19 Burst results for "Stephen Dubner"

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stephen Dubner on the next Freakonomics radio. Bren Smith is an ocean farmer, and he's on a mission in the air climate change. Everyone needs to think way way bigger. Smith makes his case for the future of aquaculture, and he reads from his book. Eat like fish leave civility on the docks, Hop aboard and rebel with me and the profane. It tastes so good is the future of farming in the ocean. That's next time. I'm freaking Radio Freakonomics Radio three o'clock this afternoon on KQED. I'm Louise Schiavone. With these headlines, Authorities say they now know that at least 22 people have died in last week's collapse of an oceanfront condominium in Surfside, Florida 126. People are still missing. In a post disaster review of other buildings. The city of North Miami Beach has ordered the evacuation of a condominium building after a review found unsafe conditions at the 156 unit Crest View Towers. This July. 4th weekend will be the first weekend for legalized recreational marijuana in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It's the first state in the south to do so. I'm Louise Schiavone. NPR NEWS Washington A new study shows sharks have well, bull sharks anyway. Have relationships, enemies, friends that story coming up. The next segment a weekend edition Support for NPR comes from C three. A. I C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at Enterprise scale solving.

Stephen Dubner Bren Smith Louise Schiavone Smith NPR North Miami Beach Surfside, Florida Washington last week Radio Freakonomics Radio first weekend three o'clock this afternoon Freakonomics Crest View Towers first state NPR NEWS This July 4th weekend 156 C three
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 5 months ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A chance of rain this evening and it likely after midnight and expect rainy Sunday morning. Temperatures right now. Walnut Creek 64 in Morada. It's 61 70 in Sacramento. Right now, Sam Carlos 63 in San Francisco. It's 59 degrees. Yeah. This is Freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen Dubner. Anthony Measure Ellie and Stephen Trees Jack are doctors and administrators at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey That's just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. They have co authored a book called Compassion Onyx, which argues that when doctors treat their patients with compassion It improves medical outcomes and reduces costs. But there is a problem. There is a compassion crisis in health care. How can that be? How can the most caring of caring professions be lacking in compassion? Before we get into the causes. Would you like an example? Of course you would Remember. At the beginning of this episode, I mentioned a certain nasty and vulgar incident. Let me just pause here to emphasize this example is not representative of most health care professionals. Most people who get into medicine do so because they want to help people. They take a barrel to uphold the standard. Occasionally, that standard is violated. In 2013, For instance, a man went to have a colonoscopy and a medical facility in Reston, Virginia. There was the gastroenterologist who performed the procedure, an anesthesiologist and medical system. The patient planned to record the doctor's instructions on his phone once the Kama Skippy was over, But he accidentally recorded the whole procedure from his nervous questions before things got started. Hey, it's only question is okay. That's good. That's up to the doctors talking about him once he was anesthetized, Maybe they start talking about an earlier problem. The patient had a general rash. You keep mentioning it like the first time we've never talked about. I'm not, sir. If you two urologist,.

Stephen Dubner 2013 Philadelphia Delaware River 59 degrees San Francisco Morada Reston, Virginia Sam Carlos Sacramento Sunday morning Stephen Trees Jack Camden, New Jersey Compassion Onyx Cooper University Health Care Walnut Creek Anthony Measure Ellie 61 two 63
"stephen dubner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 9 months ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen Dubner. Today. We're talking with the journalist and psychologist Maria Kondakova, whose new book, The Biggest Bluff, chronicles her journey to become a professional poker player. So the story The main story in the book begins Really with your pursuit of a coach Eric Seidel, who's a great famous poker player and backgammon player. Tell us briefly about that. Had you considered perhaps people before him? So Eric ended up being my first choice. And he was my only choice because he said yes, but I did do research and I did look at a number of possibilities before settling on Eric. But tell us what he had or represented that made him the mentor. You wanted. He had a few different characteristics. First longevity. There's actually no comparison between him and any other player in terms off staying at the top of competitive poker. For decades and most people they have kind of this peak, and then they go away. The other component was that he seemed more old school in the sense of being more psychological, more thinking in his approach rather than ah, lot of the newer poker players who while brilliant, are Very mathematically minded, and they have just a very calculation ALS approach, and that's not my background. Okay, But at this point knowing how to play poker was not among your skills. Why was it that poker captured your attention? I was originally introduced to poker through game theory through the work of Jon Bon Norman as I was reading about luck and kind of immersing myself in the world of chance, and how to think about chance. I read John von Norman's theory of games, which is the foundational text of game theory. And I didn't know much about a Norman or his work, and he loved poker. Correct. Yes, he was just an avid poker player, and he hated the games. By the way, he hated roulette. He hated chess. He hated go. He thought that they were boring because they were either solvable or unsolvable. And he looked up for a second. So you're saying he hated roulette, and he hated chess. Hmm. And on the spectrum of information those air at opposite ends of the spectrum. Exactly. So talk about that. And what it was that he was looking for what it was that he didn't like about those MMA Norman was drawn to poker because it was a game of incomplete information. There was a solvable component to it, but there was always an element of the unknown. And he was working at the time as a national security advisor in the United States government he was working on the hydrogen bomb. I mean, this is someone who was involved at the very highest levels of decision making, and when he saw poker, he said. This is a good analog for that, because it's a game of incomplete information. Chess is boring because it can be solved. There is theoretically always a correct move and roulette is boring because it can't be solved. It's all chance the House wins. You know, there's nothing you can do. Hooker is interesting because we can try to find a framework to develop a solution. How to think through it. And yet it's not solved in the sense that there are deeds, elements of the unknown on this acumen element of bluffing of kind of representing and misrepresenting information. This is what decision making in the real world is actually about. That was the germ of game theory, so he came up with game theory as a way to Try to solve poker and then ultimately shuttle light onto how to make these very complex strategic decisions on at the highest levels of government. Baby baby Poker isn't a homogeneous game. There are multiple varieties of play with names like stud Omaha, Raz, but do G and horse Each has its own unique set of rules. But in any style of poker, the basic parameters are essentially the same. Some cards are dealt face up, visible to all. These are the community cards and some face down. So that on Lee, the person to whom they're dealt can see them. You make bets based on how strong your hand is and how strong you think others hands are Because the on Lee other cards you know, for sure are your own. You're in a game of incomplete information. You must make the best decision you can given the little you know. The style I've chosen to pursue is one particular variant of the game, which happens to be the most popular No limit Texas Hold'em. How no limit hold'em differs from other forms of poker is twofold. The first is in the precise amount of information that is held in common versus in private. Each player is dealt two cards face down the hole cards. This is privileged information. I can try to guess what you have based on how you act, but I can't know for sure. On Lee. Information I'll have is your betting patterns. Once the public information the cards still to the middle of the table face up is known. The amount of incomplete information in Texas Hold'em creates a particularly useful balance between skill and chance. To hole cards is just about us practical ratios. You can have enough unknown to make the game a good simulation of life, but not so much that it becomes a total crapshoot. The second thing that distinguishes this particular playing style is the concept of no limit, but Norman's own preferred style. The power of the Pure Bluff is restricted in a game of limit, explains Amarillo Slim, one of the best poker players of his day. When there's a limit, it means that the exact amount you bet has a ceiling on it. And no limit. You can bet everything you have at any point. And that's what makes this game a particularly strong metaphor for our daily decision making. Because in life there is never a limit. What's to stop you from risking all your money? Your reputation, your heart, even your life at any point you choose..

Norman Eric Seidel Lee Texas Stephen Dubner Jon Bon Norman John von Norman Maria Kondakova Pure Bluff United States Amarillo Slim advisor Hooker Omaha Raz
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Works dot com Stephen Dubner on the next Freakonomics radio Welcome to the Tele Health Revolution, People worked wanting telehealth visits for low back pain. They wanted it for shoulder pain. What does Telehealth do for health outcomes and for the trillions we spend in health care costs, So if I could get any part of that trillion, then I can do whatever the heck I want. That's next time on Freakonomics Radio. Freakonomics radio gets under way at the top of the hour right after the conclusion of the radio lab. Michael State high pressure over the Golden State to result in sunny mild days and clear cool nights right through this weekend. Slight cooling is expected on Monday, according to the National Weather Service. Followed by a gradual warming trend through the remainder of next week. This is radio lab. Get back to our story about Syria, Bonaly or born Ali, as it said in French from producers, Tracy Hunt and a lot of Nasser. I was I'm really curious. What what happened at that at that medal ceremony in 1994? Um oh. Is the world from which is the world champion? Not the antics. No, no, no. No other place now. Oh, we have this. Washington Shipping Japan seven Olympic titles. 17 World Championships just to set this up. The World Championships are the second most important event in figure skating After the Olympics and at the Olympics, Richard just a month before.

Freakonomics Olympics Stephen Dubner Michael State National Weather Service skating Syria Washington Tracy Hunt Bonaly Nasser Japan Richard Ali
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

15:36 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I don't see the correlation someone's home going. I fucking hate decks. Because he's having fun but I don't think anyone should say I hate Dax because he's having fun but I think they might think like. Oh good for you. You're having fun. I can't pay my rent. I can't do you know it. Just I think it can stir up like I totally agree with you but my question is. Is that my problem? Where that person's problem but it's a little bit town down to the world is a real thing. I'm but I'm recognizing that it's terrible for a lot of people. Isn't that the problem? I'm just trying to isolate what is the actual objectionable thing. 'cause I might agree but I just want. I want to hang on exactly what it is. It's just to me. It just feels insensitive. It's insensitive to what other people might be going through to be like I. I got you like you see a funeral procession. Aaron an IRA ON MOTORCYCLES. And we're having the time of our life and then we ride a whealy by the funeral procession in your like. Just don't just don't do that during the funeral procession. Yeah that's pretty good. I can I ask and we were screaming. It feels so good to be alive. I know part of me is like they don't want to everyone that's feeling good to be able to feel any pressures. Do not feel good. Yeah I agree and I was asked you to feel bad. There's a different actually. I do feel bad for the people who are fucked right now. No no I'm saying no one's asking you personally to have a bad time right you. Maybe don't just like run around talking. About how great of time. You're having all going through the exact same situation right now and it's affecting people in vastly different ways so it just it shines a light on how different income inequality all the things. Yeah and so. Yeah maybe just a little sensitive Okay we got to start their many so maple syrup heist you said in the two thousands. That's right over the course of several months between two thousand eleven and two thousand twelve. Nearly a hundred and twenty two thousand barrels were stolen in a suspected insider job from F. P. A. Q. Facilities in Quebec surplus stored in unmarked white metal barrels inspected only once a year. Thieves used trucks transport barrels. Who REMOTE SUGAR SHACK OR? They siphoned off. The Maple Syrup refill the barrels with water then return them to the facility as the operation progressed that they've started siphoning syrup directly off barrels in the reserve without refilling them. The stolen syrup was trucked to the South Vermont and East New Brunswick where it was trafficked. And many small batches to reduce suspicion. It was typically sold illegitimate syrup distributors. Who were unaware of its origin on us. Crazy is right. Yeah Pretty Cool. I like obviously I love. Ocean's eleven yes. I love high. Stu was the Seagram's Fortune. Built on prohibition era smuggling. Oh yeah he and I are the worst for you. So we're both just pop an hour ago. I know I'm GonNa read so the Versatile Bronfman and his brothers went into the mail order business shipping whiskey by rail when the government banned the mail order business but said it was legal to sell alcohol as medicine. The Bronfman's just slapped on new labels such as rock a bye. Cough cure and liver and kidney care with the passage of the bolstered act in nineteen nineteen making and drinking liquor became illegal in the United States. Opening up a lucrative new market for the Bronfman's rather than reduce alcohol. Consumption prohibition seem to stimulate it as more and more American succumb to the temptation of this newly forbidden fruit. The liquor kept flowing. Now controlled by gangsters. The gangster's were constantly looking for more alcohol. And the Bronfman's had it. Although the sale of liquor for use within Canada was prohibited. Canadian authorities did not ban its export to the United States. In fact the government almost encouraged it because of the tremendous tax. Revenue Generated Okay is non secretarial a word? No Oh bummer. Ask a lot of people say like I use nonplussed. In a way that offends people. He did the original definition Means basically the opposite of how I use it but so many people in America use the way I use it. It is a definition in yes so a lot of people will complain when I use it and then I I was nonplussed like I was not bothered by it but it actually originally means very bothered it also means not bothered and so I always screen shot the definition from webster and I respond with the screen show interest so in that way. I bet we could if we just use it enough eventually. They'll the. Yeah Oh yeah yeah. He said he said Geld. I don't actually remember why he said he said Geld and then he said I don't know whatever you guild. I don't know 'cause I don't remember. But gelding means castrating a male animal. Ooh Yeah I should get killed. Okay let me tell really funny. Joke that Martin Mull told me. Martin Balza phenomenal actor. He was on the ranch and then he Is An episode of blesses mess. He's also a painter. He's also the most amazing bait forever. He does these photo realistic paintings. That are a possible that they're not photos anyways. He told me this joke. There's a man at a used car lot and he's looking at a car up and down. He's kicking the tires. And then the the salesman comes out and he says you thinking about buying a car and the man Says No. I'm thinking about women but yeah I need to buy a car. So I'm here to get one and it gets so Sums up man. In general we're thinking about women like ninety percent of the day and so many times. I have thought with my friends. We've talked about like just the amount of brainpower that would be opened up if you dig your castrated. I mean it could be a G- here's where all kinds of things you would. It would fix the mentality. I have no idea. I don't really know how. Well here's what I do know about castration when you castrate a pit bull. It's far less likely to buy a child's face off and bowl. You can't have bowls around right. Somehow there'd testosterone goes way down without the balls because that's where it's being made would be made it is. I think it is being made in the. Yeah Yeah so. That's probably why. Yeah so you can't be around bowl with balls any of that they'll kill you shit but that was soon as you cast him. They're like they're not pleasant but they're not lethal in the dock in tiger king. You know there's a lot of humans interacting with big casts in tigers insane animals and for one. I mean they're just so gorgeous. These animals are impossible looking. It looked like a kid drew a picture of just a random beast and it came obese. Also there are so many people in this documentary around these tigers and Lions and tigers and I was wondering how many people would be comfortable being within five feet social distance six feet of a tiger. I would not know me either me neither. I am terrified of those things but I guess a lot of people would. They're selling these services as tourism. Yeah and like all these people show up they will exactly they want hold the cubs and I mean they are really cute the cubs. Yeah yeah they are again and I don't want to embarrass anyone who's gotten their picture taken with a tiger. Because you don't really know everything behind jude that but also it's really now that you know. It's pretty embarrassing that everyone's third pitcher tiger. I guess I don't know I have pictures. Mansa Faris Animals. I guess I like that. No but they're out in their their in their element. That's the difference is I mean I do think a lot of people are just like. Oh cute like these. Little baby tires are so cute. How fine let's do it? There's the durst oblivious. It's not really embarrassing. They're just not thinking it through as okay. So how did these tigers gay here? Shouldn't they be out in the wild? Are they being mistreated? What just occurred to me? This isn't a hypothetical question for me because the animal wrangler we hired for hit and run to bring a pit bull. He shows up with the pit bull. There's very standard practice on a movie. And then I don't know where he goes. Hey I got a baby tiger and my back of my car would you like to hold it and I didn't want to hold it in fact I didn't hold it but I felt inclined like the guy was so excited that my codependency was all. Go look at this thing. This is really important guy. And he handed it to Bradley and then he took a picture and then he sold that pitcher to Tableau and then after the movie wrapped I got a call from a federal investigator wanting to meet with me to talk about it. I'm like look man. I don't know anything about that guy. I didn't hire that guy. Movie hired them have no knowledge other than I met him in a parking lot and he ended up tiger and he wanted us to hold it. But I had no desire to hold that type law and I don't think had one either. He just gets shoved in his hands and snapped a pick. Oh no the worst outcome imaginable. Joe Exotic I wish it wasn't I would have held. It probably always charismatic. You would have convinced me that it'd more like him if I held him a okay. So is there plastic bag ban in California? You said it got a field. I got lifted because I see them in fact yesterday I got chicken from the grocery store and they put it in a plastic bag. The rest of the stuff was in paper bags but they put chicken in the well. Yes so in August. Two Thousand Fourteen. California became the first state to enact legislation imposing a state wide ban on single use plastic bags at large retail stores. Then in two thousand eighteen eighteen no sixteen in two thousand sixteen. That vote was backup on the ballot and it did get upheld so California. Voters upheld a state law prohibiting single use plastic grocery bags environmentalist declared victory business. Groups cried government overreach but still shopping bags made from plastic film remained commonplace in checkout lines across the state. That's because the law contains an exception pushed by lobbyists for grocers and some plastic companies that allows stores to sell thicker plastic bags for ten cents the new bags while classified as reusable closely resemble their single use predecessors and are often thrown away after one transaction still they satisfied the law because technically they can be used one hundred twenty five times without falling apart gumming since because this one was It was nice and thick. So they're just thicker loophole. You touched on Ambien men verses women you said it's two times powerful and women as it is men yes that is true times powerful. Yeah so you're right about that but something you were really wrong about so I really want. This is a big time fact. Check okay. Jane Goodall is a vegetarian. She's not a some times. I might eat meat if it's on. I won't order to restaurants or something. She wrote an article about this. I stopped eating meat some fifty years ago when I look at the pork chop on my plate and thought this represents fear pain death that did it and I became an instant vegetarian. She looks like a whole. It's a whole article about why you should become a vegetarian for all these reasons and more. I chose to became a vegetarian all those years ago. I continued to ask people to consider what this choice really means on. A moral and practical level for animals and the environment is the twist change our individual lives which will in turn have enormous benefits for all of humanity and all of the other living creatures. We share our home with she. Even has this whole like pledge. What's the plug? She's encouraging people to eat meat less. It's an I eat meat less. Pledge Okay so maybe that's her. That's where I got the. Oh maybe I'm doing this per Jane Goodall. Maybe part of the pledges do it..

Bronfman United States Geld California Jane Goodall tigers Dax cubs Aaron Martin Balza Martin Mull Versatile Bronfman Canada Seagram South Vermont America Quebec testosterone Ocean
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:36 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I don't see the correlation someone's home going. I fucking hate decks. Because he's having fun but I don't think anyone should say I hate Dax because he's having fun but I think they might think like. Oh good for you. You're having fun. I can't pay my rent. I can't do you know it. Just I think it can stir up like I totally agree with you but my question is. Is that my problem? Where that person's problem but it's a little bit town down to the world is a real thing. I'm but I'm recognizing that it's terrible for a lot of people. Isn't that the problem? I'm just trying to isolate what is the actual objectionable thing. 'cause I might agree but I just want. I want to hang on exactly what it is. It's just to me. It just feels insensitive. It's insensitive to what other people might be going through to be like I. I got you like you see a funeral procession. Aaron an IRA ON MOTORCYCLES. And we're having the time of our life and then we ride a whealy by the funeral procession in your like. Just don't just don't do that during the funeral procession. Yeah that's pretty good. I can I ask and we were screaming. It feels so good to be alive. I know part of me is like they don't want to everyone that's feeling good to be able to feel any pressures. Do not feel good. Yeah I agree and I was asked you to feel bad. There's a different actually. I do feel bad for the people who are fucked right now. No no I'm saying no one's asking you personally to have a bad time right you. Maybe don't just like run around talking. About how great of time. You're having all going through the exact same situation right now and it's affecting people in vastly different ways so it just it shines a light on how different income inequality all the things. Yeah and so. Yeah maybe just a little sensitive Okay we got to start their many so maple syrup heist you said in the two thousands. That's right over the course of several months between two thousand eleven and two thousand twelve. Nearly a hundred and twenty two thousand barrels were stolen in a suspected insider job from F. P. A. Q. Facilities in Quebec surplus stored in unmarked white metal barrels inspected only once a year. Thieves used trucks transport barrels. Who REMOTE SUGAR SHACK OR? They siphoned off. The Maple Syrup refill the barrels with water then return them to the facility as the operation progressed that they've started siphoning syrup directly off barrels in the reserve without refilling them. The stolen syrup was trucked to the South Vermont and East New Brunswick where it was trafficked. And many small batches to reduce suspicion. It was typically sold illegitimate syrup distributors. Who were unaware of its origin on us. Crazy is right. Yeah Pretty Cool. I like obviously I love. Ocean's eleven yes. I love high. Stu was the Seagram's Fortune. Built on prohibition era smuggling he and I are the worst for you so we're both just pop an hour ago. I know I'm GonNa read so the Versatile Bronfman and his brothers went into the mail order business shipping whiskey by rail when the government banned the mail order business but said it was legal to sell alcohol as medicine. The Bronfman's just slapped on new labels such as rock a bye. Cough cure and liver and kidney care with the passage of the bolstered act in nineteen nineteen making and drinking liquor became illegal in the United States. Opening up a lucrative new market for the Bronfman's rather than reduce alcohol. Consumption prohibition seem to stimulate it as more and more American succumb to the temptation of this newly forbidden fruit. The liquor kept flowing. Now controlled by gangsters. The gangster's were constantly looking for more alcohol. And the Bronfman's had it. Although the sale of liquor for use within Canada was prohibited. Canadian authorities did not ban its export to the United States. In fact the government almost encouraged it because of the tremendous tax. Revenue Generated Okay is non secretarial a word? No Oh bummer. Ask a lot of people say like I use nonplussed. In a way that offends people heeded. Yeah because the original definition Means basically the opposite of how I use it but so many people in America use the way I use it. It is a definition in yes so a lot of people will complain when I use it and then I I was nonplussed like I was not bothered by it but it actually originally means very bothered it also means not bothered and so I always screen shot the definition from webster and I respond with the screen show interest so in that way. I bet we could if we just use it enough eventually. They'll the. Yeah Oh yeah yeah. He said he said Geld. I don't actually remember why he said he said Geld and then he said I don't know whatever you guild. I don't know 'cause I don't remember. But gelding means castrating a male animal. Ooh Yeah I should get killed. Okay let me tell really funny. Joke that Martin Mull told me. Martin Balza phenomenal actor. He was on the ranch and then he Is An episode of blesses mess. He's also a painter. He's also the most amazing bait forever. He does these photo realistic paintings. That are a possible that they're not photos anyways. He told me this joke. There's a man at a used car lot and he's looking at a car up and down. He's kicking the tires. And then the the salesman comes out and he says you thinking about buying a car and the man Says No. I'm thinking about women but yeah I need to buy a car. So I'm here to get one and it gets so Sums up man. In general we're thinking about women like ninety percent of the day and so many times. I have thought with my friends. We've talked about like just the amount of brainpower that would be opened up if you dig your castrated. I mean it could be a G- here's where all kinds of things you would. It would fix the mentality. I have no idea. I don't really know how. Well here's what I do know about castration when you castrate a pit bull. It's far less likely to buy a child's face off and bowl. You can't have bowls around right. Somehow there'd testosterone goes way down without the balls because that's where it's being made would be made it is. I think it is being made in the. Yeah Yeah so. That's probably why. Yeah so you can't be around bowl with balls any of that they'll kill you shit but that was soon as you cast him. They're like they're not pleasant but they're not lethal in the dock in tiger king. You know there's a lot of humans interacting with big casts in tigers insane animals and for one. I mean they're just so gorgeous. These animals are impossible looking. It looked like a kid drew a picture of just a random beast and it came obese. Also there are so many people in this documentary around these tigers and Lions and tigers and I was wondering how many people would be comfortable being within five feet social distance six feet of a tiger. I would not know me either me neither. I am terrified of those things but I guess a lot of people would. They're selling these services as tourism. Yeah and like all these people show up they will exactly they want hold the cubs and I mean they are really cute the cubs. Yeah yeah they are again and I don't want to embarrass anyone who's gotten their picture taken with a tiger. Because you don't really know everything behind jude that but also it's really now that you know. It's pretty embarrassing that everyone's third pitcher tiger. I guess I don't know I have pictures. Mansa Faris Animals. I guess I like that. No but they're out in their their in their element. That's the difference is I mean I do think a lot of people are just like. Oh cute like these. Little baby tires are so cute. How fine let's do it? There's the durst oblivious. It's not really embarrassing. They're just not thinking it through as okay. So how did these tigers gay here? Shouldn't they be out in the wild? Are they being mistreated? What just occurred to me? This isn't a hypothetical question for me because the animal wrangler we hired for hit and run to bring a pit bull. He shows up with the pit bull. There's very standard practice on a movie. And then I don't know where he goes. Hey I got a baby tiger and my back of my car would you like to hold it and I didn't want to hold it in fact I didn't hold it but I felt inclined like the guy was so excited that my codependency was all. Go look at this thing. This is really important guy. And he handed it to Bradley and then he took a picture and then he sold that pitcher to Tableau and then after the movie wrapped I got a call from a federal investigator wanting to meet with me to talk about it. I'm like look man. I don't know anything about that guy. I didn't hire that guy. Movie hired them have no knowledge other than I met him in a parking lot and he ended up tiger and he wanted us to hold it. But I had no desire to hold that type law and I don't think had one either. He just gets shoved in his hands and snapped a pick. Oh no the worst. Outcome imaginable exotic. I wish it wasn't I would have held. It probably always okay. There's Manik you would have convinced me that it'd more like him if I held him a okay. So is there plastic bag ban in California? You said it got a field. I got lifted because I see them. In fact yesterday I got chicken from the grocery store and they put it in a plastic bag. The rest of the stuff was in paper bags but they put chicken in the well. Yes so in August. Two Thousand Fourteen. California became the first state to enact legislation imposing a state wide ban on single use plastic bags at large retail stores. Then in two thousand eighteen eighteen no sixteen in two thousand sixteen. That vote was backup on the ballot and it did get upheld so California. Voters upheld a state law prohibiting single use plastic grocery bags environmentalist declared victory business. Groups cried government overreach but still shopping bags made from plastic film remained commonplace in checkout lines across the state. That's because the law contains an exception pushed by lobbyists for grocers and some plastic companies that allows stores to sell thicker plastic bags for ten cents the new bags while classified as reusable closely resemble their single use predecessors and are often thrown away after one transaction still they satisfied the law because technically they can be used one hundred twenty five times without falling apart gumming since because this one was It was nice and thick. So they're just thicker loophole. You touched on Ambien men verses women you said it's two times powerful and women as it is men yes that is true times powerful. Yeah so you're right about that but something you were really wrong about so I really want. This is a big time fact. Check okay. Jane Goodall is a vegetarian. She's not a some times. I might eat meat if it's on. I won't order to restaurants or something. She wrote an article about this. I stopped eating meat some fifty years ago when I look at the pork chop on my plate and thought this represents fear pain death that did it and I became an instant vegetarian. She looks like a whole. It's a whole article about why you should become a vegetarian for all these reasons and more. I chose to became a vegetarian all those years ago. I continued to ask people to consider what this choice really means on. A moral and practical level for animals and the environment is the twist change our individual lives which will in turn have enormous benefits for all of humanity and all of the other living creatures. We share our home with she. Even has this whole like pledge. What's the plug? She's encouraging people to eat meat less. It's an I eat meat less. Pledge Okay so maybe that's her. That's where I got the. Oh maybe doing this. Per Jane Goodall. Maybe part of the pledges. Do it. When it's ceremonial. I think the pledge is like do what you can to reduce as much as possible to guess close vegetarianism as UK. But she herself is on Thanksgiving. Okay speaking of Thanksgiving Great Transit Ish. He's a ninety nine point. Two percent of Turkeys are bred for human consumption in the. Us are artificially inseminated. Yes everything I read is like all. Everyone's saying all okay so he gave the reasoning as we like specific parts of the Turkey breast and stuff like that so they have to get really big time circles it. Yeah but a lot of what people are also saying is natural. Mating puts the female risk of injury in commercial meat markets. The male Turkeys aren't I think there until yeah curl little aggressive right because this is artificial. Insemination is widely used to overcome low fertility and commercial turkeys which results from unsuccessful meeting as a consequence of large heavily muscled. Birds being unable to physically the mating process. Okay that makes Wow Okay is there a culture where people eat a little bit of dead loved ones The four or four A. F. O. R. E. PEOPLE CAN. I guess we're there from Papua New Guinea. Yes Oh yeah. How'd you because they're the famous? Can't they have some? Cannibalism historically a once isolated tribe in eastern Papa..

Bronfman Jane Goodall California United States Geld tigers cubs Dax Aaron Martin Balza Martin Mull Versatile Bronfman Canada Turkey UK Seagram South Vermont Papua New Guinea
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Don't love but I'm not an acceptable. I appreciate it. We'll such a pleasure talking to you and I hope we get to do again. Thanks Tax Monica and now my favorite part of the show the fact check with my soul mate Monica pad man. This is so fun. Well I also feel that. It's a little maybe insensitive to say. It's fun it's different. Why is it insensitive? Because some people really aren't having fun they don't have jobs they don't have our next. Paycheck is coming from their home. Schooling their children all day. It's miserable for a lot of people and they would want me to be upset too. Well I think they might be like. Oh good for you. You're having fun. Look when I'm starving and I found out someone just had a big rectangle sandwich extranets. I'm pretty happy for them. Okay anyways we've been doing these meetings on zoom. Aa meetings and Aaron. And I you know there's on average is generally nine of us or something and yeah I sometimes feel guilty because Aaron and I are having the time of our lives because we haven't been able to just be with each other in a long time I'm loving it. Are you hating it? No I don't hate it but I I recognize the weight of it for so many people who I think are really really really struggling. Oh Yeah I think. A lot of people economically are getting very. I'm just mentally. I mean people are in our house for two weeks but when you see those videos of the Italians plan violin on their their balconies. And everyone's happy. Are you upset that they're happy now? I think they're making the most of a of a very very bad situation there. Yeah I feel like that's what I'm doing. Good also I would feel dishonest. Not vocalizing my gratitude. So we've been having these fun meals together as a family which is also rare and cooking. I have like extra gratitude for food that I don't normally like when I made air fried chicken yesterday I was like. Oh yes we still have chicken amazing. Yeah it definitely elicits gratitude for sure should I? It puts a magnifying glass on everything. Like everything you touch on everything you interact with on the things. You can't interact with every time I grab a clorox wipe. I'm grateful. We have the day I opened up one of our wives and it's like almost empty and I got a little pants shirts. We can't get more. They are sold out but I hope everyone is doing okay. You know our armchairs. I hope one's doing okay and reminding themselves at its temporary and while you're in it to try to focus on the positive things. Oh Bill Gates Sent I think it was like a private email. Okay But Chris got a hold of it and it was just put so perfectly the end he basically said I choose to look at this as not the great disaster but the great corrector. It's in the fact that like yeah like this is making people focus on their families. You go from this mentality of access to minimalisation like all of it is just correcting our mentality. That's now been ingrained for so long. It's a great perspective shift. It really is so we had Stephen Dubner on. Who's so smart? An interesting and it was funny. I didn't notice this when we were recording it but the conversation just takes so many left center right. He's he's a perfect talking partner. Yes he's happy to just laterally. Move all over the landscape and he knows A. I don't even want to say a little bit. He knows a good amount about most things so he can just duck in Blake duck and leave. The conversation takes a lot of twisties which I started laughing at some point because I just realized we couldn't keep one topic going but it was great surprise that I enjoyed them so much. Because I loved Freakonomics Book. There was like how people name their kids but like this explosion of people naming their children. Lexus and Mercedes low really. That stuff's fascinating. And then just reams. And reams of data on how people were naming their kids and how it was like kind of motivated by Social Mobility and the book is phenomenal. And I've listened to tons of that podcast before we even had them with the baby. Names is that like hopeful that they will when your name your baby something like that. That's high status that they'll like acquire that kind of stat. And what is an attempt to bestow status onto you with the name because the name itself has status? This Mercedes cash money. I don't know that I've ever met anyone named Alexis. Alexis Shar pressure. There is a huge amount of babies named Lexus. Late nineties again. It's been fourteen years since I read freakonomics so I'm hanging on by a thread about how much I remember but it's a fascinating read like I like all that moneyball stuff remember moneyball love moneyball. I just Love Win. Like a smarts overpower me to as a goody and. I do think we should take a little detour right now for tiger king. We're into it just like I think everyone else in the country world is right now but if you're not you're not out it's the first documentary since wild wild country that have been this lustful over we are. We have one episode laughed. Seven episodes. Were UNBELIEVABLE LITTLE PANICKY. About only being one left. What's really funny is it's almost. The same story is while while country in that. It's just an exploration of escalation of reaction. It's a feud the movie is a feud yeah and both people are willing to keep going. There's so many layers to this documentary. Though it takes about a thousand turns. You have no idea where it's going like. Oh my God so many things happen off the new pause it and go hold on a second. I'm watching a gubernatorial race. All of a sudden. No it's crazy. Feel Documentarian are the bill gates of going to say they're like Bill Gates like it's magical the way these things cut the good ones come together. You have to be such a risk taker to be a documentarian. Because you're like I guess I'm going to devote the next six years to this person or this concept or this thing and you kind of hope I assume will happen. But you don't know you don't know although if you look at Joe Exotic yes that's your lead gestures names you look at Joe. Exotics like last eighteen months go. Hey Joel re up to last eighteen months and you heard what he was up to. You would be certain that a ton more was coming in the next eighteen months. I mean this guy hasn't had a month of his life that didn't involve some incredible theatrics. It's true but you just not you never know. You're taking a risk and even like the ones like the staircase and have big twiss. Some of them have huge twists. In do you cannot predict that you but I guess that's the hope with all these documentarian at some point. Some toys will emerge so just bravo to the documentarian out there. Run of applause so many people to be grateful for. Oh so many nurses so many doctors so many truck drivers people in Logistics Grocery Store Workers Pharmacists of an eleven employees. I'm really grateful to all those folks so if it wasn't clear. I knowledge that I'm so privileged right now. We've been giving people way more than they're supposed to get paid and Bob The pool guy. Text me that he thought there was a clerical error. Me Yeah Yeah. I'm not bragging. I want people know. Yes they have extra money and we're also paying everybody that no longer working for us. I know but because that could be encouraging other people won't businesses as an example. I do I mean. We told this land all the time. Kristen and I all the time. We're trying to figure out. Like what do we say so that it feels like lead by example but also enough? We get it. You're giving away money like there's a fine line that shorts so I think everyone just has to evaluate within themselves. What can I do if anything and I should do? And that can be small. That can be sure ten dollars if you have ten dollars to spare or it. Can it can be. I feel very scared that I won't have enough money to get through this. I cannot give anything away. That's fine Y- I would never be on here being judgmental people. Yeah and also one of my favorite aspects of the two thousand and eight downturn was. There's this long history in Judaism where when times are hardest. That's when they're called on to give the most. I forget the verbiage of it but I thought circulating in a lot of my Jewish friends were telling me about it. And it's like there's a big push in those times to be to go against all your fears and be extra generous and I just think that's beautiful detail test in my mind is I. Don't feel any ego bump by saying it. I'm not proud of myself when I say we're paying people will probably because I've never been someone who got their approval through being generous to strangers that you have gotten approval from having money how I mean you've gotten self esteem from that for me. Purser universally big from having excess money and this is a way of saying that you do. Why do that's a fact anyone doesn't realize that but it can give an ego boost in that in that way of like I gave this and then in a roundabout way. You're saying I was able to give this. You know what I mean. Yes but I think we can draw a huge distinction between people taking pictures of themselves getting on a private jet. Like what do you think of that to me that just going? Hey Look I'm rich can throw money away for sure. And so if I was doing that I would feel like I trust my spidey sense. I would feel gross about that. Yeah yeah and I don't feel gross at all saying if you're in a position keep paying people. Maybe overpay them you know. Whatever I don't I yeah just doesn't feel like bragging. There are many things I san here that are straight bragging about my driving skills all these. There's a ton of things I brag about but for me I can. I don't feel in my soul at all that I'm like bragging. I think if I'm honest at all times I will come out ahead ethically for myself so I if I got on here and acted like having a terrible time in the Corn Team. I would just be lying. I would be being untrue to be sympathetic to people who are suffering and I don't I don't think that's right. I don't mean lying. No that that's extremes. You don't have to lie. It's the presentation I think you can say. I personally am having a lot of gratitude. I you know we're all living together and that's a nice change and I. I'm appreciating all these things but to say I'm having so much fun those to sound different to me or someone hated you because you got a house and I basically didn't feel bad about that. I was like fuck you like. Someone wrote like a feel so gross that. We're supposed to be excited. That Monica bought a house. Because we listen and I was like well. You didn't fuck and pay for her house. The shows for free and fuck you like. I don't know if you can't be excited that Monica got a house because you didn't get a house.

Bill Gates Mercedes Aaron Monica Joe Exotic Paycheck clorox Stephen Dubner Lexus Alexis Shar Corn Team Chris partner Logistics Grocery Store Worker Joel Kristen Purser
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Don't love but I'm not an acceptable. I appreciate it. We'll such a pleasure talking to you and I hope we get to do again. Thanks Tax Monica and now my favorite part of the show the fact check with my Soul Mate Monica Pad man. This is so fun. Well I also feel that. It's a little maybe insensitive to say. It's fun it's different. Why is it insensitive? Because some people really aren't having fun they don't have jobs they don't have our next. Paycheck is coming from their home. Schooling their children all day. It's miserable for a lot of people and they would want me to be upset too. Well I think they might be like. Oh good for you. You're having fun book when I'm starving and I found out someone just had a big rectangle. Sandwich extranets. I'm pretty happy for them okay. Anyways we've been doing these meetings on zoom. Aa meetings and Aaron. And I you know there's on average is generally nine of us or something and yeah I sometimes feel guilty because Aaron and I are having the time of our lives because we haven't been able to just be with each other in a long time I'm loving it. Are you hating it? No I don't hate it but I I recognize the weight of it for so many people who I think are really really really struggling. Oh Yeah I think. A lot of people economically are getting very. I'm just mentally. I mean people are in our house for two weeks but when you see those videos of the Italians plan violin on their their balconies. And everyone's happy. Are you upset that they're happy now? I think they're making the most of a of a very very bad situation there. Yeah I feel like that's what I'm doing. Good also I would feel dishonest. Not vocalizing my gratitude. So we've been having these fun meals together as a family which is also rare and cooking. I have like extra gratitude for food that I don't normally like when I made air fried chicken yesterday I was like. Oh yes we still have chicken amazing. Yeah it definitely elicits gratitude for sure should I? It puts a magnifying glass on everything. Like on everything you touch on everything you interact with on the things. You can't interact with every time I grab a clorox wipe. I'm grateful. We have the day I opened up one of our wives and it's like almost empty and I got a little pants shirts. We can't get more. They are sold out but I hope everyone is doing okay. You know our armchairs. I hope one's doing okay and reminding themselves at its temporary and while you're in it to try to focus on the positive things. Oh Bill Gates Sent I think it was like a private email. Okay But Chris got a hold of it and it was just put so perfectly the end he basically said I choose to look at this as not the great disaster but the great corrector. It's in the fact that like yeah like this is making people focus on their families. You go from this mentality of access to minimalisation like all of it is just correcting our mentality. That's now been ingrained for so long. It's a great perspective shift. It really is so we had Stephen Dubner on. Who's so smart? An interesting and it was funny. I didn't notice this when we were recording it but the conversation just takes so many left center right. He's he's a perfect talking partner. Yes he's happy to just laterally. Move all over the landscape and he knows A. I don't even want to say a little bit. He knows a good amount about most things so he can just duck in Blake duck and leave. The conversation takes a lot of twisties which I started laughing at some point because I just realized we couldn't keep one topic going but it was great surprise that I enjoyed them so much. Because I loved Freakonomics Book. There was like how people name their kids but like this explosion of people naming their children. Lexus and Mercedes low really. That stuff's fascinating. And then just reams. And reams of data on how people were naming their kids and how it was like kind of motivated by Social Mobility and the book is phenomenal. And I've listened to tons of that podcast before we even had them with the baby. Names is that like hopeful that they will when your name your baby something like that. That's high status that they'll like acquire that kind of stat. And what is an attempt to bestow status onto you with the name because the name itself has status? This Mercedes cash money. I don't know that I've ever met anyone named Alexis. Alexis Shar pressure. There is a huge amount of babies named Lexus. Late nineties again. It's been fourteen years since I read freakonomics so I'm hanging on by a thread about how much I remember but it's a fascinating read like I like all that moneyball stuff remember moneyball love moneyball. I just Love Win. Like a smarts overpower me to as a goody and. I do think we should take a little detour right now for tiger king. We're into it just like I think everyone else in the country world is right now but if you're not you're not how it's the first documentary since wild wild country. That have been this lustful over we are. We have one episode laughed. Seven episodes. Were UNBELIEVABLE LITTLE PANICKY. About only being one left. What's really funny is it's almost. The same story is while while country in that. It's just an exploration of escalation of reaction. It's a feud the movie is a feud yeah and both people are willing to keep going. There's so many layers to this documentary. Though it takes about a thousand turns. You have no idea where it's going like. Oh my God so many things happen off the new pause it and go hold on a second. I'm watching a gubernatorial race. All of a sudden. No it's crazy. Feel Documentarian are the bill gates of going to say they're like Bill Gates like it's magical the way these things cut the good ones come together. You have to be such a risk taker to be a documentarian. Because you're like I guess I'm going to devote the next six years to this person or this concept or this thing and you kind of hope I assume will happen. But you don't know you don't know although if you look at Joe Exotic yes that's your lead gestures names you look at Joe. Exotics like last eighteen months go. Hey Joel re up to last eighteen months and you heard what he was up to. You would be certain that a ton more was coming in the next eighteen months. I mean this guy hasn't had a month of his life that didn't involve some incredible theatrics. It's true but you just not you never know. You're taking a risk and even like the ones like the staircase and have big twiss. Some of them have huge twists. In do you cannot predict that you but I guess that's the hope with all these documentarian at some point. Some toys will emerge so just bravo to the documentarian out there. Run of applause so many people to be grateful for. Oh so many nurses so many doctors so many truck drivers people in Logistics Grocery Store Workers Pharmacists of an eleven employees. I'm really grateful to all those folks so if it wasn't clear. I knowledge that I'm so privileged right now. We've been giving people way more than they're supposed to get paid and Bob The pool guy. Text me that he thought there was a clerical error. Me Yeah Yeah. I'm not bragging. I want people know. Yes they have extra money and we're also paying everybody that no longer is working for us. I know but because that could be encouraging other people won't businesses as an example. I do I mean. We told this land all the time. Kristen and I all the time. We're trying to figure out. Like what do we say so that it feels like lead by example but also enough? We get it. You're giving away money like there's a fine line that shorts so I think everyone just has to evaluate within themselves. What can I do if anything and I should do? And that can be small. That can be sure ten dollars if you have ten dollars to spare or it. Can it can be. I feel very scared that I won't have enough money to get through this. I cannot give anything away. That's fine Y- I would never be on here being judgmental people. Yeah and also one of my favorite aspects of the two thousand and eight downturn was. There's this long history in Judaism where when times are hardest. That's when they're called on to give the most. I forget the verbiage of it but I thought circulating in a lot of my Jewish friends were telling me about it. And it's like there's a big push in those times to be to go against all your fears and be extra generous and I just think that's beautiful detail test in my mind is I. Don't feel any ego bump by saying it. I'm not proud of myself when I say we're paying people will probably because I've never been someone who got their approval through being generous to strangers that you have gotten approval from having money how I mean you've gotten self esteem from that for me. Purser universally big from having excess money and this is a way of saying that you do. Why do that's a fact anyone doesn't realize that but it can give an ego boost in that in that way of like I gave this and then in a roundabout way. You're saying I was able to give this. You know what I mean. Yes but I think we can draw a huge distinction between people taking pictures of themselves getting on a private jet. Like what do you think of that to me that just going? Hey Look I'm rich can throw money away for sure. And so if I was doing that I would feel like I trust my spidey sense. I would feel gross about that. Yeah yeah and I don't feel gross at all saying if you're in a position keep paying people. Maybe overpay them you know. Whatever I don't I yeah just doesn't feel like bragging. There are many things I san here that are straight bragging about my driving skills all these. There's a ton of things I brag about but for me I can. I don't feel in my soul at all that I'm like bragging. I think if I'm honest at all times I will come out ahead ethically for myself so I if I got on here and acted like having a terrible time in the Corn Team. I would just be lying. I would be being untrue to be sympathetic to people who are suffering and I don't I don't think that's right. I don't mean lying. No that that's extremes. You don't have to lie. It's the presentation I think you can say. I personally am having a lot of gratitude. I you know we're all living together and that's a nice change and I. I'm appreciating all these things but to say I'm having so much fun those to sound different to me or someone hated you because you got a house and I basically didn't feel bad about that. I was like fuck you like. Someone wrote like a feel so gross that. We're supposed to be excited. That Monica bought a house. Because we listen and I was like well. You didn't fuck and pay for her house. The shows for free and fuck you like. I don't know if you can't be excited that Monica got a house because you didn't get a house.

Monica Pad Bill Gates Mercedes Aaron Joe Exotic Paycheck clorox Stephen Dubner Lexus Alexis Shar Corn Team Chris partner Logistics Grocery Store Worker Joel Kristen Purser
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So I think he had this. I don't know how specific this recognition was but in the old days of Microsoft for Instance Bill Gates and then Steve Bomber. They both basically treated every company. That was a little bit like them or that did business in any realm closely at all related to there's would consider everybody an enemy a threat to market rival every single one. So Google Adobe Lennox you name it anyone and when saw Tina delegate men again I don't know how specifically this was part of the strategy for what Microsoft is done in the last four or five years but they've a they've become much much much much more successful invaluable for five years but one way they've done it is by saying instead of you know what. Google's are sworn enemy and we're never going to do anything with them. Wouldn't we rather have ten percent of what we might have in this co- relationship with Google and rather than be hundred percent rivals? Why don't we think about it as an opportunity for us and what to me this is about is humans generally we still operate with a lot of paradigm 's like zero sum versus the scarcity abundance that are baked into us from millennia ago. It's like we're the same hardware pretty much but our softwares like badly outdated. Oh Yeah Yeah and we can transcend all of these are compulsions but it just takes a lot of faith and again. I JUST WANNA point out that we've come full circle and then what Microsoft is clearly doing is just having a fully offensive strategy. And they're not playing defense anymore awarded for I have one quick question. Non sequitur Oriel Question That I thought of as well on your sat's sentence do you ever feel because I you're sort of unique type of material out in the world? Do you ever feel this responsibility like when you write about the drunk walking? Do you ever feel like okay? What if somebody hears this reads this and then drives drunk and then dies or kill someone like? Do you ever think about the fact that you have a really big power in that way. I think you're probably overestimating our power. A little bit but no So the truth is yes you try to think about it but then because humans are interesting and decision making is weird. You often totally failed to appreciate how someone might take it and act on it so like to me entertaining. The is really important and yearly hard. But I do. When I'm writing the script. We interviewed a bunch of people we ended down. We arrange a script. We write rewrite at record. It listen to it then re edit a little bit rewrite a little bit what I try to do is just listen as anybody. And so the minute you hear someone say a a word or phrase your brain responds and then you say well. I want to know the next thing based on that if the host in this case me doesn't ask that then. I'm pissed at him right. That's what you try to do is be the person really really really listening the way a therapist would be really listening or the way your wife would be really listening when you talk about doing the dishes and it's not about this. It's about that. And that's and that by the way is one thing that I think. Humans will always be way better than robots by the way yes. I don't think one has to account for all the dip shits in the world. I don't think one has to sit on data because I don't tend to just you know what I'm saying. I don't think the world could operate like that. We're we're we're planning all things for the very worst interpretation by the dumbest people in the country. I just don't know how things should either but I just wonder carry any of that as a as a human on earth. Let me ask you this. How do you guys feel about? Are you mediators or not? Sway both okay. Do you worry at all about the strain on the whole system that meets puts on things are not really a minute. My meat consumption is one of several things I do. That are morally indefensible. A so how do you feel about? Let's say what they call fake meat or vegetable plant based meat do you. Do you think that's a good idea? Generally yes I know I do consume. I and I think they're great and to me. That's where I go. That's the Republican in me. That's like yeah you had to make it fucking delicious right. He had to do that. You can't just say the fact that we have to call it the republic the logistics in me I agree. And that's you know Pat Brown. The Guy that invented impossible foods. That's exactly it and he's very liberal He thinks that the whole point is that meat. Production is terrible and he said but you can't expect to win on the moral argument to make delicious. You can give people a car that doesn't function right. It doesn't meet all their needs and ask them to use that car. Just don't think you can do that all right. So how do you? Here's the question I really wanted to ask is. How do you feel about eating insects? Let's say that protein is important in the insects are a great source of it. I'm all for it if you eat many insects I understand there's some like beetle protein powder and there's cricket powder. I eat a restaurant at a restaurant in New York recently. We taped were doing this. Episode on disgust So it's about how discussed works in how there are things that people should be disgusted by. Aren't yet and vice versa. And so I went with this guy. Who's a psych professor at Penn? Who's kind of the leading authority undiscussed and we went to eat some different insects at this restaurant. Called the black ant ooh It's a Mexican restaurant is delicious. I'd go there in a second so next time. You're New York if you WANNA go the black ants in the East village and it'll be everything from like a bowl full of little sauteed grasshopper no bowl full and you see. They look like grasshopper. Oh Yeah and they. And then there's also like a bowl full of very small ants than have a very interesting flavor. Not Aunt Lake at all they in a flavor. The I've never encountered but pleasant and then there's also insects kind of baked into things like little Croquettes grasshopper croquettes. So then but that conversation then lead us to in this case okay and this guy is kind of a vegetarian. The psych professor so he has a weird rule like we all have weird rules like he won't ever order meet in a restaurant but if somebody's with orders me and can't finish it he'll finish it. This is approaching the Jane Goodall. Approach her kind of thing as I understand it is like meet service. Amazing function historically throughout. You know the study of man so special occasions she will win offered by hosts she will. She won't herself go procure it or order it or whatever but there are times when socially it's it's to be enjoyed all right. Here's the big question would eat human. Is it someone grew but Sheikh in a lab that is human meat Said that seems a little bit too easy for.

Microsoft Google New York professor Bill Gates Jane Goodall Tina Aunt Lake Steve Bomber Sheikh Pat Brown Penn
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"W-well GO Morgan. Welcome Armchair expert. I'm Dan Shepard. I'm joined by EMMY NOMINATED MONSTER MOUSE. You good are you good. I'm so grateful to be quarantined with you. It's Fun Yeah. We really lucked out. I feel so bad for the folks that are just straight up by themselves. Quarantining could have been me could have been you but boy oh boy. Do I have a long list of gratitude for so many things? We had. One of the best conversationalist we've ever had this motherfucker Stephen Dubner. He can talk about any topic you throw at him. You'll know a little bit about it. He will and we did talk about every topic. Really go out a lot of tangents and it's fun Oh we I love talking to McCain Devon back so Stephen Dubner courses in award winning author journalist and podcast and radio host is the CO author of one of my favorite books of all time freakonomics. I'm sure many of you have read it as it reached millions and millions of people. Globally he also has the very fascinating podcast freakonomics radio which is a huge huge hit and we are just delighted to shoot the shit with him. We hope you'll enjoy and we're hope you're staying safe and well fed in your ass as well wiped pleasing joy Stephen Dubner. We are supported by policy genius. Now there are things we look back on and think. How did I get it so wrong? It might be wearing multiple polo shirts and popping all the collars donating to Kony two thousand twelve or dating. That one person that one time you know the one. We're always going to get things wrong. That's just life. There are also things we can get right on the first try like shopping for life insurance..

Stephen Dubner Dan Shepard EMMY Quarantining McCain Kony
"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"W-well GO Morgan. Welcome Armchair expert. I'm Dan Shepard. I'm joined by EMMY NOMINATED MONSTER MOUSE. You good are you good. I'm so grateful to be quarantined with you. It's Fun Yeah. We really lucked out. I feel so bad for the folks that are just straight up by themselves. Quarantining could have been me could have been you but boy oh boy. Do I have a long list of gratitude for so many things? We had. One of the best conversationalist we've ever had this motherfucker Stephen Dubner. He can talk about any topic you throw at him. You'll know a little bit about it. He will and we did talk about every topic. Really go out a lot of tangents and it's fun Oh we I love talking to McCain Devon back so Stephen Dubner courses in award winning author journalist and podcast and radio host is the CO author of one of my favorite books of all time freakonomics. I'm sure many of you have read it as it reached millions and millions of people. Globally he also has the very fascinating podcast freakonomics radio which is a huge huge hit and we are just delighted to shoot the shit with him. We hope you'll enjoy and we're hope you're staying safe and well fed in your ass as well wiped pleasing joy Stephen Dubner. We are supported by policy genius. Now there are things we look back on and think. How did I get it so wrong? It might be wearing multiple polo shirts and popping all the collars donating to Kony two thousand twelve or dating. That one person that one time you know the one. We're always going to get things wrong. That's just life. There are also things we can get right on the first try like shopping for life insurance..

Stephen Dubner Dan Shepard EMMY Quarantining McCain Kony
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen dubner. Hello. Good to see you. Shave. Even when the topic is serious Neiman has a playful streak like the New Yorker cover. He made after the Fukushima nuclear disaster against a black background Neiman. Drew the branches of a cherry tree. The blossoms of familiar pink were in the shape of the international radiation symbol, the tree foil. Well, when I started out it was fairly easy, easy in the sense of like simple. I would get a call from a magazine or newspaper, and they would say we have a story on the stock market some political political event, we have a certain space. We're here's the headline. Here's the article we need a visual equivalent to the headline. My record was forty five minutes times op-ed page because the Pakistani decided to test nuclear weapons. Three thirty and the people went to print at five once they had to decision. I had I think thirty minutes to actually do the entire drawing usually from day to a week. Sometimes it's actually years for very open assignments give me just an example to be short long. Big small of a particularly difficult problem that you had to solve with an illustration for me the difficult. But also, the fun problems were always the ones where you have to tell a boring story through an interesting visual has for years. I was illustrating the New Yorker financial Columbine, James. Vicki brilliant column. And I remember one day was about how small companies updating their technical. Machinery Khodadad is an indicator for for something. And of course, that's not a very sexy female. So it was really about. Small accounting for buy new computers, and how often they would do that. And of course, I didn't want to draw counts or computers. So I actually drew the grim reaper, and he looks into shop to shop winner. There's a there's a big sickle. And then there's a lawnmower and then an electric lawn mowers in same kind thinking about whether he should find the upgrade. And of course, you have to you have to know the metaphors requires a bit of a leap with a story like that. It's much more interesting to them at a visual layer..

Neiman Stephen dubner Machinery Khodadad Vicki forty five minutes thirty minutes one day
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the next reveal. Stay with us reveal is coming up in about thirty five minutes. It starts at four. Partly cloudy. The rest of the day with temperatures topping out hamper seventies tonight, partly cloudy in the evening. Mostly cloudy overnight with lows in the upper forties and low fifties. Tomorrow a little bit cooler mostly cloudy in the morning, partly cloudy by the afternoon and a slight chance of showers by Sunday night. This is freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen dubner. Cory Booker grew up in a middle-class black family in the mostly white town of Harrington Park, New jersey. His parents were among the first black executives to work at IBM, his father in sales as mother and market today. Booker is one of three African Americans in the US Senate in his book United. He writes about race through his own experience chapter one, for instance, begins the chapter begins. I hate Henry Louis gates because of some very humbling things he did to me. It's a great chapter about your white ancestry. Skip gates lead you on this DNA hunt. And it's fascinating. And you discover that you have nearly as much European DNA as African-American DNA. I think you're forty seven to forty five. Is that right? Yes, sir. Yes, sir..

Cory Booker Henry Louis gates Stephen dubner US Senate IBM Harrington Park New jersey thirty five minutes
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stephen dubner. After year in the White House tax reform done Gary Cohn decided he'd had enough the chronology goes something like this. We sorry and tax reform on December twenty second the Friday twenty seventeen twenty seventeen president left for Marla. Go for vacation, I left with my family for vacation. We all came back in early January. And I sat down and had had a one on one lunch with the president. And I was at the point now where I was getting ready to move on. And I said, look, you know, I wanna work with you to make sure there's a smooth transition that you hire someone I'm happy to work with you to transition that person. And I leave as soon as you need me to or I'll stay as long as you need me to and was this with the understanding that you were essentially losing the war on the trade war. No, no, it really wasn't. It was it was the understanding that my my main mission. Of getting tax reform had been done cones replacement was named Larry Kudlow and Cohen received. A Pat on the back from the president. This is Gary Cohn last meeting in the cabinet of the cabinet, and he's been terrific. He may be at loveless, but I still like him. Just to be clear. Cohn was losing the war on the trade war. But he says the reason you left the White House was because of how he was losing. So let the most important thing to me. And this is the way I've always lived my life. Whether I was at Goldman Sachs. I was at the White House is you have to have a set of policies and procedures to debate issues and as long as you abide by the sets of policies and procedures to debate the issues and everyone gets their ample opportunity to express their point of view in an open form, that's a perfectly legitimate environment to work in the Bank idea win. You're never going to win every argument. You're never gonna win every fight. But you're part of a team. And when the team decides, you're gonna do X versus Y even know you're passionately think that why is right and access definitely wrong. You. Have to be a team player. And look when I worked at Goldman Sachs for twenty seven years, it is the most team oriented place in the world. So I believe in that team oriented approach what happened in the White House is we got to a point, unfortunately, where one or two people decided that they were gonna no longer be part of a process and a debate. And they were gonna use a direct connection to the president to set up a meeting in call in CEO's of aluminum companies in steel companies to announce steel tariffs and aluminum tariffs without there being a process and a procedure to set up that meeting without the chief of staff knowing there was a meeting without the office of legal counsel having written an executive order memo or anything to sign and they created that meeting without anyone knowing these were Navarro and Wilbur Ross institute. When the process breaks down. Then you're sort of in my mind living in chaos, I don't want to live in a chaotic organisation I'll live in an organization where people vehemently disagree all day long as long as there's a policy vehemently disagree. When people start and running.

Gary Cohn president White House Goldman Sachs Stephen dubner Larry Kudlow Wilbur Ross institute chief of staff Navarro CEO legal counsel Cohen executive twenty seven years twenty second
Quitting Is Underrated

Curiosity Daily

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Quitting Is Underrated

"Quitting is under rated there. I said it our cultural glorifies perseverance, but there's a lot of research that shows that sometimes quitters do prosper heard work is key to success. Sure. But today, I want to get into the science of strategic. Weekly giving up this goes to home because I did this in college. And it was really hard. What did you quit in college? I dropped my music major. Yeah. Yeah. I ended up with a journalism degree. I was going to double major in. The worst part is it was partly into my first semester, my senior year, and I just looked at my class load and Tang where I was at. And I was just like I this is an well. I kept my music major and look at us. Now, look look who's really using their journalism degree. You play gigs like every weekend. We both got the best of both worlds meet did. But here's the thing. A lot of people look at their life in terms of what a communists, call sunk costs. That's the cost of something you've already paid for the you can't recover, but that's not just about money. It can refer to the amount of time. You spent on something like all the time has been in practice rooms, my freshman, sophomore engineering college. Here's another example. Let's say you wanted to make a living playing video games fulltime, and streaming online on Twitter YouTube or somewhere all that time. You spend building a website and recording editing broadcasts and marketing your show, all of that is a sunk cost, even if you don't see any traction with getting more viewers or making any money, you might think to yourself. How can I quit now you've already put so much time and energy and tear dream, right? You're almost there. But the thing is as Stephen dubner notes on his economics podcast thinking this way means you're constantly looking backward into the past you're focusing on what you've already done, which you can't. Change this often leads to it's known as the sunk cost fallacy. That's when you keep adds something because otherwise you'll feel like you've wasted. All that time. You spent think of this though, everything you do presently right now has an opportunity costs as the communists, put it. You're abandoning all the things you could have done with that same time and effort when you think in terms of opportunity costs the central question of your life, isn't what have I done so far. It's what's my most compelling option right now aren't the only people saying that quitting can be a good thing. Even the Harvard. Business review has positive things to say about it saying that quitting Ken set you free from mundane busy work with minimal payoff quitting. Also opens you up to opportunities that are better suited to your talents. Tried calling your obvious failure of failure early on by failing quickly as a communist Steven Levitt puts it that'll help you try more things and ultimately find that perfect fit for who you are. And by the way. Research shows that when you can let go of impossible dreams without beating yourself up. You're less stressed. You're like the sleep better Panja less likely to have health issues, including stuff like constipation, XM, a- and even depression. Just remember that while quitting is not the answer to every problem. Never quitting is not necessarily something to be proud of either. The real goal is to know when to give up and went to keep

Steven Levitt Constipation Twitter Stephen Dubner Harvard KEN
"stephen dubner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen dubner. We've been talking with John thorn, the official historian of major league baseball. So john. How does baseball end or other sports affect the social and political and cultural objectives and dreams of America? That's what I really wanna know. Well, I think sports is all about supplementation. We all think of sport as wonderful fund in and of itself weather engaged in or it and. In fact, when we go to a ball game. Or we watched one on TV. We are affiliating with a civic Anthony, and we sublimate our Marshall instincts by pouring them into sport. Which has a known end. It's quite it's quite an effort a number of innings or after an overtime in basketball, or football or hockey, and then all of the pent up emotions catharsis that sport has permitted drift away, and you feel better though exhausted. Can you talk about that a little bit more? Well, supplementation is in part masquerade for two hours, three hours four hours. We allow ourselves and those around us to be somebody other than whom we are on a nine to five basis story of the week or in our own households. We can painter faces we can wear. Silly hats. Weekend. Drink ourselves. Silly. We can yell insulting epithets at the fire or certain players, and you argue that's generally healthy function, correct, generally, healthy function because primitive instincts and aggression lurk at every moment, right and one component of that is tribalism rate. It's our team and the other team and anything that our team does when one thing that I find really curious about sports is if you're watching your team, and there's a questionable call you. Don't have to question that it's a wrong call if it's against your team. You know, it's the wrong call. Whereas if it's against the other team, you know, it's it's the right call. So we intellect is put on hold. That's why I call it the faith through the faithless that you have faith in your team and your face may not be questioned. Now, let's say that deep tribal, listen, however, whether it's soccer in England has been known to produce very very very deep tribe. Elizabeth certainly American sports fans. College football is a great example. Do you think that deep tribalism is essentially a positive force or negative or what's the trade off? It's a dangerous force when it is permitted to walk out of the stadium. Or how the? Par fans from both teams pommelled each other with punch after punch, but it didn't end there. Police are also investigating not one but two shootings that happened outside the stadium after the game was over. A tribal identity in a lot of football fans. I work with a very happy with that tribal label it really rings treat. It's Martha Newson.

football baseball John thorn Stephen dubner Martha Newson official Anthony basketball America soccer Elizabeth hockey England three hours four hours two hours
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen dubner. Elvis Costello has been making excellent records since the mid nineteen seventy s records that range from punkish pop super dense super pop country and western from Ernest to start on he's particularly adept at bringing a postmodern flair to the elegant foundations of the old school songbook style. And that's what he's done on his newest record, which is called look now just how versatile is Elvis Costello over the years. His collaborators have included Burt Bacharach the Brodsky quartet and Sophie von otter Paul McCartney the Charles Ming, this orchestra and Allen Toussaint if you're at all a serious fan of popular music. Elvis Costello has at least been on your periphery several decades for a time. He was nearly very very famous, but to those who loves music is way better than famous. He's an original a musician's musician a writer. Writer. He's also got the rare ability to create music latest, both high minded open minded, and as you'll hear now he does that in conversation as well. If you would just say your name and what she'd do however you'd like to describe. Hello. I'm Elvis Costello. And.

Elvis Costello Burt Bacharach Stephen dubner Allen Toussaint Ernest Paul McCartney Charles Ming Sophie
"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"stephen dubner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Stephen dubner on the next freakonomics radio. What can science tell us about who would be creative? This factor is so powerful that you can actually tell by going to someone's dorm room in college one thing that helps lineage well, my dad was very famous musician next time on freakonomics radio. Freakonomics coming up next at four o'clock this morning on. This week on says, you see how easy this game is Delaney. It's all the time and the carriage house where you guys used to tape and he going back and rolling around in the head. This is turning into a father's whereas nightmare. A game as fast as it's fun. And everyone's a winner says you. Says you coming up a little bit later on this afternoon at four o'clock on cake. Let's just start it up. I'm boom, Ron I'm Robert krulwich radio lab. And today, we're going to continue the conversation. We were just having about measurements. And how to size things up in the standards by which we do that. We're gonna shift a math. Yeah. Now a while ago. I got into a small kerfuffle with a fellow who's who's completely fascinated by the idea of sizing things up so much. He actually believes that all there is in the world. Then is everything that we can see and feel and touch those are not real things solid. Like, you think them to be what they simply are a mathematical equations, I thought to myself, but science might back them up. Yeah. His name is Jim Holt. Okay. And he wrote this book called why does the world exist? And just to get us started in that book. He quotes Apoel. Yeah. Number the line. Yeah. Kick kick at the rock Sam, Johnston, break your bones. But cloudy, cloudy is the stuff of stones. Cloudy, cloudy is the stuff of stone. Meaning what it's something. Well, a Samuel Johnson who lived in the eighteenth century. It was a contemporary of Bishop Barclay and Bishop Barkley was an idealist he believed that that the world was essentially pure appearance. It was like a thought not like a solid reality. It was the thought in the mind of God. Like, the rock really had no substance and Samuel Johnson. When he heard this. He thought it was ridiculous in these any went and kicked a stone. Instead, I refute Barclay thus. Any of? That's the story. I thought it was a thought the thought the rock was a what are they argue? Exactly. Well, they're arguing about reality. Just what is the this world? What is its essential nature when you hold a rocking your hand? Like, what's it made of what's it made up? Yeah. Minerals. No, he's asking is. What is the most essential nature of the rock? So if you look deep deep deep down into the wrong, do you find something concrete, you find a little bit of thing? Yeah. Where'd you? Find something more if something you can't touch something you can't pin down something like,.

Bishop Barclay Samuel Johnson Jim Holt Delaney Stephen dubner Robert krulwich Bishop Barkley Ron Sam Johnston
Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Wnyc Studios, Stephen Dubner and Argentina discussed on Freakonomics

"From wnyc studios this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen dubner every four years soccer teams from across the globe gather to compete for the sport's biggest trophy the world cup historically the americans have been brilliant winning three of the past seven world cups never finishing worse than third the american women that is the men's national team not so hot the us has never finished higher than eighth except for nineteen thirty the very first world cup when we finished third and this year as noted we failed to make the thirty two team field but don't worry the rest of the world the hardly notice the world cup is a staggering phenomenon the two thousand fourteen men's final germany beating argentina in brazil was watched by one billion people about ten times more than a super bowl the sport has been growing in the us among players and fans attendance at major league soccer games last year average twenty two thousand.

Wnyc Studios Stephen Dubner Argentina Brazil Soccer Germany Four Years