9 Burst results for "Stephanie Ilgenfritz"

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"People don't vote. They don't vote and there are million different reasons for why they don't vote. But one reason probably is in some areas in some neighborhoods in some communities, it is not made easy to vote. Can you make it easier for people in disadvantaged communities to vote with a smartphone if you can come up with a voting apple mobile voting APP Paul do you feel more confident about these newer systems? I look I think we're still at such an early stage in this that everything's being tested and everything should be tested. blockchain should be tested. Cloud should be tested to can you come up with what is sort of this gold standard, which is an end to end verifiable ballot process in other words can you come up with a system that at every point from the voter to the counting of the votes by the election officials? All of it can be verified all of it can be backed up all of it can be confirmed. Can you build that system? That's the real trick this whole thing Going to find out. No system is one hundred percent foolproof and every new technology brings its own set of problems. If you're old enough right now, you're probably thinking back to the two thousand election between George Bush and Al Gore came down to a couple of hundred partially punched ballots in Florida and whether they should be counted. So the question is, can you come up with something that is encased in four feet of iron and can't be broken? It's can you come up with something? That is as good as what we have I think that's possible I. think that's really possible I. Certainly think it's worth trying. And more jurisdictions will be trying this November online voting will be tested in counties in West Virginia Utah Oregon Washington and South Carolina. The future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal, Stephanie Ilgenfritz as the editorial director of the future of everything Lee Camping Carter is digital director of the future of everything. This episode sound designer is Sarah Gabe Alaska. Our producer is Casey Georgie. The Wall Street Journal is Executive Producer of audio is Qatari Yopougon I'm Janet Bobbin, thanks for listening..

The Wall Street Journal Sarah Gabe Alaska apple Casey Georgie Janet Bobbin Executive Producer producer George Bush Al Gore Lee Camping Carter editorial director Stephanie Ilgenfritz Florida West Virginia director South Carolina Utah Oregon Washington
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

06:33 min | 4 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Surprises in the months ahead, and not be have our minds to made up about just how strong and weak recovery will be. That's wall journal Chief Economics Commentator Greg Greg thank you so much for joining me pose a pleasure. Powell made it clear. The pace of the recovery is going to depend on our efforts to contain the novel coronavirus. Scientists and researchers are hard at work there to develop better testing and treatments, and of course hopefully find it back seen. That's usually a very long process. It can take years or even decades, but we report exclusively that key vaccine testing for this corona virus is on the fast track joining me now with more details is Wall Street Journal and Science Coverage Chief Stephanie Ilgenfritz. Stephanie there are now three companies working with the National Institutes of Health on developing a vaccine with testing slated to start this summer. How Far Away Are we from vaccine? While the time line. Is An accelerated one compared with what we've seen with axes in the past. There's still no certainty though that we will have a vaccine by the end of the year or indeed ever, but the optimism is growing right now. We have these three that are essentially front runners according to the NIH. They are working with Madeira and Astra Zeneca and Oxford University and. And also with Johnson and Johnson to start phase three trial soon and then there's also another company Pfizer that is starting a phase three trial this summer. That is not directly working with the so we have a number of companies that are going into that late stage testing very very soon. Those studies will enroll a larger number of people than past ones. Some of the companies are saying that they think we could see something by the end of the year or early next year, and that is again a very fast accelerated time compared to the vaccine development that we've seen in the past. We're still hearing a lot about hydroxy chloroquine. That's the Anti Malarial drug that president trump has repeatedly touted the latest on that drug. What do we know about it? Yeah, there's a lot of interest in this drug because there were some early signs from. Anecdotal evidence early on that it might be beneficial, perhaps because it worked somehow on the immune response, but the most recent papers on this are increasingly suggesting that it doesn't have an effect. There's a lot more research still in the works there are over one hundred studies underway. Many of them are going to look at whether it is possibly preventive especially for healthcare workers, but most recently a paper that was in the New England Journal of Medicine, which was one of the rare placebo controlled trials that actually compared it to a control group found that. That hydroxy chloroquine did not prevent people from contracting covid nineteen. You might have heard about a paper that was retracted in the Lancet that got a lot of attention and people thought well. Obviously the there's something wrong with the way the research is being conducted, so we can't trust it that paper. The problem there that caused them to retract. It had more to do with the way. The data was compiled than with the actual findings. It's all very interesting and just means that I think that more study is needed. Something scientists say a lot, right? We've also done a lot of reporting on antibody testing and inaccuracy problems with those tests. Where are we now? Are they any more reliable? And can they tell us? So? The FDA did initially allow a lot of test to come on the market, and that initial wave, a lot of them proved to be unreliable, so they did crackdown, and they now require test makers to seek emergency use authorization to market their tests. There are now at least seventeen of them that are on the market that are more reliable and have have had to demonstrate that they are more reliable now to get the emergency use authorisation. You have to be ninety percent. What's called sensitive or able to detect antibodies and ninety five percent, specific or able to identify their absence, so that means that the tests that are on the market now are likely much more accurate than that first wave was. But what about whether having antibodies means you have immunity? We still know that, right? That's the big question, right? What is the? What do those tests really tell you if you have antibodies and the tests are still not one hundred percent accurate, but if it does find that you have antibodies, we question then is. How useful is that information? We don't know yet. How long any immunity that you may have to. The virus would last. We don't know how strong any immunity benefit might. Might be based on the presence of antibodies, and so you cannot yet say that if you have antibodies that are demonstrated in a test that you're safe that you can, for instance now go back out in public, because you won't affect anybody or get infected we. There's no yet tasks that can give you a so called immunity passport. That suggests that you are now safe. Wall Street Journal Health and Science Coverage Chief Stephanie Fritz. Stephanie thanks so much for joining me thank you. Do and finally they are going to be some changes at next year's grammys, and not because of the pandemic, the recording academy which runs the grammys announced today that they're changing some categories and taking steps to make voting more transparent. For example best urban contemporary album will be changed to the best progressive orrin be album to reflect genre bending artists like Frank Ocean. The weekend and Sousa and artists will now be eligible for the best new artist category. Even if they've been in the industry for a while, our music and arts reporter Neal shot explains basically for years. The grammies have been a lightning rod. They've been criticized for not being transparent enough about how the voting process works. They've been criticized often for how they treat hip hop, and R and B artist, and also people haven't been happy with what the perceive to be a lack of female artists who are getting nominated and winning the major awards on on the televised program. But Shaw says it's unclear if these changes will restore the grammy's credibility, it's possible that the grammys at a time when many award shows are struggling with ratings will lose more relevant if it doesn't meet these challenges. The sixty third grammy awards are set to air in January of twenty twenty one, and that's what's news for this Wednesday afternoon. We'll be back tomorrow morning. If you like our show, please rate and review US wherever you get your podcasts. I'm totally for the wall. Street. Journal, thanks for listening..

Stephanie chloroquine Wall Street Journal and Scienc grammy NIH Wall Street Journal Health and Stephanie Ilgenfritz Johnson Greg Greg Powell Astra Zeneca US New England Journal of Medicin Pfizer Stephanie Fritz Lancet Madeira president Shaw
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:43 min | 4 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"The director of the one health institute and the Global Viral Project, a research group that tries to figure out where the next pandemic from so called zoonotic transfers will come from much of the group's work focuses on virus hunting, looking for viruses that could infect humans before they actually do. It's on the order of about five hundred thousand viruses that we think are out there and available to spill over and cause disease in people Ms. That's team also partners with the UC Davis microbiome. Research Program and other groups to study and catalog the viruses in the human viral them. That's the long list of all the viruses that essentially live off of us. They're part of our microbiome estimated one hundred trillion microbes that live inside of all of us. A lot of them are benign. They don't hurt us. In fact, some of them protect us one way they do that. Is They? Allow us to develop an immunity. A milder version of type of virus in your system can make you immune to other more drastic versions of the same virus like having antibodies against the flu bug. That's going around a certain season, but another way our room can protect us is by doing something known as saturating the receptors. We've talked a lot these past few episodes about how human cells and viruses almost act like a lock and key cells are protected or locked up an outer coating or membrane. Proteins and viruses can often act like a key to break into that protective shell. They latch on to certain human receptor cells. These cells are like the bouncers, allowing some materials inside cells, but keeping others out when the proteins in viruses sync with the cell, they allow the virus to get into the cell and infect us for Corona viruses. Their now infamous spike protein is the key that fits into ourselves aced two receptor locks. But. What if when Corona Virus pater bodies visit? All the receptor cells were full up. If all the keyholes were already taken here's professor ms at now if you fill up, almost all of those receptors are those locks with keys, spike proteins of viruses that don't make us sick then you're less likely to be able to let the bad one in. Ms That, says, this is how the benign viruses in our viral help us to stay healthy, so if you're already exposed to another krona virus at the same time that this bad one comes along, you're less likely to get that bad because there's just. Fewer locks available. So just like now we might take warning probiotic drink or pill to enhance our buy ohm, the flora and fauna of our guts, bacteria Mazzetti, imagine this may soon happen for our viral. We know so much less about the virus homes and viruses in general than we know about bacteria and I. It's abundantly clear that it's time for us to understand that as much as we understand it for bacteria. Viruses are having a moment and so our backs and researchers are intrigued. Start flying around and doing daily narrow tones to increase our body temperature like bats do. But scientists think we can experiment with tweaking our own viral them. In better understanding its role as part of the global firearm, this could help to answer questions about the role. All viruses that live inside US play in both accelerating and preventing future pandemics. The future of everything is production of the Wall Street Journal Stephanie. ilgenfritz is the editorial director of the future of everything. Lee Camping Carter digital director of the future of everything. This episode sound Designer Sean Marquand our producers Casey Georgie Qatari Yokum is the Wall Street Journal is Executive Producer of audio I'm sounded Bobbin. Thanks for listening..

director Wall Street Journal Ms. That US UC Davis microbiome flu Casey Georgie Qatari Yokum editorial director Lee Camping Carter Sean Marquand professor Stephanie. ilgenfritz Executive Producer
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:33 min | 5 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Sure happy to be with me. And finally we had a special guest at the Wall Street Journal Today Mall Virtually at least Dr Anthony Fauci. The Nation's top expert on infectious diseases spoke with our health and Science Bureau chief Stephanie ILGENFRITZ SET WSJ's online tech health event. He of course answered questions about the coronavirus, possible treatments and containment methods, and he addressed a common concern. Will there be a second wave. It is not inevitable that we will have a second way. What is inevitable is that we will see the return of infections as we resume the full winter conditions I have no doubt the debts, the case whether we have a true second wave. Will depend on. How effectively were able to respond to those inevitable blips that we're going to see for sure how we respond to them by having the manpower, the system, the structure, the tests to do identification, isolation and contact tracing is going to play a major major role in whether or not, we have second wave. If we effective in that, we don't necessarily have to have the second wave. You can watch the full interview on our website at wsj.com forward. Slash video, and that's what's news for this Tuesday afternoon. We'll be back tomorrow morning. If you like our show, please rate and review US wherever you get your podcasts. I'm emery for totally for the wall. Street Journal thanks for listening..

Wall Street Journal Dr Anthony Fauci US Street Journal Stephanie ILGENFRITZ Science Bureau
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:11 min | 9 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"The CD that they're making in this factory. Why are they using it in China? or where's it going so you actually can't consume CBD within China. It's technically illegal so you know there are some products out there. I think with CD in cosmetics. So it kind of raises the question of you know. Are you consuming if you put it on your skin rather than you know eating or drinking drinking and I think that that's a little bit of a gray area that is is allowed but right now the market within China's basically nonexistent one of my favorite parts. That's of your story though. Is the fact that one of these beauty product creators. His company branding actually has. CBD All over the box doesn't it. Yeah Yeah Yeah. We actually counted. We picked up. One of the boxes of this lotion had like three or four times on it so much. CBD is one of the the thing is there's there's no actually in it. They have extract which isn't quite the same thing as she doesn't have any. CD's that misleading a well. We asked him about it. He said you know basically. CBD has our logo so there's not it doesn't mean that they're CD and the product. It's just the way that the brand beyond all of this security really speaks to how the market for CBS restricted in China. I guess my question is ah there are companies who are already branding their products with CBD on them are they expecting China to change. Are they expecting China to to open up more. I think that's the hope for a lot of them. Because you know if you look at the global picture right now the. US is also growing a lot more cannabis in a lot more CBD. And from what I heard from people here I think the research facilities are more suited towards growing strains with with higher CD content so that they can extract more but light. I think China's big advantage aside from you know having cheap processing and cheap labor costs if the market does open up here and consuming. CBD is legal. They already have this foothold in this giant consumer market. So I think that's what a lot of them are betting on international lawyer. Jonathan Bench says exchanging domestic laws and taboos about CBD. We'll have to happen top down but it may be easier to convince the market than it would seem so. I think that Chinese Medicine Addison is very prominent in China. Obviously and it's You know they use herbs they use things that come out of the ground in certainly qualifies for that and so I think that the as China continues to raise its educational awareness and ease up on the stigma taboo. That's associated with what they might consider drug use and using that hemp planted planted the marijuana plant. I think that there are some barriers to overcoming that in to increase the local market for consumption. But I think that this CBD especially and other cannabinoid Napa know certainly fit the bill of fit within the framework of the natural Chinese products in in Chinese medicine and I could see that they could increase their domestic consumption. Quite a bit Stephanie. Yang says there are already subtle signs of a shift in attitude about CBD and other cannabis products. There's even a third province that's You know in the process of legalizing cannabis production. It's really been helped by this new trend that we're seeing where everyone is really obsessed with CBD products addict so. I think that that's given a lot of lift to this industry within China and young people are seeing that all over the world right right. I think that they're aware of of of CBD becoming more popular and you know it's not just in the US it's even closer to home like in Hong Kong and other areas in Asia's where it could become really big as well. Oh that was Beijing based Wall Street Journal reporter Stephanie. Young the future of everything is a production of the The Wall Street Journal. This episode was reported by Stephanie. Yang with help from being long Sharon. She and Clement Borge Stephanie. ilgenfritz is the editorial director of the future of everything. Our Technical Director is Jacob. Gorski Janet Bobbin is our senior producer. I'm Qatari Yoga things for listening..

CBD China Stephanie cannabis US The Wall Street Journal Yang Chinese Medicine Addison Gorski Janet Bobbin Jacob Technical Director Jonathan Bench CBS Sharon editorial director marijuana Beijing Asia Clement Borge Stephanie. ilgen Hong Kong
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

08:08 min | 9 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on The Journal.

"Sean is normally based in Beijing. But you actually. She volunteered for the assignment. Because I been interested in infectious diseases for a while. That's a that's an interesting interest. What is it about affects? It's just diseases that interest you. Well it's something that you know you can't see but it really can rapidly change people's behavior and also How they relate to each other strangers friends family members? I really just wanted to see it. So last week she stocked up on face masks and booked booked a flight to Wuhan so I flew there on Wednesday morning into Han and Han is a city located located in central China. Some people call it the Chicago of China because it's a major domestic transportation hub. There's a lot of railways highways on the ground. It looks like a lot of Chinese second tier cities the all the all pretty similar. They all look the same sort of Lego box folks but on the street level Shawn says he felt really different. It was really early quiet. There were very few people on the streets. The weren't aren't that many cars part of the reason is because of Chinese New Year. Chinese New Year is the big holiday. In China. Millions of people travel home to see their families. By the time. Sean got to hunt. The city had already started emptying out for the holiday. But that wasn't the only reason the streets were so quiet and talking to residents is a lot of people were staying inside and afraid of coming out afraid of being infected afraid of going to public spaces and they were just avoiding going out in public. Uh the virus that had this giant city on alert has a pretty regal name. The virus is what's known as Corona virus. Chris Corona viruses. Have that name. Because when you look at them under a microscope they have these little spikes on their outer surface in the scientists rather fancifully. I decided it looks like a Crown Corona Virus Stephanie. Ilgenfritz is our health and science editor. And we'll shun was on the ground in Wuhan. Stephanie was keeping tabs on the virus from New York Krona viruses mostly infect animals like bats but they can transmit from animals to humans and they can mutate to become come transmittable between humans as well so this is a corona virus that science hasn't seen before this is a new one. This is one that has not been seen in humans before and in fact they call it two thousand nineteen NCO v which basically just means new corona virus discovered in two thousand nineteen strikes me as surprisingly uncreative move. I don't think creativity usually is a priority for public health officials and you can just call at the lawn virus. That name might end up sticking many of the first people to get sick in on either worked at or visited a live animal market. They're part of the market sells exotic animals for meat stuff like baby crocodiles crocodiles and bamboo rats. There's evidence that the outbreak could have started their though. Scientists aren't entirely sure yet as the virus spread from animals to humans and then from humans to humans it began causing pneumonia like symptoms which can be fatal and this was a story that China had seen before It happened almost two decades ago with another corona virus called SARS just like with the Wuhan virus it really took golf during the Lunar New Year as millions crisscrossed. The country on planes and trains SARS spread to Hong Kong into Vietnam Taiwan and Canada China. But the Chinese government refused to acknowledge that it had a crisis on its hands. It hid SARS cases from World Health Organization investigators going so far as to put patients in hotels or drive them around in ambulances that. WHO inspectors wouldn't see them China's efforts to downplay. The outbreak continued for months until the spring of two thousand and three and April. They acted much more aggressively to shut down the mayday celebrations to to try to contain travel now realizing that traveled have been a problem in the past but it took a long time. How do people evaluate China's performance there on containing the SARS epidemic? What was widely considered to have been inadequate and the government was forced to admit that in fact they could have done better they could have been more transparent and by the time SARS was contained? It had killed almost eight hundred people and infected over eight thousand so far the virus seems to be less lethal than SARS China arguably has more to lose. Well the China has made it a priority to become a global player scientifically. They've invested very heavily and improving their public health systems. And if they can't contain this suggests that they're not there yet. They're not really ready to be a member of the international community the standing of a country. That's able to stand alone. It could damage their reputation in and it could affect international travel and commerce as well in fact it already has yesterday. The Dow fell more than four hundred and fifty points. Its biggest drop drop since October on fears. The outbreak was getting worse but even after the hard lessons of SARS Sean says when this outbreak started local officials imposed poised to make the same mistakes. All over again for weeks. They were minimizing. Saying it's really not that bad and in early early January they want authorities actually ended up pulling eight people for allegedly spreading false. Information about the virus were kind of false information it appeared appear. That was just information that the outbreak was happening. But they didn't give any evidence that they were purposely spreading false information so it seemed like that they were more kind of aggressively containing. Would they would view as negative information coming out than anything else at a meeting of local officials around this time. The Corona virus wasn't even on the agenda. There's a concern that basically local government officials took a wait and see approach. Like don't do anything until they get a directive from on high last last Monday they got that directive Chinese President Xi Jinping said for all those provincial governments. You have to be very proactive about disclosing cases you. You should be hiding anything. After that we start seeing all of these new reports. Hundreds of new confirmed cases coming out from all over the country. When Sean landed in in Wuhan last Wednesday there were about three hundred? Seventy five cases of krono virus in the city in the surrounding province by the end of the weekend that number had climbed to for more than fourteen hundred. And what was the mood like in the city as people were seeing the number of cases. Go up like this. I think what was most marked about my. I time there was that it was kind of Intel. The lockdown was announced. It was fairly quiet so I went to two of the hospitals treating patients. It was just relatives. Essentially waiting outside waiting for news of their loved ones inside whether they were tested positive for the virus or not and and basically passing along food and supplies it was somber but it wasn't really hectic story passing in food. Yeah so and China patients mostly rely on their relatives for food and everyday essentials like towels for example and it was just streams of people bringing in bags of soup and fruit and vitamins and towels in plastic bags and each labeled with their family members names on and then some actually Britain and red lipstick. Because I think they didn't realize that they had to label. It made me think that I needed to figure out who would come and feed me if I ever had to stand hospital.

China Wuhan SARS Sean Taiwan Chris Corona Beijing Chicago Chinese government Intel President Xi Jinping Canada China editor Shawn New York Krona NCO Stephanie World Health Organization
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

07:59 min | 10 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"That was our reporter Sara Castellanos so you get hired you work and at at sixty five. You have a big party and you retire right well. Maybe in an era when many big thinkers are lamenting the breakdown of our cultural institutions work is being floated as the new religion and columnist. John still has some thoughts about that. My financial planner and I do these annual asset reviews where we talk talk about fun stuff like my retirement savings. It took about six reviews to confront a big question. I spent my entire adult life socking away enough money so I could quit working by the time. I'm sixty five in my planner. His name is Joe. Wanted to know if I thought I'd even want to retire. It's a fair question. I'm a forty two year old writer with pretty engaging job being a journalist offers me travel opportunities intellectual challenge and lots of social connections. I've only got a few hobbies and I don't like to the sit still for very long. So Yeah Joe's right. My comfortable retirement may indeed more work than rest. Most people spend time wondering if they'll have the means means to retire but we often ignore the equally important question. Do we really have the will to retire. Our modern concepts of retirement Tirmizi forged around the Great Depression. The one starting in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and lasting into the nineteen thirties. That's when social security was established as an insurance plan to pay guaranteed benefits benefit. Those who couldn't work after age sixty five at that time the majority of Americans who made it to adulthood could expect to live at least that long men eligible for social security typically drew benefits for almost thirteen years after that on average women a bit longer. By the time I was born in the late nineteen seventies sixty. I five was hardly considered elderly even if it fit to technical definition growing up in Michigan. We're automotive jobs. Disappearing and pensions were being taken away. The thirty year in out career in the car business was no longer automatic by the late. Nineteen Ninety S gold-plated retiree benefit plans were beginning to be phased out at the same time. Lifespans kept kept getting longer along with advancements in personal health today the average life expectancy in the US is seventy eight up from seventy one in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Aw consider my dad. He still sells cars three days a week at the dealership where he's been working for thirty years at age seventy four if there's a poster child for Sixty Z.. Being the new forty my dad's been candidate for quite some time to be sure. Many people do still leave the workforce by age sixty five but that's almost a luxury life insurance companies and pension funds are projecting that people entering the workforce right now could live to be one hundred twenty five and a popular demographer even says that the baby who will live to be two hundred years old has already been born. The government now considers sixty seven to be the official age of retirement for social security purposes and many economists arguing for an even even older threshold. So that the plan doesn't go broke. Americans aren't protesting in the streets about this in a recent survey by the TRANSAMERICA Center for retirement studies. Half of the more than sixty three hundred workers interviewed said. They didn't expect to retire before they turned sixty five. That's three times as many as nineteen ninety. Five and thirteen percent. said they'll never retire. That's especially true. For millennials. People who began reaching adult at the turn of the twentieth century. Aren't starting their careers with the end in mind. I talked to a lot of twenty. somethings thirty somethings who aren't yet planning for retirement. It's not because they're pessimistic or lazy for one. They may lack the resources. After racking up pilot student debt and two younger people are foremost among the Americans considering the lifelong benefits of work one twenty six year old I talked to for instance since expects to dice up his work life into twenty year increments potentially devoted to completely different areas of interest. He reckons take a sabbatical others. I talked to say they'll work work part-time or even go back to school later in life and it makes sense if you enter the workforce in the twenty twenties believing that you could very well be alive in the next century turns over. Shouldn't that shape. You probably think about planning your career or careers. I'm not in that category of people thinking I'll work until I die but I have no problem buying into this notion of working at least as long long as my father with five kids of my own under the age of fourteen I currently view my job is one of the responsibilities to tackle in the day at some point as my kids make their way into college. You can start careers. I reckon. I'll be able to revisit. Some of the professional goals that are currently out of reach their also benefits to sticking it out in the workforce. Of course you'll earn more if you work longer but you could also live more Boston. College research suggests even a few extra years of working beyond sixty five can extend lifespan and lower the risk of dementia depression and obesity. And there's another aspect the workplace is filling an emotional and even spiritual ovoid think of how often you've heard so and so having a work life or how many people talk about their work family. Many of the people I consider my closest friends are those icy and our midtown in Manhattan offices or people. I visit traveling report out stories or have standing lunch. Meetings with part of the reason for that is because people are working longer hours a half hour longer everyday redick compared to twelve years ago according to government data. US birth rates are falling and so as church membership. Our jobs are often taking the place. Once occupied by children religious it just institutions and community organisations so people want to stay in their jobs for the money for personal satisfaction and and to keep their social connections. Luckily that make it easier in the future partly because today is less well work working with computers on a smartphone or in some kind of artificial intelligence has replaced many of the manufacturing tasks or manual labor requirements that define the workplace. People have more gas left in the tank. Thank at the end of their careers. Don't tell employer but after twenty years of this journalism thing I feel like I'm just getting started. I use my brain a lot but like many Americans. I have the hands of typist artist. And not a tradesman. They're also technological developments. That will aid. In older workforce driverless cars could make commuting easier there will be more automated processes. This is that reduced physical or mental demands and there are an abundance of retraining programs being implemented at companies and employers are becoming more welcoming to their graying employs always one company. I talked to Patagonia calls employees entering the later stages of their careers elders and it offers them opportunities to stick around around on a so-called glide path. The company's longtime editor for instance has left her day to day role editing company materials and is now teaching younger charges. How to right in the Patagonia voice other spend time in the archive room at the company headquarters passing down stories traveling the world lecturing on the company's culture or conducting concessions on the environment? Okay so where does this all. Leave me I'm treating in worrying about whether I can retire at sixty five with a new strategy here it is. I'll pursue financial flexibility with JOE that financial planner. who asked me to think about whether I really want to call it quits instead? I want him to to advise me on how to achieve some wiggle room in my budget within the next quarter of a century by that point. I want to be able to do the work I like to do with the people. I like to work with on my own terms terms even if it means making a lot less money that was Wall Street Street Journal columnist. John Stole the future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal. This episode was reported by Hilton Shaman. Sarah Castellanos Lanos and John Stole. Jabeen is our senior producer. Stephanie Ilgenfritz is the editorial director of the future of everything and our technical director. Is Jacob. Gorski I'm Terry Yokum. Thanks for listening..

Joe John Stole US Sara Castellanos Michigan reporter Wall Street Journal Jacob Sarah Castellanos Lanos Street Journal writer Boston Hilton Shaman TRANSAMERICA Center Stephanie Ilgenfritz producer
"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:31 min | 11 months ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"<Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> I don't know <SpeakerChange> but that's <Speech_Music_Female> that's that's <Speech_Music_Female> kind of the thing. I'd <Speech_Music_Male> like to know like <Music> to know more of <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> what <Speech_Female> we have. In common <Speech_Female> with. People who share there <Speech_Female> are specific <Speech_Female> genetic code <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and how we connect <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with them is <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> at the heart of many of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the DNA stories. We've <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> heard <Speech_Female> over time <Speech_Female> as the databases grow <Speech_Female> and the revelations they <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> contain ripple <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> out. It's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> likely even more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> people will be asking <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> those questions <Speech_Female> in the future. <Speech_Female> That may lead <Speech_Female> us to rethink <Speech_Female> reconfigure <Speech_Female> and even redefine <Speech_Female> our <Speech_Female> notions <SpeakerChange> of family. <Speech_Music_Female> I think <Speech_Female> ultimately we may <Speech_Music_Female> also end up with DNA <Speech_Music_Female> tests families. <Speech_Female> It <Speech_Female> could be this whole <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> number of <Speech_Female> people that you <Speech_Female> find to perhaps <Speech_Female> your half siblings <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> new cousins that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you didn't know and you're <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> connected through a DNA <Speech_Music_Female> test <Speech_Music_Female> and you have to decide <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> how much you <Speech_Female> want to build the relationship <Speech_Female> with them. <Speech_Music_Female> I was <Speech_Female> thinking about the example. <Speech_Female> Is Stephen Walled. <Speech_Female> He wasn't comfortable <Speech_Female> saying dad <Speech_Female> because he thinks <Speech_Female> of the person who raced as <Speech_Female> Tim has dad <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> I did ask him what. <Speech_Female> What do you call this man? <Speech_Female> And he said <Speech_Female> I struggled with <Speech_Female> what we're to use. <Speech_Music_Female> I use <Speech_Female> donor dad. <Speech_Female> You you <Speech_Female> know that was a word he <Speech_Music_Female> sort of came up with. <Speech_Female> I think it's <Speech_Female> possible that our language <Speech_Female> is going to change <Speech_Music_Female> a lot. I think people <Speech_Music_Female> are gonNA come up <Speech_Music_Female> with new <Speech_Female> descriptions <Speech_Female> new names uh-huh <Speech_Music_Female> a lot of <Speech_Female> it will depend on <Speech_Female> what your relationship <Speech_Female> ultimately <Speech_Female> is with the new <Speech_Female> people that get introduced <Speech_Female> to you and how comfortable <Speech_Female> you feel <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> identifying them <Speech_Female> And placing <Speech_Female> them inside your <Speech_Female> existing identity <Speech_Music_Female> in your existing family <Speech_Music_Female> structure. <Speech_Female> I think there's probably going to <Speech_Female> be a lot of people who don't <Speech_Female> use half <Speech_Female> sibling. <Speech_Female> They're just GONNA say Sibling Sibling. <Speech_Female> There's <Speech_Female> going to be a lot of people who <Speech_Female> don't WanNA donor dad. <Speech_Music_Female> They're just going to say dad <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> that's going to <Speech_Music_Female> depend on it <Speech_Female> but I think it's GonNa <Speech_Music_Female> be fascinating to see <Speech_Female> how <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> how we look at families <Speech_Female> and even what <Speech_Female> names. We used to call <Speech_Music_Female> them. <Silence> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> The future of everything <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is a production of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the Wall Street Journal. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> This episode <Speech_Female> was based on reporting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> by. Amy Dr Marcus. <Speech_Female> It was written <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> by amy and me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with contributions <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> from Phoebe Wing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Amanda llewellyn <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is our producer. Her <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> editing support <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> from Stephanie. ILGENFRITZ <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Gerard Cole. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Michelle Ma and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Nikki Waller from the WSJ <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> live team <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> special things <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Pamela <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Powell. Carol Davis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Stephen <Speech_Music_Female> Walled and their <Speech_Music_Female> families <Speech_Music_Female> are technical director. <Speech_Music_Female> Is Jacob Gorski. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Qatari Yoga. Thanks for listening.

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"stephanie ilgenfritz" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"Reproducible software than models. So steps in three d. is a system of building blocks like a blueprint. This blueprint can be fed into a three d. printer or shared with others, which could also be a time saver here on earth. Machine learning and algorithms could also help us build stronger, customized medicines more cheaply. It's like using GPS to find the best route and traffic. This might change access to medicine for low of people. On. I think it's it's important discussion that we need to have access to medicine is a big problem in the developing world and also obviously in the in the in the rich world as it were with a medical treatments becoming Emma more expensive. And I would like very much that that that we start to have that debate about how we can make things cheaper and more accessible, a more reliable back in space. We face another challenge with medicine, and that's figuring out whether the drugs we develop on earth even work. Well, there again, astronaut Serena an-and chancellor on the international space station. We really don't have a good sense of do we have the same amount absorbed in the body as we would on the ground. How long are those medicines lasting up here? He don't. We have a different radiation environment up here in the space station than we do on our how medicine impacted by that in on the same token. If we go to Mars, how are medicines? Gonna last, could we find a way to three d print. Those medicines with the right material. Because if our medicines expire every six to twelve months on the ground, we're not gonna make it out to Mars right now, it's a great question to ask because this is something that is very real and certainly in the next five to ten years, we need to think about. The future of everything is a production of the Wall Street Journal. This episode was produced by Anthony, green, Daniella Hernandez, Robert Lee hosts, and Brian Gutierrez with help from Matt Luke, Alex. Drought diptych, Kapadia Harmon, Damara George downs and Stephanie Ilgenfritz. Our technical director is Jacob Gorski. John where doc is executive producer of WSJ podcasts, San perish is the editor in chief of the future of everything. Thanks for listening. I'm Jennifer strong in the newsroom in New York. Beck include Stephen, thank you Wall Street Journal and all participants station. We are now resuming operational audio communications.

Wall Street Journal Serena an-and Jennifer strong Kapadia Harmon Beck New York chancellor Jacob Gorski Damara George downs technical director Stephen editor in chief Matt Luke executive producer Daniella Hernandez Stephanie Ilgenfritz Anthony John Brian Gutierrez