21 Burst results for "Stephen Hadley"

"stephen hadley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:08 min | 10 months ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"20th. It could be that he wants to delegitimize Biden's presidency in the public mind. What Trump is arguing in court, however, is plain There he is seeking to throw out boats, overturned results and remain president against the will of the majority of voters and what should be. The majority of Electoral college electors will look at that legal campaign in a few minutes, including a set back late last night in Pennsylvania. First what this means to the American people. When high school we play football leverage for our side. John Martino of West Seneca, New York, thinks the president denying defeat is like poor sportsmanship at the under the game. Winner lose, You walk to the game, You slap each other's hand. It's a good game under the next, even if it was a close game, many others NPR heard from worried a reluctant transition of power will harm The government's response to the pandemic, or like Katie Brian of Little Rock, National security 9 11 how they attributed some of the lack of awareness Bush had with being part of that they took so long to transition. NPR's Brian Naylor affirms that concern in a report We have in just a moment, so stay tuned for that. Trump supporter Bruce Hutchins of Spring Hill, Florida, says the hand wringing, though, is unnecessary, but needs a political appointees. There is interactions going on, so the bureaucratic centers of the country are still operating, and they're going to Move was transition, which they've done every kind of had a transition. Democrat Alberto Fill a pony teaches US history, government and economics at high school in Lombard, Illinois. He says his students have been connecting this moment with others in history. Especially since they're in the middle of a unit about the civil war. Philip Oni says his students are asking more questions. The longer trump stalls and it's really difficult, you know, because there's a lot of people That feel like we shouldn't have united trends fishing? Forget, Um, let's just go forward, and now it's our turn. And ultimately, I just don't think that that's gonna do anything good, and it's just not how transitions have worked recently. Here's Brian Naylor. In 2009. Just before then President elect Obama was set to deliver his inaugural address. Members of the outgoing Bush administration's national security team sat down with the people who were about to take their place. Stephen Hadley, who was Bush's national security advisor, remembers they were set to talk about the threat posed by Iran, and that weekend we had gotten intelligence that there was a potential threat to the inauguration itself. So that Saturday morning we had the FBI director come in and brief both the existing and incoming national security teams about that protective threat. What we knew about it what we were doing about it. And then had kind of a round table discussion. Among those taking part in the discussion was then Senator Hillary Clinton, who was set to become Obama's secretary of state. Hadley says Clinton posed an interesting question. Why do we tell President Obama if he's In the middle of his inauguration speech, and he hears a loud bang and potential bomb attack or something like that. What does he do? Does he hunker down? We rush him off the stage. How does he want to handle that moment? Well, that was a very productive discussion. Thankfully, there was no bang or attacked and Obama's inauguration proceeded smoothly. Hadley spoke at a webinar last month sponsored by the nonpartisan Center for Presidential Transition. National Security is one of the major reasons smooth transitions are so crucial, says Barbara Perry, a professor at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. He notes. The 9 11 commission pointed to the shortened transition period between the Clinton and Bush administrations after the disputed results in Florida played a role in Al Qaeda's attack in 2001. That and the economic crisis is why Perry believes the outgoing Bush administration worked so hard for a successful transition to the Obama White House. They were leaving office and Obama was coming in in the midst of this horrible crisis. It almost feels like it pales compared to what we're facing now. But remember at the time, it seemed pretty dire because the entire economic system was collapsing around the world and in the United States and was within inches of seizing up the Obama administration trying to emulate the smooth transition between it and the Bush administration after President Trump was elected four years ago, But Obama's chief of staff Denis McDonough, speaking at that Webinar says Trump made it difficult. First replacing his transition team just after the election, and it appears that a lot of the material that was paired for the transition team just wasn't consumed. Still, Perry argues that the nation never paid much attention to transitions before the contested 2000 election between Bush and Gore, probably because they were rather ordinary. And she says, now we may be paying too much attention to them. The vast majority of our government in our bureaucracy in the executive branch continues, no matter who's in The White House by that, I mean that there's probably some over emphasis placed on the transition of power from one administration to the other. However, despite an economic crisis and a deadly pandemic, Trump is refusing to allow his administration to take part in any transition activities with President elect Biden in what may be remembered as one of the rockiest transitions in history. Brian Naylor, NPR news and now to the ostensible reason for the delay the legal maneuvers by President Trump and his allies toe overturn the legitimate results of this election, including a huge loss in one state last night. Ross Garber joins us Now He's a political investigations and election lawyer who teaches at Tulane Law school, and he has mainly represented Republicans. Hi there. Good morning. So that loss in Pennsylvania Federal Judge Matthew Brand, a Republican, wrote scathingly in his dismissal of the case..

President Obama President Trump president Bush Brian Naylor Stephen Hadley NPR Senator Hillary Clinton delegitimize Biden Barbara Perry Pennsylvania Trump Florida US Obama White House John Martino football
"stephen hadley" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"You've during the commercial break you each wrote down a price handed it to me. No, I have not looked at the prices. You two did not discuss the price. But just to make sure we're all on the same page here. We're going to get some outside counsel. Let me go to marry Mary. Welcome to the Hammer and Nigel Show. In addition to that punishable face of Rob Kendall. What did you think about the ultimate warrior mural that's autographed. And how much would you pay? I would pay $500. That's my starting bid. Starting bed at 500 bucks. Okay? Whoa. That sounds a little high, but I appreciate it, Mary. Well, those are counted memories for my fans. Got it? Got it. Ok. Thank you, Tom. Welcome to the hammer and nitrogen. Tom, would you punch up Kindle? And how much would you pay for the mural? So I punched him right. NetZero thie for the murals that that's from the golden age of wrestling, backward hall and all of them so I would start it. 75 started 75. Okay? And then could go up from there. But why? I've got you. I've got a question about the survey. Okay? I took it last night. Twins. The question about your gender become a stolen The blunt question is normally pick one bubble or to bubble. Welcome to 2020. My friends. All right, So you heard some outside counsel these air some tweets that came in. Okay. Stephen Hadley tweets at us at Hammer and Nigel. How much would you pay for the picture? A dollar 99 expired Pack of Trojans Cliff. $80. Um, Uncle Slow Be tweets at us at hammering Majal $150 so Here's what we're going to do. Rob. I'm going to open your piece of paper first. Yes, This is how much you're willing to sell this for $250. Yes, Now, Kyle, you handed me a piece of paper. You're willing to pay $100. So, Kyle Rob, We got to meet somewhere here in the middle here. Can we work out a deal on some kind? Robert? You willing to come down from 2 50 I'm willing for Kyle to come together. Okay, Kyle, What can you do for rob Candle? Well, would you sell it for $100? First and foremost? No, okay. I had a feeling you'd say that, Uh, what if I threw in something from my collection child trying to get rid of the wrestling stuff? Well, I got more things than just wrestling. I think he's only interested in dollar side of this point, so you're gonna have to go above $100. I'll have Tio have to think about it. Come up with a nice price because I want us to actually lock this down The price right now you've got the city of Indianapolis in the number one drive time show in the city, waiting with bated breath to find out what you're willing to go for for this awesome piece of memorabilia that.

Kyle Rob Nigel Show Tom Mary Rob Kendall wrestling rob Candle Stephen Hadley Indianapolis Tio Kindle Majal Robert
House holds hearing on killing of Iranian general

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

01:08 min | 1 year ago

House holds hearing on killing of Iranian general

"A house hearing today on the U. was killing of Iran's top military general was it justified lawmakers heard varying views first from April Haynes former deputy national security adviser and former deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency we would not have had the legal basis for taking action against solo money in a rock without their consent without it being an imminent threat and they want to know what that imminent threat is and nothing that's been said really back set up former national security adviser Stephen Hadley on the other hand with a differing view I don't know what the imminent means in many contexts but it seems to me we were in the middle of a pattern of escalating attack on American personnel a diplomatic and military and it sounds demented enough to me to justify a strike either way democratic senator says he has at least fifty one votes to support a bipartisan resolution asserting that president trump must seek approval from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran senator Tim Kaine of Virginia says the Senate could vote as soon as next

Iran Central Intelligence Agency Senator Donald Trump Congress Tim Kaine Virginia Senate April Haynes Deputy Director Stephen Hadley President Trump
House holds hearing on killing of Iranian general

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

01:08 min | 1 year ago

House holds hearing on killing of Iranian general

"A house hearing today on the U. was killing of Iran's top military general was it justified lawmakers heard varying views first from April Haynes former deputy national security adviser and former deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency we would not have had the legal basis for taking action against solo money in a rock without their consent without it being an imminent threat and they want to know what that imminent threat is and nothing that's been said really back set up former national security adviser Stephen Hadley on the other hand with a differing view I don't know what the imminent means in many contexts but it seems to me we were in the middle of a pattern of escalating attack on American personnel a diplomatic and military and it sounds demented enough to me to justify a strike either way democratic senator says he has at least fifty one votes to support a bipartisan resolution asserting that president trump must seek approval from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran senator Tim Kaine of Virginia says the Senate could vote as soon as next

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

"Can be brought to them and again? We've seen this ad by the government which has been set to pretty jaunty music about the so-called millions that they're spending the attempt to help the emergency services. That hasn't gone down very well. No it hasn't because it is important to spend that money to help people get back on their feet to reestablish the economy and to protect advice diversity the white give these fires but what the firefighters are really asking for. Is it the government. Make sure that there were place. which is the fire front is is Saif as humanly possible? And what they see. Is that the government policy is piling on more emissions of carbon dioxide. We can wake month-on-month year on year and that is making the fire conditions thou face tomorrow that much more perilous. What is your realistic scientific and economic social cultural the view of of these future prospects? Because you've said obviously these kinds of government leaders who don't believe in it who refused to say take the science a seriously needs to be voted out but the facts including according to your council. Your research found that Major. Australian cities will experience temperatures above above fifty degrees Celsius by twenty forty if the current warming trends continue at the same time another operation climate of the nation reports that sixty four percent of Australians. Australia said they wanted to see a target of net zero emissions by twenty fifty again people precious seems to be active. And we've also seen the Greta Thunberg inspired student strikes all over the nation over the last year to eighteen months. Where do you realistically think? Perhaps that this crisis crisis might provide political and policy opportunity to mitigate this for the future. Look I really hope so. I hope that our Prime Minister Lucas Strategy and in the face and say he will do everything he can to reduce the problem at its source to reduce the burning of fossil fuels in this country. It's all doable. I mean Britain has virtually done away with coal is in their energy mix. Now we're still heavily dependent here in Australia stride yet. On the burning of calls. Very old coal-fired power plants quite frankly needs to be retired But that's not government policy but I think more realistically will happen is that we'll hear some nice words simply Katri words are some of the more extreme people might be muzzled a little bit but little meaningful action will happen. That's been the patent of the past and I really fear this will continue and it will divide our society because people are deeply angered by the retrial of of one government. After the other on this issue so I I hope for something better but I really. I can't see where it will. Oh come from well I mean again. I have to ask you the existential question. So what next is even as we talk. The biggest mind Australia has ever dreamt up is is currently being dug a huge coal mine which might very very seriously threatened probably will the Great Barrier Reef with all the run offs and all the rest of it. What what what is the hope right now? What is the way to stop this that minds not being doug yet the grand is being prepared for it but not the resistance that you see in the street in Australia against that mine is overwhelming? The number of people even retired. The people elderly people who are demonstrating in front of the banks. DECI do not fun. This mind the the economic muscle that's being pulled away. Wife from that now is very considerably in this country. The truth is that Mr Danny could probably found that mine himself and if that is the case then we'll be set up up for one of the greatest environmental confrontations that this nation has ever seen because The the anger in the community about this continued obstinacy to Susu the reality to see that those emissions are causing unbelievable. Misery on the ground in. This country is infuriating and we I becoming a deeply divided country. It's one of the saddest things that I've seen. I hope for so much better for for these beautiful place that I live in. Well you just mentioned the name name of the man who's funding the mind. We really hope that he listens to you. And it will be very interesting to see how people whose lives are at stake and their wellbeing and their country react is going forward professor. Tim flannery thank you so much for joining me. Thank you and finally these fires are provoking an outpouring Warringah support from around the world all the way even to the Golden Globes in California where last night Australia Zone Russell Crowe skip the Golden Globes to focus on the fires and actress Jennifer Aniston to accept his award for best actor playing Fox News. Chief Roger Ailes in the showtime series the loudest voice assist what Jennifer said. Make no mistake. The tragedy unfolding in Australia is climate change based we need to act based on science move our global workforce to renewable energy and respect our planet for the unique amazing place. It is so that message getting out loud and clear and Australia serving as an important reminder that we must all find a way to put differences aside to come together globally to tackle climate change. We've seen amazing leadership on this issue from young people the world over and like the school strikers and the activists here on this show. We'll continue to keep the issue front and center. That's it for now. You can always catch US online on our podcast and across our social media. Thanks thanks for watching and goodbye from London.

Australia Saif Great Barrier Reef Greta Thunberg Tim flannery Jennifer Aniston Roger Ailes US Prime Minister Golden Globes London Britain Mr Danny Lucas Strategy
"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:50 min | 1 year ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

"Is obviously something that everybody wants to really be clear on the evidence of this so-called imminent threat from rob. You were part of the effort to persuade Congress to persuade allies to persuade the world. That Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. You've since apologize for that but don't you think the American people the American Congress the rest of the world deserves to know the precise evidence that we cannot use cannot afford to deliberately accidentally fall into another Middle East war on anything other than the most solid of cases. Well we do want to know the evidence of forthcoming attacks but what we do know is that Qatabi Hezbollah for two months in Iraq had been escalating increased attacks on and military facilities where US forces were housed that in the end of the day at a strike south of occur cook they kill the US contractor wounded three soldiers and then two days later assaulted and burned part of the US embassy so the record of Cobb Hezbollah clearly clearly at the behest of Iran increasing attacks on American personnel is absolutely clear and there is no evidence that that was going to stop. So Oh yes we ought to. We ought to know what the intelligence was but we also have a record of escalating activity that increasingly threatened our men and women in uniform. It's a really fraught relationship. forty-one years long we wait to see where this next phase leads us. Stephen Hadley thank you very much. Indeed delighted to be with you and one of your aunt's most powerful leaders and adviser to the Supreme Leader has warned that West Asia as he called holded will become another Vietnam. The United States. Now we turn to the crisis already shaping the twenty twenty s and that is the apocalyptic wildfires advised which are decimating Australian flora and fauna. One expert saying that hundreds of millions of animals probably being killed volunteers formed form the backbone of the desperate firefighting effort to control these fast moving flames. The smoke is filling the skies above Australia and even reaching New Zealand earlier. I spoke with Australia's chief climate scientist. Tim flannery professor flannery. Welcome to the program thank you. It is truly a tragedy to see what's happening to your amazing and beautiful country and this has been going on for days weeks and in fact it was no it all started months to go. Give us the state of play as we speak right now. We've had around seventeen million acres of Australia. Burned twenty five people have died in the flames. The impacts on biodiversity of being truly horrific just on kangaroo island off the coast surface area half of the population we think has been killed about a third of the Koala population for the northern half of New South Wales and the species species. That are easy to count. So I think unfortunately the impacts of these on our economy on our by diversity and on just human lives will will be with us for many decades and sadly it's not an end. These dry conditions look set to persist for several months. So why is it that it is so so bad this time around. We have had the driest year on record and it follows the previous year which was very dry as well this she. It has been the hottest year on record by quite a considerable amount about one degree. Fahrenheit and those conditions the part of the long term trajectory of of climate change and if conspired together with a with a windy season to produce these horrific fi conditions which have just gone on and on and I. Should I tell you that this was predicted by climate scientists. I nearly eighty s my own. Climate Council has produced twelve reports warning the government and and warning people of the escalating fire risk and danger in Australia and sadly until it heats very little is done. Are you absolutely sure that this is climate. Climate change caused. Yes absolutely certain the scientists telling us this. It's telling us that these extreme heat conditions we've seen this year might occur naturally once every three hundred and fifty years but once you add the influence of the human immune greenhouse gases. We're likely to see those conditions once every eight years and and of course that number will decline. It will become more frequent as the build up of guesses continues. You as you mentioned started the Climate Council for Australia and just put into perspective for us. How your experience demonstrates the lack of seriousness that certainly this government previous governments have have have taken climate change? Because you if I'm not mistaken have had to raise funds on your own for this very important. Important scientific monitoring system will that's correct. I was Australia's climate commissioner for three years. The first act of the new conservative government in two thousand and thirteen thirteen with me and my commissioners and to take down our website But we felt that the work we doing with so important that we really went to the Australian in public and crowd. Funded the entity Beck into existence today. Where larger and better than ever before but courtesy of the Australian public who understand that we we need to understand the science of climate change? We need to protect ourselves with good advance warning but the government so far hasn't been interested in this. It is truly tragic. I can't tell you how it feels to me to wake up every morning smelling the smoke of my country burning for month after month and and knowing that we could have done something about these head we started ten fifteen years ago. How is this affecting the current? Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Because he's never taken taken these science seriously and I don't even know whether he's agreeing right now. These fires are exacerbated because of climate crisis and climate change age. But how long can he persist in that policy and political stance when the people presumably people who also elected him a feeling. So Oh angry. Obviously we've seen these pictures of him trying to meet with people trying to go to the scenes and people heckling him. Many refused to shake his hand. Far How will you handle more funding to artists. So many people lost their heart becoming. Ah Sadly Cristiana. It's not just our prime minister. We have a significant minority of Australian parliamentarians who who are welded on climate skeptics and even if the seas were lapping day chain and their hair was on fire as a result of climate change. I don't think I changed my mind. And these are people who are deeply committed to a particular cause deeply committed to the burning of fossil fuels. We have this thing in a strategy called the revolving door. These people go. In as lobbyists for the fossil fuel industry they come out of the revolving doors administering conservative government and then they go back in again again and come out on the board of a fossil fuel company the links just so intense. They so interwoven. That I don't think there's a prospect it for change these people. If we want change we have to vote them out and vote in a government that will take action well. Let's just talk about the possibility of trying to get changed in a responsible responsible government but to augment to amplify what you've just said Scott Morrison your current Prime Minister back in two thousand seventeen when he was treasurer of the nation actually held up a lump of coal. And we know that cold Australia's is the biggest exporter but he held it up and we have a little clip of that. This is called Darby Fried. The Treasury is the rule of trump's. It's called by men and women who work and leaving the electorates of those officers from the hundred dollars. The mega behind it would not. It's called that has ensured for one hundred he is the deputy prime joy and energy competitive advantage delivered prosperity to a strident businesses Anderson. Shaw auto industry has remained competitive on a global market. What hope is there when you have this kind of of demonstration of gets Rebecca word one of the better word and addiction and National Addiction? A political addiction to this fossil fuel looks sadly it is a national addiction and the nexus between the fossil fuel industry and the lobbyists and the government is. This is almost complete. It's not exceptional in Australia. For a federal government minister in charge of natural resources and mining. Too when he leaves parliament going to the Board of a fossil fuel company. It's it's a tragic situation. Where self interest is seeing such great damage inflicted upon the people? Oh and the the nature of our country. What about the people who are trying to fight this now? I mean many people around the world won't fully appreciate that. So many of your emergency workers the five fighters of volunteer workers and they have had to put up with something that clearly is as we see now beyond their capacity. What kind of help.

Australia government Climate Council United States American Congress prime minister Iraq Stephen Hadley Qatabi Hezbollah Prime Minister Scott Morrison Middle East kangaroo island Cobb Hezbollah Iran West Asia Tim flannery Beck Scott Morrison
Australia's apocalyptic wildfires continue to rage

Amanpour

08:00 min | 1 year ago

Australia's apocalyptic wildfires continue to rage

"We turn to the crisis already shaping the twenty twenty s and that is the apocalyptic wildfires advised which are decimating Australian flora and fauna. One expert saying that hundreds of millions of animals probably being killed volunteers formed form the backbone of the desperate firefighting effort to control these fast moving flames. The smoke is filling the skies above Australia and even reaching New Zealand earlier. I spoke with Australia's chief climate scientist. Tim flannery professor flannery. Welcome to the program thank you. It is truly a tragedy to see what's happening to your amazing and beautiful country and this has been going on for days weeks and in fact it was no it all started months to go. Give us the state of play as we speak right now. We've had around seventeen million acres of Australia. Burned twenty five people have died in the flames. The impacts on biodiversity of being truly horrific just on kangaroo island off the coast surface area half of the population we think has been killed about a third of the Koala population for the northern half of New South Wales and the species species. That are easy to count. So I think unfortunately the impacts of these on our economy on our by diversity and on just human lives will will be with us for many decades and sadly it's not an end. These dry conditions look set to persist for several months. So why is it that it is so so bad this time around. We have had the driest year on record and it follows the previous year which was very dry as well this she. It has been the hottest year on record by quite a considerable amount about one degree. Fahrenheit and those conditions the part of the long term trajectory of of climate change and if conspired together with a with a windy season to produce these horrific fi conditions which have just gone on and on and I. Should I tell you that this was predicted by climate scientists. I nearly eighty s my own. Climate Council has produced twelve reports warning the government and and warning people of the escalating fire risk and danger in Australia and sadly until it heats very little is done. Are you absolutely sure that this is climate. Climate change caused. Yes absolutely certain the scientists telling us this. It's telling us that these extreme heat conditions we've seen this year might occur naturally once every three hundred and fifty years but once you add the influence of the human immune greenhouse gases. We're likely to see those conditions once every eight years and and of course that number will decline. It will become more frequent as the build up of guesses continues. You as you mentioned started the Climate Council for Australia and just put into perspective for us. How your experience demonstrates the lack of seriousness that certainly this government previous governments have have have taken climate change? Because you if I'm not mistaken have had to raise funds on your own for this very important. Important scientific monitoring system will that's correct. I was Australia's climate commissioner for three years. The first act of the new conservative government in two thousand and thirteen thirteen with me and my commissioners and to take down our website But we felt that the work we doing with so important that we really went to the Australian in public and crowd. Funded the entity Beck into existence today. Where larger and better than ever before but courtesy of the Australian public who understand that we we need to understand the science of climate change? We need to protect ourselves with good advance warning but the government so far hasn't been interested in this. It is truly tragic. I can't tell you how it feels to me to wake up every morning smelling the smoke of my country burning for month after month and and knowing that we could have done something about these head we started ten fifteen years ago. How is this affecting the current? Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Because he's never taken taken these science seriously and I don't even know whether he's agreeing right now. These fires are exacerbated because of climate crisis and climate change age. But how long can he persist in that policy and political stance when the people presumably people who also elected him a feeling. So Oh angry. Obviously we've seen these pictures of him trying to meet with people trying to go to the scenes and people heckling him. Many refused to shake his hand. Far How will you handle more funding to artists. So many people lost their heart becoming. Ah Sadly Cristiana. It's not just our prime minister. We have a significant minority of Australian parliamentarians who who are welded on climate skeptics and even if the seas were lapping day chain and their hair was on fire as a result of climate change. I don't think I changed my mind. And these are people who are deeply committed to a particular cause deeply committed to the burning of fossil fuels. We have this thing in a strategy called the revolving door. These people go. In as lobbyists for the fossil fuel industry they come out of the revolving doors administering conservative government and then they go back in again again and come out on the board of a fossil fuel company the links just so intense. They so interwoven. That I don't think there's a prospect it for change these people. If we want change we have to vote them out and vote in a government that will take action well. Let's just talk about the possibility of trying to get changed in a responsible responsible government but to augment to amplify what you've just said Scott Morrison your current Prime Minister back in two thousand seventeen when he was treasurer of the nation actually held up a lump of coal. And we know that cold Australia's is the biggest exporter but he held it up and we have a little clip of that. This is called Darby Fried. The Treasury is the rule of trump's. It's called by men and women who work and leaving the electorates of those officers from the hundred dollars. The mega behind it would not. It's called that has ensured for one hundred he is the deputy prime joy and energy competitive advantage delivered prosperity to a strident businesses Anderson. Shaw auto industry has remained competitive on a global market. What hope is there when you have this kind of of demonstration of gets Rebecca word one of the better word and addiction and National Addiction? A political addiction to this fossil fuel looks sadly it is a national addiction and the nexus between the fossil fuel industry and the lobbyists and the government is. This is almost complete. It's not exceptional in Australia. For a federal government minister in charge of natural resources and mining. Too when he leaves parliament going to the Board of a fossil fuel company. It's it's a tragic situation. Where self interest is seeing such great damage inflicted upon the people? Oh and the the nature of our country. What about the people who are trying to fight this now? I mean many people around the world won't fully appreciate that. So many of your emergency workers the five fighters of volunteer workers and they have had to put up with something that clearly is as we see now beyond their capacity. What kind of help

Australia Government Climate Council Prime Minister Prime Minister Scott Morrison Tim Flannery Kangaroo Island Scientist Beck Professor Scott Morrison Treasury New Zealand Shaw Auto Industry New South Wales Darby Fried Commissioner Rebecca
"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

"Now remember the fraud. US evidence as for the Iraq war there was in fact no WMD there is the US claim back in two thousand two and two thousand three ironically though in two thousand eight Donald Donald Trump spoke to wolf blitzer arguing. The George W Bush should have been impeached for taking the country into Iraq. Take a listen. Because of the conduct lied he got us into the war with lies and I mean look at the trouble Bill Clinton got into to with something. That was totally unimportant. And they try to impeach him which was nonsense and yet Bush got us into this horrible war war with lies by lying by saying they had weapons of mass destruction by saying all sorts of things that turned out not to be true and president. President trump wasn't president then and now though he faces his own impeachment crisis and of course questions over the strength of his evidence for Souleyman is killing. I've been discussing this with Bush's National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley Stephen Hadley welcome to the program. Nice to be here. Can we just stop by admitting and just putting it out there. The US money was no angel that he was the architect of malign Iranian influence and masterminded miniature adventures and responsible for the deaths of so many Americans and so much other negative influence in that region. But the question into somebody like yourself is was the assassination of this personality at this time. The wise choice for America. And what is the route ahead. What is the the next step? That of course is the right question. Why did the president do it? What they've said is they did it to forestall imminent attacks on Americans Americans? I think they also did it to try to show by a big move by taking out Sulejmani to try to deter further Iranian the inaction Iranian Iran through one of its Surrogate forces in Iraq head for months been attacking. US Tha AH targets that through COBB Hezbollah and I think the administration wanted to send a message to the Iranian regime that this had to stop or there would be consequences so I think was to prevent an imminent attack and I think it was also to try to send broader deterrence message to try to halt an an escalating set of attacks on American forces in Iraq. So you agree then That this was the right thing to do. Don't know it'll depend on how it goes and it's in some sense. It's too soon to say there are a lot of people said this could be a disaster it rallies the Iranian people around the Iranian regime. It may result the Iraqis kicking out American forces. It will result in Iran getting out of the nuclear deal retaliating there are a lot of doomsday scenarios out there. They may come to pass on the other hand. It is also possible that this will deter escalating Iranian activity directly and through its proxies against against American forces. Second of all it will put more pressure on Iran. It'll make clear that this administration is willing to escalate militarily. There's likely to be more sanctions. More constraints on Iranian oil expert. Exports and the problem for the regime is whether that hardship reignites nights the demonstrations that occurred in October and November in Iran that the regime was only able to put down through very harsh military measures. And the question is whether that kind of threat will force the regime to be pragmatic and to return to some kind of negotiations where we would talk about their nuclear weapons there ballistic missiles and also their disruptive activities in the region. So it's too soon to say bold move could go badly but they're also scenarios where it could have a positive outcome. Can I just play a little bit. About what Secretary Pompeo who's been saying about the reason for this and what they hope and this particularly about influence of Iran in the region are partners in the region now what America did was a good thing it reduced risk in the region. It reduced use the threat of instability. That the theocrat in Iran have imposed on the Middle East for so many years. That's a little bit you know. Sort of what you've been saying. But the question is do the allies really think that this is something they want to get on board and are they. Do they believe that this will do as what you hope. And what Pompeo hope that this will deter action. I guess what's the evidence from the past that this kind of action will produce what you wanted wanted to produce well around has under pressure been willing to make compromises and of course one of the most famous examples is when and the United States accidentally shot down in Iranian airliner and the supreme leader at the time hominy decided that it was time to as he said take a sip out of the poison challenge and end the war against Iraq. And I think the hope is that if the regime feels threatened that it's that it's really really at a dead end with its policies. They will decide once again to return to negotiations and it's interesting that in the announcement that was made that the Iranians were going to move move out and no longer observe the limits of the nuclear agreement the joint the JCP. Oh that they held the door open to returning to that agreement if if there would be some relaxation of sanctions so even in this difficult moment the Iranian authorities are leaving the door open for negotiations and the question. Question is is this an opportunity and we'll either the Europeans or our regional friends of allies or perhaps even Vladimir Putin decided. It's time I'm for a diplomatic initiative to try to get her on the United States and other countries to the table to talk about the current situation those allies would say hey apart from some in the in the in the Persian Gulf area would say that actually that diplomatic move happened under the Obama Administration and there was a nuclear clear deal the did constrain. At least the worst impulses that the world was afraid of about Iran's nuclear efforts and that this was perhaps foolish of the United United States and has led to where we are now the unilateral withdrawal from that deal the imposition of very severe sanctions. And and the idea that there was no way to have a different kind of situation this with Iran sort of responding as you pointed out militarily over the last cat and mouse over the last many months. That's of course. One argument the counter argument that people will make is that that agreement was imperfect it did not really eliminate the risk that Iran would be a nuclear weapons state and it also failed to address other aspects of Iranian behavior. It's ballistic missile program. And the kind of disruptive activity that was spearheaded by Soleimani that you described so ably at the beginning of of this segment. Can I ask you because I wonder what you think will be the Iranian response. You've heard that that the one of the senior Iranian Ryan Commander spoke to CNN in an exclusive interview and said we will seek revenge. We have to. We cannot stay silent. We will talk it military military sites or site and that in response to the president's claim that he would hit fifty two including cultural sites. They said well we can hit anywhere anytime wherever what we want. What sort of response to you expect? And most of the point was sort of response. Can the United States live with. We obviously don't know they. They have said that they will confine their strikes at least initially to military targets. They have ecorse a whole wide range of options. They they could do cyber attacks. They could do cyber attacks on the energy infrastructure in the region They could disrupt the flow of oil L. Traffic out through this the Straits of Hormuz. They have things they can do in Iraq Syria and Lebanon so they have lots of options available to them. My guess is and I think the administration's hope is that the one the attack on Selemani and onto the statements by both the president and the Secretary of State that we will respond to either direct or indirect action by around by hitting targets in Iran. No no longer in Iraq or elsewhere that that will deter from the kind of dramatic escalation that Iran certainly capable of and it will it will either deter any retaliation altogether or will it limit it to a a a a level that does not really dramatically increase the military escalation. Because I think the truth is that neither Iran nor the trump administration actually want an all out offensive war conventional mentioned war between the United States and Iran. At this point I mean they might point to the one that your administration launched against Iraq and many believed that blowback is still being felt even even to this day and to the point. The evidence.

Iran Iraq United States president Donald Donald Trump George W Bush Secretary Pompeo Bill Clinton America fraud Stephen Hadley Stephen Hadley Straits of Hormuz Vladimir Putin wolf blitzer Selemani JCP Souleyman Middle East
"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Amanpour

"Iraq. Can they continue to support terrorist elements throughout the region. And so we need to remember. Even this moment where there's going to be a lot of criticism of the president's actions that we continue to need to have a strategy that understands that Iran is an adversary of the United States and they support dangerous elements elements throughout the region that pose threats to civilians and to American forces and allies. The question that we're asking today is whether or not the execution of Qassem Soleimani makes the United States. Say for my contention is that it does not. In fact it will lead to a series of reprisals more military military escalation between the United States and Iran that will ultimately get more Americans killed and given that the president inherited a relationship with Iran in which they had given up their nuclear program. They were not launching attacks against us. Personnel this is entirely a conflict of choice. EXPI- this president. Iran's behavior cannot be excused but we didn't need to go this way so the question then is i. Guess the ball as I said to Mr Morandi is in. Iran's sounds cool right now. We don't know what Iran is going to do but in you'll situation as members of Congress who believe in the War Powers Act and being notified defied. What is your statement? Today what is your realistic. Hope of being able to enact Congress's prerogative in this particular field which is in conduct conducting war but first let's make it clear. We're now talking on Monday afternoon. American time and Congress has still well not been briefed on this alleged imminent attack vet was about to be lodged against American forces that made it necessary to kill General Sulamani. We apparently are not going to get that briefing until Wednesday and I think it may speak to the relatively thin evidence that exists that there actually was a set of exigent emergency circumstances that required this attack. The trump administration now absolutely has the the obligation to come to Congress wants to engage in continued military action against Iran for which there is no current authorization. They need authorization from Congress I and I hope that they will do that on their own. I doubt it but the process beginning in the House of Representatives this week to bring a war powers resolution before the the house is necessary. Senator the president has said and he's posted. These media posts will serve as notification to the United States Congress that should Iran strike can us personal target the US quickly and fully stripe back perhaps in a disproportionate Mana. Such legal notice is not required but is given nevertheless. Is that enough also you well. The fact that the president is denying the legitimacy of the war powers act is very disturbing uh he has not followed the war powers act which requires him to consult with Congress before taking military action that hasn't been authorized by the legislative branch and he now seems is to be throwing salt in that wound by making a notification on twitter. Now he has formally notified Congress of the actions that he took several days ago. I literally just came from reading that notification. There is nothing in that notification that is classified or needs to be classified and I joined Senator Schumer and others calling on the administration to make that notification public but the president even if there is a series of emergency actions doesn't have the ability to go around Congress for more than about thirty to sixty days he still has to come before us even if there are ongoing threats my hope is that Congress will take our responsibility seriously. Obviously I know the house is going to this week. Just just briefly you said that you implied and you actually said that so far what you've been able to glean or understand understand. Is that the evidence of an imminent threat is not as as shop or as clear as you think that they've claimed it was. Do you feel that some of Said is razor thin so I have seen no evidence from the administration about this imminent threat in which leads me to believe that the evidence may not be as robust as secretary of state. Pompeyo is suggesting it has now been what three or four days. Yes and no information has been given to Congress. I can tell you that that information is not contained in the war powers notification that is classified reading for Congress today and well I still remain open to hearing information about this emergency threat that required this dramatic action action to be taken. It hasn't appeared before Congress yet which begs the question as to how strong the information is and some of notice said secretary. POMPEO has us all sorts of reasons seasons from imminent threat to to hoping that they will be regime change in so many words and as you know former sex former national security adviser John Bolton in the immediate aftermath has tweeted that he hoped this was the first step towards regime change. And you but I need to ask you a question about John. Bolton because in another instance because of the impeachment spend crisis and what he knows about Ukraine and that famous call. Here's now said that he would testify to Congress. If subpoenaed. Will you subpoena him. Would it be a successful subpoena to to have him appear well. The Senate can't subpoena without a consensus and so we are in the minority Democrats so ultimately we will need Republican votes in order to issue any subpoenas for John Bolton Mick Mulvaney or others. I'm glad that he is now willing to testify. I wish that he had been willing to do that when the house was making their inquiry. But it just underscores the absolute need to issue issue. Subpoenas get witness testimony. Look at the documents that are sitting in the White House today. That likely provide more evidence of this conspiracy to defraud taxpayers spares. And this is just not going to be a trial. It is now going to be a legitimate process. If Senator McConnell doesn't agree to actually go out and try to produce witnesses this is in documents and John Bolton's offer today to come and testify before the Senate basically did. It closes the door on that case. I think now everyone in this country can agree that the Senate needs needs to call witnesses and seek documents and getting back to this crisis with Iran. You've been very very active on twitter since the since it was apparent that this assassination had take a place you pointedly call it an execution verbally and in your and in your tweets but you've also talked about the notion that president trump has publicly bigly in double down on hitting record Iranian cultural sides. And things that have nothing to do with the case at hand and I was actually astonished to hear United State Senator Yourself Right the following an unstable president in way over his head panicking with all experienced advisers having quit and only the sycophantic a frantic amateurs remaining. It's pretty extraordinary that even in a situation like this even in the opposition you would say something thing about a president like that well. I think we've all seen this moment coming. The president has conducted himself in a correct manner for the last year and a half essentially throwing out any norms that existed around what we expect from presidents and their behavior it is become normalized because it's on TV every single night. His twitter feed is exhausting. And so we've come to expect that this is just Darah Gore for for this administration but we always feared that there would be a moment of international crisis. There would be a moment when perhaps thousands of Americans lives were on the line and the president would make rash ashed decisions. The president would make a series of mistakes that will ultimately accrue to the grave detriment of us. National Security truly believed that that moment baby here today. Hey and I am further worried because all of the relatively sober minded individuals like General Mattis who surrounded the president are all gone. They have all quit because they can't worked for this individual and now the president has relative amateurs by his side advising him to the extent he listens to any of this advice. This is a really serious moment. It begs congress to step up to the plate and provide some serious limitations on the president. I doubt Republicans are going to do that in the Senate. But it's our job to press for Senator Chris Chris Murphy. Thank you very much indeed and these serious consequences already manifesting themselves after the US strike that assassinated General Soleimani. They are mounting quickly. For instance any rock where the strike took place and where the parliament has now voted to expel US forces from the country. Remember Iraq is an ally of the United States and president. Trump has responded by threatening Iraq with sanctions if in five they follow through with expelling US forces so joining me now to discuss this allow it. He held senior posts following the US invasion of Iraq including prime minister and vice president. Welcome to the program during our so. You've been you've been religiously on the front line of the last. US war in Iraq. And you saw it unfold. And you've you've dealt with the consequences first and foremost how serious is Iraq's threat and it's vote in parliament to expel. US forces. I don't think is very seriously idiot. Because you know frankly speaking. We need to arrange a rolled over engagements unfortunately if the government did not do the rulers uh-huh engagements with the forces assembled to fight Isis including the United States of course forces and Roseau Zoe engagements have should have been very important to write down unto agree upon. This never happened really. And that's why the the the attack talk for days ago on Iraq Sawyer was Frankly speaking undermine this country say you agree with the current leadership in Iraq did this violated Iraq's sovereignty quotes absolutely but also the the the the the ship Barris possibility this time I have told them long ago that they should really write down It's and agree with the Americans are resolve engagement breath co what can they Americans do. Can they should not do. Unfortunately this never happened and I think this is. This is a great mistake that there are committed committed and as well as the Americans also and what did you think is the next step since. President trump is threatened to sanction. Your country can your country actually afford to be sanctioned sanctioned. No it's our country is very tired on goes and let me express my views also on on on what happened. Not only on this occasion but three eighty being victims of American and Iranian confrontations. And the the Frankly speaking with happened as the Iraqi people are suffering because of this covenant issue Iraq is being used as the battleground for these essential proxy walks. He wore not physical Award and I'm for Von for charity. Chanted Iran also play the very negative role that fearing Iraqi.

president Congress Iran United States Iraq Senate trump twitter Senator John Bolton Qassem Soleimani House of Representatives Iraq. Senator Schumer Senator Chris Chris Murphy Mr Morandi Senator McConnell John Bolton Mick Mulvaney
"stephen hadley" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"I remember to create an ad this one visit pure winning dot com slash CNN let's get deeper into what happen the next with Syria Iran Turkey and American policy. This Stephen Hadley was President George W Bush's national security advisor in his second term he's the principle of the strategic consulting firm Rice Hadley Gates Meghan O'Sullivan was the Deputy National Security Adviser for President Bush she's now professor at Harvard's Kennedy School Megan you handle the Middle East a great deal Let me ask you what do you think this means that the end of the day because I hear people talk about Russia and Tokyo but it does seem like the principal beneficiary of all this is Iran after all Iran has been the principal supporter of the Assad Regime Assad is now in greater for all of that country they continue to have influence in Iraq How do you see it sure thank you for aid I would say that the Middle East I got even more dangerous in very short period of time basically if we look at the events in Syria of the last week and we couple it with the attack on Saudi Arabia to be a just last month the fact that the United States has not been unwilling to use military force to protect to it's very direct in interest ladies and the Kurds really sends the message to the rest of the region in the world that the US is unlikely to use military force to protect its interests and that will be vite more provocations I think the most likely invitee we'll be Iran but it will also encourage those to me provocations thinking that the US won't use any military force when in some cases the US will be forced to use military force so I think there's an increased chance provocations and there's an increased chance of a very unwelcome an unwanted military conflict between the United States and some forces in the middle least and perhaps even elsewhere in the world Steve Hadley what do you think this does to US relations with Turkey after all those are also now pretty add in Turkey and some of this is the Turks obviously exercising their own kind of unilateralism but they are in NATO ally the United the state says what fifty nuclear weapons housed in that airbase in Turkey Are you worried about this relationship. This has been a difficult relate ship freely for some time and this strain of us being allied with the Syrian Kurds who the Turks view as affiliated with PKK at terrorist group that has killed tens of thousands of Turks it has been a problem for years Ash Carter talked about that I think the best that we can hope for out of this situation is that some kind of deal gets worked out the United States I think by giving a certain achieving a period of ceasefire maybe provide the context for a deal whereby Turkey is allowed to establish this security zone in the northern ten miles of Syria the Syrian troops come in and make sure it does not go further there is some arrangement between the Syrian Kurds words and the Assad regime that gives them some kind of autonomy and hopefully allows the United States to continue to do what it needs to do to ensure that Isis does not it come back and at some point the Turks then move out of that northern security zone I think that's the best that really can be achieved out of this situation and hopefully the United States working with Russia and Turkey is and the the Syrian Kurds is trying to seek that kind of arrangement but it's is it tough situation Meghan would you say to people who say look why the hell away there in the first place the United States is now producing almost lots of oil and natural gas why do we need to have any involvement with the Middle East? Well I think there are several responses to that the first would be that are interested in Middle East are so much broader than oil and when we look at Syria in particular Syria was a modest producer export or oil actually their oil resources are in this Kurdish area but the influence of the United States and the interest of others in Syria really has nothing to do with oil and has much more to do with security and US whether it's the Turks being concerned about the Kurds the US and others being concerned about Isis or concerns about this Saad regime.

United States Turkey Syria Middle East Iran Stephen Hadley Meghan O'Sullivan President George W Bush Rice Hadley Assad CNN Deputy National Security Advis Saudi Arabia Iraq PKK NATO Megan Harvard principal Tokyo
Former President George W. Bush receives Distinguished Leadership Award

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:22 min | 3 years ago

Former President George W. Bush receives Distinguished Leadership Award

"The study appears in the journal addiction dave schreiber abc news president george w bush had his dad on his mind as he cracked some jokes at an award ceremony in dc he spoke at the atlantic council a distinguished leadership award steiner and references former national security adviser stephen hadley who recommended he not wear the same talk see war to the white house correspondents dinner bush junior said he turned to hadley and said read my lips no new taxes george h w of course had the infamous no new taxes line bush senior is recovering after being treated for an infection following the funeral for his late wife barbara bush commuters are reacting to elon musk plan to revolutionize transportation in american cities on instagram the developer of tesla vehicles and spacex rockets had posted a video of a tunnel he's building under los angeles some drivers in the city say being in a tunnel during an earthquake is a concern so who wouldn't want to get that commute i mean it's an old brainer i rather be in traffic then go onto the tunnel scared if approved by regulators vehicles will be put onto electric sleds and then transported to their destinations wbz news time now five forty one we check sports with adam kauffman he's in the ticket dot com sports studio good morning good morning debbie red sox voided.

President Trump DC Atlantic Council Stephen Hadley Developer Los Angeles Adam Kauffman George W Bush White House Bush Barbara Bush Tesla Spacex
"stephen hadley" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Well i'll say there are other republican leaders in foreign policy who could have been nominated who i think would have gotten a seventy five or eighty votes fairly easily stephen hadley for example a nikki haley i mentioned bob corker and others i do think that rex tillerson given his long and close association with putin and with russia and his leadership of exxon mobil and the circumstances of the timing of his confirmation vote faced a number of headwinds and i think my mike pompeo given some of his past eight minutes we've already covered face headwinds but more broadly willie you're right that there is some broad concern in the senate not just among democrats about president trump's conduct of foreign policy as a candidate he promised to be unpredictable and untraditional and he has certainly over performed in that category all remind you with regards to syria we went with a president who have few weeks ago was tweeting it's time for us to pull out american troops to president who carried out a military attack against assad regime big swings like that on major issues from north korea to syria to iran to russia have happened just in the past year and i think that has unsettled many of us on the foreign relations committee and given us real concerned senator chris coons thank you so much for being on the show this thing you good to see you thanks for listening to the morning joe podcast you can listen to msnbc twenty four hours a day seven days a week on tunein or subscribed today to tune in premium for a specially curated experience.

trump msnbc joe iran assad senator chris coons north korea president syria senate mike pompeo exxon mobil russia putin rex tillerson bob corker stephen hadley twenty four hours
"stephen hadley" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

"Didn't know i was going to say to me this is a regression to the norm right this is donald just how donald trump manage the trump organization this is the way hit as it was eminently predictable even jeb bush who i wouldn't call a futurist basically said he's a chaos candidate he's going to be a chaos president this donald trump is running the white house like jurassic park and people that think you can tyrannosaurus rex and it not ultimately do damage to a lot of things are fooling themselves and we just heard chris ruddy say and i don't know david schulkin va secretary just get the word that he's he's definitely took twitter on his way out right i mean i hesitate at this point now anybody who thinks they know what this president is going to do is lying to you because we have heard over and over again oh no they're looking for a job in the pentagon for hr he's going to be months down the road don't worry and then everyone is completely surprised loves it that way was it people will say it's out of control chaos he'll call it maybe controlled you won't use the word chaos but it's controlled and he's doing it for a reason chaos and he he may love it but the country doesn't and in this staff is confused at times as well okay more roundtable still to come but up next we'll talk to former joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen and bush national security adviser stephen hadley about what the hops in trump's new foreign policy team mean for west national security are you hiring join the over three million businesses that use indeed dot com for hiring you can post a job in minutes and manage your candidates from an easy to use dashboard post your next job on the world's number one job site indeed dot com.

president donald trump secretary twitter pentagon mike mullen stephen hadley jeb bush chris ruddy david schulkin chairman
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"A personal question you serve for four years is national security advisor can you people a sense of what it's like to be national security adviser would is a typical day look like so i'll tell you to things about it um um i uh when i was national security advisor i got up at four thirty in the morning and was in the office by 530 and i started to think of leaving at eight thirty and that was mostly six days a week and on saturday took six as on sunday i took sunday morning off but about noon i didn't go into the office but i started work at the phones and work in the faith i remember i talked to the the late sandy berger who was a national security adviser on the second clinton administration wonderful man um a couple of months after he left office i i talk to him on the phone i said sandy what is the thing that you remember most sir sticks out in your mind most for your time is national security advisor and he said the relentlessness of it all you're never offduty i used to think that you know when you'd go to sleep there is a little part of your brain that would stay awake so there you got that three o'clock in the morning found more that something was happening and should we wake the president there is a part of your brain that was already awaken could waking up the rest uh body it's an all encompassing relentless job very rewarding but it requires you to you know think at the highest strategic level but at the same time do the paperwork and dot the i's and crossed the tea so when the president is states is asked to sign something he says if you really looked at this is this going to work you can tell in the some confidence yes mr prison i've looked at it and.

advisor sandy berger president clinton four years six days
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"To revitalize the international order is the usrussia relationship irretrievable or we in a situation in which uh there are ways assertive deny the russians the ability uh uh to continue is what seems to be their efforts to be a spoiler in the international system i think that's where they are at the moment i think they're a spoiler almost uh you know taking some delight in frustrating the united states so wherever they can on any contingency i hope that is not a strategic choice that they have made um they certainly have in in some sense there a more extreme traps threat because they're willing to be so um active on the ground in places like ukraine in syria um in a way that's inimitable to our interests in a way that china does not on the other hand they are not the heavyweight china's and terms of their economic power in the like i think the way to try to get china to try to get russia back into the international system is to move out initially without them and if we start taking initiatives that involved the europeans and other countries in asia and china to develop institutions for a revised and adapted international system russia is going to want in russia particularly putin as an individual in russia as a people have this sense of russian greatness and first uh above everything they want a front seat at every international table and if there's an important table where they are not participating i think it will bring them around because they want to participate second of all were really not gonna unstuck this relationship with russia until two things happen one domestically we've got to find out in the end of the day what was done connection of the interference with the election muller needs to do his work with his special counsel investigation the committees in the congress need to complete that work and we need to get that through the american political system imposing whatever sanctions additional sanctions on russia and we need.

united states ukraine china asia russia putin muller congress syria special counsel
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"And tell china learns as i think it will learn that it can't closed down on its economy like it is on its politics and still maintain the kind of growth that the people of china expect and that will be a crisis for the regime in may force the regime to decide it's got a double down again on the reform and opening up even at the risks it would pose to the political control that the party exercises but i would think even if it isn't the fundamental problem uh as you laid out in his just a lesser one of getting the chinese to play by the rules you may have to go a pretty long way in terms of threaten the chinese you get a change your behaviour because if there are no consequences to their exploiting the system why would they change what they do i think that's right and there were there's two ways to do it and if it is going to be successful if it is going to be successful it's got a not just be the united states it's got to be the united states working with uh working with europe working with countries in the region japan south korea india and all the rest because china really is dependent force economic prosperity on trade and investment with its neighbours with the united states in europe and that gives us leverage if we work together that gives us leverage that i think can cause hr a change in chinese behavior but if it's only the united states and we alienate all those countries now eyes and allow china to divide us from them we will not work we will end up isolating ourselves why rather reser i going i'm in that we we haven't done the necessarily necessary diplomatic spade work uh so that our leadership has followership and you can ban people together but let's talk but the other great power russia uh a moment ago you mentioned that two an equip mushroom degree usrussia relations are not doing terribly well how does the role of russia fit into sort of your vision of how.

china united states japan russia europe korea
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"I don't think the solution for that was we should have kept china out of all these institutions because that would really invited it to join russia iran north korea and all their the renegades of the international system and to construct their own order which would been a safe haven for rogue states of thugs organized crime drug traffickers dares and all the rest i don't think we had a choice we do have a problem they are imbalances china has exploited the system to its advantage and to our detriment that's the point donald trump has made he's right about that but it's not just donald trump if you talk about republicans and democrats all are concerned about these imbalances and they would have been add dubin addressed even if hillary clinton had been elected president in november of twenty four suspects who had been facing the exact same problems she may have used given rhetoric to talk about it but the problems were there so they're gonna have to be addressed in the real dilemma is can we address it with a series of half measures of sanctions of one sort of the other without having a global trade war which all the world economy including the united states will suffer from canuel address it or is it a more fundamental problem that really it can't be solved and tell china finally decides it needs to move uh and in a real reform and opening up and really decides it is going to become a an open and market based economy that we don't know that line i i think that's a sixtyfour thousand dollar question do you have any senses to which line of argument is more likely to bear out you know this is where i have to go to my condoms friends uh but i but i think that is the question that really needs to be addressed can we fix this problem of the disconnect between the chinese economy today and the assumptions of the the wto system can you can you it within the contours of that system in what you can do in terms of sanction like or is it a more fundamental problem if it's a more fundamental problem i don't know how you fix it.

russia north korea china donald trump hillary clinton president united states dubin wto sixtyfour thousand dollar
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Do it alone we even together can't do it alone we can only do it if we work together with the rest of the international community so we're we're fainted davel relations the ship that has competitive aspects and coopers it you don't think we're faded in some sense in a zerosum game with the chinese he did they emerge on top where we stay on to i don't i think we could end up there but i do not think um we are we are fated for that outcome i think there is a lot of interest uh and i think as i said earlier china actually wants to be part of the international system but they won seat at the table and they want to be able to help right the rules which they were not able to do at the end of world war two than i think that is a legitimate thing the problem really is this i think in a way you didn't have any alternative but to bring china into these international in to to sion's as it increased its diplomatic and economic heft but i think the thing that was wrong i think we probably made to miscalculations one we thought that if if you brought china into the wto which was after all a system built by and um founded upon democratic states with open economies it would make china over time a more open economy and as it became a more open economy more free economy it would become in a more open and free political system china has been able to manage economic rise using reform and opening up but still controlling its politics open economy close polity and we didn't really think that was possible so the the political opening that we thought would fire follow economic opening did not happen and secondly because it did not become an open market oriented economy like the rest of the countries that founded the wto you now have a a system that assumes transparency and market economies with a major member in it who has a much more a mixed economy with a lot of uh non transparency and statecontrolled some of its policies are dunrite predatory immune in terms of sunshine while to certainly yet technology from western western firms and the question is what do we do about that it did not work exactly the way we thought.

china sion wto
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"With the desire for the united states to wanna be able to do what it sees as in its best interests well i think you know that's particularly second half of that is pretty easy we want people they have they will want a greater voice have at it we'd love to have them have a greater voice in the end of the day though that doesn't give them a veto and you know i don't know how many presidents have said things like we will we will go to war with allies if possible alone if necessary i mean that's a framework we've had in our policy for a long time i think the reason donald trump has had some success with our allies his he's been willing to do something that really we have been reluctant to do in the past he's not only said you need to do more but he's also said if you don't we will do less and he said that in a credible way because he ran on what many people viewed as an isolationist platform for president so i think that gave him a more credibility and when he said if you don't do more we will do yes people believed him and got people in a way motivated in a way that that that pryor administrations been unable to do so i give him credit for that let's talk about countries it happen traditionally been our friends and allies and let's begin with china susser of read the history written of the clinton administration and the george w bush administration certainly uh thus under the obama administration there wars for many years a hope that the united states by bringing china into this international order bringing into the wto world trade organisation that that was going to lead china to wanna have a stake in that order and want support like the phrase came out of your administration to the desire to get china to be a responsible stakeholder in the system i would say in the last several years i'm seeing a lot more concern we bufalo china the china is didn't answer in a opt in to the order because they believed in the order it opted into the order because it saw an opportunity to get wealthier so we could change the order to its own interests i.

united states donald trump president clinton administration obama administration china pryor george w bush administration wto
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Selfinterest than simply imposing our will on our neighbors abut we had a lot more leverage uh and to bring to the table as we led and inspired than we do now so we're going to have to change our model of leadership um it is gonna be one where we are going to have to be much we're going to have to let others have a role in a more prominent seat at the table i think that is key for example to keeping china in the international system i think china wants to be a player in the international system we need to give it a seat at the table in an inclusive way consistent with our principal standing for our principles but giving it a role of the table the if we try to exclude china and keep it outside the system that's when china my may try to construct at competitors so i think we have to have an inclusive approach to leadership bringing everyone to the table a giving them a voice giving them a roll but it is still the case that the engine of innovation in in the international system is the united states i mean one of the reasons will the indispensable nation we are still the indispensable nation i'll give you the example in asia for the last several decades in continuing to be the case now um we have better relations with each of the major countries in asia china russia uh less so what russia but certainly china south korean japan we have better relationship with each of them than any of them have with each other and that makes us a an essential balance sir for the region uh we've in some sense played the same role in europe uh in arms of helping the construct the eu and the european institutions political security and economic and we have an important role in helping a europe the speaks with many voices deal with russia which is speaking with one voice these days in a pretty harsh voice to boot so i think uh regrettably there's not gonna be any a dearth of roles for america to play as we adapt revise and revitalize that international system and i think one of the good things about it is that we can now ask comp other countries to.

china united states asia russia japan eu europe america principal
"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"stephen hadley" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"And more productive and prosperous lives than they did that's a problem and this group of people felt victimized by globalization threatened by immigration which is the flip side of that abandoned by politicians and betrayed by the elites and they expressed themselves in the united states in the election of donald trump in europe in terms of the brexit vote in the uk and support for rightwing parties on the continent so this was you know globalization worked for countries and four many but it did not work for all this a whole set of election cycles has been a reminder of that and one of the things that needs to be done now is to really look at those institutions relocated the international system and make the prosperity and security provides more inclusive to your argument is the centrally to reform not reject the international system needs to be adapted and revised and revitalised and it needs to be for relief for two reasons one at the international level it needs to be revised and adapted to the emergence of new economic power centers the did not really exist at the end of world war two or even at the end of the cold war the emergence of japan of south korea of china of india people say this is a an era of the emergence of a new great power china's really the emergence of two new great powers china and india so the international system of.

united states donald trump europe uk south korea china india japan