2 Burst results for "Stephanie Haines"

"stephanie haines" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie haines" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Washington for the monitor. Artists often help people make sense of the world. As the impacts of climate change become a part of daily life, more art is raising awareness and offering support. Across the creative world, a rising number of artists are focusing on climate. Mainstream pop stars such as Billie Eilish Singh and lobby about it. Other performers from Darwin's to Tamara lindemann's the weather station feature it on new albums. An increasingly popular utopian science fiction and art genre called solar punk hinges around a new eco friendly future. At the recent cop 26 global climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland art and culture took a prominent role in several panel discussions. And now a Netflix comedy called don't look up starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence is using an earth threatening comet as a thinly veiled metaphor for the issue. The trend is becoming more important not only to artists, but also to climate scientists who see a need to stretch across disciplines to address what many see as an existential problem. Ben melis, a writer and graduate student at Columbia University, who helped found the school's climate imaginations network. Says artists can challenge what he calls the easy climate storylines, despair, or complacency. He says, no one field or industry, or way of seeing the world can see it all. This story was reported by Stephanie Haines and pavithra rajesh for the monitor. Now commentary from the monitor's editorial board on justice in Syria. For victims of Syria's decade long war, a verdict in a German courtroom January 13th brings hope of some day healing their society. A judge found Anwar raslan, a former Syrian intelligence officer guilty of crimes against humanity. And sentenced him to life in prison. He had been in charge of investigating activists often with the use of torture during the Arab Spring uprising. He later fled to Germany where he was discovered by one of his victims. The trial was the first time that Syrians who had been wronged 50 in all testified against him could confront a perpetrator of the Assad regime's atrocities. It was also a chance to affirm the dignity of victims, which is a key part of the justice eventually needed to prevent a recurrence of conflict in Syria. The verdict in the German court is just a start to restore the individual dignity of those harmed by Syria's war. It helps them to not be resigned to injustice to bring forth more evidence and to become agents for peace. Those most hurt by a war can be the.

Billie Eilish Singh Tamara lindemann Ben melis Stephanie Haines pavithra rajesh Jennifer Lawrence Syria Leonardo DiCaprio Darwin Anwar raslan Netflix Glasgow Washington Scotland Columbia University German court Assad Germany
"stephanie haines" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie haines" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"For the monitor. Many people worry about the wildlife squeezed out by urbanization. Lisa Bates lets her love for all animals from bunnies to have Alina's guide her daily work. Most people have never heard of a javelina, but for Lisa Bates, the beloved bore like animal that calls Arizona home is a familiar friend. As are the 5000 or so animals a year that come through the doors of her Tucson wildlife center, jackrabbits, bats, hawks, and coyotes all call it home temporarily while their wounds often result of coming into contact with humans or are speeding cars are intended to. In the world of wildlife conservation, there is a regular debate about how much humans should interfere, whether nature should be left to simply pick its course. The problem with this idea, miss Bates says, is that it assumes a natural ecosystem. A place where humans haven't squeezed animals habitats, where we don't drive cars across hunting ranges, where we don't put toxins on the land and excessive carbon in the air. Tucson is a real-life lesson in human expansion creeping into natural environments, and the collision that brings. In a pristine environment, maybe she could turn away from an injured owl or bunny. Maybe. But that's not what we have. She says. We have a land and ecosystem dramatically changed by humans. So humans need to help. It's our nature to save a baby, she says, holiness included. This story was reported by Stephanie Haines and Tucson, Arizona for the monitor. Now commentary from the monitor's editorial board on a win for clean governance in Europe. Europe's decades long project to unite the continent on both shared commerce and shared values took a big leap Sunday. In Bulgaria, which is the European Union's poorest and most corrupt member state, a new political party focused solely on ending official graft one of the most votes in a parliamentary election. The results were a success for the thousands of civic minded protesters who rose up last year to demand clean governance in the Black Sea nation above all else. Whether you are right or left is not important. What is important is integrity, said Kyoto, petcoff, cofounder of the week, continue the change party before the election. We are here to work with honest people, whatever their political bias. The election also revealed the depth of the civic awakening among Bulgarians. Mister petcoff formed his party only in September, just weeks before the election, with little of the usual party apparatus, it won about 26% of the vote, or enough to give it the lead in forming a coalition with smaller parties that oppose corruption..

Lisa Bates Tucson wildlife center Alina Arizona Stephanie Haines Tucson hawks Bates Europe Bulgaria European Union Black Sea Mister petcoff Kyoto