3 Burst results for "Stephen Milly"

"stephen milly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:09 min | 3 months ago

"stephen milly" Discussed on KCRW

"That's Stephen Milly's professor of theology at the Catholic Theological Union. Thank you very much. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. And tomorrow on morning edition. What awaits Joe Biden's solicitor general, who will be called upon to reverse a staggering number of Trump administration legal positions, all while representing the administration before the Supreme Court. Our Nina Totenberg lays out the stakes asked you smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. And you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Columbia has a hippo problem. Normally, these £4000 beast wallow in the lazy waters of sub Sahara Africa. But in the 19 eighties, drug lord Pablo Escobar had money to burn. Pablo Escobar had this idea that he could kind of create a Noah's ark if you like. And so he started collecting animals from all over the world and creating this Personal zoo. That's Emma Clifford, founder and director of animal balance an NGO focusing on controlling animal populations without calling them, she says, among those walking two by two at Escobar's sprawling hideout for hippos from Africa he smuggled into the country. After Escobar was killed in 1993. Most of his exotic animals were moved to other zoos around the country, but not the hippos. The hippos were left ficus is so large that rather difficult to boot on de so the hippos continued to breed. And now there's estimated between 80 and 100 hippos living in the Magdalena River Basin area. 40 of them are still living at the Escobar, a state east of million, which has been turned into a kind of hippo amusement park. Attracting tourists for the last year. So Clifford's group has been working with local scientists to study these captive animals try and figure out how to control the rest of the bunch, which you're lumbering through the Colombian countryside and invasive species for the ages. Despite the bad rap hippos have for being ornery, you know, never get between a hippo. That's water, Clifford says. Locals have grown to love these interlopers and their contribution to the tourist economy. And if the hippos comes through the villages at night time, which is tens when it intends to happen when they go for walk about a time the people respect them and give them the space that they so deserve. And she says the hippos have scared away the illegal fishermen. It used to be that they would use dynamite explosives for certain kinds of fishing, and now that's not happening on so in some ways, the hippos are actually protecting. The area off the river. But Colombia's lush lowlands are hippo heaven, and their numbers are exploding. According to Jonathan Shuren. He's a professor of ecology, behavior and evolution at the University of California, San Diego and is the leader of a team studying the hippos impact on the rivers and lakes. There was recently done a modeling after size, mapping their potential habitat. And that one happens, estimated that they would top out of in around 1 to 2000 or so animals once they've sort of filled all the available habitat. Around the Magdalena River. Fortunately, says sure in the hippos were hemmed in by the Andy so they won't be showing up in the Amazon. But they're growing numbers are a problem. Their feces trigger algae blooms and make the water toxic to fish. And with their massive appetites, hippos are competing for the same grasses and fruits eaten by native species. Were attempts in the past to call the hippos. But locals were outraged after soldiers shot one. Now it's illegal to kill them. So scientists are working on a birth control plan for the package arms. It's no small task to sterilize these huge animals. But researchers hope that they will be able to lure them out of the lakes and rivers with some sweet carrots, dark thumb with a tranquilizer and inject them with a sterilizing chemical if they are successful, says Shark in The days of the grandchildren of Pablo Escobar's hippos may be numbered, potentially if you sterilize these ones, and they stopped having new hippos than these guys would live out.

Pablo Escobar Emma Clifford Noah founder and director Sahara Africa hippo amusement park NPR Magdalena River Basin Magdalena River Stephen Milly Catholic Theological Union Nina Totenberg Joe Biden Jonathan Shuren professor of theology Columbia Colombia NGO
"stephen milly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"stephen milly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm just wondering if you you see them playing out politically on particular interested in the Supreme Court and Biden I think what's always important to remember is as much as we'd like to talk about a separation of church and state. It's always the same people who are entering the sanctuary to go to mass and who are coming out of the sanctuary to go toe work, whether they go to work in a factory or a taxi cab or a university or at the United States Supreme Court how we practice our faith. Each of us individually determines a whole lot about how that's going to play itself out. In terms of public life, Whether we're voters or whether we're public officials, I think the jury is still out on me. Cockney Barrett. We don't really know yet a whole lot about what sort of justice she is going to be in. One of the things that certainly happens with justices on the Supreme Court. I think we've seen this with John Roberts eyes The time on the court tends to change and surprise. Even the justices themselves. Last question, You know, there's been a lot of debate as to whether we should even use the lens of religion to analyze. Our public officials are justices. What are you thoughts on that? Religion, Whether it's Catholicism or not, is going to tell us something about a person. Not going to tell us always something good or something bad, But it's just another piece of information to understand who a person is. Who we should want in public life at the end of the day isn't a resume. I don't think certainly a job like president of the United States. There is No resume that can prepare anyone for it. Not even someone with this much experience is Joe Biden. What? We're looking for his decency. What? We're looking for his empathy. What we're looking for is someone who understands that this job is about the people who are being served, and not about the person who's sitting in the office. How a person practices their faith can tell us an awful lot about how they're going to hold that office. And I think that's one of the interesting things about watching Joe Biden and thinking about Joe Biden as a Catholic as much as any of those other public officials. That's Stephen Milly's professor.

Joe Biden United States Supreme Court Cockney Barrett Stephen Milly John Roberts United States president professor
"stephen milly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:10 min | 3 months ago

"stephen milly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stephen Milly's professor of theology at the Catholic Theological Union. Thank you very much. Thank you. Glad to be here on tomorrow on morning edition. What awaits Joe Biden's solicitor general, who will be called upon to reverse a staggering number of Trump administration legal positions, all while representing the administration before the Supreme Court. Our Nina Totenberg lays out the stakes asked you smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. And you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Columbia has a hippo problem. Normally, these £4000 beast wallow in the lazy waters of sub Sahara Africa. But in the 19 eighties, drug lord Pablo Escobar had money to burn. Pablo Escobar had this idea that he could kind of create a Noah's ark if you like. And so he started collecting animals from all over the world and creating this Personal zoo. That's Emma Clifford, founder and director of animal balance an NGO focusing on controlling animal populations without calling them, she says, among those walking two by two at Escobar's sprawling hideout for hippos from Africa he smuggled into the country. After Escobar was killed in 1993. Most of his exotic animals were moved to other zoos around the country, but not the hippos. The hippos were left because they're so large that rather difficult to move on De so the hippos continued to breed. And now there's estimated between 80 and 100 hippos living in the Magdalena River Basin area. 40 of them are still living at the Escobar, a state east of million, which has been turned into a kind of hippo amusement park. Attracting tourists for the last year. So Clifford's group has been working with local scientists to study these captive animals try and figure out how to control the rest of the bunch, which you're lumbering through the Colombian countryside and invasive species for the ages. Despite the bad rap hippos have for being ornery, you know, never get between a hippo in its water, Clifford says. Locals have grown to love these interlopers and their contribution to the tourist economy. And if the hippos comes through the villages at night time, which is tens when it intends to happen when they go for walk about a time the people respect them and give them the space that they so deserve. And she says the hippos have scared away the illegal fishermen. It used to be that they would use dynamite explosives for certain kinds of fishing, and now that's not happening on so in some ways, the hippos are actually protecting the area off the river. But Colombia's lush lowlands are hippo heaven, and their numbers are exploding, according to Jonathan Suren. He's a professor of ecology, behavior and evolution at the University of California, San Diego and is the leader of a team studying the hippos impact on the rivers and lakes. There was recently done a modeling after size, mapping their potential habitat, and that one at this estimated that they would top out of in around 1 to 2000 or so Animals once they've sort of filled all the available habitat around the Magdalena River, fortunately, says sure, in the hippos were hemmed in by the Andy so they won't be showing up in the Amazon. But they're growing numbers are a problem. Their feces trigger algae blooms and make the water toxic to fish. And with their massive appetites, hippos are competing for the same grasses and fruits. Eaten by native species the war attempts in the past to call the hippos, but locals were outraged after soldiers shot one. Now it's illegal to kill them. So scientists are working on a birth control plan for the package arms. It's no small task to sterilize these huge animals, but researchers hope that they will be able to lure them out of the lakes and rivers with some sweet carrots. Darth, um with a tranquilizer. And inject them with a sterilizing chemical If they are successful, says Shark in the days of the grandchildren of Pablo Escobar's hippos may be numbered. Potentially if you sterilize these ones, and they stopped having new hippos. Then these guys would live out their days.

Pablo Escobar Emma Clifford NPR Sahara Africa hippo amusement park founder and director Magdalena River Basin Stephen Milly Catholic Theological Union Magdalena River Nina Totenberg Joe Biden Noah professor of theology Jonathan Suren Columbia Colombia NGO Darth