on that idea of the Australian law that idea of summer as a time that you look forward to. I'm very central to growing up. Shift Sawai to something. That's much more sinister.

Austrailia Sydney Eileen sort Stephen Stockwell government Shift Sawai sunburn Abon Cola Ella Roy walmart Somma London Rafer Brisbane Tom Begin Melbourne
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. Thank you Mr President. Many becky isn't a national security threat. But there aroo problems with the whites operating their problem secede at the center of its operation that cannot be amended away the live in pouting the going smart. Think everything he's guy. Hi I'm not comfortable with. I'll tell you now as well as anybody else that this isn't wrought and just like that the media back laws. They did the rules that made it easier to bring asylum seekers to the strategy in mind land. Medical treatment are officially history after vote in the Senate yesterday but what happens to the people who are relying on them. I'm Stephen Stockwell and I'm Angelov wipe. Yeah and today on the signal the life and times of Medevac. What difference did it make. And what comes next. So yesterday the government managed to take a pretty major item off the bucket list when it repealed. Medevac yeah this is a big moment for them it something. They've been trying underdo pretty much ever since this bill was passed back in February so we got ABC political reporter. Tom Golden to tell us how old again so the game changer. He Ange was was the win with by-election last year that was when former prime minister. Malcolm Timbale decided to leave the parliament. We had a by election which was won by Karen Phelps. Now she among some other cross-benches cross-benches in the lower house in the last parliament decided that these these ID for amid evac legislation was was a good within numbers and some numbers in the Senate. They manage just to get that passed. There is a need for medical practitioners to be in charge of medical decisions and not bureaucrats. Now this is about emergency. Emergency medical transfers of critical critically. Ill people from Manus Island and now ruth or the result of the division is is seventy five now seventy four. The question is therefore resolved. Love in the affirmative. Some pretty controversial. It was the end of last year and the reason for the controversy was that the government didn't want that to happen though. Pretty clear about that. They said that this was going to career at a loophole a backdoor if you will and undermined national security in the sovereign borders that the government has spent so much time and if it and money create eighteen so they boys being against this the lighter. Patty can win as many bites in this house as Mr Speaker that by diest dry and people here tonight night filing the test of metal. How hot is it the potties. That aren't the government to get bills passed into into law. Usually it's hard. It's it's hard. It's very very hard. And you remember the government lost its majority because of those by-elections that bollocks Malcolm Campbell and it was an interesting situation because Karen Phelps who won. The seat is effectively a sort of a soft liberal. If she's she's had a long association with the Liberal Party but she's from that moderate right wing that does care about annoys has kid about things like strenuous treatment of asylum-seekers and again on that cross bench in the lower house in Las Parliament. They were all ex liberal. Say you also had Rebecca Schalke. For example in the seat of my issues need dependent but she's a former liberal staffer in the South Australian government and so on surreally this was It was a very unusual situation. And it's look it's never a good look to answer your question directly when a government cont control the legislative agenda. The way that this will happen with the passing of the original bill was that the AMA and a few other consent cervical organization says destroy. Medication did a tour through the holes. Here of parliament. House now I think most of US parliamentarians to tend to take what doctors take pretty seriously and the doctors were mounting a very effective campaign. I would say in saying look. The concerns about people's particularly mental health is very real on my route and on Madison panic anymore. More generally now obviously they were probably large. Parts of the government didn't agree with that analysis but there was enough people he did to really we get some momentum behind these in the parliament but most importantly in the community as well it was just one of those real almost a mushroom moment. The wellspring of support four people who needed medical attention here in strategy. It seemed like a very reasonable argument. Time that if you need medical attention on doctor's advice she should get it. So that's the thing that changed. Instead of the government women deciding largely. He tried for medical treatment. It was then after these bills got past put more in the hands of doctors much more medical advice rather than bureaucratic. You were credit gusts. I saw more of the political side right. So many back shifted that decision making power but the coalition headed. This law for more reasons isn't that it was also embarrassed because it lost that legislative fight from government and on top of that they argued that Medevac created kind of back door for asylum seekers to come here and stay under live as law. Once people received medical attention. They then can't go back under any circumstance and that is not in our country's based interests you can't have other people including advocates in the community whether they're doctoral not essentially telling a government of a guy who can come to the country and the fact that they can't leave when they received medical attention. These people are therefore on a pathway to permanent settlement and to become strained citizens and in some cases. I don't believe if that's what they would want. And that's always been the government's position right that the bill would open up this loophole. So we called up Alex Riley who is a professor of law at Adelaide University to find out what that actually meant so the latest figures from the Senate estimates from October twenty one suggested one hundred thirty five five people that were approved. Through the Medevac process. How significant increase was that on. What what was happening to you before. Well what's interesting is it really. It wasn't an increase at all so a lot of people had been coming through the ministerial discretion process. which was what occurred before? Medevac the problem. was that the minister would to was not using clear criteria for win some would be accepted or not and so people would then have to employ lawyers and the whole process that went through the courts in order in the minister to allow people to come. So what meant what. Medevac was trying to shave. Shave was to have just a more efficient process and also more timely process so that people were getting the kid. I needed straight away. Because what we're talking about about here is not just any old medical care. Emergency medical care when people are very very bad so the outcome was the same but the process. This was quicker in Asia. I mean really there are lot of papal creep. Free many back in fact they will over twelve hundred people who had come to Australia the and most of whom still were in Australia for medical care. So the government was always talking about many back as having this loophole loophole in it. What exactly do they mean by that. That's an interesting way to frame it. Certainly what many fat kids was to take full control of the WHO came to Australia for medical care out of the ministers hands and gave it to doctors and a medical process. The minister still. Oh had the final say on grounds of security so even if someone have been found to have urgent medical needs if the minister said in any way I designed it to the security of stranded and he or she can refuse them coming so in one sense. What did was it said as long as there is a medical need? Someone isn't a security risk. They will come to Australia. Okay so what about the. I guess the patent that you say where you have people who are brought to a strategy of for medical treatment and then once they hear they launch a legal claim with a high court that they wouldn't have been able to lodge from Shaw. What's that process. So they really want someone is here. They can't make an application for asylum. That's not available to them but they can certainly make an AH application not to be sent back and that would be on medical grounds so the difficulty of that is that we have a clear process around and how that happens and so we asked who are going through the courts so again. The government's concern is that people get here on medical grounds. And once they're here I've maybe had had that emergency medical treatment and from the government's point of view. I want to be able to go awry. We'll you'll you'll fit to go back but the problem is that doctors are very clear. Area that people generally aren't fit to go back and side. I still have ongoing medical needs and so if the government is we're GONNA send you back and exercises the power -ality April back. Paper will make a claim through the costs to prevent that people who are coming here during the time of many back making those nine nine those challenges so people who've come here via Medevac. Probably then not even at the stage where they're ready to go back. There probably still getting the the medical treatment German but there are so there were even this year. According to the figures there were two hundred thousand people came in two thousand nineteen ninety. Wa- Maybe Back Laura's implies who's two kinds through the old system because they're they are on to come for medical assistance. Were already on foot and site is people have come. So there's definitely people who are trying to prevent the government sending them back to now ruined and Manus And those those prices sisson London Nicole. The story that's been tall by people who are critical of the medivac legislation has been that it's amounted to a kind kind of Bayton switch. That people were supposed to come here for emergency care and they've ended up ended up staying on longer than perhaps was reasonable. Is that borne out by. The facts will the fact certainly pair out that most people who come for medical treatments have have stayed tonight and it is. It's hard to imagine them ever being in a situation to be sent back. These are people who are already traumatized and in mental health deteriorated and the physical health deteriorated while though and offshore detention. They've come to Australia for emergency medical treatment. Then the idea the prospect of sending them back act many ways. It's hard to say how could possibly happen. So yes in that sense. Ninety medical transfers both pre many vacuum postman EVAC has enable able people to get to Australia. But there's a big caveat on that and that is that they have absolutely no entitlement to stay. The government at any time is able oh to to send them elsewhere in the world and as we've seen the courts are also saying that you just can't send them back to now roy if that's going to be Terrible for the medical health so it is that people are getting here. Yes but that's that's the fundamental of short attention in the first place that you can't laypeople there for extended periods of time. We managed to stop the bites in two thousand and four. But we didn't manage to do was to get people out of short attention in the in the five or six six years since the boat stopped.

Australia Senate Karen Phelps ABC Manus Island Medevac Mr President Stephen Stockwell Malcolm Campbell Malcolm Timbale US Liberal Party Las Parliament Tom Golden Rebecca Schalke Ange Patty
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. stridency that it's political system. It's very repower and hasn't been infiltrated or sabotage by Chinese operatives. I can assure strains that under the resources have never been stronger. The laws does have never been tougher and the government has never been more determined to Cape Australians free and safe from foreign interference. Thank you very much is Jio is investigating a Chinese government to get one of its spies elected to parliament and if that sounds far fetched you should know. It's an easier job than you think I'm Stephen Stockwell and and I'm Angelov Weipa and today on the signal. We explained step by step. How like that would come off and ask what kind of damage quota foreign spy do from inside inside parliament as an investigative reporter? There are very few times. I've received message this important. It's late October. And One of my sources tells me I spy for the Chinese Communist Party wants to blow his his cover out of the spawn Happening in Melbourne with Impunity. So this story broke on sixty minutes over the weekend and and likely blimpy Andrew Hastie was saying it kind of does sound like a spy novel. Yea It really does and the center of it all is a luxury car dealer. Name Nick Zhao. Now the story is that he was approached by the Chinese Communist Party and offered a million bucks to run as a liberal candidate for federal parliament. He reportedly then with Australia's by agency is zero and in March was found dead in a moment hotel room and so obviously there are a lot of questions everyone has about that case including zero which is currently in the middle title of an investigation. But we also have questions about the toss that Nick Gel was reportedly asked to complete specifically how foreign government any foreign government might go about making this happen in Australia and what might happen if they pulled it off. I think there are a couple of governments that might be engage in these kinds kinds of activities Russia for example. But I don't think there's any country that engages in such high levels Australia apart from China Alex Jones ski is an analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute and he specializes in monitoring. The Chinese Communist. Party's foreign influence efforts so we asked him to talk us through how light these smart rotten beginning with step on finding the right candidate. You're looking for someone. Who could plausibly present themselves you know in political circles someone someone who speaks the local language Has At least a couple of us in the country is relatively intelligent but also as has has been hinted in the case of Nick Jal someone who you could also find ways to compromise and his case. That's that's through financial means. Are you also looking for someone. Who has I guess you know a clean record in terms of norges surname links to the foreign government in question differently the Preferable but in some cases I think a lot of politicians to have ties to foreign countries. Some of them quite strong but nonetheless on the list legal and acceptable within our society. So it's not necessarily an issue as long as it's at least appears to be a normal levels. I I think when you hear this story in the first place we'll hear about this scenario immediately. Sounds so far fetched right like you naturally assume I think as an USTRALIAN Woida that there would be some checks and balances in place in you know some just some background in security checks that would prevent someone who was a I guess a spy from another country being elected to hold high office. What kind of checks are there along the way frankly? There aren't many checks currently in place that could pick up this kind of activity easily Political parties do run checks on potential candidates. It's but I don't think they'd have much luck if they're looking at someone who's being successfully recruited by foreign intelligence agency and I'm not sure what level of involvement as you're heading that vetting process early stages it probably has involvement right so the kind of involvement that would be what like a basic police check may be calling a couple of referees. What are we talking about here? You're looking employers. I'm not sure exactly but potentially potentially looking at their financial information potential conflicts of interest to get them getting them to disclose these kinds of things before the public has a chance to to to find it out themselves so asking the person directly basically saying Oh you buy it works in some cases where you'd be looking get people's background facebook and finding they've been involved in questionable organizations or something but it's quite difficult to to expect a political party to suit to this entirely on their own. I think political parties if they haven't already should be finding ways to cooperate more closely with government government security agencies on bidding so maybe getting involved at a much earlier stage is what you're saying potentially I think it's a discussion that the parties have to with the government. So let's say you clean the bidding process of your chosen political party. Then there's the small matter of winning an election and at this point it's money that really helps. The most fundraising is a really important aspect of Australian politics and that would be a relatively easy way for a foreign intelligence agency to build up the status of someone. They were hoping to get into parliament by funneling donations to them through said potties rights. I just throwing a ton of money at that campaign and you try to diversify the source of the funds as much as possible muscle. None of it would have caused directly. Come from a foreign intelligence agency would be through businessmen they bribed or or organizations that they somehow compromise. So after all that if you are elected somewhat shockingly. It's pretty much a clear run to Canberra. There's no for example security clearance process for members of parliament and as far as I know becoming a member of parliament or cabinet. Minister is the only way that you can actually access classified material without so having a security clearance is that in and of itself why that is an attractive course of action for foreign power as opposed to say trying to plice and operative at some stage in the political power structure absolutely I think they recognize it is it is a weakness and And even now when accusations of this come out it benefits them in the sense that it helps questions the legitimacy of some of democratic institutions the potential that someone could be in parliament as a representative of these people but as a representative of hostile foreign power..

Chinese Communist Party Australia Chinese government ABC Andrew Hastie Nick Zhao Jio Nick Jal Nick Gel Angelov Weipa Russia Canberra Stephen Stockwell Melbourne facebook Australian Strategic Policy In Alex Jones
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This force the industry to answer a lot of uncomfortable questions I'm Angela I'm Stephen Stockwell and down the signal we speak to the owner of a Melbourne Cup champion running out on the Diet Soda scanning more important North I ranked fancied foresight..

Stephen Stockwell Melbourne
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast giving it the feeling that being watched not at time not me straight but it work well it's entirely possible view I'm Stephen Stockwell and man's Love Lapeer and today on the signal the T he's watching this like right now yeah like in a light bit definitely still quite creepy way like they have access to my phone my emails they definitely know when we come and go right and somewhere along the way that became standard practice in a lot of workplaces and you can definitely are you that it's unfair and unhealthy but the thing is there's a lot worse out there and we're not talking about it take for example this warehouse in Melbourne it's actually an old it's an old buntings warehouse sorry that sort of help paint a picture of the size and the scale of it foyer but it is a pretty nondescript warehouse from the outside on the outskirts of Melvin huge and when you walk in a straightaway there's a big sign saying Amazon fulfillment and then of course olawald slogan scattered things like customer obsession sink big and trust is Margaret viewer and cheese in ABC reporter who spoke to a bunch of Amazon staff who will worried about how they were being watched she visited Australia's first Amazon warehouses straight away you've dotted we say slogans and their ideology jeep through security gates metal detectors and then you just met we offer right after of these huge shows with all different things next to one another lack I kind of pitch it when I first started looking into it that that bay real order that it would be really well are older than everything would be in the sections like books and games over there but everything is just completely scouted and the high tech technology toes where every single item is sorry you might have huggies nappies next to video games next to an Esky and then you just met with stuff buzzing around the house so there's about one hundred and fifty people in this warehouse sending out thousands of orders every day there are people getting stuff off trucks putting it on shelves jobs and send it back out again and the job that is the most closely monitored in that way house and one of the most stressful is the pick of the people who are walking around finding stuff on that maze of shelves so basically there's an algorithm probably many algorithms that determine how many items should be stored packed within the hour and aged person has their own scanner they get that at the start of the shift they pick it up and within a few seconds of them starting their shifts there told which autumn they pick and the oil and shelf number and they've got to get there as quickly as possible kick that autumn puppet on that troy and straightaway this tells them the next Autumn have to pick and how long they have to pick it so it might say I'll twelve and you've got thirty seconds to get there and anecdotally what I'd heard from the staff that I spoke to you was that might be on them that six miles away for example and I only have fifteen seconds to get there and the the result goes to the overall pick right at the end of the dying so h person has pick rice which tells them whether they've been quick or slow that job and he's there were literal countdown on the scanners people carrying around there is a literal can't down on this China's that tells them you've got thirty seconds to bay a few hours away so a couple of people I spoke to said that when lades they'd be working lives they find it hard to unwind from these pace that they constantly have these clock that was taking taking them when they left and you know sometimes you have to like it would take them an hour or so after their shift to really wind down.

ABC thirty seconds fifteen seconds
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast could see white foaming water flowing into a creek that these animals were drinking out of and the animals at blackened teeth tumors they were wasting away there was dead wildlife in the area that he was filming it was pretty clear there was a problem but the US is already twenty years down the road? I'm Angela Voire Piere and I'm Stephen Stockwell and stay on the signal how to countries responded very differently to the forever chemical found its way into water supplies in bloodstreams so this is a story that starts twenty one years ago and has everything to do with more than sixty ongoing cases of chemical contamination in Australia it begins really when rob loss whose environmental at this big firm in Cincinnati hi uncle Statinias Hosta gets a phone call out of the blue from cattle thelma that he has never met before yeah was in October of nineteen ninety eight eight I had been working at my law firm at that point for about eight years representing chemical companies helping them comply with state and federal environmental laws and I got a call from a gentleman who was raising cattle out in West Virginia and was telling me all about cows that were dying which was a little puzzling commanded an ally was calling me and it's a little confused until he mentioned that he got my name from my grandmother and my mom and her whole family had grown up outside of Parkersburg West Virginia and that's where the this gentleman was raising cows and apparently he had lost over a hundred cows on his property after they had been drinking in white foaming water coming out of the landfill owned by the Dupont company most of our clients were companies and corporate types. oh not not the typical type of of client not the typical type of matter that we handled but you know again since he was some not that my grandmother had had referred we we allowed you know we great hey come on up he brought videotapes and photographs and we sat down on started watching you know hours of the says the days of VHS videotapes started watching all these videos and and looking at all these photographs and it became pretty obvious pretty quick that there was something really really wrong happening here we could see white foaming water flowing into a creek these animals were drinking out of and the animals at blackened teeth tumors they were wasting away there was dead wildlife in the area that he was filming so it was pretty clear that it was a problem that the footage sounds like it is absolutely horrific yeah he actually even at one point did his own autopsies of the animal all some he was having real difficulty having anybody come out to help him the veterinarian in town didn't want anything to do with it so he started getting into the animals themselves to try to find out what was happening you know he was feeding him he was doing everything they had done for for years and raising these animals and these animals are still wasted away dying horrible deaths the cavs were born stillborn or died very quickly and on his video we could see him cutting into these organs that were all misshapen funny colors jet Black Tif in these animals was it was pretty horrific stuff how did you feel when you watch that Mike what was the kind of impact be honest I'd never seen anything like that but for but it really erased any doubt I had in my mind that there was a problem here you mentioned that the the local hadn't wanted to come in look at his cows why was there this kind of reluctance in the in the town to help him well He was raising animals on a farm right outside of Parkersburg West Virginia in the landfill was owned by the deployed company which happened to operate and what was at the time the world's largest teflon manufacturing facility right up the Ohio River this community sits the middle of the United States along the Ohio River fairly small town where most of the people in town either work for or have relatives who are employed by two not so you know this was a very prominent employer in town and you know a lot of people really weren't very interested in doing anything that might upset the company so rob started working on the case that these Pharma will the tenant had brought to human and I thought it'd be pretty straightforward but before long he realized they had a fight on their hands so we ended up actually filing a lawsuit against you pot in nineteen ninety nine and started asking for documents about what was actually going into this landfill and at the point right started saying you know I'd like to see all of the records not just what's listed and regulated at the landfill but I wanna know about everything that's been sent there and used at your nearby plant that we started getting pushback from the company you know who said no we ought to be focusing only on regulated listed material also we had to go to court we had to fight we ended up getting quarters to force the production of the documents not just from the plant but everything going into the land film it was at that point I stumbled upon a document that reference something called pf being used not only at the plant and but that's seven thousand tons of sludges soaked with PF away had been dumped into this landfill and at that time I'm trying to find what is this stuff unfortunately at the time there wasn't much out there there wasn't much published there wasn't much information about what this chemical was so you've been talking about and here in Australia the stories talk about pf as or pizzas is there Ah France between those two substances P fast is the chemical family there's about several thousand chemicals that not existing on the planet to World War Two PF LA in P. F. O. S. which found a lot in firefighting foam sites those are just two of the P. Fos chemical family they're the ones with eight carbons and they're the ones that there's been to date the most researcher aw so you're hearing primarily about PF O. N. P. F. Alas because we know the most about those two at this point so often in court rub gets his hands on millions of pages of material any loans the Dupont actually knows a lot more about these chemicals than they're letting on we saw You're in the internal records of that the chemical was known to be toxic it was known to cause cancer in animals that had been actually even confirm mm to be an animal carcinogen by Dupont's on scientists in the nineteen eighties you know had multiple effects in animals in it foam D- d- Michael because of its unique chemical structure eight carbons attached to a fluorine it's almost impossible to break it down so once it gets out into the environment it doesn't biodegrade it stays there forever and when to get into living things one of the most disturbing aspects of the chemical is that gets into the blood of living things gets into the blood of people and even the tiniest amounts will get into the blood in it stays there for years and builds up slowly over time and this was known to the company in the late nineteen seventies they started tracking their own workers they knew it was building up blood so once all that came out Dupont settled the lawsuit in two thousand and one four and under filtration systems on the public water supplies in people who had private wells or water would be filtered so we'd stop that exposure but more importantly we set up an independent panel of scientists that would look at all the existing data not only what was out there and published but what was in the company five.

ABC US Angela Voire Piere Stephen Stockwell seven thousand tons twenty one years twenty years eight years
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. They were twenty three hospitals in Victoria right now locked out of their computer systems appointments have been cancelled we've been delayed and two weeks on it still not sorted. I'm Stephen Stockwell Dimanche Lovelock's and on the signal what happens when not just a hospital but sorrenstam notes have come a long way since the days when they were made from magazine letters the the Halcyon days of ransom right because now it's all give us bitcoin old late everything on your computer system also known as ransomware which is a specific kind of virus designed to hold you hostage basically so lately a string of ransomware attacks on hospitals in regional Victoria of all places some of which are still locked out of this systems and even though they might seem weird target it's a really deliberate strategy and one that's already been extensively pioneered in the US yes oh since the start of this year more than fifty cities and towns in the nights have been held hostage by ransomware attacks which walking governments police stations hospitals even schools so we wanted to know what does attacks really look like I leave our first sign from the newsroom perspective was when the Baltimore Department of Public Works posted a tweet saying that e mail service was down and that really alerted us into thinking that there was something that wasn't working within the government as a whole so this is Christine Song she's a journalist at the Baltimore Sun who was at work win they realized that something was wrong they think there was another message that said that its customer phone lines also were not working and then we checked a website for paying water bills which quite a standard thing for people to do and that was also out of order so then that really made us think if these basic things aren't working maybe there are other things within the city government that are not working either so it's just like these dorning realize ation is he more and more and more things and go oh my goodness this is actually system-wide yeah of course so the story actually that we posted on line started with saying okay some email services are down and then other people kept saying to us well no actually the phones were down to these these are also down and we were checking and so on that story was just continuously updated throughout the entire day and by the end of it it was like okay this was ransomware attack on the Baltimore City computer network it wasn't like everything had ground to a halt a lot of the sort of outside activities that people were doing like out of the Office for example you know police people patrol playing or things like that I mean that was still definitely happening but things that were very noticeable or simply trying to get a hold of government officials via email you know that just didn't work anymore right calling people at everyone has a call cell phones instead of US phones but even like you know as a person living in Baltimore right getting your water bill that didn't happen until August really for people who were trying to sell houses the real estate system for a while had also ground to a halt so definitely Li like there were tangible things that could be identified as a result of ransomware so it's just disruption but they were able to carry on so they asked in France some clutter for a payment in bitcoin which I believe at the time of mounted to I want to say about seventy six thousand dollars for the data back so right so the mayor immediately said that the city would not pay the ransom and I think later he actually backtracked and said something like I would consider it but in the end they didn't pay the ransom and just restored access based on the backup system which is different from many other cities who maybe smaller cities who have paid.

Stephen Stockwell Dimanche Lov ABC Victoria seventy six thousand dollars two weeks
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"I nance love and dumb Stephen Stockwell Signal. The Supreme Court's ruling Boris Johnson suspension of parliament was actually illegal has made the way forward less than ever before tonight. We explained the five most likely options from here announce. Its sliding doors the bricks addition okay stocky close your eyes. I don't know about this. Just do it okay but you've gotTA. You've gotta stay. That's fine okay now. I want you to imagine that your opening a door and walking into an unknown room and the door slams shut behind you and without checking you know that it's looked in front of you in this windowless damp room which smells like old biscuits cigarette butts and regret is five doors. Wait wait who who am I you Britain how God yes and the five dollars the five have most likely outcomes of your present political nightmare and today we're going to tell you where each of them laid with the help of someone who knows UK politics better than we do and obviously there are way more doors than five but who's got the time yet good point but before we play to your brexit it's probably worth a quick reminder of what actually yeah so things took a big turn on Tuesday. When the head of the Supreme Court ruled Boris Johnson suspension of parliament illegal the effect on the fundamentals fundamentals of our democracy was extreme no justification for taking action with such an extreme effect has been put before the put the court is bound to conclude therefore that the decision to advise her majesty to Parang parliament was unlawful huge so nap home is back in business and Boris Johnson. Just is not happy about this at all. This is a voted that we will respect tunes. I respect the judicial process. I have to say I strongly disagree with what the justices who found meanwhile the leader of the opposition Jeremy Corbyn who's taking every the opportunity to have a go at Boris. He thought he could do whatever he liked. He thinks he's above us. All these parts elite that disdains democracy. I'll tell you this. I don't think he's fit to be prime. Minister a narrative situation where it is even more uncertainty than before which is really saying something right. There's the deadline looming legislation to prevent an ordeal brexit but no one can agree on a deal loads of people calling for the prime prime minister to resign. Meanwhile both sides say they want an election but somehow no election has been cold. I mean it definitely does feel a bit like the sky was falling coming in on Wednesday to get a handle on it. When you use to Britain being such a stable sensible country of strong cups of Tea Eight. I'm Dr Zoe Jay and I'm a lecturer at the University of Tasmania in international relations and I research European and politics are especially the UK's relationship with the Koi to wake then to be here all the K on. I don't think I've ever seen country manage to foist chaos on itself quite liked. UK has managed to you yeah. It's a real spectacle right now and deeply confusing just for the hell of it. Let's spend fifteen minutes trying to understand what's behind. These five probably curse doors. What's what's selection one. I guess so option one is they have an election and in the Conservative Party who are currently in government lose some seats some sort of shakeup of the makeup of parliament a new government coalition has to be formed and then whichever government is formed has to you go back to the EU to work with the withdrawal agreement or try and get the parliament possibly general agreement so in this scenario according to Zoe we've got a conservative potty that loses and ends up hooking up with another right-wing party which is forced to renegotiate the exact way that Britain would leave the EU wrote and the reason they have to renegotiate that is because there's this UK law that was passed just before pollen was suspended that forces them to ask for an extinction if they can't reach a deal and an extension is something that Bros Johnson is desperate for to avoid what is whereas with rural agreement now so the withdrawal agreement is currently sitting with the British Parliament yes so the British government government with Theresa may negotiated the current withdrawal agreement with the EU last year the government and the EU agreed to it and said yes. This is what will will work with. Theresa may talk that back to the parliament and they have since rejected it in several different votes. Is there anyone working on a new withdrawal agreement as we speak Boris Johnson I think has been trying to make changes but the is very unlikely to agree to any of them so it's the agreement. That's that's currently on the table that is that or nothing if we imagined withdrawal agreement as some sort of tennis bowl in the world's worst. Wimbledon Gay it starts on the one side with Britain and then that's been negotiated negotiated by the civil service in the government is just described. Yep and then it goes to the a you and hypothetically they say yep. No sweat doesn't then bounce back back to the other side of the net to be approved by the parliament. Yes that's the price yeah so I guess the tennis ball went back and forth between the US so you and the government during the negotiation process and now it's just lying flat alton the parliament's side of the niche that is not how you play tennis. They've smashed their racket. Tennis Ball is just abandoned on the ground in the aftermath. The election described in scenario. One Guy has to pick it up and hit back to the drawing swords something out it sounds like a likely election action date would be the fifteenth of October which is about two weeks before the thirty first but the the official deadline for Brexit. It's actually the nineteenth of Doc Toba because the EU needs a bit of time to put all of its plans in place as well so anything the UK brings to the EU has to be done by the nineteenth so an election action around the fifteenth skis gives them four or five days just not enough time. They really have left this to the very last minute but I mean I'm productive on a deadline so maybe this is going to help them. Sort it out I think I think it's this difference but look look. Let's open door number. Two so option number. Two is the conservatives do even more poorly in an election and loose government altogether altogether. I liked making distinctions between like they can do. They can do very badly very badly. Look like very badly. It looks like a different potty comes to government so that would most likely the Labor Party possibly in coalition with the Scottish National Potty or the Lib Dem's but that would depend on the distribution of seats and the outcome of the election show but either way the Conservatives are no longer in charge of Brexit exit or the British government as a whole and what happens then well then I guess it is up to the Labor Party to make a decision on on whether they continue with Brexit or whether they offer to put it to the people and host a second referendum and startlingly startlingly. They don't have a position this yes. Jeremy Corbyn has a very very ambiguous and about the hallway the focus on the doorstep of an election potentially potentially their other options that we cover off but those step of election potentially and the alternatively additive lidove remembering of course that the prime minister right now is wildly unpopular. The alternative leader has not said whether or not he even wants to do brexit well it is part of this is a tension within the Labor party that existed for as Britain has been a member of the European Union some some of its members up very pro-european and a lot of its members are not so European pro European so it has made sense in the Pasta Goldman to try and step back and not assert a specific opinion one way or the other the why now it's like really quite pretty nutty ought to not right yet at this point it starts to just look impractical because potentially he'll get power and not know what to do with it because he's not had an official position shallow surely the fact that he has not peaked inside makes him fundamentally less electable in scenario that election does happen. I think this is a real tension for every party in the UK. They're all split within themselves yourselves over with to support staying in the EU or whether to support leaving. I don't think it is any less chaotic than any other situation at the moment it is a impractical and it will force Corbin to have to make a decision aid the way that I think the decision he might make would be to put it to the people and have a second referendum right so he still doesn't have to choose.

parliament UK Boris Johnson Britain European Union Brexit Jeremy Corbyn tennis prime minister Supreme Court British government Labor Party Dr Zoe Jay Stephen Stockwell official Conservative Party Theresa University of Tasmania Corbin Doc Toba
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast strike rallies on Friday huge. We're talking hundreds of thousands of people around the country millions of people around the world. It's a movement that's being led by teenagers. The piste haven't seen any governmental action. You can take some las strike and that means that we're going to keep fighting writing for the stain ability that we deserve and need a lot of us can't vote. They don't have decision making power in you know fossil fuel in investments but what they can do is talk about the problem and make noise about it and demand it from the people who can create a change. Stephen Stockwell and I'm Angela and today on the signal world leaders are in New York to negotiate a more ambitious plan to avoid catastrophic climate change so what is the strategy bringing to the table and how does that measure up to other countries we have not taken to the streets sacrificing our -education for the adults politicians to take selfish with us and titles that they really really admire what we do. We are doing this to wake the leaders up. We are doing this to get them to act. We deserve a safe future. So if we learned anything on the weekend and it's possible that we didn't but if we did it was that there are a lot of young people all over the weld who is Super Mad that government's doing more to set the policies for the World Zahava emissions by twenty thirty and reached zero emissions by twenty fifty right like so angry because the the science says that's what has to happen to limit temperature rises to one point five to two degrees by the end of the century and the white thing is going. We just not going to get there no in fact. We're probably hitting fifty. I read agrees so there is a meeting would lead as the begins today in New York and the point is to come up with a more ambitious plan not that anyone has very high hopes in Australia's case the the Prime Minister Scott Morrison is skipping together so we wanted to do an episode on what exactly Estrella is bringing to the table and what we found is that we seem to be out on a limb in in a few big wise right and the first part of that is Australia's climate policy the mechanism which the government says will allow us to mate Paris commitments and it's got this very political incredibly catchy name the Climate Solutions Fund. It's like they made it deliberately so good. We got the national environment reporter Michael Slezak to tell us how how it's actually working. This is slightly kind of caricatured version of it and cartoons. Let's cartoon version is that you're a Pharma. You've got a whole bunch of land and it's got some trees on it planning on cutting those down. You already have a permit to do that. it looks like you're really. GonNa do it. You go to the government and say you you pay me so many cents per tree to not cut them down and they give you that money to cut it down and a lot of other things like one of the more contentious chess examples is landfill gas where so if you're if you own a landfill lot and whatever they called it emits a lot of methane into the atmosphere they go and burn that gas turning it into carbon dioxide which isn't as bad for the green is an stronger greenhouse gases methane and you get some credit so I get to do that. The sectors you mentioned cy farming is when you kind of look at the whole wholesale of it. you know waste recovery again big booming. We're looking at like the companies and the the really big meteors in Australia. How did they engage with this game. Do they engage with this game. Not specifically the era but there is another part of it called the safeguard mechanism where there's meant to be kind of cap on bigger meters emitting more than a certain baseline amount of there are meeting some time that was called the safeguard mechanism because it was. I meant to say look. We're paying these other guys to pollute less but we don't want that to be completely swamped by the big admit is just a little bit more which would undo it all hasn't totally worked lot of loopholes in the safeguard mechanism so big have been allowed to increase baselines and more research. There's all looking back since I we had emissions reduction found rebranded climate. Solutions Fund drawed in two thousand fourteen yeah. It was about twenty twenty reporting twenty one thousand nine hundred forty in two thousand fifteen so it's it's had quite a few years to do. Its work. How effective has it been yes. It's let's look it's been assuming if you put to one side. All of the doubts that there are over whether or not the emissions reductions in the fund a unreal. It's done exactly what it meant to do. You know it's paid for I didn't have the figure offhand but the the the paid for certain number of tons of carbon doc side to not be omitted and a price. That's that's not bad. now the questions arise because lots of people who've who've taken money under the skein have said we weren't going to that those gases anyway so you look at the landfill gas example where they're burning the. May thank turning it into carbon dioxide. Those companies are doing that anyway antennae and using the because they're burning it right they're creating hate which they then used to cradle. Christie and which they then sell to the market and they've said that they were going to do that anyway so they call them anyway projects the government's paying them to do something. They've said that would have done regardless so those don actually savings. How does the government assist its own policy. I'm guessing they would write it as a raging success the era yeah they they say it was great. I mean and look on paper. It's done rough. It's it's done pretty much what they intended to do so yeah they say it was a great success the head trouble though now towards the end of the policy because they are failing to spend the money. That's left in the fund so there's about two hundred million. I think left the fund and it's actually strangely. The amount left in the kitty is going up rather than down feeling to spend so they can't spend it fast enough. They can't spend it fast enough year so in the last auction around I think they funded about three new contracts as opposed to dozens and hundreds and early early rounds. What does that tell us well. It could be a few things so they're trying. The whole point of this is to do it is to buy emissions reductions actions as cheaply as possible and so they sit there kind of a a line in the sand and they say we'll only pay this much in order to make sure it stays cheap. They may maybe eh just can't buy cheap emissions anymore under this type of arrangement. Maybe there's you some some shapes. Forms are like averted land clearing and landfill gas. They're all used up your bottle missions there you can buy. It's just going to get more expensive so that might be one of the reasons so basically the low hanging for. It's been picked exactly now. If you want to start cutting anymore missions it's gonNa cost you because it's it's expensive to reducing from that point exactly and part of the reason why it's GonNa be more expensive. Eh 'cause the low hanging for projects that we're going to go ahead anyway so they didn't need much money to to bind to the system.

Australia New York Climate Solutions Fund ABC Stephen Stockwell Scott Morrison reporter Michael Slezak Angela Christie twenty twenty Prime Minister Estrella Paris two degrees
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an a._b._c. Podcast heart has have being going on in hong kong for three months now. They started on the streets but they've been getting bigger and this week. Protesters shot down the city's entire airport. It didn't take long at all to get violent with police. Firing pepper spray gray and attacking protesters with batons shot up looks like they kind of losing patients with these protests taste promised an iron fist response and that's this strong words right and while those words being said fridges emerged of military vehicles rolling towards the the hong kong startling pictures now just coming through to the newsroom there showing a convoy of chinese military vehicles rolling towards hong kong from shenzhen city. I need this is just across the border on stephen stockwell and dime ruby giants and today i am a signal we speak to a man who led the student protests in tiananmen square to find find out how he thinks this is all going to end. My name is work is she was a student leader back. In nineteen eighty nine in the chinese democracy seeing movement <hes> commonly known as the kinnamon student movement so back in ninety nine were was twenty one and he went on hunger hunger-strike while that was happening he met with chinese leaders and he confronts them live on national television. One of the student leaders who has been on the hunger strikes and saturday and is being given medical treatment was were kaixi a twenty one year old from beijing normal university. He accused the leaders of showing no sincerity in solving the problem soon after that he collapsed and was taken to the hospital when dan deck meeting was televised nationwide that <hes> made my name one of the no-one named throughout the country but also that tavist <hes> that <hes> televised meeting have almost <hes> three hundred million <hes> people took the streets after the meeting that lasted for another two weeks until june the chinese government decided to move in with people's people's liberation army swiss re nations machine guns tanks rolling over people so <hes> that's that's one one of the most the darkest day in modern history june fourth massacre chinese government killed hundreds if not thousands even so peaceful demonstrators in its own capital so estimates of the death toll from the chinaman's square massacre vary very pretty wildly from hundreds to thousands with thousands more people injured and china's never given any sort of public account of what that death toll is right yeah. No i mean even now. China doesn't like talking about this sort of stuff if they find that you're really getting out there around tiananmen square and what happened on july four. They'll come up. You'll lose does your job. You're on the risk of being arrested yeah. I'm where was at risk of exactly that happening to him. Because after that diet tiananmen square he became the second most wanted person in in all of china beijing was under siege by the troops. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers charged into the city at the same time. My the name was already on radio broadcast. I mean t._v. And you know government want us even before they officially released the most wanted <hes> list so yeah. It's a nationwide hunt for the twenty. One student and leaders <hes> so with sympathizers was supporters. <hes> was in china and particularly particularly in hong kong. I managed to escape china to hong kong. Hong kong was the first step when when i managed to flee china so we're has been in exile from china pretty much ever since that point after hong kong. He ended up in france forbid now. He's in taiwan and because he has these ties to hong kong. He's been pretty closely watching. What's going on there in nineteen thousand nine back in beijing when we were <hes> we when we took the street when we occupy occupy kinderman square hong kong people gave us enormous support <hes> morally <hes> you know materially dace they really they were really behind <hes> behind us. They were really fought. Fighting by shoulder was that the students in kenema and i have greeted marija they saved my life later on so i have great admiration and you know <hes> appreciation appreciate gratefulness to hong kong people flights resumed at hong kong airport the day after violent clashes between riot police and protesters overnight the demonstrations in hong kong have continued for ten straight weeks and show no sign of letting up roiling global markets. There's kicked off a few months ago right so hong kong had this bill before to extradite people waiting for trial to different countries and the fear was that people who have been accused accused of a crime could be taken to china to be tried yet. That bill was withdrawn. Yes it was happened a month or so ago now but he kind of ignited this fire within people in hong kong this kind of fear that this kind of creeping authoritarianism had been coming in from china yeah and in the last week things have really intensified. We've seen a whole bunch. Inch of anti-government protesters make their way into the airport monday. This is kind of a bit of a monitoring convenience. I mean they were just bunch of flights canceled basically a won't we doing here. We spend our own time to stay here. I'll protect young before journey hall to go with freedom. We all have a job. All had that work been kinda rant bid on tuesday. Things started to get violent police and protestors hitting each other police. Let's begin arresting and then dragging out protesters from april so then these reports emerged that they speak line of chinese military vehicles because was heading to shenzhen which is the chinese city that borders hong kong and now there's these satellite pictures going around which seemed to shari that there's more than one hundred of these vehicles equals all lined up in a soccer stadium reward be satellite photos from above you can see the stadium and just like trucks and trucks all around these things kind of like semi armored personnel snow carries. I guess and trying to say is this johnston training exercise. It was planned before all this stuff in hong kong with going but because china people a- worried and some including u._s. Officials are warning that china could be preparing for these kind of like tiananmen square crackdown one of the most important similarity while i yeah i don't i don't send even the right word i mean is identically the same chinese regime the one government do not want to give it's people freedom. That's the identical part it's the same enemy of <hes> of the people that set kind of links to demonstrations one in beijing thirty years ago and one in hong kong going on today and then very unfortunately that same factor the enemy that we're facing <hes> do not know much tricks when <hes> when confronted wanted by people with determination sir two years ago they deployed troops and and i'm afraid this time they're thinking about doing the same so we're reckons that those troops probably going to be on police instead of the actual military but make no mistake. I mean arm the police. Police are army. Our armies are the same they're just drafted soldiers who are serving and then they will they receive the same kind of trainings they're they're the same they are the government's military force and <hes> the world shouldn't which treat them differently just because they have a different name and but unfortunately we don't really live in a very honest world so <hes> the chinese government will probably use armed police because the world will say okay this time they did not deploy <hes> people's liberation army but again as i said both armed police are the military forces of the government that they used it deployed against people and in more honest the world there shouldn't be a debate about the similarity or difference of the two <hes> on the surface. I don't think it will be the same aim uptick as what they did thirty years ago but <hes> but in a sense i think they're going to do the same they go in to kill and he's food challenge peaceful protesters challengers dissidence and then to deploy fear and then to sit and look at the world old tolerate and accept that one more time so how dangerous do you think it is right now to be a protester in hong kong very i think they will be a human life lost. I don't know when i don't know by what means but we have come to the point that the beijing wants to <hes> demonstrates the strong will of dares to after detail hong kong people demonstrated dares in the last two months all right so were seems pretty sure that things are only going to get worse for protesters although although he does also say that the fact that hong kong is an international business hub might make china think twice about intervening this is a standoff it is a this is a confrontation of the of the will one wants freedom the others don't want to give the there's no. There's no cert- option saw aw i think <hes> one of the two and let's see the i am betting on one thing though the hong kong also serve <hes> has one important potent though <hes> financial hubs in economic ports for the ruling groups there is interest of the china china <hes> there's also the interest of the chinese ruling groups that these two interests do not align. They're not the same. I am hoping the ruling groups the two hundred families within the chinese communist parties in the final <hes> destroying hong kong or you know <hes> they may also harm their own interest and then maybe.

hong kong china Hong kong chinese government beijing china beijing beijing normal university tiananmen square chinese shenzhen city france stephen stockwell shenzhen kenema taiwan johnston swiss re nations
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an a._b._c. Podcast look arrested quite willing for that very willing in fact. It'd be very baffled story <hes> for that to happen hundreds of women who've had abortions of taken to facebook facebook and twitter saying go on arrest is they've got a hashtag and protesting losing new south wales stu consider abortion a crime but this arrest i stopped protest isn't a new idea. It's happened once before in the nineteen seventies. I'm ruby joins stephen stockwell and today the signal the bill to change abortion law in south wales and why fifty years later women still asking to be arrested in the late nineteen sixties abortion the provision of abortion and through clinic century doctors was closely associated with police corruption and the <hes> abortion clinics would pay off the place. This is dr pringle. She is from the school social sciences at the university first of new south wales at that time all say you would <hes> most abortions set were brought up to that time for prosecution would have been the motion set that there was some problem with in other words that they are a woman who had a successful abortion would not normally report that to the police unclearly so they would often be a complicating factor or <hes> or some other reason that that the wash reported into the police rather than just the simple provisional then in the early seventy s two things happened a group of women eighty of them took out an ad in a the national paper with their names and the fact that they had legally terminate their pregnancies one of women her name's wendy mccarthy is now quite a high profile business woman and she told buzzfeed just feed the whole idea was really to provoke the cops a bit. She said that well you know. This is a legal and poor women than her where we're getting done for this then she we sang to place well. Why don't you come for us to right so that was one of the first kind of pro abortion protests in the seventies probably quite a quite a bit of the thing to do but the really big the thing that happened in the early seventies was doctor who was arrested and charged with unlawfully performing miscarriage in early nineteen seventies a doctor at the bundy clinic. Dr tamoil was arrested and <hes> he was put on trial four providing abortions and it was his his child that the historic ruling was is made by a judge levin <hes> to <hes> to reinterpret the law ought to interpret the law in line with <hes> with previous rulings in the u._k. Okay and in in victoria and what it did was to really provide a basis <hes> without changing a basis on which on abortion became name has since that time become freely available throughout new south wales so what did that ruling practically main for women in new south wales then who wanted to get an abortion it meant that clinics phoenix began to be established on a legal basis so that <hes> in new south wales at least most abortions are provided in free standing clinics six freestanding abortion clinics rather than in public hospitals or private hospitals <hes> and <hes> the the procedures and protocols calls have evolved a little bit insane about the about the <hes> appropriate procedures at a taken in regard to tomb nation of pregnancy at the moment they largely governed by <hes> ministry of health directive which sets out on how abortion should in what what are the criteria that abortions need to perform so in order to be performed lovely bahaji.

south wales dr pringle Dr tamoil facebook bundy clinic wendy mccarthy stephen stockwell victoria twitter levin fifty years
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

14:43 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an A._B._C. podcast in November last year. CEDI stopped Coltrane. She climbed on top. Sit at a table and chairs is and a pot of tea and invited the C._E._o.. Of the Rail Company to come and talk about climate change took the Coltrane with a t set and that's where I'm I'm GonNa stay until he's ready to commit to new coal on the horizon network. Unsurprisingly she was arrested arrested but it was months later when she got this bill seventy five thousand dollars that she started to get really worried her Stephen Stockwell and I'm ruby joins and today on the signal how climate change activists say they're being silenced by being wealthy D. corporations and how anti protest law suits could threaten democracy so.

Coltrane Stephen Stockwell Rail Company seventy five thousand dollars
"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"stephen stockwell" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an <Speech_Music_Male> A._B._C.. PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Australia <Speech_Male> took a decision <Speech_Male> fifty years ago <Speech_Male> at the end of the <Speech_Male> sixties not <Speech_Male> to acquire nuclear weapons <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the circumstances which <Speech_Male> may debt the right decision <Speech_Male> then as it certainly <Speech_Male> was launch <Speech_Male> a changing <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> there are <Speech_Music_Female> eight countries in the world <Speech_Music_Female> that have official <Speech_Female> on the books nuclear <Speech_Music_Female> weapons in fact <Speech_Music_Female> probably nine <Speech_Music_Female> because <Advertisement> Israel's <Speech_Music_Female> kind of undeclared <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> so <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> should USTRALIA <Speech_Music_Female> be trying to get <Speech_Music_Female> on that list. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Angela Pierre <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm <SpeakerChange> Stephen Stockwell <Speech_Male> and two down the signal. <Speech_Male> We ask <Advertisement> a changing <Speech_Music_Male> world means Australia <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> needs nukes <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and hear <Advertisement> what stopped <Speech_Music_Male> US last <Advertisement> time we went <Speech_Music_Male> down this path <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Music_Male> Australians <Advertisement> dot loved <Speech_Male> the idea <Advertisement> of <Speech_Male> going nuclear <Advertisement> just in <Speech_Male> general really <Speech_Male> I mean even the idea <Speech_Male> of nuclear power how is <Speech_Male> kind of a nonstarter <Speech_Male> because people can't <Speech_Male> seem to stomach the safety <Speech_Male> risks that <Speech_Male> come with that industry <SpeakerChange> yeah <Speech_Male> which leaves <Speech_Female> Actual Nuclear <Speech_Female> Weapons Fair way down <Speech_Female> the list of things as a nation <Speech_Female> really want <Speech_Female> right now somebody between <Speech_Female> long winters <Speech_Female> in higher <Speech_Female> tax on <Speech_Female> but we did want <Speech_Female> to entertain the idea <Speech_Female> just four today <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> one of Australia's leading <Speech_Female> defense strategists <Speech_Female> professor Hugh Watt <Speech_Female> thinks it's not <Speech_Male> the worst idea <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Male> have been very confident <Speech_Male> that we could depend <Speech_Male> on the United States <Speech_Male> to deter <Speech_Male> any threat of nuclear <Speech_Male> attack against Australia <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the list confident we are <Speech_Male> of America's continuing <Speech_Male> strategic <Speech_Male> role in Asia the <Speech_Male> list confident we are <Speech_Male> America's a launch <Speech_Male> with Australia analysts <Speech_Male> confident we can bay <Speech_Male> that in future America <Speech_Male> would always do that <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Male> therefore have to recognize <Speech_Male> that if we <Speech_Male> continue to <Speech_Male> rely on the united. Nodded states <Speech_Male> and that doesn't seem <Speech_Male> to be anybody else. We could <Speech_Male> rely on now. <Speech_Male> Risk of fasching <Speech_Music_Male> nuclear <Speech_Music_Male> threat of

Australia America Angela Pierre Stephen Stockwell Hugh Watt Israel United States official professor Asia fifty years