16 Burst results for "Stephanie Coddle"

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The pandemic has turned millions of people into virtual workers. But there's another trend that's been less obvious. Permanent full time jobs are going freelance, and that's severing ties between some companies and employees. NPR's er Berliner has more Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then? Of course I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep our occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer for 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, glancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip a quota tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky, and in the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers. And now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are trying to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Orry Berliner NPR news students going back to school are adapting to change and uncertainty. But for students with disabilities adjusting to constant change could be more complicated. Theresa for Stack spoke with two students in Maine about how they're navigating school in the time of covert 19 in the spring, when the pandemic for schools to use online learning the transition was tougher students. My name is cool. I am Mui I live in. One of the main Quiet is 1/12 grader who attends a public charter school with a hands on focus and tight knit community. She especially loved being on stage at her school's Open mic nights. Quiet also has down syndrome and it was hard to concentrate while learning at home was really have to focus on the work. I do because you're talking, talking talking now stay and you can't Do you look down there? She learned to be flexible and find a quiet space to work and one of quiet teachers emailed her every day, which was a huge help. The same was true for a middle schooler in Portland, Maine. Mining is after a big grey are very on would be his own grain. I really games I ah and places Asher has autism and 88. The unpredictability and lack of structure at the start of the pandemic. Where a challenge so his mom worked with the school to make sure he got the support that he'd had at school in person. I actually work with Pharrell Zoom. She also basically helps me almost every day. But Asher said some of the changes weren't so bad, like not having to choose a new outfit each day and adjusting school hours to be more manageable in their home. Learning was pretty cool. I Actually had lost under the day around. 12, both quiet and Asher schools have adopted hybrid models of online and in person learning. At first, Ashley wanted to be completely remote. But then he realized some things were better at school like eating pizza in the cafeteria in gym class. There is not sure about playing tag, no contact Andre shirt that you're not supposed to do that during cornering with people that don't even live with you so probably highly unlikely. Why has been back for a couple weeks, and she's thrilled her teachers are like family. But some things like wearing a mask and social distancing are certainly different. We can't give them hugs all high fives. Yet in a way, she also said, these changes are worth it to be in person again. Asher agrees. He started school September 14th and the changes are important to getting back his primary concern. Halloween I'm worried about is like how we and inevitably, your mask. Maybe they're based off a distance and couldn't salary in whether or not Halloween or hugging can happen this year. Quiet in Asher Think for turning to school in person, at least part of the time is a step in the right direction. When more changes come, they'll adapt again for NPR news. This's trusted her steak at a moment when over 700 people are dying every day in the United States of covert 19. And infections continue to spread. A new poll shows that trust in public health officials is dropping precipitously here. The Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that public confidence in the Centers for Disease Control has dipped 16 points. Dr..

Asher Diana Gil Berliner NPR New York Maine NPR executive editor president Post Cove United States Julia Pollock Kaiser Family Foundation Cogan editor Julia Polish Stephanie Coddle Tio Centers for Disease Control
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's gone up dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time. Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have beans to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic and has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform up work. Hubbard's study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Glory. Berliner NPR news It's all things considered from NPR news. W sponsors include T Mobile for business dedicated to delivering wireless service without compromise to help small businesses thrive. Customers. Khun stop by a store today to.

Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock NPR Cogan Post Cove Julia Polish Khun Tio T Mobile Connell founder Pollack Hubbard Black Girl Group
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Sipa quota tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the applicant certain employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers, and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bill don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. NPR News It's all things considered from NPR News Traffic.

NPR Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Julia Polish Cogan Post Cove Pollack Tio Connell Black Girl Group founder
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"Going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner

Diana Gil NPR Gauri Berliner Caputo New York Politico Cesar Selina Simmons HHS Julia Polic Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove executive editor president editor Pollack Tio Connell Black Girl Group
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"And if Caputo was not joking about that quote, someone should talk to the guy. Politico reported today that Caputo apologized to HHS staff for his comments and said he was meeting with Cesar later. Which could mean he's going to resign or take leave. We just don't know yet we'll have to wait and see. That's NPR's Selina Simmons stuff and thank you. Thank you. There's a saying going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner NPR.

Diana Gil NPR Gauri Berliner Caputo New York Politico Cesar Selina Simmons HHS Julia Polic Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove executive editor president editor Pollack Tio Connell Black Girl Group
Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

"Going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner

Diana Gil Gauri Berliner New York Executive Editor Julia Polic President Trump NPR Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove Editor Pollack TIO Connell Black Girl Group Founder
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Human Services is under fire for a tirade in which he said that a resistance unit at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is trying to bring down President Trump. He also claimed there could be a left wing insurrection. After the election. Michael Caputo became assistant secretary of public affairs at HHS. In April. The New York Times first reported These statements he made on Facebook Live and NPR. Selina Simmons Duffin is here to tell us more. And Selina. What exactly happened And where And what did Caputo say? So the video was on computers. Facebook page. It's been taken down. But Caputo confirmed to NPR that he did the Facebook live event that it was filmed from his porch in Buffalo, New York, when he was home with his two daughters nearby. He told NPR. He's been doing these for years. He's also a frequent guest on conservative talk radio in his hosted several podcast, according to The New York Times. The video was 26 minutes long and contained comments that scientists quote deep in the bowels of the CDC walked around quote like they are months, but that they did quote rotten science. He also urged his audience at one point to buy ammunition because it could be hard to get if there's a violence after the election. This is an administration official. Could you give us some context on him? Who exactly is Michael Caputo? Yeah, he's often described as a trump loyalist. He has a long history in Republican politics and public relations He's actually mentioned in the Mueller report he connected Ah Russian National who said he had info on Hillary Clinton to Roger Stone for a meeting. And I should say what's described in this recent diatribe is really not new. For Caputo. There's a podcast he hosted until recently called, still standing in which he said similar things to what's now getting so much attention. The left leaning outlet media matters first reported on these episodes, including one on March 13th in which he says Democrats are hoping the descript destruction from Corona virus will help them take power away from President Trump. How much does our economy have to die? And how many Americans have to die. For these Democrats to get what they want. And Selina Caputo had already been under fire after reports last week in Politico that his aide Paul Alexander, has been attempting to delay an edit CDC public health reports to match President Trump's messaging Tell us a bit about that. Yes, NPR has confirmed that Caputo and Alexander at HHS, which is the parent agency of CDC did attempt to exert control over more build E and mortality weekly reports, and there was huge outcry over the weekend in response to that politico story. These are supposed to be saying Chris inked science based reports, and there have been many that have informed the Covad response. So congressional Democrats are now investigating what happened there. What does this all mean for the status of Caputo's job? We'll have to see Democratic lawmakers, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Senator Patty Murray, the ranking member on the Health Committee have called for computers resignation. White House on and HHS have not responded to requests for comment from NPR. Congressional Republicans have been pretty silent, but Senator Rubio told NPR there's no evidence of an insurgency. And if Caputo was not joking about that quote, someone should talk to the guy. Politico reported today that Caputo apologized to HHS staff for his comments and said he was meeting with Cesar later. Which could mean he's going to resign or take leave. We just don't know yet we'll have to wait and see. That's NPR's Selina Simmons stuff and thank you. Thank you. There's a saying going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, glancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner NPR news You're listening.

Michael Caputo NPR President Trump HHS CDC Facebook Politico Selina Simmons Duffin Diana Gil Selina Gauri Berliner The New York Times New York Selina Simmons Corona assistant secretary Covad Senator Rubio
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, and it's gone up dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Cogan. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR on advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polish the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter. Job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position, a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make real connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Orry Berliner NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. And this is double u N Y. You are listening to all things considered. Stay with us just after the break on WN my sea we'll hear from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Mess about the latest report of no new Corona virus cases at the reservation. That's a landmark for a region devastated by the pandemic. I'll have that story and more just after the break on W and my C statement..

Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock NPR Cogan Post Cove Julia Polish Tio Jonathan Mess Connell Black Girl Group President Pollack founder
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on The Marketing Rescue Podcast

The Marketing Rescue Podcast

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on The Marketing Rescue Podcast

"Right yeah, it's GonNa. Create Anchor. It's going to do the things that you don't want it to do. In terms of the energy that you're putting into the world and into your brand, and it's just not the right thing to do I think there's a lot of people who. They would never call themselves a racist. They would never think of themselves as a racist, but. They. Don't realize that the way that they think about things is actually racist and so I think that's part of how you. Get ads like this is I think people who? Don't realize what they're doing and need to understand that what they're doing is not okay. It gets back to when we started. We say that high you in Tain, something and Howard species, even though they are from two different locations, it's usually highs perceives. That is the most accurate perceptionist reality six. All right. So. You can ask yourself how on earth. Something like this happen i. have an opinion on this. So, how could such a message make it to the public launch without somebody like you say seeing along the way all the way from the agency into the review process to the clients to then Leo made. How on Earth does happen? Well one of the reasons companies have tried to create cultural sense of contents and recognizing with their efforts to failed to do so is because they're not diverse themselves. The little bit research that we did from we understand during this time that board or the executive team at dove was predominantly Caucasian. So. How can you expect a bunch of white people to produce an ad? That supposed to be diverse? And catches. It's the same as a bunch of men marketing two females or a bunch of men marketing female hygiene products at some point. That is gonNA miss the mark because they're not talk at audience and I think that's exactly what happened here. The appetizing marketplace, and the at Biz hiring simply hasn't caught up with the reality of purchase behavior. So very often. This is still a bunch of wise men that drives these campaigns versus having diversified subset of talent that feeds into the actual campaign. Black Women in particular are even ever more powerful force in translating purchasing but representation of black women and boardrooms and executive panels. Not just in advertising elsewhere is continuing to lag and I. I really think that is part of the reason why this even happened, and that's one of the big problems that we have just in the advertising industry in general is that creative directors art directors and executive creative directors don't match. Our world and our country's demographics. Predominantly white males that creative directors and executive creative directors in the agency world, and that just doesn't to your point, it doesn't match. There's no congruency between demographics of. For example the US. Around fifty percent, being female and the vast majority of e CDs being male thirteen percent of Americans, being African American, and a very small percentage of creative directors, being African American I mean just a numbers are completely out of whack, and that's on us as an advertising industry to fix that and putting it another way after as one to make sure. that. They don't have feigned woman like we've just done here. People of Color. Or any other represented minority. They need to hire them and put them in positions. Keep things like this from happening to your point I'm surprised that we don't see more of this happening. And until we do that, it's your point as an industry. Things like this will continue to happen. and. You know why, because blind spots? You think of what the term blind spots are exactly that it's places that we can't see. That you don't even know exists because you don't know what you're looking for. That is exactly what happened here. Exactly and so Stephanie. Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group, a company that helps businesses do exactly that helps them eliminate those blind spots that they have within their organization, as it comes to multicultural marketing specifically within the African American community, and so her company connects freelance, African American women with companies creating content for African American. She says either care about this issue or you don't. It's very simple quote. We currently live in a very racially charged climate and I'm a firm believer that if you don't understand the importance of creating quality content without offending others now you never will so true right like after everything we've been through and the megaphone. That social media has pointed towards this issue. I think she's completely right absolutely, so she believes these kinds incidents are more about insensitivity. Rather than an intent to be racist or an intent to offend, she chalks it up to half hearted attempts at diversity in the AD. Industry and so she says you know you WanNa make sure your message connects with black women higher black women to write it. Really can't be that simple. Yeah, exactly, it's such an obvious thing right now. If you you say the way you just did you go of course, but it's just not the case. Doesn't happen. That's why we have things like. This is slipped through that really shocks people, but if you think of. The talent, producing these ads and approving these ads and trafficking, these ads of course can happen now for what it's worth I think there is kind of an interesting dynamic as well at play within the AD industry that sometimes even with some of those safeguards, things still happen, so for example the model in this dove ad that we're talking about when asked about it by the press, she actually defended the ad and said that wasn't the intention of the AD. That wasn't what we were trying to do me. As the model in the Ad, I felt okay with it. We kind often see this with. The people who participate like for example in the Peleton ad I was just thinking the same thing. Yeah, Peleton that's a very different situation, and that's not a situation related to racism however. I think there's a lot of pressure on people whose livelihood depends on not coming off as being controversial or somebody that advertisers don't WanNa touch or that kind of thing problem maker. There's kind of a go along to get along type of attitude sometimes and for me as a white man, I certainly can't sit back and judge her thinking or I don't know the circumstances surrounding her participation, but I think it's going to take. All of us together to be aware and to understand that just because somebody is willing to go along with, something doesn't necessarily make it okay so..

executive Tain US Peleton Leo African American community Black Girl Group Stephanie founder
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"One ten at sunset a pick up in a car collided there support for NPR comes from NPR stations and from Westin hotels resorts offering a range of wellness options for gas including their eat well menu ondemand fitness gear lending program and their signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of marionette bond for Viking ships that docked in the heart of their destination with access to towns and cities along Europe's rivers a small ship experience with the shore excursion included never report more Viking cruises dot com and from Wells Fargo investing one billion dollars and housing affordability programs through twenty twenty five working with non profits housing experts and community leaders to drive new solutions learn more at Wells Fargo dot com slash impact it's seven twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are gone mainstream you can find meatless burgers brought some sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America mo quay reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big meat eater she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to the internet the only thing I mean your balance your bike like this that's what I need you have to and with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond meat oh my god light reading they have an I. despite trying them and then I went to my local grocery store and I started buying she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood pressure and breast cancer run in her family so she's health conscious that makes her exactly the kind of consumer these.

NPR Europe Wells Fargo David green Stephanie coddle Kartel Westin hotels Weston dot Rachel Martin America mo quay North Carolina one billion dollars thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of seventy five degrees support for NPR comes from Westin hotels and resorts offering a range of wellness options for guests including their eat well menu on demand fitness gear lending program and signature heavenly bed learn more at Weston dot com a member of marionette Fauntroy Viking ships ships the talk in the heart of their destination with access to towns and cities along Europe's rivers a small ship experience with the shore excursion included in every port more and Viking cruises dot com Wells Fargo investing one billion dollars in housing affordability programs through twenty twenty five working with non profits housing experts and community leaders to drive new solutions learn more at Wells Fargo dot com slash impact it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are going mainstream you can find meatless burgers Broughton sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America mo quay reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big me either she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to yeah the only thing I mean your balance by like this that's what I need you have to and with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond meat oh my god right let me see what they have and I just started crying and then I went to my local store after it buying she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood pressure and breast cancer run in her family so she's health conscious that makes her exactly the kind of consumer these plant based me companies are looking for millennials like coddle or helping drive the industry broadly says Michelle Simon executive director at the plant based foods association this new wave of veggie burgers sausages and hot dogs might appeal to people who for example care.

NPR Westin hotels Europe David green Stephanie coddle Kartel executive director Weston dot Wells Fargo Rachel Martin America mo quay North Carolina Michelle Simon seventy five degrees one billion dollars thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"Burgers Broughton sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America mo quay reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big me either she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to the internet the only thing I mean your balance your bike like this or not but I need your twins with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond meat my god white let me see what they have and I just like trying them and then I went to my local grocery store and I started buying she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood pressure and breast cancer run in her family so she's health conscious that makes her exactly the kind of consumer these plant based me companies are looking for millennials like coddle or helping drive the industry broadly says Michelle Simon executive director at the plant based foods association this new wave of veggie burgers sausages and hot dogs might appeal to people who for example care about greenhouse gases released during industrial meat production alive younger people we know the next generation is much more concerned about climate change in the environment and to some extent animal welfare that's partly why investors are betting big on plant based meat company the stock market debut for beyond me went beyond the beyond the stock has climbed more than two hundred percent since it started trading in may second quarter revenue was nearly four times higher than the same period last year the company has yet to make a profit impossible foods is a private start up it's raised more than seven hundred fifty million dollars investors in both impossible and beyond like that the companies are making foods intended to taste feel and smell exactly like meat from animals it'll still be a tall order to get people to switch though Americans eight more than twenty six billion pounds of beef last year but Brian Spillane an analyst at bank of America believes plant based meets will eventually eat away at the chicken beef and pork industries to the extent that they continue to of all that product and are able to get to producing a meet a quibble and it really opens up what is one point four trillion dollar meat market globally the.

NPR Stephanie coddle Kartel executive director Brian Spillane analyst America mo quay North Carolina Michelle Simon bank of America seven hundred fifty million do twenty six billion pounds four trillion dollar two hundred percent thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Like engagement segments and dynamic content more a campaign monitor dot com EBSCO leveraging the expertise behind sin all to provide tools that support nurses with dynamic health an evidence based resource nurses learn skills to further impact patient care more at health dot EBSCO dot com and the William T. grant foundation working to harness the power of research to make a difference in the lives of children teens and young adults from more than eighty years learn more at W. T. grant FDN dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are gone mainstream you can find meatless burgers brought some sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America Moakley reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big meat eater she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to the internet the only thing I can talk to me balance your bike alike that's what I need you're dealing with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meets from companies like impossible foods and beyond me oh my god light reading they have an I. despite trying them and then I went to my local grocery store and I started buying she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood.

William T. grant foundation David green NPR Stephanie coddle Kartel W. T. Rachel Martin America North Carolina eighty years thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us this morning at nine o'clock support for NPR comes from campaign monitor and email marketing platform used by more than two hundred fifty thousand customers offering personalization tools like engagement segments and dynamic content more it campaign monitor dot com EBSCO leveraging the expertise behind that sin all to provide tools that support nurses with dynamic without patient health care more at health dot EBSCO dot com the William to grant foundation working to harness the power of research to make a difference in the lives of children teens and young adults for more than eighty years learn more at W. T. rant FDM dot org and by the listeners of KQED it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are gone mainstream you can find meatless burgers brought some sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America Moakley reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big me either she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I got pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to yeah the only thing I mean your balance in your life a lot alike that's what I need you have to and with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond me oh my god like let me see what they have and I just started crying and then I went to my local store not that buying it she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood.

NPR W. T. KQED David green Stephanie coddle Kartel Rachel Martin America North Carolina eighty years thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KCRW

"Run out from clean shirts in the morning to a favorite dessert at night lifetime income in retirement shouldn't learn more it T. I. a dot org slash never run out and from C. three dot a I see three dot a eyes software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems learn more at see three dot a I it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are going mainstream you can find meatless burgers Broughton sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America mo quay reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big me either she had considered giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional southern family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to the internet the only thing I mean your balance your bike I love what I need you have to and with a good cover just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond me oh my god light reading they have an I. despite trying them and then I went to my local grocery store and I started buying she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood.

David green NPR Stephanie coddle Kartel Rachel Martin America mo quay North Carolina thirty years
"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"stephanie coddle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Looking about a group of gay friends lots to talk about and listen to join us it's fresh air at one PM and seven PM here on KQED support for NPR comes from this station I'm from K. Buxbaum in support of the David gill Qian's Arbela Tamana memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments from TI a committed to the idea that while most things in life run out from clean shirts in the morning to a favorite dessert at night lifetime income in retirement shouldn't learn more it T. I. a dot org slash never run out and from C. three dot a I see three dot a eyes software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems learn more at see three dot a I it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin meatless meets are going mainstream you can find meatless burgers brought some sausages at fast food restaurants major league ball parks and soon even hospital cafeterias it's a sign of the growing popularity of so called plant based meat alternatives and NPR's America mo quay reports that Wall Street is hungry for more North Carolina residents Stephanie coddle was never a big meat eater should consider giving up meat all together but she had reservations I come from a I guess pretty traditional family where meat is a mainstay she didn't want to feel left out I hated having to go to the internet the only thing I mean your balance in your life a lot alike that's what I need you're dealing with a good cook just like everyone else and then a few years ago Kartel started coming across plant based meat from companies like impossible foods and beyond me oh my god light let me see what they have and I just started crying and then I went to my local store after it thank you she credits these new veggie burgers with helping her follow through on becoming a vegetarian coddle is thirty years old and high blood.

NPR K. Buxbaum TI David green Stephanie coddle Kartel KQED David gill Qian Arbela Tamana memorial Rachel Martin America mo quay North Carolina thirty years