35 Burst results for "Stephen Hawking"

What Business Is Twitter In?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:36 min | Last month

What Business Is Twitter In?

"Twitter the board of Twitter it's a business okay It's not a charity It's a publicly traded company It's not a charity There are charities they register as charities This is not a charity Twitter is a company It is a business If it wants to be some kind of public utility then it should declare itself as such But it's not It is a business that has one of the worst business models I have ever seen Take 40 to 50% of America conservatives you know attack them ban them from your platform and stop them from socially using a social media company How that's a business model is just puzzling to me I mean I've never claimed to have a Stephen Hawking like level of intellect But gosh if you're cracking three digits on the IQ meter you've got to be like wait what That's your business model Do you understand over at rumble right I'm an investor in rumble Like the best day of our lives is when people with followings liberal or conservative come over on rumble and start conversations It's a great day There's a comment section If it's a liberal video conservatives want to comment on it go right ahead If it's a conservative video liberals you want to comment on it go right adley It's a free speech platform Why Because it's a business It's a business They're in the business of providing a platform for speech That's literally what we do But Twitter I don't know what business they're in Do you

Twitter America
"stephen hawking" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 10 months ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Days before his death on march fourteenth two thousand eighteen famed theoretical physicists. And cosmologists stephen hawking completed what would be his final research paper it since passed peer review and was published online in the journal of high energy. Physics on april twenty-seventh written with co author. Thomas herzog a theoretical physicist at the university of louisville belgium. The paper adds another facet to our understanding of this universe that we live in and needless to say it's complicated titled a smooth exit from eternal inflation. Be publication discusses an enigmatic problem facing cosmologists but before we delve into the crux of the study. Let's go back to win. Our universe was a baby. Some thirteen point eight billion years ago. A lot of evidence suggests that our universe originated from a singularity an infinitely dense point from which all the universe as we know it was born. We call that event the big bang but how the singularity came to be and why the big bang happened isn't of concern right now. We're interested in what happened immediately. After our universe was spawned a period known as inflation cosmologists predict that inflation occurred over a vanishingly small period. Right after the big bang during our universes very first ten to thirty two seconds during inflation the universe expanded exponentially and much faster than the speed of light after only his second. The energy from this inconceivably gargantuan explosion condensed to form subatomic particles that over millions of years created the stars galaxies planets and after another few billion years life. As we know it once this inflationary period ended the universes rate of expansion slowed but it continues to expand to this day because inflation powered a faster than light speed expansion. The observable universe that we see today is not the entire universe rather we exist inside a region of the cosmos. That light has had time to reach. It's like dropping a pebble into a calm swimming pool. The first circular ripple to propagate from the splash travels a fixed speed across the surface of the pool. If we imagine that the limit of our observable universe is that ripple traveling across the pool at the speed of light it's not that nothing exists beyond that ripple there's more pool or universe beyond it. We just can't see it yet. So the consequence of inflation is that there should be a lot more universe beyond what we can see even with our most powerful

neilson us Ge
What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 10 months ago

What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

"Days before his death on march fourteenth two thousand eighteen famed theoretical physicists. And cosmologists stephen hawking completed what would be his final research paper it since passed peer review and was published online in the journal of high energy. Physics on april twenty-seventh written with co author. Thomas herzog a theoretical physicist at the university of louisville belgium. The paper adds another facet to our understanding of this universe that we live in and needless to say it's complicated titled a smooth exit from eternal inflation. Be publication discusses an enigmatic problem facing cosmologists but before we delve into the crux of the study. Let's go back to win. Our universe was a baby. Some thirteen point eight billion years ago. A lot of evidence suggests that our universe originated from a singularity an infinitely dense point from which all the universe as we know it was born. We call that event the big bang but how the singularity came to be and why the big bang happened isn't of concern right now. We're interested in what happened immediately. After our universe was spawned a period known as inflation cosmologists predict that inflation occurred over a vanishingly small period. Right after the big bang during our universes very first ten to thirty two seconds during inflation the universe expanded exponentially and much faster than the speed of light after only his second. The energy from this inconceivably gargantuan explosion condensed to form subatomic particles that over millions of years created the stars galaxies planets and after another few billion years life. As we know it once this inflationary period ended the universes rate of expansion slowed but it continues to expand to this day because inflation powered a faster than light speed expansion. The observable universe that we see today is not the entire universe rather we exist inside a region of the cosmos. That light has had time to reach. It's like dropping a pebble into a calm swimming pool. The first circular ripple to propagate from the splash travels a fixed speed across the surface of the pool. If we imagine that the limit of our observable universe is that ripple traveling across the pool at the speed of light it's not that nothing exists beyond that ripple there's more pool or universe beyond it. We just can't see it yet. So the consequence of inflation is that there should be a lot more universe beyond what we can see even with our most powerful

Journal Of High Energy Thomas Herzog Stephen Hawking University Of Louisville Belgium Swimming
Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:38 min | 1 year ago

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations. Bit researchers leaders. Who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Yesterday's dini whose professional physics at amazon is taking versity. One of the primary of usage focus is new leaders. Welcome to see you thank you. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i know that you have done a lot of work on neutrinos. You have a few papers. That came out recently. And i want to talk to a twenty eighteen paper dalogue and my own neutrino signatures of primordial black holes. invite you say. These studied primordial black holes ph is as sources of massive neutrinos by hawking radiation under the hypothesis that black holes emit nuclear no bass item states be described quantitatively called the pbs evolution and lifetime is affected by the mass and flew munich dialect my own nature of neutrinos before we get the details celia I wanted to get some definitions of folks would know what black court saw a few episodes of black holes Here we're talking about. The pride won't imprac codes owes The these black holes are fall close to the big bang And then as caulking radiation Sort of The black hole evaporating So to speak and that That lady Imitating these particles called neutrinos. Right is that. Do i understand that correctly. Yes so so pry bhutia blackhaws before we get the neutrinos what is sort of the mechanism of formation their ho- exactly what they have formed sure We believe that Primordial hose could form in the early universe from density fluctuations so We know that any object could can possibly become a black hole if you compress it into a very very small volume so this same process could happen in the universe with Density fluctuations that could be a regional space where there is an over density compared to the surrounding and each of over the east coast past Then then it could get to the point of becoming a black hole This this The details of this process are beyond my expertise But this is fairly reasonable thing to expect and The diesel really small rate in the scheme of things. Yes so when i started to Learn about time or their black holes. I was amazed by how different in mass can be. They can be may be the massive wouldn't but they can also be The mass of Being or they can be Even even smaller so they can really be very very tiny. Yes oh so. That's really really small so this is sort of quantum fluctuations only universe Kind of getting Getting concentrated in vide- small areas But we believe those. Those primordial black holes emit nucleus. we Have to go back to stephen hawking for that stephen hawking wrote this seminal paper Which is about what we nowadays. Nowadays call hawking radiation so he demonstrated that any black hole regardless of what it is could be primordial black hole or a stellar. Nicole doesn't matter any black hole isn't really black because it meets radiations so radiation particles And the the process that we call evaporation so Because a black holes fundamentally gravity objects they would meet any particle that couples to raggedy including trees so It's the moment you have a black hole you do. Have hawking radiation and neutrinos are just that are expected. Part of hawking radiation. You're so caulking radiation so that that happens to every black hole even the even the supermassive ones right so i it said gentle phenomenon And so going to neutrinos now Don't typically thing neutrino site Caltrans and electrons are really well known. neutrinos are particles. Dad don't interact with The matter Espionage don't interact much with matters. We don't really see them. They don't really see them. And and so it's difficult to measure that's right and so so this could you give a. What does the history of neutrino vendor we. I understand such things existed. Let's see We go back to the twentieth century and the story goes That the father of neutrino sees Warfare he. He made the hypotheses of a new particle existing as a way to explain Some strange behavior of neutrinos produced by by nuclear decay so It's it's a long story but Let me just say that For a long time. Neutrinos who just the hypotheses and then around the mead of this twentieth century They would actually officer so we started to Know that this particles existed and But that was pretty much heat. So we didn't know much about the properties And one of these properties the mass which we still don't know i'm easy after all these decades but we still don't know if neutrinos have something like a magnetic went for example And something that we didn't learn until much later on is the fact. That neutrinos oscillate. That's that that sounds. That's something that we that were somehow established Turn of the sanctuary around the around the year. Two thousand really after after decades of of testing with the solar neutrino selling trainers. So there are still there are still a number of no on your trainers. One of them is the mass one and the other one is the The nature of the neutrinos being the iraq particles or miranda particles we She's kind of a fundamental cost. So there are that. That's that's that's related to the fundamental nature of the neutrino as particle break. So so they do. They have a mass but masses small. Do they have a chunk. Neutrinos don't have charge so they are electrically neutral and that's Comedy the biggest reason for for them to be a so allusive as you were mentioning earlier on especially in the in early. Nineteen hundreds all the particle detectors so basically a electro-magnetic detectors they were looking for charge or Magnetic behavioral some sort. So neutrinos don't have that and so they They only have the weak interaction At that that we know wolf and gravity of course and so that's why they They escape detection so so easily because their interaction is very weak. Yeah so so. That's sort of the beauty of neutrinos right so because they don't interact V can go back digits of years. Simple hats Perhaps become pickup one on earth and it would have travelled that distance through all sorts of things but would not have affected wider rate right. Yes and so so the other phenomenon of neutrino is that you mentioned that they also late so are they're failures of tinos they go back and forth. Yes it's It's actually a fairly Easy to this cried kwan to sonam on We know that In quantum mechanics there is this Particles described by these function which is called the wave function. And so the neutrinos could be on. Neutrino could be born as a say an extra and then it's quanta way function would evolve over time in a way that after sometime. The wave function is no longer a purely electron neutrino way function. But the has a little bit or even law actually of a different flavor. It could be a new one or tau. So what we observe in the actors. Is this change of flavor and perhaps the most striking demonstration of this phenomenon is solemn. Neutrinos because we know that the sun produces an extra treatments and It doesn't produce a new on and talion trainers so But here on earth we do Have evidence that the solar neutrino flags that we receive has some You wanna talion. Trina in it and that can only be explained by sedation and Actually after this other neutrino data showed this phenomenon. This was also confirmed by a saint men made experiments so it's a fairly established phenomenon it and so that the flavors are Electron new on tall. Yes that's right and so. Did you understand the vendor made in the sun for example there they are made as electron Neutrinos and by the time they reached the earth day the Immunes dot. Yes yes Impart young. that's that's what happens so ease. It always the case that they get a manufactured so to speak as as electoral neutrinos always. It depends on where they are born. There are places where neutrino sutter born in or flavors. A so it's it's it really varies with With the type of environment We are talking about okay. Okay and so in the people you say ph is this primordial black holes. We talked about radiates right. Handed and left handed dutra knows in equal amounts so anybody right-handed unless the cleaners. Okay let me see so Yes you say. Indicates of dirac neutrinos. pba Left neutrinos in equal amounts possibly increasing deceptive number noon pheno species nest. Yes is that explainable. Yes so right handed than left handed. Neutrinos that may take why to explain what that exactly means me. Just say that It's related to the neutrino mass. So if you're truly knows didn't have a mass which we know they do but if they didn't have a mouse They would only exist as left handed particles which means that basically their spin is Is anti aligned with the momentum and but if they have mass and the iraq particles There could be another type of neutrino which is right handed. Which where the This being ease aligned with a mentor other than anti line and so If you are iraq these these two different species could exist and so instead of having one species of neutrino emitted left-handed one Indicators of a massless trina if we have not suv nutrients than you would have to species and so. The black hole radiate war energy compared to The case when neutrinos don't amass so when we started working on this paper i was interested in this phenomenon that A lot of the literature having to do with a developer. Evaporation of primordial black couls. Consider the neutrinos as massless about. Now we know that they are massive. And so i thought well Sixty speaking at primordial black hole could radiate more energy than previously thought. So i found that aspect interesting and then sees you mention the possibility to increase the effective number of species. That's related to what it was talking about. So then you the black hole would ra- gate more neutrino States or more neutrino Species to spe pseudo speak and then Would increase the number of neutrinos per cubic centimeter Data we observe today so I'm kind of glossing over a lot of these days. But basically cosmology gives us a measurement of this and effective which is called the effective number two species. And if you have this right. Handed neutrinos coming from the primordial black holes. This number could be higher than than expected. And so that would be may be a i way to tell that maybe there are more black holes in the universe yet. So so the hawking radiation essentially creation coming out of black holes Expected defined Expected that over a long period of time. Black holes radiate away lap. Later ray out the mass or information that didn't do it And so this. Radiation is hockey. Radio station is it is a new park. Or is it. Fundamentally composed of neutrinos hawking radiation is made of every particle that no of so A black hole. A camera gate Pretty much everything. Photons neutrinos throngs You loans It said cetera but There is the catch here. The fact that a black hole has a temperature which is another Big achievement of stephen hawking to end and others To that the black hole is thermo dynamical object and so Basically the bigger the black hole the lower the temperature so if the temperature is really low The black hole wouldn't be able to immed- Very massive particles because they are thermal energy would be sufficient for that so because masses energy Mc squared right so because massey's energy If a black hole has too low of a temperature It wouldn't have its quantum energy It's it's Wouldn't be enough to produce the mass off a particular particle for example a proton may be too heavy to be produced by a really low tanto black home so so the beaker. The black called the lower the temperature. Yes ed so. So then can expect the bigger black holes to have more of a neutrino content in radiation. Yes because The bigger black holes would as i said be able to radiate the heavy particles and so they would only be able to radiate away the low mass particles and so there could be black holes that only emit photons gravitons and Neutrinos do a of sort of the distribution of this primordial black holes Isn't you know sort of everywhere. What is what do we know about you. Know some of the distribution of bbc's you mean spatial distribution like where they are now. I'm wondering just like the easy would do sort of look at the early universe will find them everywhere Probably at the beginning they would be a more or less uniformly distributed Bug in the universe. Today they would probably be Behaving like the dark matter. Does they would Be part of galactic halos In other words they would be they would class gravitationally on large structures like a like a galaxy placido galaxy so these call still around They would they would behave like like the dark matter down. So they would be in in halo. Galaxies would have by. Now have april would would they not have disappear because it far it depends on the mass That they have when they are born so their if their mass is less than a certain value that trying to remember Basically yes they would have to By now they would have completely evaporate did their masters larger than they will take longer to evaporate and they could still be around So they roughly speaking the dividing line between a black hole. Steve being around today or not. I think it's something like ten to fifteen grams fiery recall correctly into fifteen clams though So this paper. Eusebio obtained the diffuse flux of right hill. Neutrinos from his idea and so so. So so the nikkei actually act to build these neutrinos. They'd be flying here do pbs specifically In principle that's a possibility we Considered that for certain Masses of these black holes and certain density of this black holes the flux of neutrinos that they generate over time could be fairly large and so we could Detect these neutrinos If we had a very Power who attacked so Now life is never ideally in the sense that a real Ut detector have substantive issues like ground And so on. So at the end of the people we conclude that impact is giving given the limitations that current nutrient doctors have It may not really be possible to detect neutrinos trump mortgage black holes but people. That's a possibility and that alone is interesting. Yeah because they suggestion that this primordial black holes could be as as you mentioned could be part of the dark matter that yes to seeking. Is that still About us that has been. There has been a debate on these Kind of going back and forth in the scientific community The latest i heard is that Black whose could be part of the dark matter. Maybe even a large part but probably not they entire dark matter so a one hundred percent primordial Battery is a bit difficult to justify the day. experimental bowels that we already have constrained so various types but there could be scenarios where maybe a fraction of the dark matter. He's made of primordial black holes. I wanted to go into a ended up paper in twenty twenty supernova neutrinos directional sensitivity and prospects for dissertation here the export potential of current and future liquid cinta league neutrino detectors. I decade old town. Mass a localize a super a supernova neutrino signal into sky in douglas was feeding the core collapse nearby star tens to hundreds of english Coated and don't be constructed policy in the detector can be used to estimate a direction to the star so so this is now neutrinos from supernova and You so so we. We have Idea here that before this opened on what happens. If please open over a time period it is creating neutrinos that could pick up and and potentially get ready to see the super bowl. Yes that's what excites me The fact that Think about bitter jews. Beetlejuice is the most famous nearby star. That could go supernova anytime and we don't know when that's going to happen and If it wasn't for these neutrinos that our paper is about we will know until the style literally Collapses and and then soon after becomes superman but in this paper we we Show that before the star collapses which is the beginning of the supernova process We can detect these. These neutrinos That are used at that at that stage and so increase the pool we could know that You know tomorrow. These days beetlejuice exploding and that that would be quite exciting. Yeah it's beetlejuice is is red joy and reasonably close to was really big star. I can remember Cecilia there was some suggestion that It could go supernova within something one hundred fifty thousand years which is obliquely in cosmic time so it is getting ready to go to Supernova right yes. I am not you formed about exactly the number of years give or take but it's it's ready it's ready. It could be any time and any time any time for an astronomer muse anytime the next thousand soviet so we should. We should hold their breath. But it's ready could be tomorrow. It could be in a hundred years could supernova. I know that this is not part of the paper but could the beetlejuice supernova avenue adverse effect on north really know a supernova is very very spectacular event. it's it's a star that collapses so it implodes i and that explodes and then when he explodes It's very bright. In the case of bitter jews we could. We could see by naked-eye shore but in terms of A fact of each radiation and neutrinos in light on on us and on our daily activities. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't affect them in any way so it's a save Show to just enjoy without any worry. Great answer so you talking about supernova neutrinos so so can be actually detect neutrinos from supernova. What different from what we talked about in the previous people Different from pbs I'm not sure. Can you repeat yes. So the new teen emanating from a supernova different from the Neutrinos of expectancy from a primordial black hole. Yes the the different In many ways disney trails have higher energies. So it's much much easier to attack them and indicates will beat the jews. We would detect thousands or even more of dan millions. Probably of them Indiana so different in the way they are born because in our primordial black hole ordinary black hole The processes volcanoes the asian. Which which is a gravity phenomenon in a supernova. You're born out of the very hot and dense environment That the that that the star as after it has collapsed so star collapsing on its own way to become very dense and so In this very dense in hot environment nuclear processes take place that produce these nutrients. So i guess the main difference is that indicates supernova it's most nuclear phenomenon and in the call is really fundamentally a gravitational sonam. Okay you discover technique in this paper and you saved sin principle possible unique the identify the progenitor star so So the existing technology and ideas discussed in the paper viki see teacup a neutrino decode. Identify valid came from or what direction thing from embed you can go back and look at the in that direction if he find to supernova then you could say that the supernova that created in-principle Yes let me. Just say that There are situations and this is not one of them but there are situations where if you have one neutrino you can point to the pointing the sky. What came from in these case. It's a little more complicated. Because what really gives us. The information is the statistical distribution of these nutrients so we are talking about may be the tax in hundred a hundred Gable take from say be for example and What did detector really observe is not the neutrino is kind of a vector which is related to the products of these neutrinos so this neutrino sues interacts with the interact with the detector. And then out of this interaction you have a positive on the new thrown and those can be observed and you can you can create a factory using these two and then and then these rector will have a certain orientation but each each neutrino coming will give you a differently oriented vector but statistically if you look at the distribution of these factors you you can tell you can you can do for with a certain of course The direction of the neutrinos because these vectors are not uniformly distributed they are they have a non uniform distribution of the direction. And so using this information we can we can define a regional the sky where The new three could come from so we can. We cannot now down to a point but we can now down to maybe a cone of a few tens of degrees Width and then we look in that cone and see what stars that com and maybe be juicy one of them. Yeah so As you say you if you see a few Neutrinos Statistics bution of those will give us some some probability That it is in in some region of the sky. And then you say the paper You can then that if it is happening please open nola. You learnt other observational. Modalities multi messagero rations Invisible in radio and other other types of observations Do actually pick up more data so this is almost like a early alert system If it is in place right yes i would call it a very early I learned to because it's we're talking about maybe our worse or insert very fortunate cases. We are even talking about maybe day Before the assad goes supernova and. so that's enough time to plan for for it so a something that fascinated me When i heard about this from a from a an experimentalist is that there is a human factor which was not aware of but The factories so if you have come up with thirty minutes to plan for watching supernova this may not be enough because it just takes stein to make phone calls and get a hold of people and and decide what to do. Come to a consensus in that. I saw in addition to technical things. Like okay have to maybe turn your telescope Direction which takes time. But i i was really fascinated by the human factor. Those things that if you had style we'd be you can kind of gathered. Relevant people decide something but if you have thirty minutes or or or minutes maybe not so. Yeah yeah i wondered. If such a earlier system is in place Perhaps could be something programmatic. Crises is picking up And you have some you know. Maybe some ai techniques or something like that that identifies the region and it goes. Programmatic returned the telescopes look. Yes yes exactly so. There could be a protocol in place For that so e if a telescope was suitable for observing a nearby supernova which which is not always the case than than now that we showed that it's possible to know beforehand if a star is going to go supernova then there could be some sort of protocol in place already so that when the alert comes which is we can just activated the protocol and oriented telescope. maybe automatically will in some sort of Organized way yeah as you say if you remove humans from the process it becomes not better there is actually already working this direction It's called this new two point. Oh a network which has to do with Exactly these using neutrinos as alert for the astronomy community and That has to do with exactly a creating alerts and also creating protocols for how to react to an alert rate. I want to end the people that just came out. it concordant scenario for the observation of neutrino from the tidal disruption. Even eight hundred twenty nine hundred ninety s t You say be induced at phenomenology concordance canadia with the logistic jet of for the title disruption event Between ninety s jesmyn proposes a source of the astrophysical neutrino event. Ice cube So the title disruption even this is star getting cooler into a black hole getting Getting sucked in rate is that the is that even up to the match yes This is something that we We had about be in in popular science stalks What what happens if you get too close to black hole and It's kind of scary. So the answer is you would be ripped apart because your feet will be pulled in with a strong force than your head and these. This is what happens to two statehouse. Use the star gas to close than by guests Ripped the park. Which is what the tied is option means and so instead of a star Rotating around a black hole we just have a stellar stellar That dr intially. I created by the black hole and so This is something that The happy neighbor cops serve did so so we have. This does happen this particularly Eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s and Bequeath actually see a new cleaners from that particular even so tightness. Deduction events are fairly well established phenomenon in astronomy. We have many of them served They they are Fairly a common plays events But what's special about this particular one. Eighty two thousand nineteen years. G is that We could let's say It could have Produced on neutrino that was detected a ice cube so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s. She is the first either direction event. For which is coincident. Neutrinos detected a dice. Cube in queens. This coincidence is likely to be accidental. So on approachability estimate tells us that these coins. This is pretty causal not accident so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety. The g could be the parent of this neutrino. And that's that's that's a i. That's very interesting. Yes i skew. is a is a big ice cube in the in. The south is I'm not sure it's exactly cuba. But it's it's the biggest block of is which has been Eastern With values Small detectors So it's it's an array of swarner detectors but yeah it's basically a big block of ice which has been transformed into a detective and so so the idea that this high energy neutrinos from what they were System montemar even that happened Out there this high energy neutrinos passing through that ice q. believe some telltale signs All of that happening and yuxi picked up Then began back Just like you were talking about the previous creeper begin. Please back to a region so this is one of those cases where you can tell from a single neutrino of course the with with a narrower where you can tell the point in the sky where three neutrino kate from. It's doable with one single neutrino because this high energy neutrinos when they enter the is They produce ca a shower so they kind of illuminate. They you me nate. The is but the do it in a way which is very much Beat so and then and then the direction of the the direction of bigotry knows. We have a pretty good accuracy often. How often could be a pickup something like that. Do we have an estimate of how often that would happen. Meaning ice cube detects something like this. Every year ice cube the tax Of the order of ten high-energy neutrinos froth outside our galaxy. Tadesse the number for the entire crop of neutrinos that ice cube has It went we talk about tidal disruption events in the specific these are fairly rare phenomena and so they estimated that maybe a few times so percent of the entire neutrino flux the thais cubeys of serving could be from tidal disruption events. Not much more than that. So we are talking about less than half of the total flats being to tell this option events okay and so the tug disruption burned as as you mentioned It starts getting clipped applaud and pulled back into a into a a black hole but this ten percent. Do they have to be these braces as they call it. The things that have a jet that is sort of lying towards us. Is that it necessarily condition for these types of high energy neutrinos. It's it's a plausible scenario Let me just say that. There is an important difference between blazers in tidal disruption events. In the fact that the ablaze is something that has a jet. She's always on so the jets kinda kerman feature of of these particular galaxy but the title is adoption. Event is transient events. Saw dotcoms creates the accretion. This accretion of the star of the black hole produces flair is flair can last year or two but then it would just fade away so There could be jet and in fact in our paper we present where there is a jet so they partisans the user chat But if there is a jet in tiger disruption event. That's a transient suggested. That's born when This starts to create the stellar debris. And then it's on for months or years and then and then shuts off and it has two point in our direction as you as you mentioned because otherwise we would. We would see the trains your so this high energy neutrinos sillier how. How many orders of magnitude are we talking about coming to the one set you pick up. Let's say from the sun I'm not sure about the question. Can you maybe rephrase yet. So when you say this high energy neutrinos that is coming from let's say a tidal disruption events or something like that How much comedy orders of magnitude more energy Outdoors come to you. Know the ones that might be created the sun a lot menu of this magnitude so It is a big difference. So the sun produces new three meals. over a wide range of energies Higher energy neutrinos from the sun reach energies of the order of ten am pt and mega awards and for the ice cream. Neutrinos we are talking about one hundred of the older one hundred t. v. or even thousand teams. Which would be p so. Let's say maybe eighty tortoise magnitude finding the mass rife or okay and so this e. v. measure it is actually measuring the mass of the neutrino of newfield. Now these these neutrinos are have such a Such high energy that basically It's impossible to know their mass Because because as i said massey's energy so they talk energy of neutrino Detected is to be so high that that percentage view to its mass east so tiny that this practice mutual so i was wondering if we know the energy couldn't be sort of back computer to save the mass is or it doesn't follow The reasoning is a bit different and The way to sink about this is perhaps they let me see the formula for energy particle Which used the rest energy Applause the kinetic energy and So connecticut is so high that he thought the overwhelms direct energy. So it's it's and of course every time you measure the energy when three no. There is a narrow associated with the measurement so You we can't really we can't really tell what What led the boss of the detroit news but both roughtly this. This appears to be sort of an early warning system for many many things right topped the supernova the in the title disruption events producing heightened plano's So this could be sort of inundated with a monkey message. Observations protocols as you mentioned that gives us a higher success. Wait suspect. I would think certainly nominated be one right That's the power of multi messenger astronomy the integration of different signals coming from Photos tree knows navigation waves Causing me craze and Danger plays very powerful emmanuel cases and maybe supernova case is the most striking Xenos come first. But that's not always the case So in the indicates of tidal disruption events Did you know that was observed. Came about five months later than the initial dhammika looser version of the tidal disruption events so It's if it can go both ways. neutrinos can be early alert or they only alert could be for example a radio salvation or or an x-ray use ovation and then and then the neutrino attacked or could Focus a surge in that direction as see what they find which which has actually been done ice cube sometimes. Does these these archival. Search this on the basis of others from From for example x ray or gamma ray surveys interested. Exciting eighty that said a lot to be owned It seems It seems like these till don't know all the production mechanisms for neutrinos but if we have robust with to pick them up on than we can place them back and and talk asking questions What might be there definitely So yes so. People celia the next five years Wanted the aid is that you believe Be will make a significant crocus in this Innovative neutrinos then two different areas. That a very promising One is Broadly speaking Manmade nutrients so there is. There is a big push especially hitting the united states to build Create very powerful beams of trainings and then these beams are manmade. So we know that very well. We know that energy we know the composition and we can use them to learn about The properties of treatments and then That other men bead neutrino experiments where Scientists look for the between months so that's also very promising In something i really. I really excited about that. That may be a furious novel with noble the neutrino mass us from these very high position laboratory experience. Then there is the whole Topic of neutrinos as part of the mouth of mike messenger astronomy and in that area. I think what was was to look forward. To among other scenes is the interplay gravitational waves shock waves. You still Somehow a science of its own into a large extent but there are so many possible connections. We've neutrinos tidal disruption adoption events should produce reputation ways so baranov shoot us gradation ways So so there is. There is a a lot of potential there which is still unexplored in and that's where i see myself Working on in the next few years you adjust very quickly The do gravitational waves travel bid closest and new ashtrays and so if If they both are produced in In uneven they're expected to arrive on earth close to simultaneously. It depends on the timing of the production if the answer is yes the waves ending a knows are born at the same time which may not be exactly true because the physics that governs tation waves is different from the one that that governs neutrinos. So but the difference in timing would be the difference Accumulated that birth But but the two were were generated genetically the same time. They should arrive the same time. Just thinking this a systematic difference in the production time than guan lorries given early warning for the other. But that doesn't seem to do a case right. There could be cases where significant lag in the production of rotation way with respect to the production of the tree nose and one example is. We haven't touched on this before but let me just nation mergers so if we have if we have a merger for example we have maybe a merger of a neutron stars or black hole neutral star before the merger happens so when the two objects that kind of still approaching each other we should start observe serving ways and this is what this is what has been seen so Delight experiment observes these these nominal But if we have a merger After the merger has occurred and the two objects have become one than a. Dan could be the formation of of over an accretion disk and he secretion Trainers which we can which we can back so the neutrino We come After they initially asian waves and so relation as would be the alert for the neutrino. That does excellent. your this has been great as celia. thanks so much complaining pleasure. Okay thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

Policy Technology Economics Science Stephen Hawking Eappen Eappen Dot Info. Iraq Dutra Eusebio Dini Celia PBS Sonam Gill Munich Trina East Coast Miranda Nicole Amazon Massey Dr Intially
A Conversation With James Fox

Walking the Shadowlands

04:45 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With James Fox

"James thank you very much for joining us today. From you on the show we could stop with you telling us about how you got into documentary filmmaking and specifically how you got into the erie of few documentaries that would take us back to the early. Nineteen nineties where. I had a father who was paralyzed from the neck down with multiple sclerosis and he was a writer and in. So i've been traveling. He was a fantastic to larry's driven ambitious intelligent witty. Great fun guy. We traveled the world together. I was his legs. Is schommer is secretaries nurse. With a lot of fun. We interviewed. Stephen hawking we interviewed race cartilage legend. Dan gurney traveled to formula one races down in mexico city. I mean we did some really cool stuff and my my father was a brilliant writer. I was always amazed at how could put words together and So good at it. Got such a skill and i had picked up probably in the late eighties very early. Ninety certainly the late eighties early nineties. A video camera from a friend of mine. And i was so a amazed at the technology of steve instant. The did was take back then. But the instant playback it's like you know it was amazing. It was a real novelty back then and and what a great tool it was for documenting things and so i started doing video production. You know probably my very early twenties and Probably i dunno. I want to say when i was around. Twenty three twenty four a very good high school friend of mine. One of my best friends. One of my best mates we We bought a car length. We flew to europe from america. We bought a car in london. And we drove this old fiat. One thirty one doors read two hundred pounds for it. We drove it all the way to added justin not just had a hell of a of adventure together and car did make it out four gold back but he was a good friend of sky rene and he started to tell me back back in the us About ufo's in one of my best friends honestly and i had. He didn't talk to me about highschool but he talked about it later in early twenties tonight. I thought he'd lost mind. I really did talking about roswell. You take your you haven't heard about roswell and i just thought well it's been a good friend and i'm gonna have to write him off. He's lost his mind and I was telling the story to a a mentor apprentice. Video production house in san francisco Ellison horn productions have been like this in this guy. Richard van sickle was was one of the senior people at the production house. The brilliant guy. I really looked up to him. And i just one day told him all. You're not gonna believe really good friend of mine is tell me about your phone and then about how you crashed and aliens were recovered in roswell back in the forties. Got my poor friend. He's lost his mind and Richard turns me and he says no. You heard about that. I said haven't heard. But no i haven't heard fully happened. He said they actually admitted that it happened. And i thought well hang on a minute. richard. Somebody i look up to and i respect and very intelligent. He runs his video production company. And i thought well if richard thinks that happened. Maybe i should take a closer look. And so i did. And i went to a couple of conferences and i Befriended some military guys basically exchanged offered an exchange of of documenting them and making you know Making their interviews available to the public and documenting presentations and things of that nature in in exchange. They kind of brought me into their world. Bit and then I think when i was twenty four maybe twenty five. I said hey. I'm a documentary on your phones. And i was amazed at how not unsupportive. My father was because my father was

Schommer Steve Instant Dan Gurney Multiple Sclerosis Mexico City Ellison Horn Richard Van Sickle Roswell Larry James Stephen Rene America Justin Europe London San Francisco Richard
Covid Milestones: Eli Lilly CEO on Antiviral Approval & Pfizers FDA Application

Squawk Pod

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Covid Milestones: Eli Lilly CEO on Antiviral Approval & Pfizers FDA Application

"Corona virus cases are hitting new highs in the united states and the cdc is urging the country to keep thanksgiving celebrations small. The recommending americans spend the holiday only with people who've been living in their households for the last fourteen days which means no military personnel. Who plant to come home and no college students back from campus. And this week amid it. All california governor gavin newsom issued a curfew between ten pm and five am for all nonessential work and gatherings in most of the state and the order will remain in place until at least december twenty first perhaps even longer but some good news today as well visor and its partner. Biontech are submitting their obligation to the fda for emergency use authorization of their covid nineteen vaccine. This would be the first covid vaccine that goes through the regulatory process. Here's becky the fda's review process is expected to take a few weeks. Advisory committee meeting on the vaccine is tentatively scheduled for early next month. If it's approved some americans could get their first doses in just about a month's time earlier this week study. Data analysis showed this vaccine to be ninety five percents effective and that's incredibly impressive. Let's bring in meg. Terrell she's got more on this good morning. Good morning becky moving incredibly fast and a really historic milestone this morning the first vaccine to go to the fda for covid nineteen to try to stop this pandemic. So we're going to see this regulatory process. Really play out over the coming weeks. We should here typically the way this works is the company alerts the world when the fda has accepted an application and set a date to decide on the drug. We're in a pandemic of course so those dates are not going to be normal. And the communications might be different to we. Might hear from the fda Either the decision timing that they might be looking at and especially about when they're gonna set that advisory committee meeting to discuss this vaccine. That's when outside advisers get together dig apart all of the data around The vaccine the safety the efficacy the manufacturing and talk about also how this should potentially be approved for the market. And it's possible. We will see an application from dern. They said within weeks So we should see that soon. Too and so the expectation that i heard was that the fda had asked those outside advisors to set aside december eighth ninth and tenth three days to potentially discuss. Both vaccines Now dr john taurus from nbc had the fda commissioners steven hahn said scott gottlieb. Stephen hawking on with him yesterday in a facebook live. He asked him about those dates. Any no he said. The fda was going to be flexible. He wouldn't confirm that they had asked them to set those dates. And so we have been hearing since we reported those dates a lot of people sort of saying. Why is this going to take so long So we will have to wait to see what the empty actually does In terms of scheduling that meeting. They do need time to go through the application themselves very carefully. Prepare the documents the committee and then the committee will discuss it and we do expect the fda decide extremely quickly after that meeting Whether to green light this market and then pfizer in biontech. Say they are ready to go within hours after that That green light to start shipping. This guy's yeah. That was one of the things that really caught my attention this morning. The idea that within hours they'd be ready to start shipping vaccine and getting it out there and that brings up the question of how we do that. How do we distribute this. Where does it go. How do we determine who gets it. I never the states have been working on plans along with the federal government to try and figure out how much each state would get. But how does it work. We do even know. Do we have a real game plan for who gets what. When and how we know part of that. So operation warp speed an eighty just secretary alex as are held. A briefing about those plans are earlier. This week And essentially what would happen after. The fda gives the green light if it does then. The cdc has an advisory committee as well that would meet to make recommendations about. Who should get this vaccine. I if there are two vaccines if there are any differences in them you know which groups should get which dosing of that stuff So that's expected to happen extremely quickly. And then the cdc makes recommendations about how much each state should get Secretaries are based on population. We also know of course that because supply will be so limited that there are going to be prioritized groups. Healthcare workers are expected to be at the top People with underlying health conditions that make them more severe. More vulnerable to severe disease will also be at the top so We'll see how that gets allocated to the states based on what. The group recommends

FDA Becky Gavin Newsom CDC Dr John Taurus Steven Hahn Scott Gottlieb Terrell Biontech Dern United States California NBC Stephen Pfizer Facebook Federal Government Alex
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Here behind your time we know Millicent Stephen Hawking Stephen hawking's dead yeah he is dead but did your reading before he died aha yeah I even have a conflict I even had a conference with my talk with them personally what are you getting at all correct I'm getting a bit war war not headed into material science anymore six hundred years of misconception our car what there is not material science meeting mortgagee energy in spacetime science in the weapons and the transport there we are headed for a stack in energy not material okay will okay so was gonna do with on talking about right now aliens what about the aliens there either artificial intelligence for the biological either way and we're not looking actually for the aliens were looking for techno signatures and bio signatures that's exactly what you're talking is talking about what's that think about this alien our our biological material but they like a fast radio blast they were shot out of a white hole they came out energy now they come back to a biological place called the earth and are trying to figure out how to get back into the biological state our sales are made of energy of the biological state let that they once were and that's why the experiments that's why everything well that's one way of looking at it they're going back you've got soldiers state and be in the vehicle now when when.

Millicent Stephen Hawking
What time is it?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:00 min | 2 years ago

What time is it?

"We're GONNA talk about time. Most states in the United States south time changes spring forward set clocks forward in the spring fall back set clocks EXPEC then you have time zones across the United States and around the world fly far enough and you'll lose a day or gain a day depending upon which way you're going when you perform perform the same activities of over and over the day seemed to fly by or drag depending on the activities for your day with new activities for the day may fly even faster faster. Depends upon who you talk to. There was a time in my life when I worked with people. WOM One and with some clients I would look up at the clock and watch a hand and the clock move from one block bark to another would seem like ours would pass and I look at the clock again only to see that it had just been a minute. Ah Yes perception. But what about time. Slips time warms is time travel possible to Great Luminaries Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking gave us. It's a simple answer. Yes but the conversation on time travel is filled with what is exactly. What did Einstein have to say about time travel? I'm Stein's theory of special relativity says that time slows down or speeds up depending upon. How fast you move relative to something else? Approaching the speed of light person inside a spaceship would age much slower than his twin at home. Also under Einstein's theory of general relativity. Nobody gravity can bend time picture. Four dimensional fabric called space time when anything that has mass sits on that piece of fabric it causes a dimple or bending of space time the bending of space time causes objects to move on a curved path and that curvature of space is what we know as gravity both the general and special relativity theories have been proven with GPS satellite techniques. That has very very accurate timepieces on board the effects of gravity as well as the satellites increased speed from Earth relative to observers on the ground make the unadjusted clocks gained. Thirty eight microseconds today. Who Thirty Eight microseconds does sound like much of a time change to me? Let's let's continue here engineers make calibrations to account for the difference in a sense. This effect called time. dilation means astronauts nonce were time travellers as return to earth very very slightly younger than there are identical twin the remains on the planet. What did Stephen Hawkins' I have to say? About time. Travel Hawking famously held a party for time travellers but did not send out the patients until after the party. No one showed for the festivities but the scientists right that there is still hope the traveling back in time could be possible according to the laws of the universe he pigs is this notion on the premise of something called m theory that suggests the universe may contain seven hidden dimensions in addition into the familiar four dimensions of space time rapid space travel and travel back in time can't be ruled out. According to our present understanding he writes. This is hawking. Science fiction fans need not lose heart. There's hope in theory you have to look hockey's M theory it's a little too long and complex likes for this podcast. There's a lesser known theory about time travel. Though is commonly referred to as the step theory it takes into account that theories expressed grasp both hawking and Einstein. They're multiple dimensions. The step theory states that although there are multiple dimensions they are parallel. Exactly to who are on that some run ahead of ours and some behind and there are umbilical warburton holes or the dimensions overlap further. That many of us unknowingly walked through these openings periodically the Dacia Fu is an example one. Conventional Science Science can't explain that is stepping into a dimension that is slightly ahead of your own. You know the feeling that you've been to displace before or met this person before or even particular activity before but that most of us shake off the feeling as being just a little strange whatever theory you embrace. It's is fairly realistic to state that in the next not too distant future we maybe stepping forward or backward and Thomas easily stepping onto an escalator skeptical. It wasn't that long ago that the concept of traveling in space let alone landing on the moon was stuff of fiction and the greatest scientific minds signs of that era declared the idea ridiculous impossibility. That's sad a little less than fifteen hours ago. I stepped into the future where I sit now.

Albert Einstein Stephen Hawking United States Dacia Fu Stein Thomas
Electronic Mind Reading

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Electronic Mind Reading

"The one thing that science will never be able to do is find a way to read our minds PT sure about that time, if our thoughts are actually patterns of activity in the brain. It's at least possible that neuroscientists could find a way to detect and decode them zones, really hard, if not impossible. Well in twenty nineteen researchers made important progress towards the skull. They placed a grid of over one hundred recording electrodes into the auditory cortex of the brains of patients that were undergoing brain surgery to treat epilepsy with this electrode, grid, they monitored electrical activity in the auditory cortex, while patients listened to recordings of actors reciting a series of sentences and the numbers from zero to nine join to interpret the data from more than one hundred electrodes all recording. At once sounds hopelessly. Complicated. That's why the neuroscientist used artificial intelligence to interpret the recordings. They trained a deep learning neural network computer program to use the recordings from the patient's brain to reconstruct, the content of the sentences the patients heard then they tested, the trained neural network program by asking it to reconstruct. The reading of the digits, the program was capable of reconstructing intelligible speech from the neural recordings. Let's not exactly the same as reading thoughts, but it's an important step in that direction. Scientists already know that the sensory portions of the cortex are also used for thinking imagining the technology could be useful for people like the late physicist, Stephen hawking who have difficulty communicating to serious speech, handicaps this moment of science comes from Indiana, University. I'm Don glass, and I'm ya'll Cassandra.

Don Glass Stephen Hawking Physicist Indiana University
"stephen hawking" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:26 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And welcome back to Costa kosher Charleston third with us. We'll take your calls. Charles on. What's your reaction to President Trump's plan to develop a space force? Another branch of our military up there in space. You know, it's actually not a bad idea. If nothing else it's going to help us drive, our technology, and a lot of people think of this as he's going to drop troops somewhere in the world in forty five minutes, or so, but that's not really the case. It may be the case, but mostly would probably drop thrown hardware all over the world fast. We wouldn't really need to send a lot of human beings around fight a war. We've got some pretty advanced drones and robots. Well, why it's I think it's a great idea in we should have had this a long time ago, we need to protect our satellite systems in an excellent excellent point. You know, I think one of the things I'd like to point out is our slow development of space travel has really been due to the fact that government treats space industry, as if it's a socialist thing, they set the market they design the product state shoes who gets divide them, and it excludes everyone, and the Asian isn't there when private industry got involved all of that changed? So this is a great step forward because he's from Spain. Typically stated he was a call in private industry you had to. I mean, if you are in war with a country or about to go into war with a country. One of the things we take out as command and control in you have to take out the satellite system because their cell phones will go down there communications. We'll go down. And it's just it's an unfortunate part of war. There may be cleaner ways to do it. I mean, imagine launching a large aluminum foil bag that simply snags satellite wraps, it up and blocks all the radio waves breaking it into fragments. Absolutely. Are you ready for some calls? Absolutely. All right. Let's start by going east of the Rockies, Sherry is in Memphis, Tennessee. Hi, Sherry, welcome to the program. Best really men. Well, thank you. Which is kinda pen knocked out our satellite. My second question is how do we stop passed away from heading this planet? Why get say also that three reasons why I believe in God if the has proven true because of healings in the bible and because of the answer prayers. All right, great, what we were just talking about the satellite systems and developing space force to possibly knock them out. If we're at war or battle, but they have capabilities now, don't they take out our satellites Charles will, absolutely. And one of the ways to do it is simply set a Saka beebees up there in a reverse orbit. It's not hard to take out satellites, and in some cases, it can be done with an intensity microwaves from the ground. You know, there are numerous ways. Russia and China both can take out an awful lot of satellites, and we would really be invest, but the problem is the damage would also spread to their satellites and one of the things right and doing this is that'd be a stalemate what they refer used to refer to a Mexican stand-off. They destroyed their own systems in the process quite likely and as far as stopping an asteroid hitting the earth. You know, there are some some the simulation going on Nasr's doing a lot of work in that area right now, it's all over the news these days. Yes, they're doing a simulated maneuver to see what would happen. That's one of the things that are planning as we speak. Now. What are the easiest ways to do? It realize that you don't blow it up with them weapon. You don't send a big bomb up there and blast it because now you have millions of fragments coming down does damage spread out over huge area. It's just as bad if not worse what you need to do is get a spacecraft there quickly that can then if powered by the sun thrust, the satellite constantly in one given direction to make it Mr. yours because if it's. Headed to the earth. It only takes a certain number of seconds for the earth to get out of the way. If you have seven minutes, you have an opportunity to miss the planet if you can deflect its course by seven minutes of arrival, miss the earth. That's all it takes. And you really don't want to blow it up because the fragments could be just as damaging as original asteroid. Exactly. They can do a lot more damage in some cases. I would think and here's the other thing. Most asteroids, we expect to be a solid rock or a piece, but many of them are rubble piles piles of rock and dirt. You know, how do you push that gently very gently Charles, do you think that they're satellites in space right now that have nukes on them, whether they're hours Russia or China's I have no doubt of that. And I often wonder sometimes if the developments in space travel were intentionally slowed down to prevent people from accessing some of that hardware that's dangerous looks terribly dangerous. But you know, we live in a dangerous world, isn't perhaps. A I don't know. Is it a deterrent key? Does the the fact that maybe all three countries? No. We have them up there. Everybody has them up. There. Does that keep things at bay? It may it may. But I mean that only works up to a certain point. And you know, it only takes one accident things off we've been very close to an eilly a couple of times in the past. And you know, if you go do history research, you'll find that we've been saved by the skins of our teeth. Just a few a couple of times at least, but having weapons of that sort in orbit all the time, it just means faster delivery. But the fact is we can deliver almost anything to orbit very quickly right now, I can assure you there are vehicles ready and fuelled to launch at a moment's notice. The put weapons in space so that they don't stay there and Arctic sessile to people are wildcard line. Let's go to Walton Pennsylvania. Hey wild. Go ahead. I joined Julius is great to be on me, George. Thank you, sir. Job. Search Charles's the best best of out on since Dr L stone. Well, thanks. That's pretty good complement. Therefore, you Charles. Sir. Charles would agree with Dr Carl Sagan, obviously, he was a great advocate of space exploration. But the doctor say said that always said that the great extension space exploration was providing obviously the redundant life support systems to support things. So I think with all the we have on the smart robots. I don't think there's as much of a reason anymore to risk human life in space. I mean, obviously, you know, go back even sixty seven at side for me to understand why the Apollo one fire occurred. You know, why didn't he engineers realize that you know, to atmosphere would be very conducive to fire? They probably never thought they'd spark. I guess they actually yes. They did know that it would. And that's why. Later. They went to they were at four point three pounds of oxygen pressure your oxygen? They went to five point six pounds of oxygen and nitrogen to lower the risk of fire greatly. But they never expected the arc of it set it off, and that was the issue people were aware of it that you're trying to make the hardware as light as they possibly could. And it was a devastating loss. But as I and space, we are getting better systems that have the capability of doing things, and we meet it because if you're a spacecraft on Mars around Jupiter, you don't have time to send instructions wait and see what happened the machine has to know. What to do? Here's the issue if you make it so smart that it can figure anything out. It may ask why am I doing this? Am I going to get killed doing this? I mean, a thinking machine might have just as much ability to want to stay alive thinking Uman sounds like Cal from Smith's on a C. Exactly. I could happen though. I mean once AI become so emotionally intelligent. It will begin to protect itself. Well in many systems, particularly the ones that are building for warfare. Have those capabilities building they recognize threaten they defend themselves. Otherwise, would be useless. Indeed. Indeed. Well, thanks for your call. Let's go next to first time caller ally in San Antonio, Texas. Hi, good morning. Hi, george. How are you today? Thanks. Question. But again. In my first question is what is Charles opinion on the picture of the black hole recently and question number two is what are his number one concerns of humanity? Maybe living on on the moon and other planets in the future. Like what is number one concern? Okay. Concerned. Let's take that one first surcharges as you know, we had the Michio Kaku believes that we need to leave the planet. The the late Stephen hawking believes we need to get ready to leave the planet. Well, what about you? You would never as a bird would never grow up in the nest you grow up, and then you leave you don't live your life in the nest and the earth is our nest, and it was very verbose about that, you know, and why I would say that our biggest concerns would be when you have large populations of humans living in isolation from each other. There can be. Be some things that change in their viewpoint their their information their environment. It will change the way they think and feel about humanity as a whole in many cases, this means the development of, you know, antitheses people who don't like the way things are being done by the people that sent them there or people who don't like what the colonists are doing out there. We have to be cautious that by relating ourselves. We don't create different factions that I would be my greatest concern. One of the great things about having separate colonies, of course, is great new ideas emerge in different environments, and they can go with them without a hazard to the rest of humanity. Right now, we're in one glass cage, and if anything happens to our environment where all gone, so it certainly makes sense for us to spread out to other environments. Absolutely. Now the picture that was released a couple of weeks ago of that black hole. What did you think of that? I think it's an amazing achievement. And I I think I'm also a little disappointed by so many people saying, well, it's all blurry. Well, yes. Zillion miles away. And it's all done, you know, second and third hand inferring from the data, and then reconstructing what must have created that image. I think that it's really important for us to recognize that we're getting better is on the universe that whole picture. The black hole picture is the first of its kind, and it took an astounding amount of work degenerate it, but it shows us that our theories are correct. That what we thought is true is actually happening out there. That's an amazing achievement. The universe is a message, and we read it and interpret it where the interpreters winning site you the most Charles about space. I think it is limitless possibilities that embodies for me. There is unlimited resource energy places to go. It is an exotic place to think of living, and and you know, in a sense, we all do that were stuck on one planet right now. You know, I think the marvels of the universe are. So extensive everything I think is just wondrous. Don't you think? Oh, I do. I mean just picture this. You know, like the Exo planet around practice in Tari that place has got to be truly weird. Your son is only about five percent the distance. It would be about three times larger in the sky, and it'd be very very dim orange your your planet, but undergo four hundred times as much x-rays from its star. That'd be flares. All the time you'd be living in twilight and your year, it'd be eleven and a half days long. Yeah. That's to live, you know, back to the other wildcard line. Carlos is with us in San Francisco. Hi Carlos thanks for calling. Good. Good evening and good morning, gentlemen. Interesting call I like to say comment to your guest. I really appreciate it. Our relation about the God factor with regards to being creation and creation happening with intensity. Holly. And how that somehow translates into hope I really appreciate that line of team that having been said the guest at the top of the hour said something to the reference about the privatization of space exploration, which things the great thing. But what I would like to posture post to question is is that is that even better that stays is becoming more times say you on my skin like, given the increased acrimonious climate of politically to the to the preservation of the space station program nationally and internationally in the US in second. Lindley? The second question is was regards to say initiative like the green you deal and stuff like that is these kinds of initiatives somehow could they potentially undermine the advancement of space exploration. Whether it's politically, you know, our government promoted or or sustained or by private industry, and and so in third my last question is is that is there anything from experts exploration that indicates that we can somehow repair our zone, and that's my questions thing. Stay stuck the ozone one. I if you well the ozone does seem to be getting better there are not on its own in it. Yes. Because we stopped expects hailing a lot of the free.

Charles Russia Spain George Sherry Costa kosher Charleston President China Trump Carlos Michio Kaku US Stephen hawking Nasr Arctic Rockies Memphis
Stephen Hawking, San Francisco And Ken discussed on Lars Larson

Lars Larson

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking, San Francisco And Ken discussed on Lars Larson

"Stephen hawking. Always dumping new Ken to unsexy that talking would slowly type out his words to be synthesized in a robotic voice, but neuroscientists at UC San Francisco have developed a new way to generate artificial speech. They take a person's brain activity and make a computer simulation of the person's vocal tract, including lips tongue and larynx in their testing published in the journal nature a person with a speech disability who might sound like this. Ventura seeing is signed only move would instead sound like

Stephen Hawking San Francisco KEN Ventura
"stephen hawking" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"And we had a joke petition hawking who is has got nothing to do with our observatory nothing to do with Colorado. As a matter of fact, Stephen Hawking's only been here once, but he decided to but in and rain, and I prayed because he heard that we had a joke writing contest out here. So he began emailing jokes pilling muscled his way our joke writing contact understand that this is a man who when I say muscled his way in you're only talking about someone who has a smile on his face because it's probably. I take it easy. I know this sounds like it's upsetting. You have to understand this man who was a spinal space because it's up by toothpicks. Which wetter? I don't think that's particularly funny, nor do I oh come on. Would you give me? This is a guy Phil understand. So let's just say you don't like Stephen hawking. And I will tell you. He must wait. Yes. He did muscles way. And even though he does have a smile propped up by toothpicks. Your asshole. You know that asshole get the did you general? Yes. I did. I heard it. But I don't believe it will you are. You're an asshole. Thanks so much. You're not gonna hang up on me. You what a pain in the oh, come on filled. You know? This guy's got to get the shot in about Stephen hawking. With a smile propped up by toothpicks. I will not have that. No. I heard Tony laugh at that. Did you think that was funny? I have to admit yes, I did. It was moderately funny. If Stephen hawking a guy that has been devastated by this terrible disease. Lou Gehrig's disease? You think it's funny that Turner's they're saying here's a guy with a smile propped up by toothpicks funny about it is that he's threaten and everything by guys propped up by pig. That's exactly the case, bud. Hit the nail right on the head. The fact that man Tana is upset with this four wheel driving toothpick propped up. It is pretty call him back. Yeah. Duck tire high up. See what answering? Yeah. Can't take tonight. Can I talk to Dr Tanner, who's what your name bubbles and phone? Hi is Dr high bubbles is this his home? Well, why did I hear is he home? Dr tartar. It's Phil Hendrie. Okay. Can you come on here with me? What was all of that noise? I heard in the background. Well, I spilled that was sound effect that I had. I was I'm at home. I'm not that the Vittori. So you were running a sound effect y. Wanted you to think that I was working I'm at home with my girlfriend. All right. And I know we're on the air. And I figured that. This is the only just penance that I can do for saying Stephen hawking has a smile propped up by toothpicks. The fact he must lose way in on his fancy multi-million dollar quad. And I don't mean quite as an quadriplegic Quadra faming quad four Wheeler four Wheeler. If you wanna talk on Wheeler dealer, you know, that was the thing. I was saying is so I'm I'm doing penance here. I am bubbles. And I apologize. Have to give a dam with your home or at work. I know you understand the by employers. I let you go. Then. Thank you. We'll be right back. Fill Henry show. The hill. Is this sounds like boogie stuff by here? This boogie sheds. Pretty mean, boogie jazz relish that -tunities eight this for vice we have the black page of and I say black as in peds as not black has racial. This reminds me of the flat paddle days of Billy Preston. All right. Dr Ron Turner. How about that? I knew that guy wasn't playing with a full. Six sick, man. The thing about dance. But we never did get the talk about the thing. You know? This is the problem..

Stephen Hawking Phil Hendrie Dr Ron Turner wetter Lou Gehrig Wheeler Dr tartar Billy Preston Dr Tanner Colorado Tana pilling Vittori Tony Henry million dollar
Why are we all so excited about the black hole image?

Live From Here with Chris Thile

09:22 min | 3 years ago

Why are we all so excited about the black hole image?

"There was so much excitement. This week around seeing the first picture of a black hole. Why was it deserving of so much excitement? Ferriol? I think part of it is that it's a new frontier, it's something we haven't seen before it's something that we didn't even think we could see and it's been so long in the making both the technological developments and the theoretical understanding to interpret the data. So I'm I'm really happy that everybody's excited to see the image. Shep you said in the press conference and even here on on our program that black holes are essentially unseasonable. So how do you explain what we're seeing that? We are seeing one now. Yeah. See there naked. If there's nothing around them, but black holes attract just everything around them because they're intense gravity, and they're trying to get into a small volume that it's like when you rub your hands together. They get hot all the fiction heats that guest hundreds of billions of degrees. So black holes are surrounded by these three D flashlights of this hot luminous plasma. And then there. Gravity warps the light from that plasma into these distinct shapes. You're really seeing Einstein's geometrical gravity laid bare. You're seeing just how light moves along space time yet, Einstein even though he came up with the theory about warping space that he not well, he wasn't really convinced that black holes might exist. Yeah. Got. He did struggle with that far awhile the theory. I mean, practically breaks down at the center of a black hole, it predicts a singularity an infinite space time curvature and energy density. So he was very unhappy with that. And he thought maybe there there's a reason why nature would not form. These objects talk a little bit Ferriol about the image itself. So we can explain to folks because it's it it's not quite wooded appears to be a lot more stuff going on there. And let's get right into the reddish ring of light. We're is that coming from? That is coming from right from the inner part of the accretion flow and the base of the jets so uh ship was saying as this plasma. That's the black hole gets from the stars around it swirls around and makes its way down to the black hole. It heats up and the emission that. We are seeing at this particular wavelength of light is coming from right outside of the point of no return. So there's the event or orison outside of that is the photon ring and outside of that is the the part that that truncates the disk and where where we think jets form. So the source of the light is right in the vicinity of that point of no return, and it is being lens than to the circular shape. Well, that's the that's the question I'll continue with that. Because if if it's a three dimensional image shouldn't that shouldn't it be surrounded by that glowing red, so we should? Not be seeing into it as we look straight. That's a very good question. And it's something that I with worked out twenty years ago. So part of the reason we are seeing it is because it's Taurus shaped, so it's not really completely spiritual. But even if it were we have to pick a wavelength of light that satisfies two things. One is we wanted it to be emitted right near the horizon. So it lights it up. We didn't want something that comes from farther away. But it's a double edged sword as you're saying if there's too much of that light too much of that guess then it will interfere with our ability to see down to the horizon by picking the one point three millimeter wavelength of flight. We're we have walking that tightrope. There is light that is lighting up the black hole. But it is not so much that it is actually obscuring our view to the black hole and ship. Actually, is it not true that that light that is heading toward. Toward the black hole will be bent around the back of it and come forward towards us. So it's still say's still face black that way. Yeah. It's a it's a good idea to try to hide behind the black hole because the light from me will always be bent around when in one thousand nine hundred when they looked at it affliction of light during a solar eclipse of stars to verify Einstein at first the deflation was one two thousand of a degree. And now we're looking at light that does loop two loops. So it's a completely different ballgame from that perspective. And and your Senate very, well, you have this flashlight this this light that's close to the event horizon. But not in the event, of course, and with that means that the latest Lynn's around this last photon orbit all the light grazes this last photon orbit. If it goes a little bit inside there is lost forever in the event horizon. And with that means is that we see a ring, which is a projection on this three dimensional flashlight. But then for example, if there were another civilization fail screwing the Milky Way. They would also see a ring or in eighty seven. They would see that ring to. So everybody gets to see a ring because of the Lenzing Einstein's gravity. Why? Then is some of the ring whitish seems brighter than red. Oh, it's a phenomenon that it goes from what very was saying the gas is moving around so quickly. It's a near light speeds. So when it defends all the way into this gravitational, well, it's really moving quickly. And when material moves that fast when it emits light the light is boosted energy in the direction, it's moving. So you're seeing some of the gas coming towards us from underneath the black hole. It seems like it orbits clockwise around. What you see that? And so it's bright on one side and on the other. So is it like a candle? It's hotter. As on that side to a glows brighter. Brighter. It's not so much hotter. Right. So so the color map that we've chosen is a good representation of how bright it is. So the the parts that you're seeing in a lighter color are actually the brighter parts, and that is the reason is the swirling plasma. So the half of it roughly the half that's approaching us is the sprite or emission. And the part receding from us is slightly damore. Chef you talked about that. There is still light inside the black hole. What happens to that light in their la-? Well, there's no light coming to us from the within the event horizon. But as very sad, you have gas always falling into the black hole at all levels. And it emits you really not seeing anything too much interior to the last orbit which that ring that UC everything that is in there tends to go through the event horizon. We don't see it anymore. It just disappears from our causal existence. But where does it go? Well, that's that's the interesting you Larry. Right. If anyone tells you they know don't believe them. This Stephen hawking spent his life trying to figure that out. Didn't he? Well, I. Yeah. I wanna see I think for many people in in our collaboration. It was. It was bittersweet. We lost even hawking just a little while before we made this discovery we had a chance to describe it to him a little bit which was great and wish he'd been alive to see it. Our number eight four four seven two four eight two five five we have so many phone calls. I'm going to get to them after I ask a couple more questions at a lot of people been asking of can you explain the difference between the event horizon, and you you touched on a bit the event horizon the black hole and black holes shadow. Sure, I can do that. So Geno, relatively not only predicts this point of nor return, which we call the event horizon. But it also predicts the existence of a few other special distances from a black hole. The first one is when matter starts plunging in we call it the innermost stable circular orbits. I know it's a mouthful, but it's basically the last points that matter can be in actual orbits around the black hole. If it's interior to that is just gonna start plunging in next up closer to the black hole is the photon ring the point where the lights does the Luke two loops and makes a really bright image that we are able to see as a as a circle in the sky and interior to that is is the event or Isan. And that's where basically the everything is moving toward the singularity. There. The space time have switched. Signs, and that's where all hell breaks loose. So if we were falling into the black hole, we would know that we're going through these places, maybe we would put ten -cially notice the innermost stable circular orbit. But after that, we're just falling in, and we wouldn't necessarily know that we've crossed the horizon it's for a distant observer like us that's these things become

Einstein Shep Senate Stephen Hawking LA Geno Lynn Larry Twenty Years
"stephen hawking" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on AP News

"Get access to over fifty million songs. Download the music app today won't push to impeach President Trump AP Washington. Correspondent saga megani reports. House speaker Nancy Pelosi is waving off the idea for now. Hello sees been resisting pressure from some Democrats to start impeachment proceedings. But is now going further telling the Washington Post, President Trump's just not worth it, man. She's not for impeachment later saying much of the same to NBC news divide the country, unless there's some conclusive evidence that takes us to that place. It's different from her earlier statements that Democrats will wait on special counsel. Bob Muller's report before considering impeachment democratic thinking as shifted in part because of the possibility the report may be decisive. Sarah Sanders is response here on Pelosi waving off impeachment. I agree. Saga megani? At the White House. She wants cared for arguably the world's most famous scientists. But as AP's Charles de LA desma reports the late Stephen Hawking's former nurse has been barred for practicing professional group says it struggled Patricia daddy, the failing to provide the standard of good professional care expected. And professor Hawkins. Deserved. The council says daddy faces multiple misconduct charges including financial misconduct dishonesty and not providing appropriate care. A brilliant theoretical physicist hawking votes, so plainly about the mysteries of space time. I'm black holes that his book a brief history of time became an international bestseller. Dial-a-cheat a seventy six off the living with a rare form of motor neuron disease. Charles with London. The US has joined the probe into the European plane crash. And the Charles de LA desma reports they're hearing from one witness who's providing a graphic account of the planes descent. Linda says told the Associated Press the smoke was coming from the plane's radio before it crashed in a rural field. The witness says the plane rotated two times in the air and it had smoke coming from the back, then it hit the ground and exploded investigators on Monday fan the jet. Liner's two flight recorders at the crash site, but they're partially damaged. Meanwhile, America's Federal Aviation Administration has arrived at the scene with representatives in the National Transportation Safety board. They joined Ethiopian lead investigation. I'm Charleston with asthma. AP radio news. I'm Ed Donahue, more and more countries are saying yes to.

Charles de LA desma President Trump Nancy Pelosi Patricia daddy AP motor neuron disease Sarah Sanders Washington Post NBC Stephen Hawking Bob Muller White House Washington Ed Donahue Federal Aviation Administratio special counsel professor Hawkins US National Transportation Safety
Hawking's nurse struck off for failing to provide 'the care he deserved'

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Hawking's nurse struck off for failing to provide 'the care he deserved'

"She wants cared for arguably the world's most famous scientists. But as AP's Charles de LA desma reports the late Stephen Hawking's former nurse has been barred for practicing professional group says it struggled Patricia daddy, the failing to provide the standard of good professional care expected. And professor Hawkins. Deserved. The council says daddy faces multiple misconduct charges including financial misconduct dishonesty and not providing appropriate care. A brilliant theoretical physicist hawking votes, so plainly about the mysteries of space time. I'm black holes that his book a brief history of time became an international bestseller. Dial-a-cheat a seventy six off the living with a rare form of motor

Patricia Daddy Stephen Hawking Charles De La Desma Professor Hawkins Physicist
"stephen hawking" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Very important figure in the arena. He was the guy who brought together the citizen hearing on disclosure at the National Press Club in Washington DC. Researchers and military agency political witnesses from ten countries that testified for thirty hours over five days before six four members of the US congress regarding events in evidence confirming extraterrestrial presence engaging the human race right here. And many of you know, of the hearing many of those who made the testimony he certainly is a very important figure when it comes to this type of medication. We have on the show tonight. You know, one of the things that I have been talking about. I'm very fascinated about is. It was after the sighting of a memorial. This this interstellar object where people like AVI Loeb, says that he doubles down and says it was some sort of extraterrestrial craft or something that would be an extraterrestrial craft. We had people from SETI and many and even before Stephen hawking passed away saying that we need to take a look at this. We need to understand what it is. In fact, they were saying it was our run David with Rama and from. Mm there. We've had now members of SETI enmity saying that we need to reconfigure or refigure. What it is. We're looking for. We're not necessarily looking for communication with AT for. We're looking for bio signatures and techno signatures. And NASA even said if we're going on moon, Michelle we're going on any mission in space at all we need to look for some sort of biological life form to make it worth our while. So the attitude is changing was memorial that much of an influence or was there. Something more to that. Most of this is a straight. Now, it's not what it seems as I say, we have a hurry dysfunctional situation. Let's just take Dr Loeb, for instance. Very cool thing that happened there. Here's my take on it. Because when he talking about the extraterrestrial issue. Remember, there's a bit of truth. Embargo government still denies the existence. Most people are afraid to buck that embargo. And so everybody has to sort of dance around it. It's it's it's like you have to kind of partially stay in the closet. Let's talk about this guy. He's the head of strana meet Arbor. So he's he's a really big deal. And guess what? Really smart people who are focused on the cosmos. On astronomy astrophysics, and so forth who have pretty good connections. Are you sure you they are fully aware? There's an extraterrestrial presence. Hell all I have to do is go read the public domain research. There's about five thousand books pick the best one hundred and the proof is right there. But they know, but that doesn't mean they can say anything about it. And so here you have Dr low I believe for absolute certainty knows there's an extraterrestrial presence. So this Barack comes flying through the solar system. It's interesting because it may be the first extra solar object that we have seen means is coming from deep space perhaps from another solar system or was tossed out. Okay. It passes through and the only thing that was unusual about it. Frankly, other than the fact it was somebody long gated. So what you can have rocks of any type out there, though, they tend to gravitate over time toward. Severe or partial spheres. This was a little unusual, but not that unusual. However, it seemed to have some gravitational. REI gravitational. But it seemed to have some deviations in its path. Speed variation which was fully explained by I can say the gravitational effects of the the the planets and the sun and so forth, though, there could be any number of explanations for that. Because when it comes to Paul tea party or multi component, gravitational quesions. Let me tell you you need supercomputers any of it. He jumps on this. And he comes out and makes a big deal out of the fact that that anomaly could indicate it is a quote, pro extraterrestrial pro and he gets pushed pushed on it. And he pushes back, and he keeps saying that making a big deal of it. What's going on here? What I think is going on is this is the way a good man, Dr Ivy low who has a very powerful position. Like John Mack had Margaret psychiatrist restraint psychiatrists to engage the abduction issue legitimately and did fantastic work. And what happened Harvard tried to destroy him? It cost them a quarter million dollars to get past that Dr Loeb is taken an approach where he's keeping the issue out there in his own way. But I'm going to bet dimes to doughnuts that one day. Dr low may say look I was doing what I could tact is there's an extraterrestrial presence that'll be after disclosure. So that's that's my take on that. We'll.

AVI Loeb US Washington DC Dr low Stephen hawking AT congress Dr Ivy National Press Club NASA John Mack Michelle Barack David Arbor Harvard Margaret million dollars thirty hours
"stephen hawking" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

10:39 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Hour. We talked about the economic man whether economic man is now it's part it's going to be part of our evolution. It's going to be mandatory for a lot of people. And some people are not going to be able to measure up it. They don't measure up. They don't get it'll get jobs. They don't get to travel. They don't get to do anything. And the reason why I know this is coming in the future because this is a trend that's happening all over the world, and we're already pretty much there. It's just we need that one nudge. We need that nudge to get us over the top. Back in two thousand nine Stephen hawking spoke at a conference about how he believes humans have energy to do stage of evolution. Although it's been taking a homo sapiens. Several million years to evolve from the ABC useful information on DNA has probably changed by only a few million bits. According to Stephen hawking. He says the rate of biological evolution in humans. He says you look at the the humans hawking says that in his life when he looks at life is life in the universe. He says we've sped up or with the use of drugs bodily enhancements technologies because humans we will see in the not too distant future. According to Hocking, we'll be an advanced human. Maybe even something that is semblance to humanity without being human. And we all know, that's all part of the trans human agenda. So we're entering this new phase what hockey and calls self defined or self designed in which would be able to change improve our DNA and other things behavior even. I, you know, the changes we can find a repair of genetic defects cystic fibrosis muscular dystrophy behavioral modifications. I mean, all these things are are changeable. There adaptable genes. Can be changed. Snip snip step. The DNA has changed. It's all easy they identify. It's all easy. Correct. Improve upon so when you're working on other qualities to intelligence intelligence, we can go into jeans, and and we can go bam. We're going to be this person and tells you when you give a chip in the brain. Can you put a chip in the brain? I was just reading about this the other day putting chips in the brain to make people smart, and the guy's name is Moran. The guy that invented the smart chip as he was more. Call him moron. Well, yeah. The guy I'll get the story later. I could find it for I was reading the other day, this guy moron or Moran invented this. Chip. They're going to be able to put in the brain. And it can create behavioral modification changes where you can make a person happier or or a little less, hyper or just different behavior modifications because of a chip that's put in so you can control intelligence you can control genes control sickness and help. And it reminds me what Jose Delgado did. Hello z. Delgado went to a bullfight. And he was he was a neurophysiologist. He went to a bullfight, and he stood there. And it was going. What are you gonna do? I mean, the bulls gonna kill him because he's not dressed like a matador didn't matter because they'll gotta wanted to demonstrate how he can take a transmission and and put a box on the horns of a of a bowl, and he'd have a box to, but there was a probe who's on the end of these wires that went into the brain of the bowl and all you had to do is push the button and the Bogo stop, right? It's tracks would be able to be able to move. And so he basically when the bullfight because he was able to mind control or at least. Make the mind be controlled with an electronic device, and he said that this could really work in the future because you know, man, would be able to be a part of what he called the psycho civilized society. We're all fears and troubles. And behavioral problems could be just zapped away with a chip in the brain or with some neurological chip, and they were just talking about this the other day in science, I was reading his science MAG, and I saw the science website. And this guy named Moran is the guy that created this new chip, he's probably a student of Delgado's. Kind of reminds me of the matrix. They sit in the last hour agents. Smith is talking to morpheus any say in the morpheus that he said, you know, human beings are cancer on this planet there virus there disease. He said humans are a plague because all they do is they multiply and multiply and multiply, and they do nothing, and he says, and we're the cure. He says morpheus he says, and what he's talking about as he says, you know, we are the programs within the matrix that are the cure all the ills of humankind. And all you need is to is to have downloadable ideas. I download -able frames. So we can change behaviors and human beings and behavioral scientists have been observing human behavior realize that humans are very curious about an almost things they they they're very curious about strange facts, they're they're very curious about odd observations. And and they certainly are always, you know, looking for answers the questions are just burning in their minds as to what it all means what the meaning of life is all about. And they were saying that their behaviors that people do they don't make any sense gamblers will keep gambling even though they know they're losing or, you know, people say, oh, yeah. I'm going to save for retirement. I'm going to eat better start exercising. I'm gonna quit smoking. But they mean to do it. They want to do it. But they don't do it. Majority of people who believe in after climate change or global warming, or whatever if you're not an activist and you're not in people's faces over you're not part of the call. See people say, yeah, something's gotta be done about climate change. But they don't do anything about it. They don't do anything about it. They drive cars and do all the things. It's like what they were talking about a causE' Cortez. It how you know her carbon footprint is pretty huge. He's telling people to change their lifestyle. So they will do anything. That's how human behavior is. Now, we live in a culture of victimhood so victims of any kind they say that what they do is they exact revenge on people, and they do it even hurts their own interests. So these actresses of the metoo movement they're going to go in and their vengeance is to get somebody like Weinstein and get him frame, but they're going against their opportunity to work because that's exactly what they want. They want vengeance so badly they don't care if they don't get any work. They don't care. They don't care the repercussions. They just want revenge. So these things are what they call. You know, this is something that is human behavior that is you know, it's definite. We see the patterns in human behavior. See the technocrats say that in the future. They would like to see a a more economic man or a more economic person or woman in the economic man makes logical rational self interested decisions that way costs against benefits and maximize value and profit for the person. In other words, you go from being a selfless individual a person with problems to a person who is basically amoral and decides that your best interests are the only interest that matter. And the economic man they say is more intelligent because they're more analytic as I said there's selfish during the perfect self-regulation. They focus on the prize. They know what their future goals are. And they're not swayed by any politics, not swayed by any feelings or not swayed by any spirituality. They know what they want. But the sad part about economic nannies is they are a perfect pawn. In the chess game, they're they're they're the perfect sheep or the perfect malleable creature because they have no imagination and they and they cut away all their emotions. And basically, it's almost like they're breeding psychopath behavior. Oh, sociopathic behavior. Economic man in in mass does not exist. But that doesn't mean they're not going to try to make that person. I mean, we've got social media. We got data mining. We got human behavioral studies, we got we got a way to create the economic man, and this economic man will be created and human behaviors will be augmented to create a more responsible psycho civilized society, much like Delgado talked about. Is a guy from the university of Chicago. He's professor he won the Nobel memorial prize in economic sciences. His name was Richard Thaler. And he's inspired scholars across different disciplines in fundamentally changed the way we think about human behavior, and he's considered the father of behavioral economics. It's a pretty much a new field. That combines insights, recycle Aji, judgment and decision. Making and economics basically to generate a more accurate understanding of why humans do what they do. What human behaviors are? So they can actually outguess us, and and keep moving ahead of its still finally we groom or we're being groomed through psychological means to be more like an economic human. One of the jump through hoops when told one that looks out for. The interests of the party pretty much. I mean two plus two week was five or whatever they say. It is it's it's it's illogical to actually question authority or questioned science. The. When we look at economics. Economics is long different from other disciplines in its belief that most if not all human behavior. Can we easily explained by relying on the assumption? That our preferences are well defined and stable across time and eventually become rational see back in the nineteen ninety s failure began challenging what view the basically started challenging views about behavior by writing about anomalies in people's behavior. And he said these are anomalies that cannot be explained by standard economic theory. And so he wrote a number of columns about how humans behave and what they do. And he created something called the nudge unit. He said that there are behavioral science apparatus that we can use to nudge people in certain directions. We can nudge them. We nudge them in public nudge them in private, and it's all through suggestive retailing, it's all through suggestion propaganda. We can nudge people. We can groom them. We can push them in a direction where they will see the way we see it. It's always been the objective. We want to change human behavior. We want to change collective mass. We want to give them something that they can believe in other than something that would be an external savior, okay? We want them to believe in something other than what their religion. We.

Jose Delgado Stephen hawking Moran ABC hockey Hocking plague Richard Thaler bulls university of Chicago Smith Cortez Weinstein professor
"stephen hawking" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Last hour. We talked about economic, man. The economic man is now it's part it's going to be part of our evolution. And it's going to be mandatory for a lot of people. Some people are not going to be able to measure up, but they don't measure up. They don't get. It'll get jobs. They don't get to travel. They don't get to do anything. The reason why I know this is coming in the future because this is a trend. That's happening all over the world, and we're already pretty much there. It's just we need that one nudge. We need that nudge to get us over the top. Back in two thousand nine Stephen hawking spoke at a conference about how he believes humans have energy to do stage of evolution. Although it's been taking a homo sapiens. Several million years to evolve from the ape, so useful information, our DNA has probably changed by only a few million bids. According to Stephen hawking, he says the rate of biological evolution in humans. He says when you look at the the humans hawking says that his life when he looks at life. He's life in the universe. We've sped up our evolution with the use of drugs bodily enhancements technologies because humans we will see in the not too distant future. According to Hocking, we'll be an advanced human. Maybe even something that is semblance to humanity without being human. And we all know, that's all part of the trans human agenda. So we're entering this new phase what hockey 'cause calls self defined or self designed in which we'll be able to change improve our DNA and other things behavior even. I, you know, the changes we can find a repair genetic defects cystic fibrosis muscular dystrophy behavioral modifications. I mean, all these things are are changeable. There adaptable genes. Can be changed. Snip snip snip. The DNA has changed. It's all easy they identify. It's all easy to correct and improve upon. So when you're working on other qualities to intelligence intelligence, we can go into jeans, and and we can go bam. We're going meet this person and tells you when you give them a chip in the brain. Can you put a chip in the brain? I was just reading about this the other day putting chips in the brain to make people smart, and the guy's name is Moran. The guy that invented the smart chip as it was Moran. They call him moron. But yeah, the guy I'll get the story later. I could find it for I was reading the other day, this guy named moron or Moran invented this chip. They're going to be able to put in the brain. And it can create behavioral modification changes where you can make a person happier or or a little less, hyper or just different behavioral modifications because of a chip that's put in. So you can control intelligence you can control genes, you can control sickness and health. And it reminds me what Jose Delgado did hell Jose Delgado went to a bullfight. And he was he was a neurophysiologist. He went to a bullfight, and he stood there. And there was going. What is he going to do? I mean, the ball's gonna kill him because he's not dressed like a matador didn't matter because they'll got to demonstrate how he can take a transmission and and put a box on the horns of of a bowl, and he'd have a box to, but there was a probe who's on the end of these wires that went into the brain of the bowl and all you had to do is push a button and the Bogo stop, right? His tracks would be wouldn't be able to move. So he basically wanted the bullfight because he was able to mind control or at least. You make the mind be controlled with an electronic device, and he said that this could really work in the future because you know, man, would be able to be a part of what he called the psycho civilized society. We're all fears and troubles. And behavioral problems could be just zapped away with a chip in the brain or with some neurological chip, and they were just talking about this the other day in science, I was reading his science MAG. And I saw the science website as guy named Moran is a guy that created this ship. He's probably a student of Delgado's. Kind of reminds me of the matrix. They sit in the last hour agent. Smith is talking to morpheus any say in the morpheus that he said human beings are cancer on this planet there virus there disease. He said humans are a plague because all they do is they multiply and multiply and multiply they do nothing. And he says, and we're the cure. He says to morpheus he says, and what he's talking about as he says, you know, we are the programs within the matrix that are the cure to all the ills of humankind. And all you need is is to have downloadable ideas. I downloaded frames. So we can change behaviors and human beings and behavioral scientists have been observing human behavior, and he realized that humans are very curious about an almost things they they they're very curious about strange facts, they're they're very curious about odd observations. And and they certainly are always, you know, looking for answers, but the questions are just burning in their minds as to what it all means what the meaning of life is all about. And they were saying that their behaviors that people do they don't make any sense a gambler's. We'll keep gambling even though be know. They're losing. Or, you know, people say, oh, yeah. I'm going to save for retirement. I'm going to eat better. I'm start exercising. I'm going to quit smoking. But they mean to do it. They want to do it. But they don't do it. Majority of people who believe in anthropogenic climate change or global warming, or whatever if you're not an activist and you're not in people's faces over you're not part of the call. See people say, yeah, something's gotta be done about climate change. But they don't do anything about it. They don't do anything about it. They drive cars and do all the things. It's like what they were talking about Qazi Cortez. It how you know her carbon footprint is pretty huge issues telling people to change their lifestyle. So they don't do anything. That's how human behavior is. Now, we live in a culture of victimhood in so victims of any kind. They say that what they do is they exact revenge on people, and they do it even if it hurts their own interests. So these actresses of the metoo movement they're going to go in and their vengeance is to get somebody like Weinstein and get him framed. But they're going against their opportunity to work because that's exactly what they want. They want vengeance so badly they don't care if they don't get any work. They don't care. They don't care the repercussions. They just want revenge. So these things are what they call. You know, this is something that is human behavior that is, you know, Stephanie, we see the patterns in human behavior. Was he the technocrats say that in the future? They would like to see a a more economic man or a more economic personal woman in the economic, man. Makes logical rational self interested decisions that way costs against benefits and maximize value and profit for the person. In other words, you go from being a selfless individual a person with problems to a person who has basically amoral and decides that your best interests are the only interests that matter. The economic man they say is more intelligent because of this more. Analytic as I said, they're selfish. During the perfect self regulation. They focus on the prize. They know what their future goals are. And they're not swayed by any politics, not swayed by any feelings or not swayed by any spirituality. They know what they want. But the sad part about the economic nannies is the perfect pawn. In the chess game. They're the perfect sheep the perfect malleable creature because they have no imagination and they and they cut away all their emotions. And basically, I it's almost like they're breeding psychopathic behavior. Oh, sociopathic behavior. Economic man in in mass does not exist. But that doesn't mean they're not going to try to make that person. I mean, we've got social media got data mining. We got human behavioral studies, we got we got away to create the economic man. And this economic man will be created and human behaviors will be augmented to create a more responsible psycho civilized society much like Delgado talked about. A guy from the university of Chicago. He's professor he won the Nobel memorial prize in economic sciences. His name is Richard Thaler. And he's inspired scholars across different disciplines and fundamentally changed the way we think about human behavior, and he's considered the father of behavioral economics. It's pretty much a new field. That combines insights, recycle judgment and decision. Making and economics basically to generate a more accurate understanding of why humans do what they do. What human behaviors are? So they can actually out guests, and and keep moving ahead of us till finally, groom or were being groomed through psychological means three more like an economic human. One of the jump through hoops when told one that looks out for. The interests of the party pretty much. I mean two plus two week was five well, whenever they say, it is it's it's it's illogical to actually question authority or questions science. The. When we look at economics. Economics is long different from other disciplines in its belief that most if not all human behavior. Can be easily explained by relying on the assumption. That our preferences are well defined in stable across time and eventually become rational see back in the nineteen ninety s failure began challenging what view the basically started challenging views about behavior by writing about anomalies in people's behavior. And he said that these are anomalies that cannot be explained by standard economic theory. And so he wrote a number of columns about how humans behave and what they do. And he created something called the nudge unit. He said that there are behavioral science apparatus that we can use to nudge people in certain directions. We can nudge them where you nudge them in public, nudge them in private, and it's all through suggestive retailing, it's all through suggestion propaganda. We can nudge people. We can groom them. We can push them in a direction where they will see the way we see it. It's always been the objective. We want to change human behavior. We want to change collective mass. We want to give them something that they can believe in other than something that would be an external savior, okay? We.

Jose Delgado Moran Stephen hawking hockey Hocking university of Chicago plague Richard Thaler Qazi Cortez Smith Weinstein professor Stephanie
"stephen hawking" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Twitter questions, and I want to get both of these out of the way. Let's go to this is from Kevin Kevin says there are reports that the folks at Sern are opening up portals to other dimensions assuming that. This is correct. Will they be able to close them once they open them. I don't know to the best of my knowledge. They haven't done anything that would indicate they have had to have done that. That's you know, Vail viable yet. And so if we'll open them up, we don't know how open them. So I don't know how we'd go about closer to me though. So I can't get an answer. One last this is from junior robot Dobbs. He says doesn't quantum entanglement worked between particles where one is down inside a black hole and one is not if so then it appears we we do see information transferred from other space times or universes. Well, this is kind of arguably how hockey variation what Stephen hockey is where they finished Ford. Walk is that you could be losing mass a black hole by by a particle pale entangled, but you're not really getting information other than what the state of those two park was as us can't seem to find a way to transmit any other information that we've come up with so fall. So if we find another way, that's great. But at the moment is not something that we can do with what we know and one last one last point here, the the statements made by Stephen hawking which were and he was very direct. Don't tell ET where we are. We don't know what to expect and we are just inviting trouble. And I think about the Fermi paradox and some of the answers and the questions that are there, and that would be one of them, maybe ET's thinking. Like, Stephen hawking. That's actually a great one because we just didn't episode. I called doc force theory, that looks an example of that. And what I usually tell people on that one is it's a very legitimate concern except that it's too late Edo, the cat is already out of the bag any civilization able to travel the galaxy already knows about us. So whether we communicate with them intentionally or not they only know what he'll data done fly bys with folks, they are doing that you need to go out and hang out with us and do it night watch one night and have that epiphany that life change, but Isaac what about really quick thirty second answer. And before I have to say good night. What about these fast radio bursts? That is a great question. They extra galactic they'll probably something along the lines of a neutron stall. But we eat so much more data. We can say and about all we can say with eating something is they're probably fairly small. I wanna thank you. Absolutely, wonderful conversation tonight and. And I want to let everybody know that. When you go hang out with Arthur on his channel or his Facebook page and everything is there Isaac, Arthur dot net, the dot com or dot net. Donna, yes dot net. Arthur response to everything comment. He reads all the comments you have any questions you want to interact over on his Facebook page. He is completely open to the community. So go and do that and start your Isaac Arthur journey after this program tonight. Thank you, so much, Arthur great conversation, my friend. Thank you for having me on Jimmy pole to pole Isaac. Arthur. Thank you so much. And thank you everybody for letting me hang out this weekend with all of you here at coast to coast, it is just an honor and a privilege great questions. Great phone calls over the last two nights, the Twitter in the Email and everything else is just a fantastic. Thank you so much and with that I have to.

Isaac Arthur Stephen hawking Twitter Kevin Kevin Facebook Stephen hockey Dobbs Sern Jimmy pole hockey Donna Ford thirty second
"stephen hawking" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of all time that I don't think anybody's read. Pay off that tees in a few seconds. Perhaps you've heard that federal prosecutors are subpoenaing documents from the Trump inauguration committee, making sure that they didn't promise anybody front seats in exchange for legislation or something like that yet another investigation going on that'll be fun to follow. People contribute to the inaugural festivities expect something don't they? Oh. Yeah. Obviously if they're dumb enough to offer a quid pro quo in writing or something as Boesel be in trouble. But I don't know just yet another investigation. Okay. That's why aren't NPR. They didn't even go support a claim that they said there there's a lot of paperwork involved, and we're not sure they did all so it'd be a paperwork violation. Which is what happened with Obama got fined four hundred thousand dollars because there's a whole bunch of paperwork involved in something. That's stupid, right right deal. Well, I don't want and bribery going on either. But if you've ever seen all the lobbying shops on K street, you know, there's plenty of LA bribing on. I guess they just got to run a speed trap now. And again, so it doesn't get to agree. Just Trump and Schumer Twitter tweet net each other and Marshall we'll have that in his news coming up. I'm sorry. Breaking news. Breaking news. It's not donkey worthy though. Michael, a lock of George. Washington's hair has been sold for over thirty five thousand dollars from his head. Oh, you're an idiot. Back here, leg hair. Be quiet. The lock of the first US presidents hair sold in the who cares. Was from the family of Alexander Hamilton Hamilton who had the lock of hair fix to an autograph signed by James Hamilton for about a century his hair. I founded variables this is the chair. Why is there vendor? Hamilton rap about George Washington hair off. Oh, why is g dubs hair affixed to an autograph of Alex? Hamilton was that the original leather letter of authenticity, certified this is one of five hundred lithographs or whatever actually just had to clip off some of the dudes hair that used to be a common thing though. You'd right Abe, Lincoln hair and say, hey, really love what you're doing in the country. Do we favor semi lock your ear and he'd snip off a little bit? Dorian? Another simpleton asking me for some of my hair. Bald soon just take a little bit. Are you gonna wear this hat? So I read I've tried to read this book many times in my life a little of a brief history of time by Stephen hawking Hawking's book. Yeah. Stephen hawking. It's I didn't realize this. It's mentioned in his forward or introduction to the most recent addition that it's one of the best selling books in the history of books one out of every seven hundred eighty people on earth have a copy if you broke it down. I mean, it's just it's insane. I'm wondering how many people actually read it or read past the second chapter good for you. If you've made it past the second chapter of never made it past the first chapter, I've never even attempted it sits just I I would like to understand stuff like that. I just I my my head gets really fast. And then I lose track of what's going on. You know, it's funny. I'm reasonably being drunk. I'm reasonably reasonably bright guy. Some of you might disagree, and that's fine. But I've discovered I cannot dance. No matter how hard I try, and I cannot comprehend your your theoretical physics Nelson. Whole will sing opera to a hog. You're just wasting your time your wormholes your courts. But here's what got me interested in this. So the latest addition he says, there's an this was written a couple of years ago because he died, but he said there's a new chapter in this edition in which I talk about time travel, which I believe is all which I believe is possible since and he says, of course, the age old question about time travel is if it's possible how come we haven't met anybody from the future, which is the age old question about time travel? He said I address that in the chapter Dow, I know I actually have to buy the book to read it. I totally know why that is you got to sign a form says you're not gonna tell anybody here from the future. You gotta wear old-timey close. You're not allowed to say anything from big giant closets of our clothes. And if you break the rules, we leave you back there. Come back. The president. You think that's Super Bowls? Halftime show suck forty. Yeah. You're in trouble in eighty seven year old Adam LeVine. Shirt and seems to the crowd. Right. So I don't buy that many boom. Download the first chapter because you can do that for free, which is awesome. I've read the first chapter of many many books now. Wait a second. Okay. I wonder twenty bucks to find out. But I'm kinda interesting. Why Stephen Hawking's is time travel is possible. And there's a reason why we've not met somebody from the future. I I understand. Why? Well, I understand why you would not willingly tell anybody because you would practically universally you'd want to get back to your time because that's your time, and you'd wanna lay low because if indeed you were from the future, and we discovered it we'd hold on for plenty.

Stephen hawking James Hamilton Stephen hawking Hawking George Washington president Alexander Hamilton Hamilton Boesel Obama bribery Hamilton US Washington Twitter Adam LeVine LA Schumer Dorian Alex
"stephen hawking" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"And helps us to connect with those around us, which is why losing our ability to talk because of an injury or disease can be so devastating for example, locked in central or LS an example of that would be Stephen hawking that he was also losing the ability to talk that's name MS Karani from the Commons mind and brain institute at Columbia University. So in these cases, the brain is fine the pattern of activity that produces or here's speech is. Okay. It's just a connection between that and speech generation muscles that is affected. What you're hoping to do is to directly read speech from the brain of a person. So that they do not have to to actually say it, but we can go one step before that. And as the brain activity is produced we can directly detect and code it. When we hail or imagined speech, our brain kicks into gate, and that generates a specific pattern of neural activity in the brain as it prices. This information that goes on an assassin area code the auditory cortex that brain patent depends on who speaking what we're hearing on the quality of the sound. What's impressive is that name and his team measured is brain signals and came up with a method that decode them and turns it back into speech views a machine learning algorithm. These models that are loosely based on the properties of neurons in the brain. And they are able to learn extremely complex patterns of relationships. We also use the latest technologies in speech, synthesis. And the basically asked the algorithm to learn how to translate how to go from the brainwaves back to the speech sentences and from there we can go to to the sound itself. I mean that sounds take fee to so how do people come? Into this. How are you able to test that we tend with neuro-surgeons and whenever they had patients for example with epilepsy. The surgeon implants a bunch of electrodes in their brain. And this patients are in the hospital. They're connected to a recording device, and we played them sounds and record their brainwave simultaneously, the first part of the experiment involved. Playing children's storybooks to patients this helps the algorithm to recognized that all important brain patents when hearing speech, but then it was time to see if the algorithm could invest this telling his brain patterns into something audible, we asked them to listen to numbers from zero to nine and the Ogden was never trained on numbers. But looking at half hour of speech, it was able to figure out what sort of brainwave activity corresponds to what sort of speech sounds, and then this algorithm is able to reconstruct this down that is most similar to. To what the person actually heard. And of course, because we know what the person actually heard you're able to compare that to to determine whether it did a good job or not. And when we did test we found that what we constructed from the brain is highly intelligible how intelligible well. Using the latest speech synthesizes, the algorithm translated thoughts into this. Chain. Found checks and nice speech synthesizers similar to Siri Google or any other minion living in your device helped make this Avaz improvement from any previous attempts. See I mean, but name is seem very positive that one day this system could translate brain signals into more complex sentences. So could this technology give voice to those with airlines locked-in syndrome or those with any other speech impediment. So I would say that this is not a big seven that direction. But obviously, there's a lot more that has to be done. Previous. Studies have shown that there is a lot of similarity between actually listening to speech or imagining listening to speech. But of course, it has to be tested, and that's also another future direction of our work. The ideal goal would be to have an implantable device that is able to detect and decode the brain activity that reflects the internal voice of person. So when the person tries to say something internally we would be able to code translated into speech. So that the person will have the ability to communicate using. Speech. Subsidy amazing, isn't it that was named scrawny is from Columbia University. And the study on that work is in Santa that records finally this week. The F is to put it lightly. A pretty important factor in humanities origin for star. We live in but the extent to which features of the planet like rivers route type in plate boundaries have shaped our evolution and human history runs..

Columbia University Stephen hawking MS Karani Ogden Siri Santa one day
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Future Tense

"Conference in the US capitol organized by the Washington Post, the focus is on defense and Morton. Just to drill down. When you think about the future talk a little bit about how you see a transforming your business of military. Our and the guy in the hotseat is general Joe it chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff in our profession one of the areas that's going to really determine future outcomes is speed of decision making. So a is certainly relevant to speed of decision-making. If you think about cyberspace, a is critical to be able to implement effective ways of protecting ourselves in cyberspace. I don't think it would be an overstatement when we talk about artificial intelligence to say that whoever has a competitive advantage in artificial intelligence and can field systems informed by artificial intelligence could very well have an overall competitive advantage. I mean, I think it may be that important. I don't think it's something we can say definitively at this point. But it certainly going to inform. Warm in be the preponderance of the of the variables that would go into. Hey, who has an overall competitive advantage? AI will be a key piece of it. Anthony Fennell here. Welcome to future tents. A group of the world's leading scientists and tech experts, including physicist, Stephen hawking, an apple co founder, Steve Wozniak have issued a stark warning in open letter published today, they say or Thomas weapons systems was use artificial intelligence to select targets without human intervention should be banned predicting that was more than three years ago. And since that time the development of autonomous weaponry has continued pace when he begin to think about what a world would look like where militaries have deployed Atanas weapons in in large numbers. One of the dramatic changes that we're likely to see is the pace of battle exceleron pull Shari's. Our first guest today as we look at the influences speed on future conflict. He's the director of technology and national security at the center for new American secure. Thirty and then one of the drivers of military's pursuing. This technology is fear that others are doing. So and they'll have to do this just to keep pace. This was well captured I'm gonna paraphrase here, but a coat from former deputy secretary defense Bob work who said others build terminators, and they don't make good decisions as people, but they're faster. How do we respond? That's kind of colorful and slightly scary way. To look at the problem, which is that even if a ton of JV don't have all of the reasoning capabilities that humans hat in a variety of different contexts, maybe they don't understand ethical principles the same way, these are vitally important things. But if they're faster that pressure will loan drive lotteries to use this technology, but could also shift warfare to new domain.

US Washington Post AI Joe Thomas weapons systems Anthony Fennell Morton Steve Wozniak Stephen hawking director of technology deputy secretary Shari chairman apple physicist Bob work co founder three years
"stephen hawking" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"What is that speak and spell? Says. So James Zeki rodent said, I think the noisy from episode seven zero six. Is the SP zero two five six narrator speech synthesizer, chip that was included in Mattel's and Televoice voice, synthesis module for the television. I don't think a lot of people will remember that. I do remember that. I remember in television. Yes. And it does sound quite similar. It's not it. But is a very good guess because there was a similar sound there. Definitely has a robotic electric type of voice. But that is not correct Paul Tate said, hey, there, you guys having watched a lot of Bruce Perry tribes and pretty certain that this week's noisy is a member of the Combi tribe. Saying farewell to someone has a melancholy tone to it. If it isn't the correct answer, Google, the combine farewell whistle much love. So that's spelled K O M B A. Not correct. The thing about that is I think it's very clear that we're hearing numbers in there. So it had been a hell of a coincidence. If them saying goodbye is like someone. Counting from one to ten. I didn't hear I didn't hear what they're good. Bye. Could be similar to that. So I have another guest. Here was coming from Ashley spur Hala, which I would have pronounced spy Challah. But she told me how to out. So there you go. She said, hey, guys love you on what you do been listening for about eight or so years and have only submitted an answer one other time, which I one which was the Audubon bird clock. So hopefully, I'm not killing my undeniably record here. I'm bursting that this is a recording of Stephen hawking configuring, his first visual speech module. And oddly, many people guessed that people running against that one. That's not correct. Oh, sorry. Yeah. Sorry. But you're fifty fifty you're doing better than Steve is science fiction. But we did have a winner last week. And the winner is Brian Landry and Bryant's at hey, Jay. It's rare that I actually know the noisy of the week. So I figured I'd write it down. I believe that this noisy is the result of a computer interpreting reading the thoughts of someone's brainwaves. So yes, indeed, this is so this technology has been researched for quite a while by multiple different teams what they're trying to do trying to the ultimate goal will be that. If somebody thinks of a sentence that a computer could say it. This would be particularly good for people who can't speak that are that are suffering from a disease multiple things could be going wrong with someone where they can't move. Or gesture they can't do the the holy grail yet. They can't just have the person think of it. But what they're able to do at this level is the person could be hearing, the sounds of someone speaking and the computer and the software that they have and the have electrodes that are hooked up to the expose. Brain. And they can they can interpret with the person is hearing into that sound. So let me play that again. Now that you know, what it is. Hey, hey, hey. Shapes. Hey. Now, this is this is a really this is a little creepy. They can only do this experiment on people who have their brain exposed for one medical reason or another. There's a few different scenarios where they would have to expose a part of the brain could be for surgery. It could be treating someone that has a certain condition. So this is you know, they can't do this research on just anybody has to be under these certain conditions j just we clear that doesn't mean their brain is exposed to the outside in an ongoing manner. Just means that they have brain surface electrodes place. Well, Steve it's likely because this is still in like early research. So it may actually be only tested during search neuro-surgery interoperative tackling deep. There's plenty of deep. Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's, for example. Yeah, there's an electrode that's placed into the brain. And the skull is closed again. I don't think that they leave this in there permanently. They were just doing fasting. So what we're looking at is a picture of the top of somebody's head in the the bone has been taken off like the crown of the head has been taken off. And there's a number chart its looks..

Steve it Brian Landry Mattel James Zeki Stephen hawking Google Bruce Perry Paul Tate Parkinson Bryant
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Think Again

"Understanding sounds a bit like Stephen hawking when he said. We've cracked the entire secrets of the universe. We will know the mind of God. That's what hawking Senate, so ourself. It would have sort of have no truck with that. What he would have said though, is that before philosophy was invented. And he was very wear. It should only been around for two hundred years rational philosophy. The people used myths to explain the world he saw philosophy a superseding and improving on holy laudable efforts by the storytellers to explain the universe before he actually says that it's so he does have respect for those totally that impulse that early explanatory impose peace science, the Greek equivalent of Genesis, which is he c- odds, the organ, he says, this is an amazing work by quite a primitive mind trying to understand and that philosophy is simply the clever child of myth and Aristotle's teacher Plato is. Is that Plato or Socrates Plato Aristotle? So so critise, our cels intellectual Granddad. Okay. So but Plato doesn't shy away from miffed. But he does it in in maybe a different way in a somewhat metaphorical way or allegorical way kind of righty. Yeah. Well, yes. And no, right. I guess the the platonic forums are meant to be real in some sense. Now, our Suffolk does not use myth in the same way when arguing philosophically play tone, blurs them confused. Use his famously in the Republic, you know, the myth of the story of the guy who went to the underworld. And so what was going on or the myth of Atlantis in the tomatoes? Are some does not do that. He saw a very clear distinction between mystical thinking and rational argumentation, which is not scientists love him. I mean material scientists love him what because it's very seductive. I mean, the storytelling is very seductive. And it's very dangerous because in the case of Plato as I recall, you know, you have that. So you have some things that are fairly metaphorical like the origin of men and women as one being that got that's not meant to be Llanelli the case, but you can very easily build systems of control around these ideas..

Plato Stephen hawking Aristotle Senate Suffolk two hundred years
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

Man Points! Podcast

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

"Does it burn? When you pee not go in there. Looking at web, MD stuff and everything like, okay? This is what I'm seeing some typing and stuff, and I ended up getting narrowed down to two things before I went to the dock. It was either a stroke. Or detached retinas? Luckily, I lean towards the I'm here. Route Robbie I'm like. Forty one. I'm going to lean towards the eye thing. It prey on night too young for stroke. So I went there, and I said this symptom straight out of there. That's of course, what it was. But yeah, they wind up and demand. It gets scary. Because when you're looking at the first, of course, that pops up is not detached retina, it's like this. Oh, you gotta stroke Mike now, dude. Yeah. But it's supposed to be the patient pavilion that freaks out on web MD, not doctored. But it would have been a way more entertaining podcast. If I would have had a stroke and not went blind. News in here. Her your mouth every folk in thirty seconds. Put up one dead arm and try to push buttons Komitch back. With a happened. What happens something went loud west Dover? Again. Let me put him back up. It's terrible. You have one of those chairs like that fucking. What was the dude? What was his name help me out here that the Stephen King? Stephen King, Stephen hawking talking just big difference. Nah. Nah. Both were Stephen Stephen hawking. Komitch back. The robot on the show. It's a good guy. And chair talks. Check that out. Cohered ever was. It could properly pronounce names, but like an enunciates. Everything's like pizza route instead of pizza. Oh, like, my my Australian chick on my GPS. Is there speaking spell sitting there at the table? No, that's just wis. It's just pull the of the sound like an animal. Vic out goes. Wouldn't that be fun to replace somebody with their voice pox thing? The string pool. Keep have no idea. What's coming?.

Stephen hawking Stephen King Robbie Dover Vic Mike Cohered thirty seconds
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"So it really is very well confirmed in many ways, but the thing is causing inflation has one really incredible prediction that a lot of people find hard to believe. And that's that we live in a multi-billion. In other words, our universe is just part of one of many universes in this whole multi-diverse this hold on samba which in many versions of the theory is literally infinite so that means there's an infinite number of universes in them. They would have other intelligent beings. And in fact, if you went long enough, you could find intelligent beings who are exactly like you and me, so it's somewhere in another multi-diverse. Yes. There's two people. There's only one multi-diverse, but there's many many us in in the multi verse. Yeah, there's another universe where there's two people recording a podcast and maybe be wearing a blue sweater instead of black or something like that. So if you look long at yes, you'll find a blue sweater version. But if you looked long enough, you would find a black sweater version. And if you look long enough, you would find that a one where that person is named Nick Bilton, and he's interviewing Bill Poundstone. So really everything would be repeated endlessly there would be universes that would mirror this universe. And what is the what is the larger implication of that? Well, it's pretty mind boggling to the extent that most physicist, I would say art to some degree uncomfortable with it. I mean, it's uncomfortable with it because it makes them uncomfortable as human beings flamboyant claims about this mind boggling multi-diverse that no one can really confirm because we'd never be able to actually go in his spaceship and explore this multi-diverse because it's way way out there. And in fact, Stephen hawking when he died was trying to come up with a version of the theory that would may be saved these predictions about the cosmic microwave background that we can confirm, but maybe not make so many gaudy claims about this multi, but it's very hard to do that. So, but if you take this seriously, then you know, it is pretty amazing claim that that we're out there. So the question is is there anything we can do to try to convince ourselves that this is a reasonable claim or else to to prove it's not so reasonable and one of them is is actually uses the same sort of math. Because we have something. That's that's known as 'cause MC fine tuning now. This is the observation that if you look at the universe. Many of the attributes of our universe seemed to be really fine tuned to life and to intelligent life. Because if you look at university of planet of our universe, not not our planet because if you look at the exact strength of gravity, relative to the strength of electromagnetic force, you can show that if it was just a little weaker or little stronger, you would have a universe that was basically just all thin gas where it would be impossible to have planets and stars and galaxies and presumably it would be impossible to have any form of life. And it's not just a those attributes it's really a lot of them like the dark the proportion of dark matter dark energy in the universe. Even the fact that we have three dimensions of space really seems ideally suited to intelligent life. Because if you think about it, we can imagine to debriefings, but it would be very hard to have a brain with all these interconnections if if it had to exist in a plane, and you can imagine four d space..

Nick Bilton Stephen hawking university of planet physicist Bill Poundstone
"stephen hawking" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hawking" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"To pervaded with Dave Asprey. Today's Koufax today is that people are fully paralyzed are now using brain implants with off the shelf tablet computers in order to send text messages and surf the internet, which is completely life-changing. Because before that all you had was maybe a twitch of your eye are moving of your tongue. The way Stephen hawking. Did this is game changing because what's going to happen in five years when we can get that same signal from the surface of your scalp without having to stick electrodes inside your brain, you could pretty easily scramble your eggs by sticking things in your head. We're probably not going to do that for many many years if ever I don't think it's going to be necessary. But the fact that this is already happening is a precursor to the world that's coming where you don't have to hold your phone up to look at your face because it's already able to read your mind. This is going to celery things way more than we have today. And I'm excited. To see it as long as they have a good firewall for my brain. Do you know about as-as Anthon? It's the combine the gives weld caught salmon shrimp that amazing red color and may have something to do with salmon's amazing strength. It's from a class of antioxidant. It's called keratin noise. And it turns out that cells throughout your body, especially your eyes can work better when they have enough. That's the way I created the new bulletproof armor supplement, which stacks large dose of than with two other crinoids extracted from as take Marigot hours on top of that included, bilberry fruit extract, which was first used in World War Two to help pilots with night-vision since I'm plan to live to at least one hundred and eight years old, I want my is as strong constant exposure to indoor LED lights screens is a new source of visual stress is did not evolved handle. That's why I give my is extra support with bulletproof armor. Check it out on bulletproof dot com..

Koufax Stephen hawking Dave Asprey eight years five years
Stephen Hawking auction raises astronomical sum

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking auction raises astronomical sum

"Our permission and agreement. It's hard to do. But that should be the goal period. That said nations should be compassionate. We should have effective immigration laws. When you see a column of people that's made up of women children and young men who wanna get across to avoid danger in Guatemala Honduras. It's hard to consider them invaders. Okay. Now, you talked about the importance of a nation should be able to control its borders. President Trump has sent thousands or will ultimately sent he says fifteen thousand US soldiers to the border to control it what there's been some pushback from from various senior military figures. Would you be among them? I don't think it's the move that. I would recommend. I think it also plays to emotion. I actually think it was designed to go before the midterm elections to meet with the idea of invasion of this caravan. But it's actually should be viewed separate from should we control our border? I think that shouldn't be a debate. That's something that we as a nation should do. But when you send a bunch of troops down to the border, and there are some legal limitations of what they can do you need to make sure that you explain to the American people that this isn't a classic invasion, and our soldiers aren't going to man the ramparts and shoot the invaders. Because that's an accurate. Okay. Except we know that President Trump has said I'll tell you this anybody throwing stones rocks like they did in Mexico where they badly police and soldiers in Mexico, we will consider that a firearm implicit in. That is the idea that they might be shot at well. I think it would be dramatically. Tragic to put soldiers in a position where they particularly shoot immigrants moving forward. Okay. And not as wet this. I mean, this is fascinating. It is an extraordinary issue. But there are senior military figures. General Jim WBZ who oversaw the effort to build the Iraqi army and police I think you'll know these figures he said, the militia was where the military is being used for partisan political purposes it's dangerous because it will political politicized the use of force in ways that democracy should avoid now. He said that actually just about the sending of the troops. And he's right. I think do because. Right. I think that we've used military force for political reasons as far back in history as you can record it that said, it doesn't make it right? Particularly for symbol like this for internal domestic politics. I'm critical of this move. But what I want to make sure we don't do is. We don't then say what we should control our borders. Of course, we should. We need to make sure that's clear sometimes we get around the political rhetoric. Forget it can you imagine the image would come up if immigrants came forward, and we use physical force against them. I mean, what it would do to the United States reputation in the world to the morality of the soldiers put in that position is unconscionable. Okay.

President Trump Jim Wbz United States Mexico Iraqi Army Guatemala Honduras
Stephen Hawking’s personal belongings fetch more than $2 Million at auction

BBC World Service

01:17 min | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking’s personal belongings fetch more than $2 Million at auction

Stephen Hawking's PhD and wheelchair go under the hammer

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking's PhD and wheelchair go under the hammer

"Inspiration and a global celebrity now his wheelchair is apparently up for auction by Christie's, that's crazy. They're also going to auction off a whole bunch of his papers from Cambridge University. Yeah. We were talking about this earlier. And we said, well, they ought to put that wheelchair in the Smithsonian. He's a British. He was a British citizenship. Put it in some, you know, someplace in Britain. Similar to the Cambridge University would be the place. Yeah. Sure. Apparently proceeds from the sale of the wheelchair will go to to charities is Stephen hawking foundation and the motor neuron disease association. It's also going to be used I guess to pay off. Inheritance taxes for his kids? Well. Guess you do what you gotta do. Still a shame that it's not going to be prominently displayed in some place where the public and appreciate you would think Ben's

Cambridge University Motor Neuron Disease Stephen Hawking Britain BEN Christie
Stephen Hawking discussed on Steve Scaffidi

Steve Scaffidi

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking discussed on Steve Scaffidi

"His death presents answers to the questions that hawking said he received most during his time on earth. These are the things Stephen Hawking's, considered brilliant. Any was and people wanted his thoughts on things other bombshells? I do not consider it. A bombshell Stephen hawking do not believe in God other. A bomb shells, the British scientists left his readers with include the belief that alien life is out there. Artificial intelligence could outsmart humans and time travel. Can't be ruled out. I'm not

Stephen Hawking
Apple gets critical iPhone technology in $600 million Dialog deal

Geek News Central

02:50 min | 3 years ago

Apple gets critical iPhone technology in $600 million Dialog deal

"Some source. Some, you know, wild blogger making claims. Or apple is betting six hundred million dollars at improving apple watch iphone battery life. Apple struck a deal that will push its chip making ambitions Ford. The tech giant agreed to pay six hundred million to dialogue semiconductor. A UK base chipmaker that has been working with apple since the first iphones come out. Congratulations to that team. All three hundred employees are going to become apple employees now. And so they paid three hundred million cash for a portion of the dialogue company, including licensing power management, technology assets, and the company will pay the remaining three hundred million to dialogue in an advanced in advance for products that come out within the next three years. Apple says, dialogue has deep expertise in cheap chip development, and we are thrilled to have this talented group of engineers who've long supported our product now working directly for apple, Johnny, Sarah, j Apple's senior vice president hardware technology said in a statement. Very cool. Congratulations to the dialogue team. Or Google pixel three exile, you gives you a love this. Those of you that are are Google pixel fans. And I know I, we've got a few that listen to the show. A matter of fact, I saw one post someone was ordering well, the pixel XL did arrive with a notch because we knew this was going to happen, but the notch can be hidden. It can be disabled and settings. If you don't wanna see the notch, it a black it out. So they, they added a notch hide option. So goodwill explains, it's it is to bring the best cameras. They're dual front cameras, so. Okay. Why would you hide it? Well, you hide it just because if you don't wanna see it, if you don't wanna look like apple fan boy, I guess. All right, pretty cool. Stephen Hawking's, of course, who is no longer with us. His final paper published tackles a famous paradox in if you want to learn about black holes and how they may have soft hair. Yes, that's the the term. It's a pretty fascinating article. I did actually take time in read it and it just give you a fair warning like the first two paragraphs are like dry. In, but then a little bit further down at actually gets kind of good in explains in layman's terms what they're talking about in then you get near the end any get

Apple Google Senior Vice President Hardware Ford Stephen Hawking UK Johnny Sarah Six Hundred Million Dollars Three Years
Stephen Hawking, Motor Neuron Disease and Physicist discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

Stephen Hawking, Motor Neuron Disease and Physicist discussed on BBC World Service

"A final scientific paper continue work by the physicist. Stephen hawking has been published. The study was completed by three professor Hawking's colleagues after his death early this year and examines what happens to objects that disappear into black holes Stephen hawking who lived for more than half a century with motor neuron disease was one of the world's leading cosmologists in a forward to the latest paper his colleagues say his contribution to black hole physics remained. Vitally stimulating to the very

Stephen Hawking Motor Neuron Disease Physicist Professor
Department Of Homeland, Westminster Abbey and Charles Darwin discussed on Special Programming

Special Programming

01:39 min | 4 years ago

Department Of Homeland, Westminster Abbey and Charles Darwin discussed on Special Programming

"Looper says many visitors during this crucial summer tourism season are canceling their plans after hearing of the fire and these are small businesses don't have a lot of the lastest bounce back on after a month of bad sales the state's delegation says they will be trying to bring relief funds to the community from fema and the us small business administration for npr news i'm dan voiced in drank oh on wall street stocks closed slightly lower f recovering from heavier losses earlier in the session the dow jones industrial average fell eighty four points the nasdaq composite index lost fourteen and the s and p five hundred to three points this is npr news figures from the department of homeland security indicate that almost two thousand migrant children are being detained in the united states without at least one parent parents and their children were separated after entering the us illegally across the southern border attorney general jeff sessions says it's part of his department's zero tolerance policy sessions is being slammed by some members of congress over that policy and by civil rights leaders for using a biblical passage to justify it british physicist stephen hawking was laid to rest in london on friday npr's debbie elliott reports that memorial events included a transmission into outerspace hawking's ashes have been interred between british science greats isaac newton and charles darwin at westminster abbey the gravestone is etched with hawking's equation describing the interplay of a black hole one thousand members of the public from around the world were selected by ballot to join family and friends for the.

Department Of Homeland Westminster Abbey Charles Darwin Isaac Newton Debbie Elliott London Stephen Hawking Physicist Attorney Looper NPR DAN Congress Jeff Sessions
Apple refuses to write software that will unlock mobile phones in order to help protect personal information

Morning Edition

01:13 min | 4 years ago

Apple refuses to write software that will unlock mobile phones in order to help protect personal information

"Will fort law enforcement that's used the flaws since two thousand sixteen to collect information for investigations the fbi found the flaw when he got into the phone of one of the shooters in an attack in san bernardino california law enforcement used an outside party to hack the phone because apple refused to write software that would unlock it the company said it did not want to create a security flaw in its product that set off a legal fight then presidential candidate donald trump's urge people to boycott apple in a statement apple says its decision to tighten iphone security is part of its ongoing effort to protect the personal information customer store on their phones apple ceo tim cook has been a crusader for privacy rights even saying privacy is a fundamental human right laura sydell npr news the chrome of theoretical physicist stephen hawking will be interred today the bbc's victoria gill says he will be buried in westminster abbey alongside other distinguished scientists professor hooking family and friends from the world of science politics film and television will gather to remember one of the world's most famous scientists as professor workings ashes are interred his equally famous synthesized voice will feature.

FBI Apple Donald Trump Tim Cook Stephen Hawking BBC Victoria Gill Professor San Bernardino California CEO Physicist Westminster Abbey