17 Burst results for "Stephen Barrett"

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Coffee With Conrad

Coffee With Conrad

06:51 min | Last month

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Coffee With Conrad

"He fed his spirit every day pretty much all day. And if you're interested in Smith, ogle's were check out my affiliate Lincoln the show notes he's a guy that is pretty awesome to check out. Now. If we sewed the flash we, will of the flesh reap corruption. Now in probably the oldest chronological book in the Bible, we can see that job knew this principle early on. He knew not to so to his flesh by looking at something that he shouldn't in job thirty, one verse one, a made a covenant with mine is why then should I think upon a mate? So jobs says here. If you looks upon a made. He's going to think about her. You see the correlation here. Look. Thank. Jesus takes this a step further to show us that if we look at a made, we're going to think about the made and then we're probably going to commit adultery because we've already done. So in our heart, right so notice that the sewing of iniquity and our hearts in this passage it begins was something that we look at like Joe was talking about here's Matthew Chapter Five Twenty eight through thirty. But I say unto you that who so ever look at on a woman to lust after her have committed adultery with her already in his heart. And if I right I offend. Pluck it out and cast it from the Ford is profitable for the one that I member should perish and not that whole body should be cast into hell in its I right hand Effendi cutted off and cast it from Ford is profitable for the that one of the membership perish in not that whole body should be cast into hell. Now, I've talked about the chronology of sending several my podcasts, but I'm going to. Illustrate it quickly again. For New listeners I guess. If we look upon a woman to lust after her Jesus is saying is pretty much the same thing as committing adultery with her in your heart. And then Jesus shows us the chronology that if my ride I offensive notice how it's something that begins with the eyeball. He says diplock it out. And then he says, if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. So the chronology here it all starts with something you put before your face is something that you're looking at. He's basically saying it starts with the I, and then you think about it and as you think it drops down into your heart you know as a man thinks in his heart. So is he right? It begins with something that you see. So the first thing we need to do here. Is To not put that stumbling block of our iniquity before our eyeballs coney to. This is Stephen Barrett from holy fire Japan and you're listening. To, cockpit, Conrad. So we know that Jesus. By the reins of our hearts in in in Jesus speaking to the church here. In revelation chapter to read a passage, he talks about judging our hearts in keep in mind this is letters to the church. And I will kill her children with death in all the churches shall know that I, am he would search with the rains and hearts in I will give unto everyone at you according to your works that's revelation to. Twenty three. Noticed at Jesus searches the reins of the hearts in rewards us according to our works. Well, guess what? The works that we do are going to be something that comes from our heart. and. If you're catching the spiritual football that I'm throwing here, we're GonNa see that something that gets into our hearts Sartre starts with something that we put into our hearts intentional. Usually right you've heard out of the abundance of the heart, the mouth speaks. So we need to watch what we're saying. You know when we mutter like we're doing the dishes or whatever we start muttering things we need to pay attention to that dialogue because it's what's going on in our heart. We may think were just mindlessly uttering something. But it gives us a clue what we need to work on. Looking into the author of our faith. Now, we know that we're not supposed to put the stumbling block of iniquity before our face. But. What are we supposed to put in front of our face? How Jesus? Hebrews twelve to. Looking, unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith who for the joy was set before him endured the cross despising shame in his set down at the right hand of the throne of God. Of course if Jesus is the author in finisher of our faith, keep in mind and author writes something. It's also the root word authority. And if we believe Jesus, we're going to believe something that he said in order to believe something that Jesus has said we have to read what he says he meant the Bible's the easiest book on the planet to get. If you're listening to this podcast, you probably have smartphone you can get one for free check it out you version we listened to it every day they're readily available. But when I think about keeping your eyes upon Jesus, this is what comes to me when I pray about I think about Peter. If, you remember the incident where Jesus was walking on the water and Peter Decides to take advantage of this opportunity to do something radical. He told the Lord. Now this is this is cool. This is how this works. He told Lord Command Him to come out there on the water with him. Now notice when Peter had a word from the war he had a command from God Jesus says. com. Peter could walk on water. But there something that Peter did that was incorrect something that caused Peter to. Stumble. He. Looked at the wind and he saw that it was boisterous. So, as Peter was walking towards Jesus in over walking towards, Jesus lied to me to think of the Prodigal Son who was walking on his way home one foot in front of the other. And he kept muttering about what he was going to say to the fodder rehearsing what he was going to say. However Peter. As he was walking towards Jesus he for a moment, he took his eyes off Jesus the author and Finisher General authored.

Jesus Peter Ford Finisher General Smith Japan Joe ogle coney Stephen Barrett Conrad Effendi
"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

05:44 min | 4 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

"I mean Michigan's like why didn't. These beaches to. Inconvenient lodging if I lived in West Michigan. Like the part that's not in. CHICAGO. Yeah, they're probably like Wisconsin would look to you weird if if they had it. Could have this big horn. Let's the Michigan was like well. We'll keep it. I want it. But also we getting legalized there. It is legalized. It's not recreationally I. Don't think so I. was I think it's? Much I know. I thought it was legal. Recreate not. Officially Legal Michigan, really in two thousand seventeen. Eighty two thousand and eight hundred to two years ago. That's crazy, but what I was saying I would prefer Canada like Toronto Canada because I now purchaser sell it a really i. mean a dispensary can consuming possess Oh you have to grow your own eat. If you want to smoke still pretty I guess you can't sell it. Is, Kinda dumb but. Still there that means a probably closer to decriminalizing in recreationally legalizing than. Fifty percent of seats at least Oh, for sure yeah. But so Canada. So Canada everything legal. You know what I mean. Canada has recreationally legal everywhere I think federally. We Yeah We. Not Everything Yeah. About, is it the art shrimps are that arch streams mushrooms. Aren't shrimps, mushrooms legal layer. I would hope so, but I don't think so know because Ptsd we needed to. That's what we need shoes for us to help people against. Even yeah, we can take him from. Just, but yeah, but not me personally because we're on, you know we are on air into. We don't know I would i. don't I don't I would not say don't do it. You never tell someone to do it, but if someone told me they're going to try it I'll be like. Research. If you've done research. Yeah if you feel safe doing it, you know, and you have like a good environment to do it in your mentally stable. Yes, but just make you know you have to make that coffee coffee. Yourself do with a purpose. That's the main thing or don't do it at all. Because Josie and people say that reason sometime. anyways candidates so. I've been what I've been trying to..

Canada West Michigan Wisconsin CHICAGO Josie Toronto
"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

02:13 min | 4 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

"Having a conversation and We do make good points and. I don't know so again. Get ready for this episode. Stephen Beard and enjoy. Stephen. But because we were going to talk about this, anyway is kind of but so we're just talking about climate change for real quick secondly. You're saying for just a second. It comes up too often. You know what I mean when I'm around. It does which is probably annoying for a lot of. Now, I mean it should come up more than definitely than it. Does. You know I don't know I, think you're. Probably better about talking about. Yeah, in my I mean my. Yeah! I think about it a lot and bring it up a lot because. especially like with the pandemic in the background like there are these huge things about the start happening to Ed like this climate change you something like the pandemic that is going to affect everybody except like the one percent. Affect, everyone and like we everybody care about it. We don't I mean it is definitely talked about more now, but. In my opinion like how we all should obviously don't get stressed out, but we all should be alarmed Oh. Yeah, Oh, it's going to be way worse than the pandemic. You know it's going to be like it's just GONNA get bad. It's You can for a little bit. It'll it'll come. It'll go up and down and. You can argue that. Everyone feels like the the period that they live in. Is Worse on the world's GonNa. Follow it. Like the Cold War. There's going to be nuclear annihilation in our room. Like climate change is GonNa fuck us will. We're pandemics or I think that is I, guess. Maybe it's not like a side job. Bad thing of nature being like. A. Way To. Yeah, Well! I mean they've had placed before though. and We survived I. Think we're GONNA survive Kobe..

Stephen Stephen Beard Ed
"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

03:49 min | 4 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

"Another episode with Stephen Barrett? Listen to the other ones. Him and I got off the real. Sometimes we get a little while, and this one is no different. It gets this one I. Think is actually one of the most wild ones that we've had. But you know it's it's also very I think it's pretty philosophical and informational gets a little political and I know Stephen I don't think he would mind.

Stephen Barrett
"stephen barrett" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"The cure a self described genius entrepreneur with a corona virus prevention pale arrested by the FBI if you take this pill once a day you cannot contract the virus you're saying that silver solution would be effective televangelist Jim Bakker sued by the state of Missouri to stop promoting silver solution a so called cure for covert nineteen totally animated kills it and today activates it yeah there are just two examples of what's considered modern day medical quackery black actually originates from the word quack selber which is a middle Dutch word that means somebody who boast or brag about their selves so someone on the street corner who's hawking their wares Dr Lydia Kang is the co author of a book on the long history of quackery which she defines as the promotion of a treatment or cure without a solid scientific basis in other words fake medicine anything generally thought to have reached its heyday in this country toward the end of the nineteenth century when I hear the word quack I instantly think snake oil salesman why so way back when it is the end of the eighteen hundreds there was a guy named Clark Stanley who was selling a liniment that he claims had snake oil in it and he was saying it was basically could cure everything as for what was actually in that it had to be fat and pepper and turpentine but there was no snake oil in it and he made a ton of money off of it but many discredited practices we're genuinely considered best practices in their time for thousands of years tree panning the drilling of holes in the head was used to release evil spirits and long before the current opioid epidemic opium the highly addictive nor Kotick derived from the opium poppy plant was a respectable go to pain reliever they use it for everything under the sun so you know if you're having a bad day you would take some opium you're nervous you take some OPM if you have some crying babies at home and your physique parents trying to go to the factory you don't come up with some opium heroin a derivative of opium was once even sold over the counter by bear for sore throats and respiratory ailments at the opposite end of things in there were equally unscientific remedies my gosh they use so many different things and animals pretty much anything in your kitchen cupboard could go into an animosity things like milk and honey tell me about the tobacco enema you've probably heard of the term blowing smoke up someone's yes that's where that expression comes from in England for a little while they were actually used as a means of reviving drowning victims and remember mommy eating me you're glad you don't one of the weirdest things about Egyptian mummies were taken from their tombs stolen and sold overseas because they were considered this fantastic remedy for everything how can you be assured that you are eating a ground up mommy and not just some random guy that is true and so people would sometimes take like dirt and soil and ashes and maybe like a bona fide real money now lest we mark our benighted for bears too much are there any accepted practices today that might very well be seen as quackery in fifty or seventy five years old absolutely you know it's funny when I was in medical school there is a saying which was half of what we're teaching you here is wrong we just don't know which half fifty years from now the things that I think are going to be really considered right now all kind of barbaric are going to be things like the way that we screen for cancers so for example doing a colonoscopy and having to drink that terrible traffic going six actual colonoscopy done of course Colin Oscar bees work there is central in screening for colon cancer an important distinction from certain products being pushed today so there's lots of public concern about code nineteen and so scammers everywhere are including that in whatever their marketing Dr Stephen Barrett runs the internet site Quackwatch the most dangerous is our so called them article mineral solution MMS miracle mineral solution is an industrial strength bleach that's right bleach that has been falsely promoted as a cure for everything from HIV to malaria and now culverted nineteen the FDA pretty much drove this sellers out of the U. S. market analysis supposing it brought to light inside yet this past Thursday president trump wondered out loud whether injecting household disinfectant into the body might kill coronavirus right and then I see the disinfectant for it not to go out in a minute one minute and is there a way we can do something like that by injection medical experts and manufacturers were quick to point out that consuming those products can kill you in recent weeks accusations of quackery have been leveled against two of television's most famous doctors heart surgeon Dr Mehmet oz was criticized after hyping the use of the drug hydroxy Quora Quinn as a treatment for covert nineteen when the benefits are far from conclusive out what that's where I got your chloroform plays a role we've been talking about it a lot that's the the malaria drug we he has since reversed himself Dr Phil McGraw a former clinical psychologist incorrectly compared to the diseases danger with other causes of death forty five thousand people a year die from automobile accidents four hundred eighty thousand from cigarettes three or sixty thousand a year from swimming pools but we don't shut the country down for their heat to backtrack to while the peddlers of quack medicine may have mixed motives Dr Lydia Kang says the patients should always be treated with compassion but a lot of it really just comes down to fear people don't want to be sick they're afraid of being sick they don't want to get worse and hope they want to get better the look for whatever they can do so there's much more ahead on CBS and keep it here for developments in the corona virus crisis your streaming CVS always if your email magically see seed all the right people what is your email let you easily share a message with everyone who needs it and it wouldn't be choose a better way to get started its lack something's going on I've had cases disappear for the judges given them a succinct minimum six eighteen since two a rich and powerful to comply with a judicial room I usually explain these movements C. he comes in many forms the lawyer expenses have changed right now it seems as if everything is unpredictable we're all stuck.

FBI
"stephen barrett" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

06:50 min | 5 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"Kinds of advice and then mo rocker reminds us there are the quacks not only did we create the cure a self described genius entrepreneur with a corona virus prevention pale arrested by the FBI if you take this pill once a day you cannot contract the virus you're saying that silver solution would be effective televangelist Jim Bakker sued by the state of Missouri to stop promoting silver solution a so called cure for culvert nineteen totally emanated kills it in today activates it yeah there are just two examples of what's considered modern day medical quackery black actually originates from the word quack selber which is a middle Dutch word that means somebody who boast or brag about their selves so someone on the street corner who's hawking their wares Dr Lydia Kang is the co author of a book on the long history of quackery which she defines as the promotion of a treatment or cure without a solid scientific basis in other words fake medicine anything generally thought to have reached its heyday in this country toward the end of the nineteenth century when I hear the word quack I instantly think snake oil salesman why so way back when it is the end of the eighteen hundreds there was a guy named Clark Stanley who was selling a limit that he claims had snake oil in it and he was saying it was basically could cure everything as for what was actually in that it had to be fat and pepper and turpentine but there was no snake oil in it and he made a ton of money off of it but many discredited practices we're genuinely considered best practices in their time for thousands of years tree panning the drilling of holes in the head was used to release evil spirits and long before the current opioid epidemic opium the highly addictive not hatiku derived from the opium poppy plant was a respectable go to pain reliever they use it for everything under the sun so you know if you're having a bad day you would take some opium you're nervous you take some OPM if you have some crying babies at home and you're busy parents trying to go to the factory you don't come up with some opium heroin a derivative of opium was once even sold over the counter bugbear for sore throats and respiratory ailments at the opposite end of things in there were equally unscientific remedies my gosh they use so many different things and and that's pretty much anything in your kitchen cupboard could go into an animosity things like milk and honey tell me about the tobacco enema you've probably heard of the term blowing smoke up someone's yes that's where that expression comes from in England for a little while they were actually used as a means of reviving drowning victims and remember mommy eating me you're glad you don't one of the weirdest things about Egyptian mummies were taken from their tombs stolen and sold overseas because they were considered this fantastic remedy for everything how can you be assured that you are eating a ground up mommy and not just some random guy that is true and so people would sometimes take like dirt and soil and ashes and maybe like a bona fide real money now lest we mark our benighted forebears too much are there any accepted practices today that might very well be seen as quackery in fifty or seventy five years absolutely you know it's funny when I was in medical school there is a saying which was half of what we're teaching you here is wrong we just don't know which half fifty years from now the things that I think are going to be really considered right now all kind of barbaric are going to be things like the way that we screen for cancers so for example doing a colonoscopy and having to drink that terrible practice going to actual colonoscopy done of course Colin Oscar bees work there is central in screening for colon cancer an important distinction from certain products are being pushed today so there's lots of public concern about code nineteen and so scammers everywhere are including that in whatever their marketing Dr Stephen Barrett runs the internet site Quackwatch the most dangerous is our so called them article mineral solution MMS miracle mineral solution is an industrial strength bleach that's right bleach that has been falsely promoted as a cure for everything from HIV to malaria and now co Vic nineteen the FDA pretty much drove this sellers out of the U. S. market and then I said supposing you brought the light inside yet this past Thursday president trump wondered out loud whether injecting household disinfectant into the body might kill coronavirus right and then I see the disinfectant if we're not set up in a minute one minute and is there a way we can do something like that by injection medical experts and manufacturers were quick to point out that consuming those products can kill you in recent weeks accusations of quackery have been leveled against two of television's most famous doctors heart surgeon Dr Mehmet oz was criticized after hyping the use of the drug hydroxy Quora Quinn as a treatment for covert nineteen when the benefits are far from conclusive out what that's where I got your chloroform plays a role we've been talking about a lot that's the the malaria drugs we he has since reversed himself Dr Phil McGraw of former clinical psychologist incorrectly compared to the diseases danger with other causes of death forty five thousand people a year die from automobile accidents four hundred and eighty thousand from cigarettes returned sixty thousand a year from swimming pools but we don't shut the country down for that he to backtrack while the peddlers of quack medicine may have mixed motives Dr Lydia Kang says the patients should always be treated with compassion but a lot of it really just comes down to fear people don't want to be sick they're afraid of being sick they don't want to get worse and hope they want to get better and look for whatever they can do so Sunday morning on CBS news radio continues after this radio.

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

09:12 min | 5 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"Trying to get their way out of there and then here comes heidegger the Shinwar Flunky of. I think he's the head of like he's basically the general of the head. The army essentially. Yeah pretty much like the fence and stuff I think the the minister of Defence SECDEF SECDEF heidegger. Yeah and this is cool right like the way how they have all these different. Holograms that show up here. In the original like President Shinwa himself like shows up on a helicopter and like himself physically in harm's way to come and confront cloud and everybody here when you walked into the trap us. Stink you guys already. It's we're going to set you up. Avalanches the worst. You guys are working for Wu Tai. That's what we're going to tell everybody and this I think a lot more plausible is that like the president would literally like phone. It in is like yeah. Here's all these like Hologram flies. That will project my vision out to you and I will not actually be at risk. Yep Pretty much then They WANNA frame avalanche for working with uterit- this shit so modern like this stuff is so relevant. It's crazy I mean like it's like talking about like deep state stuff and like news and everything and like how presence generous kind of just like if you think I really care that we're sucking out the life blood mistake it'd be for somebody who cares. I just I just care about like lining my pockets right now and bear. It has a good hate into these guys he really is pretty disgruntled over the course of this whole thing and he wants to put on a show because he knows what they're doing so he's like why don't we show them that. Yeah so everybody. Now we're GONNA take this air buster down and Shell Shock. Avalanches I will I will. How so they're like being filmed and they're gonNA televise to the world that avalanche are these horrible people and Barrett's let's play it up for the camera. Let's go avalanches. We should make victory pose to you. Caught that where he's like somebody in the Games when you went to match you do you do a victory pose pretty much like a victory dance or whatever right and and this game you don't so he's like he's like playing it up or so funny. It's really really really great. I'm interested then you get to this point. Where like they're going to unleash. The air buster on you but like the sense of urgency is really diminished by the fact that like all right. But I you're going to go through five different floors to queer five different rooms of different types of Shandra troopers and you're GonNa make all these convoluted decisions to like. Merck up the air buster but like if somebody had has great tips for this come to the discord and let us know. We'll show you out on the next podcast. Because I think Ken and I are both like I don't know like I'll take some of the arms here. Yeah I found the key card then I just went to wherever teachable as I just I just WanNa Fight. I JUST WANNA fight. Let's just get this going. Is this this guy has yeah? There's an item room that you can get whatever you discarded on the air buster at might be the move. That might be the move. I I didn't know I got a lot of these. Ai Chips or something and they're worth a lot to sell. But I don't know if I missed anything good I got like a couple of like either get high potions and stuff. Okay so I think the the best thing is to do is to get the AI chips to sell because they were worth a lot of money. How much rezoning them for. I think it's like five hundred for peace. Okay let's get play racket to like four or five thousand of us. Went offer chips okay? Maybe that's the move so but I think it makes the boss harder. Yeah but I'm playing on easy right now so this next run through When I when I get to him I should probably just take all the AI. Chips and make myself nice and rich from my normal playthrough. At which point I will now be so that they're not going to be able to. They're not going to be able to handle me. Yeah I mean Gill is a big problem for me anyways not rich. It's hard to get money. Listen second place through. I've I've got more than I know what to do with Ken. How man okay. I'm swimming right. I'm Boris L. I can't afford anything you have to do. The emergency lock right where you left lever right levels Stephen Barrett. This is like the most infuriating part of the original game and I hate that. They adopted it because it still sucks here. I was like I failed so many times. I don't know what the timing is is. Bad is what the timing's good. I figured out towards the end though then I was like okay. This is easier than I just threw. It does not great. It's not great all right air. Buster fight how did it go for you? Okay so I. This is the second time I died. I find it and then there's a time where you can't fight them and he has a lot of tricky towards him like just doing out of his body he's pretty much immune than you try to fight him. Then you just get hit by electricity. And his arm flies around. That's what you're supposed to hit and I went. I just went straight for him and I just died. Just rocked you. Yeah so the next the after I referred him. I knew that you're supposed to fight. The best studied species out a time limit to write. I don't know I don't think so. I think that doesn't heidegger. Like like sets a bomb Roy when you wake said charged for when the bomb is going to go off in the reactor. Is that not in play during the battle with Airbus site. I don't remember there was a time limit. I just know that they had a they. Were GonNA blow up the reactor with a what was it. A A minor remind. Yeah that's right that's right center and then heidegger just He he he's these little. Mac Things Sti- I hate heidegger so much. Yeah Yeah So. They couldn't do it but their plan was to kill the air. Buster event. Blow it up. So they've got a ton of you got like three different phases to the Airbus battle. I mean it was definitely the hardest boss of the game at the time I think up to this point for sure to but just like they make it very epic like you're on like the Mesh Metal Bridge and everything. It's just a lot. Yeah it's not easy like these boss. Lights are not easy but you beat them. Kill the air buster. If the Airbus or kills you can kill it after you come back to life like candid or you could just play on classic easy mode. It'd be a total trump lake me. I highly recommend it. I'm having a great time just going very easily through this game and cloud get separated from the crew. This is of another iconic moment cloud and T. Barrett or all going to get separated even better still together wait their best buster like blow up and that's why the bridge like collapses right. That's my memory of it from the original. I think something similar happens just like a lot more dramatized in in this version. Okay so then. It cloud tries to shoot his little. What do they call it? A little grappling guns grappling gun. Yeah it still breaks. He's like they're trying to like plausibly. Explain how he's going to survive. This ball is at least maybe give them like a little bit less of a drop give him a grappling gun like baby. He would actually plausibly survive falling into just like a bed of flowers. And that's going to be soft enough to keep them alive. Yeah how did he survive? It's hard to say can. This is video game. Physics are in full force right now but before that he's like telling Barrett to take teeth. Get outta here. There goes your not such a bad guy. If you're all right man shut up and go. Yeah it seems like parting is such sweet sorrow because these guys were finally starting to get on the same page cloud yeah antithesis all Super Sad. He's like no we gotta Save Them and she is taken away. I think that is one thing just to say quickly about the game is like the banter between characters like. That's one one thing that I really like about those two chapters back to back where it's just like three chapters really five through seven or so action oriented but when you're a fighting all these battles in like after battles like the interplay between the characters like cloud will tell like you're not so bad in Brobeck. Thanks it can just feels like it's kind of like deepening. The character dynamics between everybody the.

Stephen Barrett Ken president heidegger Buster AI Airbus Wu Tai army Shinwa Shell Shock Brobeck Mesh Metal Bridge Gill Boris L. Roy
"stephen barrett" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:40 min | 10 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Science Friday

"Myra Plato this is science Friday from WNYC NYC studios talking with Stephen Barrett and Dan sperling about Alternative Transportation's we have a lot of tweets income in John Asks Why can't they have batteries. They just swap out like a battery and a drill for a long haul truck This seems I was talking about this before with my staff about this. You you know you're a truck is is or even a train. If you make an electric train you swap out the battery the trains you know it. It has a couple of days to travel. What an hour swap out going to take out of that kind of travel context of airplane? Slowly I saw. Is this the today and you go okay in Celtics planes one of the good things about using a fuel is that you know as you fly you betting field so the plane's getting elected so so for a long ranger mission you really beneficial to have a plane against lights at the throat. You go because he gets Ijaz feather so. That's one of the reasons why batteries tend to look veteran the shorter range because they're very heavy anyway relative fuel and they get even heavier for an across long ranges it is not building it up so the having batteries long reign choose difficult then when it comes to the swapping if you WanNa swap you have to have more all structure in the aircraft to enable swapping so it'd be a less efficient across structure which makes heavy or send me more energy so it's much more difficult thing to do for playing than it would be ground view. I'm Dan last word here Yeah I mean we are going towards electric vacation for everything except aviation you know there are the exceptions with aviation's for short haul but basically we're electrifying Transportation Asian and I think that's the future and more trying to figure out exactly how it's hard of that includes hydrogen fuel cells which are electric battery. electrics I don't think swapping is going to play much of a role but there's fast charging technology that's coming along and a lot of it's on the individual perspective. We have have to adjust a little bit. You know it is easy. Electric vehicles really are easy. It's a lot easier to charge up at home than go to gas station. So it's a lot of this. Is People people adapting to this new reality tonight. We're going to leave it there thanking Dan. Dan sperling professor of civil engineering at. UC Davis Steve Barrett Professor Veteran Department of air `aeronautics astronautics at MIT reminder continuing our climate series of change each month..

Dan sperling Stephen Barrett Celtics UC Davis Steve Barrett Myra Plato Alternative Transportation Professor Veteran Department o NYC professor of civil engineering John MIT Ijaz
"stephen barrett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

15:01 min | 10 months ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Daniel Sperling of the university of California Davis founding director of the institute for transportation studies we have as you can imagine lots of calls coming in and tweet let's see how many we can get and let's go to try in Phoenix I welcome to science Friday how are you today fine how are you go ahead yes all for you I drive an electric car and I also have a reservation for an electric shock I own the delivery date and I currently use any user went PR type delivery truck kind of like the bigger than that and you can get struck and I'm currently standing about a thousand twelve hundred dollars a month and you'll forget vehicle and with the electric truck and charging it during the day out that solar panels on my roof charging that truck with very little out help from the great that more the covers you know for that truck so your return on investment on electric vehicles for delivery it is very good at that almost no brainer economics it's a great thank you that's a great comment then there must be a lot of people like him waiting for their electric trucks to come out well that's what Ilan mosque things with his sniper truck I don't know if you saw that but but it's true but there are there's a a number of companies now really of planning to roll out some electric pickup trucks and and I think you you know there is a big market because indeed you say the electricity costs for operating these vehicles is much less than the gasoline or diesel that you use in it so you know even though it for now the truck still cost more the electric trucks the battery because you know the big story in vehicles is battery costs are coming down so fast that come down sick they were like twelve hundred dollars per kilowatt hour ten years ago now there about two hundred dollars so that's at six you know six time yeah you know it was six times higher and it's and all the port forecasts are it's going to keep continue coming down so that means that the really the the future of battery vehicles whether it's cars or trucks is really very promising to his like tweet from Jessica says I would love to reduce my carbon footprint by taking Amtrak but this isn't feasible on my schedule how can we increase awareness and viability of rail travel when so much of our infrastructure has been hostile towards such efforts it is it possible Dante thing to resurrect a rail travel and you you know you hear about our efforts in California between San Francisco and LA going and having trouble getting going I'm I just heard the the day that they're they're talking about Portland Oregon in Seattle coming out the are has a has rail got any good life blood left in this country well maybe a little but you know the reality is that this country a hundred years ago started down the path of cars we built our cities around cars so what you know all of our modern all right twentieth century cities are all sprawled our suburbs and even the older cities are sprawled and that just is not very conducive for using rail transit transportation and and we have so many cars and land uses so diffuse so it's really a tough sell you know I was just in Europe and I just loved using the the bullet trains there but it's just gonna be a tough sell so I think what we're looking at here is coming up with other ways of providing that inner city travel and you know aviation is part of our challenge but for the shorter trips you know one of the longer term options are these automated cars that are can be like vans and they can be pretty inexpensive but yet they can be electric so there's no emissions and that you know it that's not tomorrow but you know ten twenty years that could be one of part of the solution mmhm to go to the phones to Brandon in them made in North Carolina Brandon yes they are I've been waiting on a conversation for a long time the I've got two questions one has anybody thought about a great house or added dispose of it because I have really toxic chemicals in those batteries is saying and I'm thinking bout of a car battery enough in the dump and that leads into the soul and had why haven't we moved more towards like compressed hydrogen vehicle because the emissions from those is water and it takes a lot less packaging to make the same American but in that your honor may not good good questions and then what do you think any of their did we did we lose then I think we may have lost and what's gonna have that's just well and that gives me the opportunity to bring in another guest early in the hour I mention the good at ton Berg sailing across the Atlantic because you want the mission burden that goes with air travel air travel is our whole contributes only two and a half percent of the world's carbon emissions but any given flight can produce hundreds of kilograms of CO two per passenger with a large portion coming during the taxi take off and landing portions so what can we do going come can be done to cut back on those emissions joining me now is Stephen Barrett he's professor in the department of aeronautics and astronautics and director of the laboratory for aviation and the environment at to M. I. T. and he joins me by Skype from South Korea where it's around four AM thank you for staying up although I didn't stay up on the right side but like a lot I'm glad to be with you thanks for having me well it's it's great it's great to have you how carbon intensive easy air flight it kind of depends how you measure it so depends on the question if you compare of sheep sheep miles so I kilograms all tons of CO two per seat mile it actually looks pretty good and ends up being about the same as our really marking a call like a hole in the side yeah we measure like that home though say well occupancy it to people then it comes out to be the same the difference is that a home the doesn't travel you know ten thousand miles through the night at six hundred miles out so you know we look at it that way the the absolute numbers can be pretty high powered passenger I heard I I saw a a pilot on you tube talking about this and he said that just in the the taxing and on a taxiway waiting to take off and then the take off mode is a tremendous release of of of carbon dioxide in the air pollution in and that's phase yeah I I mean in absolute terms it can be it some you know it's still probably in about ten percent of the role CO two emissions of all the typical flight but you get a sense of the scale something like a Boeing seven thirty seven or eight three twenty on the take off roll cool and then how to engine speech about it about a lease for a fuel cut second so yeah I'm not swans two four pounds of second roughly of fuel going into the engines on the on the take off roll and what about the news this week that there was a small electric plane being tested had its first flight in a sea plane I think that's a pretty exciting development I mean we're seeing more more lecture planes are full initially you know mission small range applications but this is important development because in the long time you would like to see aviation to become more more lecture and there are real challenges with making long haul flights electric and it's not even albeit sit long haul flights could be made electric because of challenges with and you can see in batteries but for short range flights and for for example for I have an ability or axes and what I like to make a lot of sense because it does seem like you could get flights that but lost thirty minutes or an hour to be electric with something not too far off today's up after technology I'm I'm this is a great step along that Paul says we're excited about development what what are some of the areas that to your lamp is looking at to make plans more carbon neutral one of the areas we look at ease it feels so I mean really you you basically got a few options you can either come is fly the plane smallest so you pay you use less fuel I'm not about reaching more efficiently but there's only so much you can do you can win that you might get five or ten percent so that's important to do but it's you know there's a limit to the scale of anything the second thing is you could slight things that use that skill and allotted Arnold X. recession cleaning some we do is focused on designing Ashcroft in the future that would use less energy I'm going to be having the same planes operate in the same way but finding a few less in terms of the current and that would be biased feels that have a lower life cycle call intensity and we do a lot of work on I'm accessing by fuels to provide impartial information to industry policymakers the public all not the common intends to a different feel options I'm at a A. R. O. planes in common use around the same the same modern propulsion system are they different mine I know that people think that all jets are the same but there are a lot of different kinds of jets and some are more green friendly than others are they not yet generally pretty compatible for given generation so if you take for example are you are nineteen ninety designed grasses at twenty ten design that they'll be a critical matter perhaps you might say no twenty percent something well maybe twenty five percent but so did the main manufacturer is beating my factors with his rolls Royce and prime working engines all at Boeing and I've also met friends but they do tend to keep pace but if you take a look at the long lost thirty years and more there's something like a one point five old two percent year on year improvement chain the fuel efficiency backplanes last a long time track I'm I'm just saying that many years of telling press it the problem is that aviation is growing at a four five percent per year thus far outstripping the improvements and efficiency I tell us if we get a phone call or tweet and before we have to go let's go to Kristin in Manhattan hi welcome to science Friday hi thanks so much for having me on I was just looking online trying to get some information on on paying a voluntary carbon tax for air travel and dot and then your show came on so maybe you guys can answer this for me recently retired and and traveling now like I never have before I just got back from Vietnam I'm going to Peru in February and I I you know I see beautiful a great a tune Berg I feel like a guilty I feel terrible yeah let me ask let me ask our guest Steve K. can you pay a voluntary carbon tax Dan yeah I I think I start yeah only thing to do you feel like you you want to do it the I think the only thing to keep in mind is one is to make sure your research the integrity of the offsetting scheme that's often and you can look up online reviews of off the integrity of the screen that's being offered by am the band and the second is that in the long run I don't think we can rely on kind of you know moralizing people to do the right thing we also many will need some Russian whiting cooperating these are faxing and speaking of existence and I also many ready means a carbon tax or com price of some kind I think that's where that's where we got a head injury I'm IRA Plato this is science Friday from W. NYC studios talking with us Stephen Barrett and Dan Sperling about alternative transportation we have a lot of tweets that have come in John asks why can't they have batteries that just swap out like a battery in a drill for a long haul truck this seems I was talking about this before without my staff about this you right you know you you a truck is is or or even a train if you make an electric train you swap out the battery the trains you know we have it has a couple of days to travel what's in our swap out going to take and I kind of travel it only in the context of our planes yes I'm sorry is this the two of you can go yeah I can in cultures of planes one of the good the good things about using a fuel is that you know as you fly you burning the fields of the plane's getting like that so that so for a long range mission you you know it's really beneficial to have a plane you guys like to the five you got it because then it gets easier at seven so that's one of the reasons why Bactris tend to look at your initials arrange odd because they're very heavy anyway rouses a seal I'm I'm a get even heavier for that cross longer ranges and then you know putting it out so you know having bashers long range is difficult then when it comes to swapping I'm if you want to swap you have to have more structure in the act Croft to enable swapping so it would be less efficient Accra structure which makes them more energy so it's just a much more difficult thing to do for playing then it would be for ground medical term and then you have a last word here yeah I mean we are going towards electrification for everything except aviation you know there are the exceptions with aviation's for short call but basically we're electrifying transportation and I think that's the future and we're trying to figure out exactly how it's harder that includes hydrogen fuel cells which are electric battery electrics I don't think swapping is going to play much of a role but there's fast charging technology that's coming along and a lot of it's on the individual perspective we have to adjust a little bit you know it is easy electric vehicles really are easy it's a lot easier to charge up at home than to go to a gas station so it's a lot of this is people adapting to this new reality all right we're going to leave it there thank you Dan Dan Sperling professor of civil engineering at the UC Davis the barrack present apartment err err and onyx and astronomic said to MIT reminder we're continuing our climate series of change each month and if you want to get involved in our series tell us what you think or what's happening in your community you can find out more at science Friday dot com slash degrees of change I'm a last thing before we go since we launched.

Daniel Sperling university of California Davis founding director
"stephen barrett" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"He made possible for others to do the same it became a kind of thing to do. Hey, let's disinvite this guy. Let's say. Steve bannon. We don't like you don't like your policies don't come anywhere near us. We don't wanna talk to you. We don't wanna hear for you. We don't think about you. It's one of the strange experiences that I've had. I've had a number of strange experiences over the years general phenomenon. I can't I wanna talk about it after we ended the film a little bit. But because it's, it's really remarkable. It wasn't really a backdrop kind of was the backdrop. This is a an edgy thing to do to have a feature documentary fellow about Bannon, at least in your world. I think we're taking to be the kind of world of progressive filmmaking filmmaking which have progresses tilt. Here's a really simple way to look at it. I like thinking about this stuff and making a film without really knowing what the film is going to be what's going to be said, what's gonna be edited out what's going to be included without knowing in advance its investigative. It's an opportunity to find out something I don't know. And I love doing when he make the fact that America in two thousand nineteen this films out amounts. It's an amazing thing really this guy whatever you think of him, he's been very consequential. He was very consequential in Trump's election campaign, he was less consequential. I think maybe they need to give him credit for in the administration. He stood as a question about whether he is the pie. The pie chart thing, what the how much of him is, is the real deal. How much of misery of what percentage of, of the pies steak oil drills than what percentage is true believer, all all fair questions, but he's a consequential person, and he has access to and insight into very important. Part of the American population, Donald Trump was elected president and just being shut out from a lot of places and it's any you. Are have credibility in that world. Enormous the most enormous amount of credibility, and yet he still shut out. It's really remarkable comment on the state of public debate in this country, evidently, it is. It was an editor at cannot wanted me to write a book people still are asking me to write about the fact that now this may change in the next week or so, because there is now some interest in distribution, but I went to the Venice film festival. This is in early September last year, there was a standing ovation honest to God through the entire credit sequence of the movie never seen anything like this before that night, I read one of the most savage reviews that I've ever received from someone who has praised by fills in the past among other things. They called it a bromance bottles. Now my bromance. With Stephen Barrett and no one would come anywhere near the Phil talking about distributors, right? What were they worried about? I wanna move the film after this. But what were the what were they worried about whether they worried about retaliation, they lose business on some other dimension? Do they worry about going home to their families in being harassed? Or I don't understand what the mechanisms are. I think all of the above I've heard so many stories, one distributors said that all of the young people working in his office, would get up and leave, if he would take this Phil. So, you know, I think I, I believe that this attitude certainly not euro two is you've tried the found you film, the isolated brilliant families. Talk about this in the second this general attitude is just making the problem. That's dividing this country so much or because exacerbating the problem. Yes, because I'm not the are. No, but if the establishment is gonna just say. Shutting people out, you're not even worthy taboo discussion with its deflects. Your deplorables. Having to do NS just confirming everything their entire woven. The entire band in worldview expressing your movie is ratified by the fact that you can't get the movie stringent. I think, well, I agree. Let's talk about movies. So what does American Dharma mean his obsession with cyclical history with darva, which he defines for us in the movie is duty destiny fate, faith. But I make all of it. What does he think his arm is under the answer?.

Steve bannon Donald Trump Phil darva president Stephen Barrett America Venice editor
"stephen barrett" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Stephen barrett. I'd like your both to react to this. Steve you I I'm going to tell a story about skin Walker ranch as I mentioned before. And as you both know there's a range of really strange paranormal inexplicable activity on that property stuff that stymied the scientists and the residents and people lived in the area for a couple of hundred years, according to records among the things that happened to the family that lived there in the nineties were these blue orbs that would appear. Now, this family had been through the wringer. They'd seen a lot of really weird stuff. Entities that would appear at windows and then in their house. They heard voices in the sky. They saw you off owes. They had animals that were butchered. But this is what really scared, and they had these blue orbs they looked like a little bit bigger than a softball. They appeared to be made out of glass kind of a substance and the in the middle was a blue swirling liquid. And as these things got closer to the family. It literally drove them to their knees as I said they had been through a lot. So they were not easily frightened by that point. But this thing somehow tapped into the flight or fight center of their brain fear center, and literally they fell to their knees. They were of afraid way beyond normal. And I wondered if if this would be an example where you have an entity or a presence that that feeds off of fear that that wants to do it for something more than just kicks that it gets something out of it like a psychic vampire, Steve you first and then berry. Has has call had dropped and. Okay. All right. But I can certainly an answer that okay? In regard in regards to the fear response. This is something that we that we see across the board. And and what what we see is this is this aspect of of mucus, and it it's it's a it's a harvesting of mucus, and which which tends to happen in particular with with the abductions. And and and this this fear this aspect of fear generates huge amounts of of of of of stuff through the body during an auction or mutilation scenario, we tend to see areas and of the soft tissue entry points to the body tend to be those areas that are harasses these mucous membranes. And it seems go into overload the moment dot fighter flight kicks in. I'm especially if it's kicked in at extreme amounts. Fear, and this is something across the board. We're seeing right across the planet that there seems to be some connection to this mucous membrane which in itself. Reflect back to to f. Possibly with an immune system. And so there may be something in that that they've been doing as Steve's back now, and, but but dominant self the reason for that fear that fighter flight certainly can beat up for that. But for that, particular instance, on the gorging itself from an energetic level and the gorging itself of. From elements within the fear that this generated is another component WC within the paranormal. I was out of Saint George here on it was known as as the hand of the term for for the ferry, but it's also the term for the passage chamber, the Neolithic passage chambers that are dated back several thousand years fact, up to face dozen years, and and and these people or entities that came through the doorways to our world. Now when we went there, that's whenever we got to see it for ourselves. And and the first thing to happen with the lights. That's when we noticed that phenomena was beginning was a strange or lights set appeared. It culminated into this weaving effect that this it was like a shimmer of the surface of water. I'm what was what was seen was behind that surface with another landscape that didn't belong to ours? But this was not being opened by us. This would be open by Sam. This is this is this is high were able to determine and find the areas that we find are more prominent of this phenomenon other areas by using the satellites, and and and by by using utilizing the satellites them it can start to hone in on these particular areas that present more phenomena because within the modern age, we never necessarily. I am I don't know world. And where lots of our technology is beating there's an, but whenever you're trying to differentiate hours, and there's that's the problem that we lie in today, and that is almost impossible to do. So but by using the subtleties, and where able to home down particularly areas and areas that haven't even been investigated, but we know will will present phenomenon if we go there, and again, we're back to this conscious connection as well. And so there's a connection between at all. But I'll I'll step aside. And let Steve answer there. But the reasons as to why the arts were present such such amounts of fear. Yeah. Steve any thoughts on that? Are they generating that on purpose that the feeding off of it somehow? Well, I mean, according to how noble statistics, which seems cabal politics stations. These seems to be fifty see seemed to generate phenomena purpose of very very resourceful. This phenomenon always produces a witness will experience they witnessing causes vexation stress station cycle the phenomenon seems to fee from that a motion to generate the next events. So it's a bit of a vicious cycle lily. And this is what is generally seen within the power normal realm. We also see not within the you for logical Rambo we have to also consider not just say we have in the Palanivel round. We have a drink of the phenomena in nineteen seventy two how psychologists got together along with a handful of psychologists to create experiment. On that was to generate to see an apparition ghost could be manufactured number weeks, describing what big subdivision would like you gave him a look history a name. It was only within a few weeks that came into the physical world. It was brought into the physical world simply by the Palo belief. I'm was and into out. So no different than any other problems experience. It maybe we all the same thing. We got the cease five training with when we take five maybe and location are they meditate for several hours. And then we have this manifestation UFO, maybe. Phenomena. Doesn't seem to be any different than what people would describe as real phenomena phenomena seems to be the same. This could just another element of this cultures connection, powler belief. We call the visit drawing this phenomenon. It does seem to be a within the fields of the problem noble. I'm the USA logical. We don't physical fitness can take place in every will through powers belief. We have stigma example, where people believe deeply about Bill cracks. So they bring them into the physical world, we know people that'd be placed them hypnosis and been placed on the it'd be told it's hot I'm die full. They whole ballista. You know? A very thin leg between what is our reality. And what we can bring into the real world. I think also apply to the just as much as it goes to a logical. Let's talk about animals little bit and not to to keep bringing up skin Walker, but they lost a lot of animals there the cows that disappeared, and then other animals that were butchered were mutilated, I was surgical precision. In many cases, cats dogs were destroyed. Cabs were carved up other animals horses were attacked it seems like the phenomena does make a distinction between animals, and humans, and I know Stevie your book about the UFO investigators training course, you do reference cases of human mutilations. There are a few in the literature. But in general, there are a lot more animals that get treated that way. Then human. So the phenomena seems to be able to make a distinction there. Do you think it it is noteworthy ended? It's on purpose. Oh, I think the fact gonna do listings of I mean, I was invited to tend to meet in nineteen ninety-five with gentleman that what is telling you research and investigate when the UK and not needing was also news recently castaway. And we had to be presented seven cases of fever mutilation. We in the UK, and that was in nineteen ninety five a what we know of throughout the as there's been a number of there's how the pig to the general public in Brazil, these questionable ones from the guy. Russia. If we could say, yes, these things do take place the nation is very likely to get out and support Bush stream of what stubby looking. And then he's obviously a concern that have actually happened. Well, they seem to be a focus more on arguable in the UK. We had a spike through nineteen ninety three. Fox's. Goes even thirds which were having those types of be found say mother, we actually see right across the board. I mean, they stiffen up because backhoes is here. Salacious another you on we've got documentation of those type of incident. And he thought I was talking to adults who come up to the it'll be a couple of years ago. And he told me a story of him when he was his father was a little boy living in India and his grandfather had a phone. They rushed out when they saw their lights coming down from the mountain. They sent all the children are have you be out to get the animal style king on the shelf. Because if they did they would often find the slices. Wow. This was to be a man sixty seventy gays eighteen years ago. Been going on for quite some skills. Does continue to carry out you AllState suppose incidents taking place in UK. In a particular place, which is really mimicking. What's actually going? And we had some guys that recently. Great guys, Chris. And I'm in cloud investigation. Why these animals with found they were trace elements of radiation in that specific location? Whether you be. It was only walnut. I believe last week this continuing phenomena. We've we've advised the to try to. Some degree by placing. I put some I am not my my help to some degree. But it seems to be considering he's repulsive. It's the Betty is. Still those go on internationally worldwide. And he's really not much of it is actually coming to lie. Thanks of incidents in Colorado where I'll still be utilizes. What was actually sounded a tree George? I mean, you know. Secretly occasionally drop from high. Tree hole Gopi that straight of calls and nation show all the stereotypical. Be mutilated nation. And so on the sofa. It is perplexing phenomena willing facility. So it's quite an alarming situation. He needs me fully actually is hyper value this. You know, just call. Dave only when you take you back just a big we seem to see the same thing. Those type of experiences as well. Berry ask you this while we were talking about animals a moment ago..

Steve UK mucous membrane skin Walker Stephen barrett AllState USA Saint George Colorado Palo Russia Berry India fever Dave Walker Stevie Bush
"stephen barrett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have Mongolian taste for milk by thirteen hundred BC in Mongolia. We already had cattle sheep and goats daring taking place these animals are not native to the region. But I that future flight like you say seventy five years or so since propellers churning the gave way to spinning turbines jet engines to propel our airplanes, well this week news of propulsion with no moving parts, it's all just electric fields and an Ionic wind. The concept has been tested on a scale model in a hangar in Boston. This inventor MIT engineer. Stephen Barrett came into the studio to tell me about the project. It's solid state electric propulsion. And that means that it's different to say electric fans where you cause an electric motor to rotate your fan. This is directly using electrical energy to here. And how does that work? We which means we strip electrons of Emily kills that makes them. Charged. And then we use an electric field to move the charged particles, whereas a normal airplane propeller one you're driving the with moving blades. This is direct electric affect exactly. So we're accelerating ions which of these charged molecules directly with an electric fields. And they collide with other Amela heels and transfer momentum to them is only a is a small one, but this is an airplane that doesn't have a visible engine on it that doesn't have an engine that you'd recognize. But it does have an array of filaments under the wings, which create the islands, then an array of thin wing like structures, which then collect the island. So there is an engine region. But it's nothing like you'd normally imagining engine looks like you got these filaments the on is. Yeah. That takes a very high voltage is that right twenty thousand volts positive, and then the the other parts these thin air falls, their minus twenty thousand volts, so forty thousand volts entitle does it. Glow. I mean, I always imagine. If you go there's a blue global. Did you get a blue glow in the darkness? You call it in the light. But maybe future big evasions. You might even see in daylight, the front end of this is the wing is it that's where you get it all iron is. And then since the airplane and pushes against those lines with the electric field across the rest of the wing. That's exactly right. And that's the kind of current setup, of course, going forward. We imagine different ways. It's might look and you've tested it on this prototype, which is how big price five meters. Wingspan two point four five kilograms and flies at five meters per second, which is walking pace or what it's more running pace running pace and her father. Did it go about sixty meters? So that was constrained by the size of the gym that we flew there. Crofton in fact, in some of the test flights were crashed the aircraft into walls into the ceiling. So definitely fly control convenient. I love the picture of this. But there must be. A motivation for me is really environmental because if you think rather long term future of aviation, we have a huge growth rate in passenger numbers doubling or tripling by twenty fifty. And if you won't have reductions in CO two emissions something like eighty percent of that timescale. That means you need something like ninety five percent reduction in the carbon intensity of air travel. So clearly any kind of conventional technology might imagine isn't gonna get anywhere close. So in principle, you could have something powered by batteries paps in the future and electric fields. And you won't get any of those exhaust pollution. You wouldn't get any direct CO two emissions. You'd obviously want to charge the batteries with clean power. You wouldn't get contrails which of these artificial clouds that created, and you wouldn't get carbon monoxide and said another emissions butts. You probably would get ozone. And that's one of the concerns with the signal the Finn Weiss at high voltages can create ozone. Sometimes you think of it as good gas because. Hi, Al she absorbs ultraviolet radiation, otherwise because skin cancer, and we need. Hi up but low down, it's bad for our health. If you breathe it in it affects your health. And so we definitely don't want to create more ozone laurel ostrich, you've got sort of a toy version of this to fly. What are the prospects for making something much heavier much bigger that can actually carry people or loads? Well, I think the prospects of making something that's perhaps ten or fifteen meters wingspan is really quite near term because that's not all that different to what will achieved already. But when you're talking about spans, a thirty or forty meters, like large commercial aircraft. That's really a very long way off. And if you think about a normal airline, it takes about ten years to build it or design and build it. So that's with conventional propulsion. So during that with something that's using propulsion. You know, nothing about we'll take much longer than ten years. So what is the next step? The next step is to try and make out what we think of as the next generation of propulsion technology by Robin. Having all these thin wires under the wings would integrate the propulsion into the skin of the aircraft. So it rolled them having a skin of an aircraft that produces drag. You're just credit flow across the skin of the aircraft. And that would be the propulsion system. In other words, no distinct propulsion system, all in the skin of the aircraft in a way sounds a bit. Like, those early biplane lots of struts and filaments all over it. How close is it to that actually is a bit like a biplane? In fact, the next design I envision would be something like a tendon biplane, so two sets of byplanes, and the reason as you said that you can put the propulsion structures between the biplane wings looks just like that. And how did you get these high talking about tens of thousands of volts? How do you even generate that on a plane? Well, that's actually one of the tricky things and lost time engineers, look Ted's Ionic wins as as this is also called in the nineteen sixties. They concluded one of the reasons you couldn't do this because it'd be impossible to generate the voltages you need in a package light enough to use on that plane, but we worked I've lost five years with electrical engineers at MIT to develop ultra lightweight. Power Electric's that converts, low voltage battery output, one hundred volts to high voltage that we need forty thousand volts, and I imagine for a long flight you can Nate need either a big battery or some way of recharging it we'd need new Bashar technologies ultimately because today's tech isn't good enough for long flights. What about having solar power photovoltaic? There is some prospect of that. And actually the way you design a first of all take plane is quite similar to the Howard electric era. Genetic plane would look because you have a very long wing that gives you a lot of area to play with for electrodynamics. So it could be a potential application would steer the same way as replaying the current version does, but some pretty direct path to getting rid of all moving surfaces like. Elevators and rudders. And instead using electric fields to shape the flow and steer the plane by shaping the flow that way, you just have manipulate the voltages on the wings manipulate revolts, and perhaps manipulated the locations which is air. So there'd be two ways to control it grand designs from Stephen Barrett from MIT's department of 'aeronautics and astronautics now from electricity defying gravity to actress ity defining well, not quite gravity that mass the source of gravity you conserve miss. The news last Friday, the experts in Paris voted to redefine the kilogram. It doesn't way any more or less your groceries shouldn't be affected, but you're grossest scales will no longer be checked against a precious. Cylinder of metal kept in a Paris volts which could in principle gain sweaty, fingerprint or lose a few atoms if scratched instead, it's weight will be compared to current in a complex electromagnetic balanced, which themselves. Can be compared to constants of nature that have remained unchanged since the dawn of time. A reporter Henry Benny went to the UK's national physical abortuaries near London where this balance was invented and the accompanied NPL's Purdy Williams and the team as they headed to Paris burying their replica of the conventional kilogram. This is kilogram. Number eighteen. It's a platinum radium cylinder. Which was given to mpn eight hundred eight nine to be used as the standard started to mass it sits in a bell jar with an air filter to try and reduce the contaminants, which get on the weights, and we are taking this kilogram to Paris. And this is the last time it's going to be calibrated before the redefinition kicks in with voting to redefining kindergarten which is insane..

Paris Stephen Barrett Mongolia department of 'aeronautics and skin cancer Power Electric engineer Boston Amela Emily Finn Weiss MIT NPL London UK
"stephen barrett" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Wingspan. Powered by electric aerodynamic propulsion or what sometimes known as an ion drive. So what we did for this design is to try and stick to something that looks somewhat like a conventional aircraft. But under the wing rather than conventional engines it has series. Electrodes and those consist of an array oh thin was at the front and then Ray of foils are the back. Now, those thin was at the front sets very high voltage plus twenty thousand volts and whether high feels rings occurs. It's creates a source of islands the islands created when electrons are knocked off nitrogen molecules by the wires of the positive electrode the front the ions therefore positive nitrogen ions. Meanwhile, the air force at the buck of the plane a negative electrodes opposites attract so the positive ions move towards the back of the plane, and so on that path from positive negative, the ions collide with molecules many many times transferring momentum to they're creating breeze or an ironic wind that's left behind and so as nitrogen ions push against the Amel. Heels thrust is created silently and invisibly propelling the plane forward. Well, that was the. Theory anyway attempts failed because the various things going wrong like structural failures. The power Electric's frying itself that the first day that actually works. It was about fifty percent power. So it was a power glide. But there was quite a lot of excitement and a lot of hearing when that happened from that I glide the team was soon able to make the first fully powered flight. And it's no surprise. They were so excited about it. It's taken decades to put this technology into practice in this way. For example, spacecraft have been using thrusters for decades. But with the design that only works in a vacuum here on earth. It's relatively simple to create little I on driven lifter that jumps off a table. But that requires the craft to be attached by wires to a large power source nearby. The new plane has onboard batteries in his remote controlled. So what we achieved was the first ever sustained flight of an airplane that is propelled by Elektra era. Propulsion, and that's also by many definitions the first ever solid state flight. Meaning my moving parts this achievement has been made possible with modern technology such as lightweight batteries. And it's an impressive feat of engineering to get it to work his crispy stir the university of California, Berkeley, no one has ever been able to do this before. And plenty of people would have said, no that's not possible that will never work. Chris what's in this area himself, and is optimistic about some of the applications though, perhaps not the ones involving futuristic glowing flying machines or I on powered passenger planes. I'm skeptical whether it will have practical application at large scale in the in the atmosphere. I think that it's a technology that scales. Well, so for me as Michael robot person propellers don't work well at nor meter scale. Whereas this technology has the same performance kind of independent of scale. So at a small scale this may end up being the best. I'm in town potential applications include creating silent drones which could be used to observe wildlife all monster traffic in urban areas without creating noise pollution. Hopefully, this is just the first step in developing useful flying ion across and the site of this silently guiding machine with no visible power source or propulsion may well inspire future. Researchers to explore new uses for this strange technology. It's cool because the physics is so different from the physics of flight that we're used to and you you don't have to be a physicist to appreciate that that was crispy STA, and we also heard from Stephen Barrett whose paper is published in nature today. Find more coverage.

Chris Ray physicist Berkeley Stephen Barrett university of California Michael twenty thousand volts fifty percent
"stephen barrett" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on WTVN

"Ohio. Newsradio six ten WTVN. Columbus DC. Our radio station from ABC news. Michelle franzen. President Trump is on his way to California where he will get a firsthand look at the devastating wildfires the campfire in northern California. Now, the deadliest in the US in the past century and more bodies have been recovered ABC's. Marcus more has the latest the death toll now from the campfire in northern California stanzas, seventy one more than a thousand people considered missing at this point and twelve thousand structures have been destroyed in that fires. We are seeing firefighters making progress in getting containment with the various fires that have been burning in the state, but we're also learning just how bad of a tragedy and a disaster. This is for the people here in California. And certainly how long of a road they have a head to to recover. The president will meet with California leaders and firefighters before leaving the president said he's completed his written responses to a series of questions submitted by special counsel, Robert Muller's office. ABC's Tara Palmeri is at the White House President finally answering those questions from special counsel, Robert Muller. Claiming that he alone responded without the help of his lawyers at the same time the president without evidence suggesting the special counsel wants to catch him in a perjury trap. The president has yet to submit his answers saying he's only his lawyers to review that President Trump also says he expects to be briefed today on CIA findings on the killing of Washington Post journalist, Jamal kashogi ABC's, Ian panel has more from the foreign desk in London was had weeks of speculation and denial. But apparently the CIA has now concluded in its own assessment that the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammad bin Salman did order the assassination of Jamal has Shoghi. Now, this is according to the Washington Post the writer who worked for the paper was murdered last month after he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to get papers to marry his Turkish fiance. Saudi Arabia has denied that the prince ordered the killing. You're listening to ABC news. Newsradio six ten WTVN. I'm Sean Gallagher. Elevated lead levels have one school district on alert is ABC. Six is Haley Nelson tells us as a safety precaution. Gehenna? Jefferson public schools is superintendent Stephen Barrett says the district tested water in all eleven buildings. It was really just a preventative maintenance sort of thing. A letter sent out to parents. The results are back for three buildings showing some elevated lead levels in fifteen faucets at high point five at Gehenna middle school east and five faucets at Gehenna middle school west Barrett. Says levels in drinking fountains were normal. The school has reached down the Ohio EPA in Franklin county public health. The district has showed off faucets and all buildings as they await the rest of the test results and work to replace faucets. And water lines will begin this weekend.

President Trump president California Gehenna middle school Robert Muller ABC Saudi Arabia special counsel Jamal kashogi ABC Washington Post President Michelle franzen Marcus CIA Saudi consulate Columbus US Ohio.
"stephen barrett" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on WTVN

"Jerod Brown has been outlining his vision for twenty twenty ever since he won reelection earlier this month, whether I run for president or not I want I want the message of Democrats to be about the dignity of work. And if you love your country, you fight for the people who make it work ABC sixes Benghazi brick the Ohio house of representatives are trying again to get their antiabortion heartbeat. Bill through the Senate and to the governor by a vote of fifty nine to thirty five on Thursday, the house passed what it considered to be among the most restrictive antiabortion bills in the nation if made into law the Bill would ban abortion at the first detectable fetal heartbeat which could be as early as six weeks into the pregnancy. Elevated lead levels were detected in some faucets at Ghana Jefferson schools as a safety precaution. Gehenna? Jefferson public schools is superintendent Stephen Barrett says the district tested water in all eleven buildings that was really just a preventative maintenance sort of thing. A letter sent out to parents the results are back for three buildings showing some elevated lead levels in fifteen faucets at high point elementary five at Gehenna middle school east and five faucets after Hannah middle school west Barrett. Says levels in drinking fountains were normal ABC sixes Haley, Nelson your ABC six first warning weather forecast. Cloudy dry and cool today with a high of forty two I'm Troy Adams more news at the bottom of the hour and on demand at six ten WTVN dot com. Darren college a former NFL SuperBowl champion signed the most important contract of his life to serve in the army national guard military families big part of what is up for a long time. I'm I want to go out there make. The difference. I didn't find that working behind desk. Pretty easy decision to make and then the opportunity to serve Mike and Mike country was just icing on the cake to learn how to be part of the army national guard, log onto nationalguard dot com. Sponsored by the Ohio army national guard, aired by the Ohio association.

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"stephen barrett" Discussed on Start the Week

Start the Week

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on Start the Week

"We've got into terrible trouble as did freud at the idea that there were memories that the person didn't actually remember but somehow true and we keep repeating that mistaken in this sort of a recovered memory movement of that's the great hazard of what you were talking about have the idea that that collaborative princess of the therapist and the and the patient isn't it well you have to go in there with a good and clean mind that now with too many prejudices which of course is impossible but once go to strive to do that i'm not sure whether we have arrived at a definition of water clean mind is said it's a very complicated things to come to his net anyway we we run out of time i'm afraid thank you to all of my guests fanny and alexander adapted by stephen barrett continues at london's old vic until a fourteen today pro antony david will give a lecture fighting stigma in mental health and losing that's going to be at king's college london on wednesday december the march jewels montagues lost and found memory identity and who we become when when no longer all cells and nick chato's the mind is flat the illusion of mental debt and the improvised mind a bheith out next month next week andrew marr has arts from everywhere except antarctica apparently but for now thank you and goodbye as more information about start the week on the programme's website go to bbc dog code on uk where you'll also find many more radio four programmes you can download for free.

freud alexander london antony david nick chato antarctica stephen barrett king andrew marr bbc
"stephen barrett" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"stephen barrett" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"You're one of us withdrew even north who laid yeah so what's great you know there's the hero part of this story is that you're you did not have motivated reasoning kick in and white this from your from the front of your mind meeting like you actually took it on the chin and said wait second this is wrong and your brain didn't do some fancy footwork to make you be okay with it because you had invested you know a decade of your life to get to this present of money and money so yeah it's a it's fascinating because you've been on both sides now right and you end there was a time when you were looking at sciencebased medicine were you saying a nexus as the enemy right and what was that like first of all it means is fascinating for me to give two rare opportunity to get your view of what we do from the other side they said what we what was your thoughts about that and then how did that shift for you because that was a complete one hundred eighty degree turn says the naturopathy meanwhile yes so a lot of what i was exposed to as announcer path was stephen barrett and then you in gorski in i you know the the running thought was when you don't know you don't know and i used to have sort of like this delusional kind of fantasy where it was like well now if i if i met you i would be able to talk to you and i can talk science i can talk medicine i can talk about the soap noten you know throw a medical words and things like this and and convince you that i medically trained because the crux of it is that i really believe that was medically trained let it know what i didn't know it so and i thought the only problem was is that you got you guys were so close minded y you know you never took the time to come to best year to think about or you know take the time to learn about what i'm learning to know that uh that us legitimate so could really to sort of turnoff that whatever that cognitive dissonance was or whatever you know.

gorski stephen barrett one hundred eighty degree