35 Burst results for "Steiner"

"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

06:42 min | 3 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

"I had a lot of people from Europe just on one of them calling me up to ask me what's going on and Isabel and I don't really know I'm not involved in a day to day basis. I speak with Ken and obviously they are down the road they were down for my company, maybe 50 minutes, you know? Drive. So I knew roughly what was going on before doing some work. But the idea actually came from there because the idea, the head was good, you know, definitely U.S. based advantage because it was needed, you know? And somehow, out of that one out of their failure, I created my idea to do it a little bit different. I was going to say, did you look at how they failed essentially and go, okay, I wouldn't have done it this way. You've missed an opportunity here, but I'm going to take it and run and kind of work on it. Yeah, and I wanted to make sure that if something happened is finance properly, because I knew that Formula One, you can not do on a shoestring. It needs to have the right investment and the IP behind it, which believe in it, and I've got the financial means to do it. So before you met gene to really get it off the ground or really convinced him or he bought in, how close did you come with other people and how frustrating was it to you must have had this vision for an F one team that you knew would work. But other people maybe didn't quite buy into it for a while. No, but that is a few routes. You need to expect it. There was no guarantee. And I had no desperation because I was okay. You know, and that helps because you stay calm, you're not overselling or not trying to oversell. You stay, I just always updated the business plan with the change of the landscape, the political landscape in F one, but never try to push people out. If they passed on it, that's fine. I mean, you need to respect that, you know, and a lot of people various respectful to listen, but then they decided against it because they didn't want to do it. They didn't want to take the risk. So it was not frustrating, because there was no need to be frustrated because I didn't need this desperately, you know. I wanted to do either it's Tom right or I'm not going to do it, you know, because it's no point to do something which you know you struggle from day one. So I always thought that the reason the team came into F one at the time it did was because of new regulations in 2014 seeing how they went then having the time to respond to those with the final half of 15. And then you delayed 16 because things were late. But was it more because you just weren't in a rush and you weren't going to basically hit a deadline because you'd set it and you're happy to wait even longer if you needed to. Absolutely and we didn't come in in 15 because we started in 14 a lot of people were pushing all year in Formula One, you need to come and immediately and it was like in the beginning we wanted to do that, but then after a while we realized why should we push ourselves to do something and then start on our back foot just to recover. Let's take the year to set up everything as good as we can workout ideas and thanks God we did that. Because otherwise I do not think that it would still be around because it was too big of a challenge. You know, in that year, we did a lot and changed a lot of our plans. We found a lot of good partnerships. She found a lot of good ideas how to do things differently than the normal form team. So I think that was one of the good things we did. We said, we take our time to come there. We were in no rush to get there. And even if we were pushed from left right and saying, all you need to come in in 15 know not really, you know, we have got a license. We can do a properly 16 and I think it was the right choice. And how much was it kind of easier because financially you were well backed by the way you'd set things up and with you didn't have to rush it through and start trying to get sponsors on the cards, that sort of thing. Was that a big help? Absolutely. Absolutely because I could focus completely on setting up the company and the team to set up everything that there was a few elements in here which were very good and that is the reason why we are still around in my opinion because in the beginning, we took time. We had the finances gene did everything he said he was going to do. He didn't miss a beat, you know? He wanted to do this and he was always available, but he was very supportive in what we were doing. Let's talk about Jane and because I guess without him, the team sent him what they called us. But yeah, probably wouldn't exist in this way as well. So how did you first meet him and start to tell him the idea? Was it that you were looking for people and went seeking him out or was it just like a chance meeting and eventually you thought I should let him know about this? No, I was looking for people and then I got to know Joe Custer, which is running the NASCAR team when I was in NASCAR, and I hadn't seen Joe maybe for two years entire run into him somewhere and we said hello and exchange place and then I thought I could have faster if maybe gene has seemed like because I didn't know gene from NASCAR because not a lot better. You know, so I called you up and said, hey, I've got an F one business plan. Do you think interested to see it or would you want to have a look at that and to present it to gene? So I met with Joe actually in a coffee shop again, it's not the same bond, you know, another one and I gave him the presentation and we talked it through and he said, I take it to G I don't know what he will answer. It would be his decision. And I will let you know. So I gave everything to him and maybe a month later, Joe called me up and said to a gene house is in town because the Charlotte race was happening in jail. We want to have dinner with us and talk gene through until he gets to know you because he may be interested. Don't take it as his interest. Just after that, you know, and then I met Jean and we kept in touch. We spoke in the beginning maybe once every three, four weeks, and then every two weeks, and then every week, and then he got more and more interested, but we talked about the project more than a year. I would say one out here at some stage, he said, okay, I want to do this, you know? Once he was convinced that I could pull it off and the background was good enough, obviously we met with a lot of people in between and I came with him to all stain and nobody recognized him and we met with Bernie and the whole thing and he kept it very I wouldn't say secret, but we kept a low profile, a very low profile, you know, because we didn't want to go out there and this is what we are doing because then it doesn't happen. So at some stage, she said, let's go and do it. And then he said, how are you going to get the license? I said, I don't know yet, but I will get one, you know. And that's quite a big thing you need for everyone. Exactly. That's.

Isabel Ken NASCAR Europe Joe Custer U.S. Joe Tom Jane Charlotte Jean Bernie
"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

05:36 min | 3 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

"I should have done earlier to be honest, but anyway, hindsight is a wonderful thing. So I was just thinking a little bit about what I could do there, and I got to know a lot of people, I knew my way around in American racing at that time. And I saw an opportunity for composites there, which was I wouldn't say underdeveloped, but it was nowhere near the level technically as it was in Europe at that time. So maybe my composite factor company would be a good idea to have something on my own, you know? And it isn't on my own. I've got it with a business partner, my company fiber works. We opened it in 2009. And we opened it together, Joe Hoffman, and he runs it now because obviously have no time to run it, but you open it in the first 5 year I worked harder to bring it off the ground, you know? So the company is running very well to be honest, you know, very satisfied with how it is going. And that was the reason to stay there. I wanted to have something in my home and in the beginning, obviously anything when you do it on your own is more difficult because you need to manage a lot of things which I don't before. But it is pretty good. On that front then, do you think that actually taught you a lot as well in terms of the role you've then gone on to do with House, building a team up from the ground basically? You built a company up from the ground and you had to find ways of making that survive do you think it helped teach you a lot of skills that you've then used in the years since? Absolutely and all these new experiences they help you. They're not sweet to make this experience. But once you have done it once, you know a lot more and once you have done it twice you know even more. So it's just like do having been able to do that, then it didn't help me only with learning how to set the company up. It told me also how the culture in America works. It is completely different because a lot of times if you come from Formula One from Europe to America, you think you know it all. And I would say America is different. It's not bad or worse. It's just different than you need to adapt to the culture which is which is there. We can not change a culture. And neither would I like to or do I want to change a culture. We need to adapt and get a good things we have and bring it in and advance things in life. And for sure, setting up my own company helped a lot once I was out there to find an investor on a farm team in the U.S.. As far as going to move on to. I mean, the fact that you had such experience with F one already and with WRC and the DTM, I'm sure people were still coming to you with job offers and trying to get you to come and work for them. One of them tempting interesting before you started on the harsh project, where you need to pull the wave from your own business? No. I was quite adamant because I liked to have my own business because you can make your own decisions. So for me, a challenge to set something up was actually that's what I wanted to do. You know, and then I wouldn't say I set up companies, but I helped to grow companies before in rallying I set up the NASCAR theme. I did a lot of that stuff. I set up my own company and then I said, why and they were different challenges to set up on my phone team at some stage you need to say what bigger challenge can I have than this one or try to make an advantage and I had no pressure because I was doing okay, you know, I was doing well I was happy at no pressure but that's a nice position to be in and that for I wanted always my business. So the pressure isn't there to find a job, because you've got a job, you know, because it's yours. So and that challenge me and said, hey, this idea came along when I saw in think it was 2000 8, when the big teams left and the small teams came along, and I was to talk about customer cars and obviously F one, I wouldn't say struggling, but they were not as strong as point, and then challenges give opportunities and as I said, I've got a lot of friends in the industry and a lot of friends which believe that I could do a job and one of them is Stefano dominical, and I spoke with him quite a lot at that time. You know about when they were contemplating to have a third car to make up the numbers or customer cars and the spoke with him, hey, if a car comes available, if I find the money to run it, would it be possible that we are not out of the states and Stefan or so as well as the opportunity for them and we kept in touch and that the plan developed more and more and I got in touch I contacted quite a few people with the business plan and then I got in touch with Jean and we spoke quite a long time and I always updated him with the movements, the political movement was going and then at some stage he wanted to do an F one team. Well, before we get on to how about then, collect and successful. At that same period we had USF one trying to come in. We in talks with them at all, or did you have anything to do with that? Because you'd have been well placed for it. I know the people. I mean, and I got to know about it very strangely. I mean, I was in a coffee shop and Peter Windsor comes in, you know? In a coffee shop in North Carolina and he then first he didn't tell me what it was and I couldn't really I didn't really care. But then he told me and I was in touch with them my company did some work for years F one at the time and then I had a lot of people from Europe just on one of them calling me up to ask me what's going on and Isabel and I don't really know I'm not involved in a day to day basis..

Joe Hoffman U.S. Europe Stefano dominical NASCAR Stefan Peter Windsor Jean USF North Carolina Isabel
"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

06:11 min | 3 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

"For me, it was like okay, I can go back to home to stay with my family all the time and take for the decision was taking. But they're helping around was not disturbing me at all. You know, it was more like, okay, always I saw it as a new opportunity to do something different again. And just how different was it at Red Bull compared to Jaguar? Because it sounds from the outside at least that you've got one that was very corporate and didn't work. And then you had one that came in completely changing the landscape and disrupting Formula One with their approach of having a lot of fun, like the image that the team wanted to have and was at the same behind the scenes working or is that not possible when you're trying to be successful on track? No, it can not be like you see it from a site. You still need to work hard. It wasn't all fun. You know, it wasn't all fun. It was hard work, as well. But I was a way to yes, and when I came back, actually, a structure, not a lot of change, how we left at Nicki and myself. It was very weird. You know, it was like they have two years come by. There was not a lot of progress made, you know? I was quite surprised about that one. How little was actually changed for people in place. And the Copa coach obviously was another one and Red Bull was mister Matthews was adamant to invest and to go forward, not just sit back and see look at the old days. And did that help though in you being able to kind of continue, like you said, you were Nicki needed maybe one or two more years. Did it feel like you were continuing from almost where you'd left off when you left the team? It's very difficult to say because it's also very strange when you get back to a company after the TF been away two years with completely different ownership. It was like something I never experienced you know because you don't go into a new place, but it's not completely new. It's somehow just different, but some of the things that this was yesterday and now there's a completely different future. So I would say almost a little bit confusing at times. So we're looking in this podcast for a big break moment and you obviously got a lot of experience in that Red Bull time. I mean, big budget, a lot of people to work with. Was it the biggest company you'd have team that you'd have looked after at that point? Absolutely absolutely. You know, because at the time, it was already quite a big team as geographic, not one of the biggest one in Formula One, but then the Red Bull came in and it was going very quick. But then the flip side was you were then I'd say center. I don't know if it was a choice, but you went to America to set up the NASCAR Cup Series team, which I imagine was a a lot smaller, even if it's still big money. But be very different. How did that come about? Because that's like you say, you're happy in the UK. You hopped around things in Europe and then suddenly you're off to America. I would say a dreadful because there was so much change going on, I think there was for me, it was like, I don't know if this is my future or not, and then my relationship with mister Matheson was pretty good, you know. And then at some stage, he asked me if I got an interest to move to the states to look after the NASCAR team, which we will open. And I was like, I don't know what she said. I was pretty happy, but then when I was younger, I would say everybody had not a dream. You know, I would like to go to the U.S. and obviously it's very difficult for you paying to go to the S, especially with driving a good job there, you know? So you would need to start from the bottom again. So I was like, well, yes, with interest me and I didn't know anything about NASCAR or not anything. I knew a few who they learned, of course. A few names, but I didn't know anything technically or how the CFS works. So I was like, I don't know if NASCAR is still writing and died, no idea where Charlotte was to be honest when we first spoke about. So it was one of the things so I said the challenge of the U.S. with the nice, you know, so I went to speak with my wife and we spoke about, and we said, hey, let's do it. We are still young enough to do this, you know? If you like it, we stay there a few years and if not, we come back, there's always something to do. And off we went. From an F one perspective, did it feel like you were leaving the sport though at that point to go to America? Because the links weren't so tight, were they at that stage between the U.S. and F one? I never felt that I'm leaving anything. I just changed. You know, because even if you change job, I didn't think this is gone now. I still had my friends in F one. I went to a few races after even after I moved to the friendship with Nikki was pretty pretty big. You know, so we always wearing contact. So I never, even in Raleigh, I still have friends who are you know I'm still involved, obviously I don't know a lot of people in DTM anymore, but that has changed so much as a race series that there's not many of the old people around anymore anyway. So no, I didn't feel like I'm leaving something. I was up to, hey, what are you going to do next? Let's enjoy this experience. Well, I'd suggest as well from the outside looking at the way your career went that that was a big turning point for you because you still live in America. You've obviously run an American team as we call it in Formula One. And you had two good years with the Red Bull team. And then when you left, you stayed in mooresville in North Carolina. So what was so attractive about staying in that region? So I guess at that point, you may be at that stage didn't have anything else keeping you there at that point. You could have gone anywhere again. Yeah. It was with the NASCAR team about two years. And then when that was all I was like, what do they do next? I had job offers to come back to Europe quite nice ones. And I was like, I don't really, I'm not finished with America yet. You know, there was only there two years. And I liked the country. I liked my personal life. My wife liked it, you know, so I said, well, that is good I do. I had another dream, you know, always when I was younger. To have my own business and I never had the time because I always had good jobs and then you don't want to stop working a good job to do something take a risk to doing your own business..

mister Matthews Nicki America NASCAR mister Matheson Red Bull Europe UK Charlotte Nikki Raleigh mooresville North Carolina
"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

07:36 min | 3 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

"Formula One, and aims to uncover some of the significant moments that put them on the path to where they are today. I'm your host Chris medlin and in this episode, I'm joined by hars team principal Gunther Steiner to discuss his history prior to F one, his brief spell at Jaguar and Red Bull, moved to the United States and his dream to create his own American F one team. He did it, of course, but the journey to get there is a fascinating one. Gunther, thank you very much for joining us on the podcast. We're looking for the big breaks in your career at the moment that really changed direction for it. Sometimes good, sometimes bad, but maybe it was an unexpected reroute that's brought you to where you are today. Now you had such a successful time in the world rally championship. Rally was your bread and butter for a long time. And then Jaguar came calling to bring you across the F one. Now, that was the start of a pretty I guess up and down journey with Formula One until you joined us. So what happened there in terms of why did someone come and look at a rally head and go, this is going to work in Formula One. I mean, I don't really know when we can not ask any kid anymore because unfortunately he has left us, but I think his story was Nicky when he took over Jaguar. I don't know how long he was there actually. He was looking for people because he saw he had a big job to do and Jaguar at the time was owned by fourth and I worked for M sport, which was commissioned to do the early car for forth was the fourth works team. So the motor sport manager, tyron Johnson, his name is still around, you know, and he's still a friend of my he gave Nicky my name and I think he's secretary called me up one day and said, mister loud, I wanted to speak. I would like to speak with you. I said, sure. I have never met Niki before in my life, but obviously I know who he was because he was a child I watched him racing for me. It was an honor. Any time you know, and then he called me directly. And asked me if I was available to have a chat with him that sure. And he said, are you by any chance coming to Vienna? And just as a step, I had to be in Austria two weeks after because we were doing those championship. Focus. So I was there in Debbie went for dinner. We had quite a long term to hours for him. That was normally a dinner with half an hour or was half an hour. So we had two hours and the next day, 8 in the morning he called me up and said, thank you for your time yesterday. You're going to be working for me. May I ask you what I'm going to do for you, you know? I said, oh, I still need to find that one out. That was, you know, that was how he acted and I think that was around in springtime around the store. And then I had to and then we kept on talking and then he spoke with fourth management, obviously, for me, for me moving from fourth early to Jaguar F one team and they wanted a finish of the care of that year to the homologation and then I joined the year after in general I think it was a joint after the season was over and so it was Nikki's call to bring you in or sound like all it's cool. And was that whole dinner meeting then just about him getting the workout if he liked you as a person if you were someone you could get on with? I would think so. We spoke about a lot of things, you know? And I think he just wanted to see because at the time there was not a clear picture in his mind where he wants her because they need the people that cost off because cost was part of the premier automotive group. And he needed people there. And then at some stage, I don't remember exactly during the year then it was decided that. Bob was leaving, and then he said, hey, you come with me along to run the F one team. So I said, okay. It's a nice offer to have, especially from a legend like Nikki, but it didn't seem to work out quite the way you probably hoped. How was it in Jaguar? Maybe didn't it click for you? I think a big cop about taking over a race team at the times it was very difficult. There was no real understanding everybody this is easy to do to go Formula One racing. And I think when Nik came there, a lot of damage was already done. And he would need to be a year or two more to fix it. I think, to be honest, we were on a good way, but we were not given any more times because obviously there was a different agendas within the company or shouldn't have meant I would say Nikki didn't fit the picture anymore. Did the good old racer running a race team? It was more like we need to get cope, but we need. It's more than one way that you can do this, but I think we have on a good way and then the Nikki go enter of the first season and obviously I didn't want to stay around to be honest without him I was loyal to him. We had a good time. I think we knew where we were wanted to go and we were going. And then it worked out that I left as well or was left or we decided that I'm leaving. But then the team became Red Bull a few years later. And you're brought back into the center, I guess, continue the job you'd started, what would have been for 5 years before? So did it feel that way? And were you surprised to get the call from essentially the same team when it's under your ownership to come back? Actually, it was a thing two years later because the people which took over, they run it into the ground. I mean, a force had no interest anymore to keep their F one team going because it wasn't promised you know the plan didn't work out and they said we get back and be in the top three between 12 months and these are things that they are gone no I knew mister Matthew sheets from before from the early program in Austria. So I wasn't completely surprised that they called me, but it was a good surprise at the time and at the time I was working for open DTM. I had a contact quit open. It was negotiated that I can get out of the contact was actually with GM because I wasn't employed. There was a contractor. So I got out of it and started at red bullia. For that, there's quite a lot of hopping around, I guess, from the moment you left rally, then you're into F one, and then you said DTM, and then you're back at F one. Where was your passion at that point? Was it just all motor sport or did you actually have a goal in mind that you wanted to crack F one? No, not really. I mean, I was pretty happy. I was, for me, it wasn't a bad time. I think it is hopping around with the, I would say, we can. I didn't really, you know, it didn't do anything to me. I quite liked. I mean, I went to DTM and I enjoyed the experience to be honest, you know, before at blue cold, I had no intention to leave. It's just like, then they offer came and they said, hey, I was still living in the UK. I like to live there. And I was commuting to Germany, actually. You know, it's very strange because the DTM team was only two and a half hours drive for my hometown, but I stayed living in the UK..

Chris medlin hars Gunther Steiner tyron Johnson Nicky Nikki Red Bull Gunther Niki Austria Vienna Debbie United States Nik mister Matthew Bob GM UK Germany
Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

"In eighty nine year old Rhode Island man has finally achieved something he's dreamed up nearly his whole life Manfred Steiner had always been fascinated by physics but instead went into medicine after retiring in two thousand I really don't want to spend my life just sitting around so he enrolled at Brown University and after nearly two decades of classes I made it Steiner earned a PhD in physics this was the most gratifying point in my life his advice to others if there's something you want to do go ahead try it now that he has Steiner hopes to catch on as a research assistant I'm not looking for a paid job you know that's still I'm Sager made Connie

Manfred Steiner Rhode Island Steiner Brown University Sager Connie
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

05:38 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Both of these books on amazon. They're interesting reads including whole discussion. Of how the first world war broke out and steiner's attempts to bring a healing to central europe at the end of that. That's about as much as i can think of offhand. I hope greg. You'll send me an email so i can listen to the podcast when it airs and tell about it to my friends certainly been very interesting talking to you. You've got great questions and great insights. I'm quite impressed and hope to be able to hear this broadcast when it comes out absolutely and that's kind of you to say i'm really just trying to hang on it's you that is so impressive and you're a real inspiration. You know a lot about a lot huge. Thanks for doing this and take care out there. Well thank you so much. Do send me that link. So i can listen yes. People want a great episode. We got here. I seriously loved it. I've said it before but some interviews with guests who are just doing the conspiracy podcast rounds and i still try to do the best interview i can but in those situations i'm still only going to be one of many win. Certain people have a new book out and stuff like that. But the real good ones the specialty hce episodes when i can bring you someone you most likely haven't heard before and they bring you content. You most likely aren't familiar with. And i think we really hit it out of the park. Today dr asher did an amazing job. He cultivated a deep understanding of steiner over many years. And i'm very thankful we were able to connect and that he is so good at summarizing segments of very complex and dense material. It's not really easy to jump around like we did. But you know. I also love these grab bags shows where we can jump from topic to topic and packed so much like we did. I also love it because it's not really about current events but yet it kind of is and he didn't really come here to plug anything. Just happy to spread the good word of steiner and he is a master at it clearly. I wanna make sure we thank john scott leg. The current managing director of steiner books dot org.

steiner amazon dr asher greg europe john scott steiner books dot org
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

05:29 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"And dealing with the diapers and the cooking. All of these things are constant interruption. So there's a third path. It's called the rosa crucial path designed for the busy person and that he describes in the fifth chapter of alkaloid science where there are certain. Meditations you can do in a few minutes during the day and then forget about them and that path is doable. But it takes willpower. You have to be able to dedicate. Let's just say ten minutes a day every day of your life to certain practices. These practices are laid out in the fifth chapter of steiner's book alkyl science. They're laid out in the book. Knowledge of the higher worlds. And it's attainment and fact it's the first half of that book which actually gives you practices and another very useful book is called guidance in esoteric training so there is a path for the busy person but admittedly to find the strength to put aside ten minutes today. You know. I know of people who they wake up in the morning. They do these practices in bed before the children can come and bother them and so forth ten minutes. That's about what it takes every day and you work at that for a lifetime. You will make progress and you'll come to appreciate that. It is progress. Perhaps not as much as you'd hope when you began but nonetheless you start being able to observe certain things so. That's my answer to that question. It's steiner's answer. The rosa cruising path is there for the modern busy person living in our civilization excellent. That is a great summary of all three paths. And it makes a lotta sense that there needs to be something therefore the busy person because we're kind of all busy these days and to get further into the dynamics and relationships between the physical round the spiritual. I was listening to a steiner lecture on this part of a collection called an e. satiric cosmology and he laid out relationship between spirits thoughts and people where just to read some of my notes here..

steiner
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Which seems to back up. What steiner told us in any case in atlanta's steiner said most people were and their clairvoyance was based on the fact that half of the pedals of each of their lotus flowers were active and this enabled them to experience the spiritual world and spiritual beings but in a state of very diminished self consciousness and the loss of the old clairvoyance was to give us the possibility to become self conscious ego beings. And we've now accomplished. That and snyder says therefore time to reawaken the clairvoyance and maintain the new ego consciousness. And what he says. Is that if you do the esoteric exercises. You will slowly bring the other half of the lotus flower into functioning. The part that had never opened and when it opens the other part will be given to you also and you will become clairvoyant. That in a nutshell was what the exercises are about. But as you work at it you realize just how hard a task it is. And it's not a abstract task something that takes hold of your whole soul and you're being and it takes you down into all of this chambers of your soul and to all the things buried there that you know a psychologist would say well you have to wake up to and you go through traumas but the problem is much deeper than what you've gone through in this lifetime it has to do with everything embedded within the deeper layers of your being from your past incarnations your karma and so as you work at these things you start pulling your karma toward you and that slows you down gives you all manner of difficulties but you go on a journey of self development and as you work at that you begin to appreciate yes. This thing is possible but to reach a level. Like steiner is extraordinarily difficult. He was so advanced. It's really hard almost to comprehend it. are late author sergei prokofiev. Who was the grandson of the famous. Russian composer wrote several books on steiner. And who he was how you could understand his stature. And as you come to comprehend that you realize you're looking atta absolute titan of higher site and that is probably unrealistic to think you're going to get to where he got but if you work at it you come to have certain experiences which allow you to say yes. This thing is true and you become more humble about how far you might achieve in a given lifetime. So that's i guess a long winded answer to your question. No it's great. I love this kind of stuff but it just seems almost impossible to really take that path of enter work in karmic work to its fullest degree and also meet the demands of modern society and a part of me is like well. Maybe that's by design so that. There's so many distractions and obligations that. Nobody can really fully take that journey but it seems more important. Seems kind of what we're designed to do to a degree but no one is really doing. Ed it's like very very rare to find someone who really is dedicated to that path and they become the the spiritual gurus and leaders that their energy their impacts extends far beyond their physical life because they are just so rare. It just seems tough i. It's probably harder today than ever to really dedicate yourself to that when you say. Well you know steiner says that there are three tasks to hire worlds which are legitimate today. The oldest one.

steiner snyder atlanta sergei prokofiev Ed
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

02:42 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Steiner grows. Your mind becomes more flexible and able you also come to understand. What a monumental thing. It is to awaken that level of sear ship. I mean ca- level. That steiner had as you mentioned he was born with capacities. It's also interesting to note that. Has he went on. To explain these things he said there are old atavistic capacities which have almost completely disappeared from humanity. And he says if you go back in time particularly if you go back before what's known as the flood and before the flood steiner says was another era. The era of atlantis. This by the way was something known to the greeks and the egyptians. I think it's in the time by plato. They speak of atlantis as being be on. The pillars of hercules the pillars of hercules are the straits of gibraltar and. What steiner argues. Is that atlantis. Occupied the whole bed of the atlantic ocean. That was possible because the flood represented a change in the parameters of physics through which the relative densities of water and air changed before that change. The water was lighter. The air was heavier and the whole atmosphere was filled with missed so atlantis was a land of missed. The was talked about by the german sagas. The knee balloons leads. They mean the songs of the lands of missed and in those poems which you can still get there were these initiated heroes the sig heroes when i tried to explain the existence of atlantis to people who are skeptical. I point them to the discovery of the largest pterodactyl bird in history in big bend in texas in the seventies. This bird at thirty to thirty nine foot. Wingspan and air nautical engineers said. There's a problem he couldn't fly over. Couldn't fly what was he using a thirty nine foot. wingspan four. And then i met a physical chemist who calculated that of the atmosphere had been four point two times denser. This bird the had been named quite waddell could fly..

steiner Steiner plato gibraltar atlantic ocean texas waddell
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

04:15 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"They put me in. Touch with dr usher and here. We are making the magic happen. So let's get into it. An expert in economics. A dedicated deep diver and steiner scholar. Extraordinary dr steven ascher. Welcome to the higher side. Well thank you for the introduction. And i'm looking forward to Exploring steiner with you. Yes thank you for doing this. There are just so many aspects of steiner's work that get mentioned here and there that i thought it would be best to really focus on his work for a full episode. Big thanks to john scott leg. The current managing director of anthroposophic. Press for putting us in touch. I like to think got a great crash course in steiner getting ready for this but even after a couple of weeks of revisiting things i can tell. I really barely scratched the surface. I guess to get into this. I don't think we need to get into a deep biography of the man but to introduce him and his ideas to the unfamiliar to put him in his proper context and describe the ways he thought and what made him special. What would you say to the people. Steiner was as you mentioned born in eighteen sixty one to nineteen twenty five already a child. He had spiritual experiences. He speaks of going into the forest and he lived in a forest in the austrian alps next to a railroad station because his father was the station master and he could see little beings in forms around plants and he discovered that the adult world didn't wanna talk about those things and that gave rise to an early search.

steiner dr usher dr steven ascher anthroposophic john scott Steiner
"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

02:12 min | 7 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Here we go higher. Say chatters from sunny san diego. I'm greg carl would and for the longest time. I've noticed that whether i'm in the mood to learn about spiritual beans growing food the nature of reality the complex parts of the mind. The unknown qualities the human body alternative forms of education aspects of the earth or half a dozen other. Thc jason subjects. Rudolf steiner has had something deep profound and usually unique to say about it. And when i think about the people today that i admire most many of these areas the rogue alternative academics and counterculture scholars. They tend to admire rudolf. Signer or at least reference emigrate deal. And i like to follow the universe where lead so it seems high time we took a look at the almost infinite range of provocative topics. Rudolf steiner has written and lectured about for those. Who don't know steiner. Who lived from eighteen. Sixty one to nineteen twenty. Five was an austrian-born spiritualist lecture and founder of the anthroposophy movement anthroposophy an amalgam of the greek terms anthroposophy meaning human and sophia meaning. Wisdom anthroposophic proponents. Am to extend the clarity of the scientific method to phenomena of human social life and spiritual experiences steiner believed this required developing new faculties of objective spiritual perception which he maintained was still possible for contemporary humans. The steps of this process of inner development. He identified as consciously achieved through imagination. Inspiration and intuition steiner believed results of this form of spiritual research should be expressed in a way that can be understood and evaluated on the same basis as the result of natural science. Y'all so hoped this type of spiritual movement would free the individual from any external authority. A notion i certainly would love to see come to fruition. His writings are about as diverse. As you can imagine and his work exceeds over three hundred volumes and here to break it all down. As one of the most qualified people. I've ever been introduced to dr steven. Usher is a hd economist with expertise in money banking and financial markets who also had a keen interest in studying steiner's work for the.

greg carl Rudolf steiner steiner rudolf san diego jason sophia dr steven Usher
Los Angeles Dodgers' Max Scherzer Reaches 3,000-Strikeout Milestone

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:06 min | 8 months ago

Los Angeles Dodgers' Max Scherzer Reaches 3,000-Strikeout Milestone

"The dodgers and padres yesterday. Max scherzer going for three thousand career strikeouts. Here's the pitch clock brings three thousand strikeouts for max scherzer becoming the nineteenth pitcher in major league to enter that very exclusive club a standing ovation inside dodger. Stadium max back into the history. The great charley steiner. An five seventy la sports. We're going to be talking with tim court about whether max scherzer needs to be anonymous selection for the hall of fame. Yesterday you a perfect game into the eighth inning this happened. There's a looper in the right field. Long-run pets he can't get it. There goes the perfect game. There goes the no hitter to out. Make that a one out. Double four hosmer at a standing ovation for mac jersey. The dodgers win game eight to nothing over. San diego swept that series Jay singler the padres manager talked after the series about. How is the worst baseball. The padres played all

Max Scherzer Charley Steiner Padres Dodgers Dodger TIM LA Hosmer Jay Singler San Diego Baseball
"steiner" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

08:23 min | 10 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Fsr or stream. It live on the peacock out. Hey this jason mcintyre join me every weekday morning on my podcast straight. Fire with jason mcintyre. This isn't your typical sports pod pushing the same tired narratives down your throat. Every day straight fire gets you honest opinions on all the biggest sports headlines accurate stats to help you win big at the sports book and all the best guests. Do yourself a favor and listened to straight fire with jason mcintyre on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. The corona virus vaccines produced in record time. But they're not slapdash overnight. Inventions their culmination of centuries of research advances to figure out how they began. You have to probe history myths and legends thousand years ago. The son of a local governor got very sick from smallpox. This sickness as caused by inoculation is not unto death. My name is shaun raviv. I'm a journalist. And i'm hosting a podcast called long shot. The two hundred and fifty year journey to the cove in nineteen vaccines will learn about the incentives experiments and accidents that drove vaccine development. And we'll meet some of the great minds behind the global effort to get us out of this pandemic. yeah i think might be the defining of my of my career. I think always be remembered for this. I wish i wasn't. I wish it never happened. Listen to long shot on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Wherever you get your podcasts hear the voices of the streets of west oakland california come alive on the lower bottoms of full cast scripted. Podcast yojiro darkly comic tale about the people of this quickly. Gentrifying neighborhood the lower bottoms. Being a small neighborhood often lends itself to serendipitous encounters between friends acquaintances and adversaries. Such was the case for sean shontae. At the end of her second week at the house she had an ascent to name. But that would not stop her from getting money with an all star cast featuring ryan destiny. Theo rossi kelsey grammer and more so go on. Take a trip out to the lower bottoms. What answers i wanna know why. My sister is lying in bed comatose. Let me show you this friday. The sixteenth street train station. Why there because it's where you're gonna be reborn. Listen to the lower bottoms on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. This is miami's own. Dj espn co host of the drink champs. Podcast on the black affect podcast network and iheart radio every week. Norian i sit down with the most legendary artists producers and icons in the music industry and the culture at large so if you like to hear some legendary stories learn some hip hop history or just want to have a good laugh. Make sure you go to subscribe to drink champs on iheartradio app apple podcast or wherever you get your podcast last. Call for phone calls what we learn. What's in tomorrow this day in sports history. Try to cram a lot of things in here by. Thanks to charley steiner babe offenburg the cowboys radio analyst. Ross tucker westwood one or nfl linemen. Frank reich the colts head coach talking about the carson wentz. Nick foles situation. This is carson's team first of all. He's our quarterback and worse outside about having him and he knows that this team knows that you know. We're when we brought him here. We brought him here for one reason. It wasn't calm you know he's gonna compete but it wasn't for he's going to come in here and and lead this football team I don't mind talking about nick foles. I love nick foles. He plays for the chicago bears and haven't talked to him but I think he's i think he's a great player. I think he's proven that. I think he's a great teammate. There's nothing about nick foles. I don't like. I think he's a winner. He certainly got it. Fits are kind of culture. But he's plays for the chicago bears. Can he find for that. I mean if they really wanted to nitpick you know he fits our culture. Well who knows what the nfl. I mean they find you. If your socks aren't at a certain height. So i i i don't know but it felt like that bordered on being flirtatious. Yes mclovin nba him for sure. Oh yeah yeah. If they hit. Steve kerr for saying yeah. Maybe we could get lebron to sign the mid level exam Exemption and that cost like fifteen or twenty thousand dollars when he said it on our show. Final results of the poll question mclovin. Who is more likely to miss the playoffs. Fifty seven percents the steelers over the cowboys. Yeah i could see that the ravens and browns should be appear to be better. I don't know what. Cincinnati you know the the whole thing with joe borough. We just assuming they said as one hundred percent. I don't think he's one hundred percent and he's not look good in camp at all and it's tricky modern medicines wonderful but the mental part of coming back from an injury. That's the tricky thing. And if you're a quarterback and you've had your knee. Scoped had surgery. It could be your your plant foot as you come forward. And you get nervous when people are around you. I remember having one of my surgeries. And i went to play golf and i i was so afraid to land on my front foot my left foot post on it and put some torque on and eventually you get past it but if you're a quarterback and you step up in the pocket you've had your left knee surgically repaired. That's a mental hurdle to overcome this day in sports history. Paulie i got a few nineteen sixty the first time to. Mlb managers retreated for each other. Detroit traded jimmy. Dykes for cleveland's joe. Gordon that's fascinating. Call them up. Let's see oud one thousand nine hundred mark. Maguire hit his five hundred career home run. He had the fewest amount of bats to get to five hundred. And here's a great one in two thousand thirteen a bud. Selig issued a suspension for. Alex rodriguez does anybody remember how long the suspension was for possession of banned performance. Enhancing drugs four games two hundred eleven game. Oh okay oh that the the old regime they would give you four games for performance. Enhancing two hundred eleven. That's a random number think it's one sixty two. The number was reduced to one sixty two by arbitrator. Is alex rodriguez going to get into the hall of fame. I'm i'm really curious what happens. I mean he got popped twice. He should not be allowed to be on the ballot. If you get popped twice for steroids you shouldn't be allowed to play baseball anymore. The club i remember selena roberts then. Sports illustrated think broke the first story or times one of them and he destroyed her. He's like she doesn't know what she's talking about blah blah blah and then he got popped again. I remember at the time we had her on the air. But that's usually what happens. Alex is done that. Though mike he'll lash out and that's how he kinda counters but Let's see here's one disdain. Sports history rod karoo in nineteen eighty-five collected career. Hit number three thousand on the same day. Tom seaver on his three hundred career game. That was at yankee. Stadium wasn't when he was with the white sox. Receiver might be rod. Career was always one of my favorites just because he'd hold the bat and it looks like it could fall out of his hands like a strong wind. Breeze could blow it out of his hands but he he had this ability he just he could put the bat on the ball. Happy birthday to one of our good friends. Patrick ewing turning fifty nine. Today saw shohei ohtani six strong innings last night. The angels back to five hundred. He didn't do anything offensively but he is pitched at least six innings in nine sixteen starts didn't add to his home run. Total stands at thirty seven. He second and rbi's Right now with eighty two and got to be the mvp.

jason mcintyre nick foles apple shaun raviv yojiro sean shontae Theo rossi kelsey grammer charley steiner Ross tucker westwood Frank reich carson wentz chicago bears west oakland smallpox cowboys joe borough nfl
Couple in eBay Harassment Case Sues Company, Ex-Officials

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:44 min | 10 months ago

Couple in eBay Harassment Case Sues Company, Ex-Officials

"You think about big tech tyranny the most of us especially in conservative talk radio talking about the latest person that twitter dispatched or the latest bias. That facebook has again somebody but what about the tyranny of ebay what the tyranny of ebay it's pre. It's where you buy stuff. How bad can they be the boston globe. Features a story where this couple that did i guess they did sort of reviews their their their livelihood was doing online reviews of various tech issues various websites and they had been not universally but occasional critics of ebay and the folks at ebay decided. They didn't like it. And there may be retribution underway. Aaron pressman writes about tech for the boston globe and had the story and it just went straight to my brain and aaron welcome. It's nice to meet you. How are you doing sir. Good morning mark thank you. This is crazy first of all how. You've been writing about tech for the boston globe. The boston globe. I'm new. i've been writing about tech for many many years. But i just joined the boston globe this summer. Where'd you come from. I was at fortune magazine for the last solar. Where your people where are you from. Where did you grow up. I grew up in the boston area. And i never quite escape so i'm still here so it's right there west of town about a half hour west of town in the lovely suburb of natick. Tell me about the couple in question and what they did to draw the ire of ebay. So i know david steiner there an ordinary couple. They like to go to garage. Sales when ebay i arose. They sort of started making a tip sheet for people who aren't to sell on ebay and it became this big newsletter. They started making a lotta money from advertising to people who want to sell things on ebay so it was a great little business. They had Ebay over the years you may have noticed has shifted to emphasize more selling like big retailers and increasing the fees on little guys who want to sell things so the newsletter became i think a little more critical overtime and kinda got under the skin of some of the top people and ebay where they were. Who would've who's eyeballs would have seen this in order to think this isn't right. We're going to punish these people. Where's he bay headquarters out in silicon valley like everybody else. Ebay is out in silicon valley. But we know there's a federal criminal case against Seven to these people to so we know we've seen the emails that the ceo of ebay right. This is a multibillion dollar corporation. The theo of ebay and his wife are complaining to their underlings about this online newsletter. Not treating them fairly and Devon winning the ceo at the time even has this very unfortunate email where he says. Take them down acre down. I believe is what he's at.

Ebay The Boston Globe Aaron Pressman Fortune Magazine David Steiner Twitter Natick Aaron Facebook Boston Silicon Valley Devon
Blogger Couple Harassed by Ex-eBay Employees Sues Company

WBZ Midday News

00:59 sec | 10 months ago

Blogger Couple Harassed by Ex-eBay Employees Sues Company

"Native couple is suing eBay over claims that its employees targeted and harassed them back in 2019 on China and David Steiner say that the scheme began after the to criticize the company in their online newsletter. Here's in a speaking in court today we were doxed. We were sent intimidating packages threats. The couple says that the packages that they received included a range of items, including things like life, insects, a funeral wreath and a bloody pig face Halloween mask their attorney, Rosemary She PTO says that the workers involved need to be held accountable for what they do now we'll do the investigation. Now we'll hold the depositions will write the interrogatory and they will answer for their acts and the employees allegedly involved include eBay's former senior director of safety and security, a senior manager of global intelligence and a senior manager of special operations and more

David Steiner Ebay China Rosemary
"steiner" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

07:13 min | 11 months ago

"steiner" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"You don't really have a choice when you are glasses so your posture. Moving is different. Right like you're you're looking at the ground in front of you because the refer vision doesn't sort that out same with screens by people with classes really tend to hunt more in the direction of screens. It's there's a ton of effect. And i'm not a motion specialist. I'm just noticing these things as i've been in this for so long. That is really helped by either heading towards some contact lens use. Ideally getting rid of the media problem. Well that's the thing. Is that a lot of will program call the battalion Actors and then we do a full analysis on the first visit based on on function. And so we're doing a lot of stuff. Balance with is opening is close. And that an ogle's proper movement through our spine which means still good posher is in order to when you have good posture loads the joints which really fledged brain with action. So that you know where you are in space and anything that prevents your pushes. You forward decreases that or recession. And then if you're wearing glasses you're you're losing a parisian also losing more information so that the body actually fires more stress response like you said because you're kinda panicking is your brain is trying to figure out where it is in space. That doesn't have enough information. And so yeah that's that's connected to what we do. It's funny because a lot of our tests we do do it with the is open. The eyes closed and we don't want to have a huge difference between those two and if people cap balance with their eyes open that means the rains not getting enough information from their environment and and that can like one of the processes could be totally vision or your glasses of because you're gonna be hunched forward which starts restricting motion in your spine. We starts restricting information to your rain. So it's kind of a cool. Ask eight. I really wanna stop buying get one of those tests done by your only way. You're on the other side of the world and it is hard to travel there but there's lots of an won't go too far but just like for example. I kite surf now. And when i used to wear glasses i would've told you no way now because of glasses but i thought it was clumsy. Yes i was. Clumsy was comes. And when i started kite surfing i got bullied into it. Basically but some of the stuff my body does. I'm kind of shocked. Balance and the ability and the nod crashing to really are moments on like. Wow like wow and i. i'm attributing this. Just because i hear some more stories from a lot of other people from you know having great vision and having a different relationship to mind by not being handicapped in some way. Let's sit in. Italy makes sense because if you have more more vision you have more movement more movement more information and we have more information your brain body work better together which is going to increase your coordination and everything you do is going to be smoother. So that's pretty pretty cool. How that whole thing. They all just connects tax. A that's pretty cool. Yeah and also and this is totally off topic. But i'm still gonna say from the movement and things sticking together what you said. I started to about a year ago. And before that i could not sleep on my left side i was just unable like it would hurt after like fifteen twenty minutes and i never did. Since i don't know for how many years quincy palmer can sleep on my left side again. Just fine like it's it's so interesting. How this movement decree of boom and affecting stuff. I'm really interested in all that it's in. His kubik is that movement is what helps to maintain proper tone. Which is exactly we're talking. Both your is is that if you're if you're getting the glasses you're decreasing your movement which then creates more stagnation. I t's my patients they said you can be. You gotta be scummy pond or a healthy river rate is coming upon is stagnant and all all gross things grown is on were you have mason flow lace good flow like a river and then like and misuse only reduce stagnant water. They don't create stagnant water rate and so ago. Say everything we want. Our bodies have been flow and so that would just make sense. The is exactly the same. So that's pretty cool at at school so at some more listeners laid out there be like i want to go definitely more information that we got a lot of our Love love good information. So do you have Like how can they reach out to you. Or how can they get get involved with this group and just kinda learn smart mason about what everybody else is doing. So there's a website called end myopia dot org. That's been around for a very long time so it is somewhat messy. I've written over twelve hundred somewhat articles and you know it will take a moment if you visit there to find your way through it We say it's a little bit of a research project. On from there. You can also find a facebook group that has twenty thousand somewhat members before him. That's really large. We have a terrible youtube channel. be a wiki. We have all kinds of stuff that that a lot of it was community source. That is really. I think a good starting point to figure this stuff out and it'll still take you a few weeks of poking around in there but if you vinnie eyesight issues i i think it's a great resource. That's awesome well Getting close to time here. I want to thank you for staying up late there in in bangkok in the and i'm up early here in entity number to canada and what is what kind words wisdom relate to leave people with out there in the car back world that might be having some challenges with some i think just exploring a little bit and and one of the things now that you mention it. We've fallen into this phone thing. Somehow and words arystom questionable wisdom. I i've been telling friends relaxed the the. We lost boredom because we can always be entertained by the stupid phone. So three letting yourself good board to become inspired and creative and doing interesting. Things is super interesting and we lose that. If you play too much on these things. So i recommend less of the phones that's awesome. That's dogging background. He barks such as whatever passing. So that i will thank you so much for being on the show. I really appreciate it. Thanks for having an for everybody out there again. This is just more information to To help our body functions at a higher level in our neuro plasticity model. And so i hope you guys enjoyed the show and until next time shift on. Thank you for listening to the podcast. If you've received value from this episode please share this with a fellow chiropractor and take some time to rate and review us on i tunes or wherever your favorite place is to listen to podcasts. If you're interested in learning more about our programs and events please visit. Www dot the vitality shift dot com or connect with me on facebook. I would love to hear from you so until next time. Dr dawn.

quincy palmer ogle kubik Italy mason vinnie youtube bangkok facebook canada Dr dawn
Arlington National Cemetery: Honor, Hope & Healing

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Arlington National Cemetery: Honor, Hope & Healing

"Visit arlington national cemetery to pay respects to contemplate the cost of war to understand history. If you're gonna kennedy's brave and the tomb of the unknown they're all serve the same vicinity. Wiki with my. Abc's colleague. james meek the tourists go to see the changing of the guard but the rest. The cemetery is pretty quiet with the exception of section sixty sections sixty is where the dead from the united states. Wars in afghanistan and iraq are buried seventeen years ago. This was an empty field. Scott to be at least one hundred rows of tim steiner. If the cemetery was just this it would be a lot and the thing about this section is. This is not people who died of old age. These are people who fell in battle. I know at one time. They called this cemetery the living cemetery because so many young people here in the wars. Were still ongoing. So you still have cazar these people being buried here so it's called the living cemetery so many people were here visiting. The davis still comes every sunday as she has for nearly the last fifteen years since her only son. Justin davis was killed. Coming up on fifteen years you say. Wow you know who who's still remembers the other than family and close family and friends in all of arlington each headstone. In section sixty tells a story private first class. Justin davis was a nineteen year old infantrymen when he was killed in afghanistan. June twenty fifth. Two thousand six. It's comforting for me to come here and just sit and you know helps. Keep life in perspective for me. This is my arlington bag and this bag. What's his Back in school in highschool believe it held up. of course i've done some stitching on it. But he's got all sorts of supplies in there. It's my arlington bag. Has got scissors. Kickers scott eight each week. All the tidies her son's headstone. She make sure there's a laminated photo of him and flowers.

James Meek Justin Davis Tim Steiner Arlington National Cemetery Afghanistan Kennedy ABC Iraq Arlington Scott United States Davis Kickers Scott
Back to Jesus With Kristin Ostrander

The Bible Says What!?

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Back to Jesus With Kristin Ostrander

"Today's special guest is author speaker. Podcast or kristen strandard to the show. Hi thanks for having me. Thanks for coming on. Thanks for taking the time So tell us a little bit about first of all what you do. I am kristen steiner. I am the host of the amazon files. Podcast and the owner and founder of mommy income dot com. I teach people to start and grow ecommerce businesses online. That sounds like a lot of fun and a lot of work. Yeah both pretty busy How many kids you. I have three kids. One two grown in one. Still in the nasty. We've got a twenty year old one. That's graduating this year at eighteen and then the youngest is ten and a half fun man. I keep you busy. That's for sure on top of everything else you're doing. Yeah that could be a whole episode about raising grown children and what that's like right. Good nece kids in general so As far as the the the religious aspect of of kristen what are your you. Would you describe the christian beliefs. Would you call yourself a christian. Absolutely s awesome. So why would you take on that title. What what is it about the christianity that you accept. I am a follower and believer of jesus. I believe in the gospel. I believe that it's All his doing. And none of mind and i have a purpose in a plan in life to follow that calling and to spread the good news to others that there is hope and help beyond this life. Open help beyond this life and what. What does the bible to you. The bible is the word of god. The bible is a sharper than any two edged sword. I can i use it against it. Right the bible is guidebook. That guy bill bible is the answer. It is my hope and my help. It is the source of wisdom the source of all instructions for humanity.

Kristen Strandard Kristen Steiner Amazon Kristen
Scoop: Kids' border surge expected to last 7+ months

Captain Mike Anderson

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Scoop: Kids' border surge expected to last 7+ months

"I Heart radio. You're listening to the daily dive on use radio. Tell you f L, A welcome back to the Daily Dive Weekend edition. Finally, for this week, the surge of migrants of the border continues as expected to possibly less seven months as projections for September by Customs and border protection is anywhere from 22,000 to 25,000 migrants crossing the border. The administration is trying to get control over the situation. But the message is not reaching migrants and smugglers. Reuters recently spoke to over a dozen self identified smugglers to see how and why unaccompanied minors are crossing the border. In many cases, these smuggling operations can cost thousands for the migrants as they're transported by a variety of ways, even by plane. For more on how these smugglers air getting it done will speak to Laura got Steiner, Reuters correspondent based in Mexico, But some of the migration that we're seeing in context I mean, for a number of years Now we've been seeing an increasing number of families and Children coming from Central America. This is something that we saw under the Obama administration to the Trump administration and now under the five in administration. As you mentioned as well. Migration trends tend to be seasonal. So migration tends to pick up in January and February and then go through until you start to get the sub warmer summer months, And then it becomes more dangerous. So you know, it is definitely the case that there are more Migrants, particularly families and unaccompanied Children traveling to the U. S border than we've seen in previous months at the same time, you know, we saw a huge increase in the number of families and unaccompanied minors as well coming in 2019. So this is something that Really spans a number of different U. S administrations from both parties we wanted to speak is as you mentioned two smugglers to understand the trends of how these Children are getting to the U. S. Border. Because it certainly striking. Of course, as you hear stories of unaccompanied Children, Children without their parents or their legal guardians, including some very young Children arriving to the borders we wanted to understand, you know. How are they traveling? Who were they traveling with? How much does it cost for them to be traveling? And where are their parents? Because I think there's often this sense that the parents are all in Central

Daily Dive Weekend Reuters Obama Administration Trump Administration Steiner Central America Laura U. Mexico
NYPD investigate suspicious letters sent to New York City schools as 7th incident reported

Nuvo Fat Loss

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

NYPD investigate suspicious letters sent to New York City schools as 7th incident reported

"Investigating the latest incidents of suspicious letters being sent to city schools, tops recalled to Rudolf Steiner school on the 78th Street on the Upper East Side at 11 P.m. on Friday. Staff member discovered a white letter envelope with pattern inside. It was the seventh incident reported since Thursday, just hours before a suspicious envelope with white powder inside was delivered to River Park Nursery School on Amsterdam Avenue at 94th Street. Each envelope had a U. S flag stamp and a hand written address in block letters. Officials say the powder turned out to be non hazardous. Paul de

Rudolf Steiner School Upper East Side River Park Nursery School Paul De
The Mystery Of Hudini

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:02 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery Of Hudini

"Welcome to kids myths and mysteries from around the world strange and unexplained people places and events often forgotten by history or loss in the midst of time. I'm kit chrome today. Harry houdini to understand houdini magic. It's important to understand the man born eric. Weiss march twenty four th eighteen. Seventy four in budapest hungary. He moved with his family when he was four years. Old to new york. And eventually migrated appleton wisconsin in his youth. He was a natural athlete and had a fascination with magic and adopted the name. Houdini by adding an eye to the last name of his idol. French magician robert who din although there was a gimmick or special effect too many of his escapes. there were those at pressed him physically to the max one story a story mind. You is that of an underwater handcuff escape. Depending on who you talked to. He was in a box. A straightjacket or manacled hand and foot anyway. The story goes that he was in chicago in winter and had a hole cut in the frozen river that he stepped through not taking into factor that the river flowed under the ice easily escaped his manacles but was swept downriver. Above the shivering crowd eventually dispersed fearing that they had witnessed the drowning of the great magician under the ice. He moved from trapped air bubble bubble eventually finding his way out. There are dozens of versions of his story but whatever the case demonstrates his power of concentration. Above all harry. Houdini was a showman dangling from cranes. Skyscrapers upside down in a straitjacket. He would attrac- upwards of fifty thousand. Onlookers necks craned as they watched the dramatic escape. This would guarantee a pack theater that evening but he was always searching for a new effect. He's responsible for bringing the obscure thread the needle from india to the american stage. This is where he would placed dozens of needles in his mouth along with thread. Poss- drink a glass of water then amazingly extract needles threaded with enough threat to cross the stage later. He performed the same illusion with razor blades. Houdini was much more than a magician however he was a man with an insatiable curiosity and was fascinated with movies made several including one where he was to rescue the ever suffering female from iraq on the brink of niagara falls. She was harnessed to a safety line. Houdini would have none of the safety features offered and was nearly swept over the falls. He got out of the movie business because it didn't make money. He was also fascinated with airplanes and in nineteen ten. Was the first man to fly a plane in australia. Sailing for over three and a half miles. Houdini died at one twenty six. Pm tober thirty first. Nineteen twenty six. He was fifty two years old. He was a man who was driven. You might say by the slogan. The show must go on but also by his own physicality take a look at the old newspaper photos of him in various stages of escape remember. This is long before photoshop notice a developed biceps quadriceps and shoulders however by late forties he suffered from appendicitis attacks and on several occasions had to be helped off stage by age fifty despite more sophisticated special effects his performances required longer periods of recuperation is said that he was backstage reclining from a broken ankle from a previous show won a university student questioned. The magicians boasts of the stomach of oak remember. Houdini was fifty to the student. Delivered a series of blows stopped when. Houdini claimed he was not able to stand to prepare for the strikes. No one knows. If this cost the appendix to rupture hours of the event. Houdini went on to perform with a temperature of a hundred and four. Eventually he entered the hospital where he felt. Recovery was eminent but at the end he was heard to say. I'm tired of fighting. Harry had two loves in his. Life is wife bests and sell you steiner weiss. His mother when she died in nineteen thirteen. He visited select mediums in an attempt to make contact with her from the spirit. World appalled the frauds who claim to be able to make contact. He went on the warpath exposing psychics. Fortune tellers mediums and in the process and raging. The industry is most outspoken. Opponent was the blonde. Which of lime street strange seems her. Spirit guide walter in one thousand nine hundred thousand five said that. Houdini would be dead within a year but houdini had devised a code. That only best would know that if indeed there wasn't afterlife he would contact her using net code. The stories surround this aspect of his life and the code between he and his wife would take ten podcast to explain it to say that he did not connect with best using the code. Each halloween for at least four years after his death she would lie to candle. Hold a seance. She continued the sales which involved a candle said to have burned for ten years. It was a nineteen thirty six ten years after houdini. He's passing that. She handed off the candle. And say on tradition to walter. B gibson friend confidante ghostwriter for. Houdini gibson was also the original author of the shadow mysteries writing under the name maxwell grant late in his life. He passe on tradition to magician. Dorothy dietrich who now burns the candle. Every halloween while conducting a seance seems. Houdini is yet to

Houdini Harry Houdini Frozen River Appleton Weiss Budapest Hungary Eric Wisconsin Robert Niagara Falls Steiner Weiss Chicago Harry New York Appendicitis India Iraq Australia
Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the future

TED Talks Daily

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the future

"I work at the united nations and for the past couple of years. I have served as the head of the un's development program when i walked into the headquarters in new york city many years ago. The first thing i noticed was a sculpture standing outside under the flags of the nations of the world. It's called the knotted gun and it's still stands today to me that sculpture symbolizing exactly what the un was created to do seventy five years ago to build peace out of the ashes of war war. That had been defined for so much of human history as the struggle of nations against nations are the kinds still raging countries like syria and yemen that the united nations works to end every day. That's what i imagined that. Not a gun to represent but now another kind of war is brewing. One that increasingly defines the twenty first century with a dominant risk to our own. Survival is ourselves a few years or even months ago. If i had suggested that we're all at war with ourselves. It may have felt strange especially when according to so many metrics humans are on average healthier wealthier and more educated than any time in history. We have more knowledge. More science more choices today than the founders of the united nations could have ever imagined but somewhere along the way we lost our balance in fact think about this. Scientists are considering whether for the very first time in human history. Instead of the planet shaping humans humans are knowing shaving the planet it's called the anthroposophy and represents a new geological era today. Humans literally have the power to alter the atmosphere and the biosphere in which we live the power to destroy and the power to repair. No species has ever had that kind of power before within humans have achieved incredible things together from closing a giant hole in the ozone layer preventing nuclear proliferation to radicalizing smallpox. But we have also taken the earth and all the people on it to the brink. It's not the rational fair what we're doing today. One third of all the food produce on the planet goes to waste. While one in ten people go hungry inequality has become extreme twenty six people on the same wealth as half of humanity based on recent data today seven million people die from air pollution each year about seven million trees the very things that keep our air clean. Cut down every few hours. We spend over ten times more on fossil fuel subsidies alone than we do all. Investments in renewable power prolonging our common habit like a drug running through the economy's veins. You don't have to be an economist like me to know that these numbers just add up that our economic paradigm is neither sustainable nor equitable climate. Change rupturing inequalities record numbers of people forced from their homes by conflict and crisis for all of our power. These are the weapons we have built less tangible than a gun but just as real just as deadly at an epic pandemic and this year for the first time in twenty years global extreme poverty is projected to rise and global human development. A measure of the world's education health and living standards is set to decline for the first time since the measure began thirty years ago. Covid nineteen has not changed the future yet but it has revealed these deep flaws in our present bringing clarity to the fact that ending. This war against ourselves is not about tradeoffs. it's not about choosing between people trees between poverty or progress. It's about choosing to do things differently. In the midst of tragedy the pandemic has also given us a glimpse of what peace could look like where we can see the snow of a mountain for the first time because the smog has cleared. That's what happened in nairobi. My home of many years and one of the city's appalachian plummeted as human activities slowed down

United Nations Yemen Syria New York City Smallpox Nairobi
Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

The Takeaway

07:20 min | 1 year ago

Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

"The question for today how can the. Us turn things around and quickly get vaccine distribution on track. Here with me. is dr amish adultery. An infectious disease physician and a senior scholar at johns hopkins center for health security. Thanks for coming on the takeaway dr short. Thank you for having me so doctor. Let's start with hospitals. They were rightly given priority for the vaccine. But now they're getting blamed for the slow rollout and for not vaccinating workers fast enough. So you're you work at several hospitals. Can you give us a look into what's happening there. You have to remember that. There's no such thing as a hospital worker. Whose only job is to vaccinate people. So what hospitals are doing are pulling people with other jobs to ronco vaccination clinic and these covert vaccines are not. The same thing is giving employees. Tetanus shots hepatitis b. shots influenza shots. There's a lot involved and the same hospitals that are tasked with responding to an inordinate number of patients are being asked vaccine so there's a lot of precautions that they have to put in place got to set up timings for people to be vaccinated. They've got to find a place to vaccinate people in a place where people can stay fifteen minutes after their shot. In case they have an allergic reaction. They have to be in close proximity to an emergency department. In case severe allergic reaction happens and it it just takes some time to scale this up so hospitals. Don't have the resources to do this in a rapid fire manner and i think they shouldn't be blamed for this. They're being actually tasked to do something. Where the government really has failed because there was not much planning done for that last mile of vaccination and it fell to hospitals to set up their own programs and their own prioritization. And all of that in it's in. It's not surprising to me that there's been lags and delays but it is speeding up and i do think the answer. Here's more resources. What could hospitals do with those more resources. If hospitals had more resources they could have vaccination basically happening twenty four seven instead of at specific times. They can vaccinate more people at a given time. Instead of having certain slots for people to to come to be vaccinated they would have other people to be able to monitor people after their vaccination so if there is an allergic reaction. It's not the same people that are giving the vaccine that have to kind of keep their eye on. Who's who's around in the in the room. That might be having an allergic reaction all of that would make vaccination more seamless and faster but some of the slowness because this vaccine is available on an emergency use authorization and that requires forms consent and checking that consent to make sure it's all accurate. All of that does take time which is very different than when you go to get a flu. Shot at employee health at hospital. Just they basically just jab you as soon as you walk in the door. You yourself have had your first dose. Is that correct yes okay. Have you witnessed any reluctance or skepticism in one of the hospitals. I'm on staff at. There's a lot of misinformation being spread among certain members of the healthcare staff including nurses and doctors where basically every conspiracy theory that you've maybe seen on. Social media is getting repeated in a hospital hallway. So yes that does happen in my experience. It's been really minimum of people and not something. That's generally reflective of what healthcare workers think of this vaccine but clearly the anti vaccine movement and all of those conspiracy theories healthcare workers are not unfortunately immune from it and that has played a role trying to combat that misinformation with facts. And so doctor. How do you balance the need. To prioritize healthcare workers and the elderly with also just getting as many people vaccinated as possible. Who want the vaccine. You have to remember that the overall goal is to get all the eligible populations vaccinated so that this public health emergencies behind us and we cross the herd immunity threshold and hospitals are not inundated. There is a reason for the priority scheme though in order to get the vaccine into people where it will have the biggest impact fast and that's healthcare workers nursing home residents and then kind of moving through other priority games. But you have to remember that we can't be dogmatically wedded to that in if that schedule is an obstacle to people getting vaccinated if it's causing hospitals consternation on how they're going to evacuate and how they're going to deal with excess doses. Maybe they've unfrozen a lot more doses than they needed that day and they've got some that they're gonna either throw out or give to somebody. That's not priority group. One a the answer. There is to give it to somebody. Who's in another priority. Because you have to remember. The overarching goal is to get people vaccinated. And we can't let an overly bureaucratic process steiner that goal and it's not right for governors and other politicians to try and penalize hospitals for doing the best they can and i think that's the most counterproductive is finding hospitals or decreasing their allocation. If they're going outside of the priority group because the goal is always going to be to get the shot into people's arms and who would be the next priority group would it be people with preexisting conditions for instance so overall the cdc says priority group one be would be people that are above the age of seventy five years of age as well as front facing workers so meat packing plants or in grocery stores or transportation workers. That's the overall phase one beat but some states are saying we're going to go to maybe above age sixty five so there is some variation from state to state. But it's generally people that are going to be dealing with the general public but they're not healthcare workers as well as people of advanced age because we know they have a high risk for severe complications. Are there states that have done a particularly good job so far. Well if you look at states in the number of doses that they've allocated north dakota south dakota standout They were places that got hit very hard and most recently and they seem to be rolling out vaccine at a faster pace than many other many other states some states only maybe fifteen percent of their doses have been allocated but again that may be a lot of the idiosyncrasies of each state and you likely will see things homogenize soon as state start ramping up and getting things in order but would say in general. No state is doing the best job Everybody could do better and we have to do better in order to put this epidemic pandemic behind us. So what are you looking for. The biden administration to do what can be what can be done to speed things up the by the ministration can ensure that hell that states have. The funding in there was a funding. Bill passed on christmas eve. But it's also just trying to understand what's going on each state and meeting states where they are. Some states may need different types of help. And i think that's going to be important as having the cdc step into its role of being this coordinating body for the states and allowing the public health response to to really be fine tuned by the cdc adding its expertise to what's going on in each in each state. I think it's also the case that we need more guidance on what to do when you have leftover doses and nobody left in the priority group. Yesterday the cdc did have a press conference or a meeting where they did talk about the fact that the goal is not to have vaccine in the fridge but into into people's arms and we shouldn't be wasting doses or doing anything like that so that type of work that kind of leadership of how this vaccination program should go would would be very useful. I also think the federal government should think about trying to help coordinate mass vaccination sites especially as we get into the community dwelling people people who aren't in hospitals nursing homes who are relatively easy to vaccinate but people who live at home can be done. It's at stadiums. Can they be done at convention. Centers Can we use old school gymnasiums during h one n one i got vaccinated at an old school gym. Can we start doing that to make things move much more seamlessly faster sort of borrowing from what israel is doing. Which is the country. That's leading the world in

Dr Amish Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Ronco Vaccination Clinic Tetanus Shots Hepatitis B Allergic Reaction Influenza CDC Steiner Biden Administration North Dakota South Dakota Bill Federal Government Israel
Amazon not liable in teen's powdered caffeine death: Court

Joel Riley

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon not liable in teen's powdered caffeine death: Court

"Not liable for the death of an Ohio high school students after 18 year old Logan Steiner was found dead in June of 2014. The coroner ruled it was from acute caffeine toxicity. Steiner had adjusted powdered caffeine, which a friend had purchased online and shared with him. His father sued, reaching out of court settlements with the company that sold the powdered caffeine and with the importer Not Amazon, Ohio Supreme Court justices of now unanimously concurred with two lower courts that Amazon was not a supplier has defined by Ohio law and therefore not liable. Retail giant has since band postings for powdered caffeine on its site. Jack

Caffeine Logan Steiner Ohio Supreme Court Ohio Amazon Jack
Elfriede Blauensteiner

Female Criminals

03:43 min | 2 years ago

Elfriede Blauensteiner

"Welcome to black widow watch like the deadly spider there named for many female criminals have used the promise of love to trap and kill their victims. These men believed they'd found the person. They would spend their lives with instead. They had wandered right into the web of a deadly Predator throughout this month. I'm taking a look at the world's most notorious black widows in these episodes. I'll uncover what made these women decide to murder the people they vowed to love and cherish. Will detail the specific methods they use to carry out these ends, and finally we'll explore what made their respective pray susceptible to the charms of a Predator in disguise today? We're discussing Elfriede. Diner dubbed Austria's black widow Blauensteiner is believed to have killed over ten people with poison, including husband to lovers and her next door neighbor, and it may have all been to feed her destructive gambling addiction. Moron Elfriede Blauensteiner after this now back to our black widow. At an early age Elfriede Blauensteiner was determined to never be poor, growing up in poverty during and after World War Two. Her sole mission in life was to become rich, no matter what. But it would be five decades before she committed her first murder, and in that time she became a nurse, was married and divorced and developed a love for the roulette tables in nineteen, eighty, one fifty year, old lounge diner committed her first murder. The victim was a janitor named Erwin neater Meyer, the murder of neater Meyer awakened a bloodthirsty nece in Blauensteiner in nineteen, eighty six. She satisfied this new urge when she murdered her seventy eight year old diabetic patient auto ronal it was with Rhino that she perfected her method of killing altering medication to make it appear as if a victim died of natural causes. The drug she landed on. Was You glue? Lucon used for blood sugar levels. Six years later in August nineteen, ninety-two Blown Steiner used you G- Lucon to slowly kill her second husband. The two year old Rudolph blauensteiner everything went to L. freed. It's believed that she used this inheritance to feed a gambling addiction. When the money from her third husband ran out, she turned her sights onto her neighbor. Eighty four year old Francisca curb rural curl died in late, nineteen ninety-two, but not until after she left blauensteiner her entire life savings. But curb. Money would only hold blauensteiner over for so long. Throughout the early Nineteen Ninety S, Blauensteiner took out personal ads in local papers, looking for victims to swindle and murder. Typically, she wrote that she was a homely housewife and nurse and a caring companion. In Nineteen ninety-four. She met and married sixty four year old Friedrich jerker once she convinced him to put his house in her name blown Steiner went to work. Jerker died in the middle of nineteen, ninety, five,

Elfriede Blauensteiner Murder Blown Steiner Friedrich Jerker Erwin Neater Meyer Austria Lucon Francisca L.
New Rainbow Six Content Coming Out

What's Good Games

04:38 min | 2 years ago

New Rainbow Six Content Coming Out

"They also announced the UBISOFT team announce that there's new rainbow six content coming so I got the press release that I have here. I'm not GonNa read this whole thing. But essentially it's the second season for twenty twenty of siege for year five. That's your five that we're in now. It's wild I think it's the game is just better. Operation Steel wave is what it's called an introduces two new operators ace and Maluzi new attacker and a defender from Norway and South Africa in addition to an entirely reworked house map and a slew of gameplay changes. We won't go too deep into the weeds here except to say that they're looking for from factions. That I'm not too familiar with yeah. They're they're unfamiliar for shore. Ace looks like it. Uses the attacker from looks like a rescue unit of some type and then Melissa the defender has very interesting character design with her braids but aside from that. They're they're not very familiar at all like they don't clearly belong to any of the factions that we've seen yet do you thank her. Braid design is a South African thing. It's not a felony design It I mean it looks like it's too thick it like it. Looks like hair on top of hair so I I would imagine that it was just something that they didn't enemy urged didn't dumb draft out natively like it's something put on top of an existing players show. Now that I see it up close it does look like a wig. Looks LIKE CORN? Row Wig omos. Yeah it's I mean. They tried how how someone is is literally amazing air every time. How do you feel about this choice? Are You mad about it or you? Like I'll take the representation. Oh Immune it's always a mixed bag with hair and in representation for black women specifically but I mean they. They gave it a go and other other than our hair. She looks cool It's a very interesting gadget. That she has so I give them pass on this one. I have a lot of love remo sick. So they'll get the forgiveness this time. What's her gadget? I haven't looked at this. Just pull up the video so that Steiner and I can take a look. Yeah some operator. Gameplay yes so for from Lucy the defender Gadget is a banshee. Sonic defense and it looks a lot like diggers what I would. I forget what it's called. Whatever the anti-grenade where you can put it on walls or surfaces and it emits a pulse. Sonically that will slow and disoriented people as they approach it and from what I can read here you actually have to disable it by hitting it or by hitting it with something very very close range so it seems pretty decent on slowing down and that in combination with the new proximity alarm which is a sticky grenade that you could probably put on ceiling. This could be a real problem for for really aggressive attackers. I like that. They're putting in some of these defenses for aggressive attackers. Because I think that it kind of changes up the dynamic even though I think we all agree that being the defending team always feels inherently easier than mainly attacking team. Which is why we got the really aggressive defender in the last round. The guy whose name I can't remember. But he can like jump up level or ix or x Ten. But if you guys aren't playing rainbow six or you've never played Rambo six. Now's a great time to jump in. There's so much happening in the game. The Operation Steel. When does that do have a date? There did I just put the Dayton when it goes live Live delays date. I see all the notes here on the video. They announced this week in the description box. I could also pull up the press release again. Sorry everybody listening hoops. Nope it's not in the description back dealer so little halloween or no. Y'All know say not seen either. Maybe there's no maybe in the future this will be in the game happening soon happening after this show airs. We're not we're not giving area take we're just gonNA keep you guessing. Yes yes we will be no but this really really

Ubisoft Norway Melissa South Africa Steiner Lucy Dayton
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:18 min | 2 years ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"This ovid nineteen pandemic horrifying as it ease. Ease making us old. Think deeply about what comes afterwards about what out. Society will o'clock about what sort of society we? What's been really incredible? He's seeing how quickly the world can mobilize when it really needs to not quickly enough. Shore and the economic consequences are already devastating about four a behemoth of Planet. We have found a common purpose. Eradicating the pandemic. It's Natasha Mitchell joining you for science fiction and given all that. What could we mobilize around next if there was similar will mitigating climate change? What about the mountains of waste we generate as a species we flush freshwater Dan at Danny's landfill is piling up Arandas? Chana doesn't want out rubbish for recycling anymore and we throw out perfectly. Edible food by the ton make sense. No not really so I want you to meet to revolutionaries who have been well breaking rules to change. The world to me is a reflection of in particular in urban our society. That's not working. The fact that we twelve thousand years ago there was four million people on the planet and you sort of think so we take Melbourne and we better data across the planet and they probably created waste but it was Beautifully by the planet putting on being people on the planet and the same model. We exactly the same model now. It's clearly not an appropriate model anymore. We have a million tons of waste water a day in Melbourne. And what we do is we clean it up enough or we put it in a hole. We'll put it in the air or put it in the sea and we say our hope. The planet just fixes that problem and at some point probably when we hit a bad abi and people the planet's wasn't able to fix that problem anymore and so the model of waste that says that we can just put it out there and the planet will assimilated hall or in the Sea. He's finished so for me. Waste Rip presents a problem that we have to solve. That goes back a very long way. So it's hard to solve. I want you to make precipitated scales a chemical engineer and director of the particulate fluids processing center at University of Melbourne. He's a problem solver an inventor a makeup from water reuse and recycling to enormous batteries powered by your piece. Joost Becker is an environmental activist. Experimental End Artists to in two thousand twelve opened. The world's first zero waste RISTORANTE SILO BY JOOST. And they join me. As part of an event at the science gallery. Millwood's last pop-up exhibition called disposable. I want to talk about what happens when you try to challenge systems as they are to cleverly rethink how we use wise because what. We've got here people who do that and joost. You decided early on that you were going to respond to the the whole West Challenge and goes zero waste and not only that trying to open up a restaurant that was wholly zero waste. So what did that look like what most people do is? They see the waste product and then try and work out what to do with the waste product. I go back and look at the system if the system is generating something that is now used in the system needs to change. And so. That's what I did basically just change the system so the milk I spoke to a dairy fabric supply me and stainless steel cake so we developed like tap system we ground our own flow because we we have our own flower roll around oats. We spoke to winemakers about putting wine in kegs. One on tap might our own data everything that kind of generated waste but an even does myself. Yeah but this is much that has has come from that. I mean that was a forty two square meter cafe and it has caused ripples across the world is stuff going on in New York and in London in China and in South America. That has happened because of that cafe. Today I was sent an image of a Steiner Steel Keg and the farmer has worked for four years with the health department to try and get his keg approved now. Just my little cafe was like you know quarter of a million milk bottles or some crazy amount of milk bottles that we didn't need to buy that. My dairy farmer didn't need to buy that went didn't didn't need to purchase them and then I didn't pay someone to come and collect them and that plastic really copy restocked because he's got a fat coating from this animal fat on it. Which makes it really difficult to recycle it. So you know there's so many things and then in two thousand twelve the year on Harvesting was that was completely illegal but like my main sponsor was the city of Melbourne and had the city of Melbourne. Lago all over it and I thought if I'm going to get a crack at this I'm going to do it now. Okay so you're on harvesting in a commercial restaurant space. What were you doing because you're pushing the boundaries in all sorts of directions in this cap so people will come in and inspect building and go on my God. We had no chemical us. We had so much stuff this allies of things going on that for for people that were you know from the council checking to see you know. I had no plastic chopping boards and I had electrolytes water so water that came from was invented for surgery to clean hands and clean surgical tools in Japan. Twenty five years ago. It's basically water with salt and electric current goes through it and kills bacteria instantly us. Four billion gloves every single day that get thrown away which ended up in landfill which copy recycled and now here nets. No nothing so no bins no rubbish. We had like a little jam jar that showed there may capstone came on the kegs so I had to work to say. I don't want plastic cats on paper caps so they can go into our invisible composter so you can imagine how if you don't have been you've gotta work it out because you end up being left with stuff you know. We ended up having this board. That big of rubber bands because everything on the veggies and stuff in rubber bands but work with we were just talking about a with. Kerama on unlike a twin ball toilet so that Iran could be separated and stuff toilet applies to boys. Talk about in the toilets. Okay so so the so. This is the Iran harvesting story in this cafe. What did you do? And how did you challenge the health authorities big time? This was instilled in me by my dad. Probably account remember how it was maybe three or four years old so we were living in Holland and I used to go with my dad so he's veggie patch and be little like delft. Were little bottles. It'll all these little things coins I'd find one that had all this stuff come here in the solar we miles away from any any city or and he said we'll hundreds of years ago. Farmers would go to cities and shovel the human manure of the trenches to re fertilized their soil. Because you can't just keep pulling from soil so became caught assist with that idea and knowing that you know I don't know what it is some safe. Three percents is seven percent of the world's gases used to create a fertilizer a synthetic fertilizers. And I must say that. That fertilizer isn't even a good fertilizer because it doesn't actually narcisse soil properly. What we're doing is with mining soil. And we're not putting back what we've taken out so for me. It's like logical that we can't solve this problem unless we start looking at putting the nutrients that we've taken out back in. So what did you do with Iran in the restaurant so we use it on grain crops so use it to fertilize mustard crops in thousand and use it as a herbicide that we did all sorts of trials different levels to say what kind of facility was brought back to soil? We ended up with three and a half thousand Litas from a five-week pop-up.

Melbourne Iran University Of Melbourne Joost Becker Steiner Steel Keg Natasha Mitchell Chana Experimental End Artists Japan Millwood South America Director China Holland New York Delft London
Record number of Steam users online during coronavirus outbreak

What's Good Games

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Record number of Steam users online during coronavirus outbreak

"Lot of the gaming news is centered around that. Unfortunately because it's really just the only thing a lot of us can think about these days but what it does mean is that a lot of people are playing video games. According to Game Industry Dot Biz a record number of steam uses online are playing during the current outbreak. Steiner would you like to read this one? I'm sure why not so. Yes as interested after less than a week's team has once again broken. It's concurrent user record reaching twenty two point six million according to steam. Db quote seemed just achieved a new peak. Concurrent use a record of twenty two million one day after reaching twenty one million and six days after reaching twenty million said Nico Partners analyst Daniel on twitter global lockdowns and self isolation due to cove in one thousand nine has led has led to at home giving becoming a save form of entertainment to pass the time

Nico Partners DB Steiner Analyst Daniel
Americans find oil in Saudi Arabia - Mar. 3, 1938

This Day in History Class

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Americans find oil in Saudi Arabia - Mar. 3, 1938

"Today is March. Third Twenty twenty. The Day was March third. Nineteen thirty eight. A group of oil prospectors working for an American company discovered a commercially viable source of Petroleum Mayor Demaim in Saudi Arabia since then Saudi Arabia has consistently been one of the world's top oil producers. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was established in one thousand nine hundred eighty two when even so combined four regions into one st through conquest even so called for searches for oil a resource that had demand and would be big source of income for a country that needed a boost in its economy in nineteen thirty three. Saudi Arabia signed a contract with the Standard Oil Company of California. Also known as so cow. So cal was granted the right to prospect for oil in Saudi Arabia's eastern provinces side note. So cal is now. Chevron in September of that year American geologist arrived in Saudi Arabia to begin surveys of the land by car airplane. A couple of months later the California Arabian Standard. Oil Company was formed. Cassocks name was later changed to Arabian American Oil Company or Aramco. Geologists began surveying an area around ideological formation near the city of Demaim on the east coast of the country drilling. The first began in April of nineteen thirty. Five in terms of the second whale started in February of Nineteen thirty six soon. More wells were authorized in the area. Those wells did produce some oil but most of them eventually produced more water than oil. Demaim Oilwell number seven at first seemed like it would also be fruitless. The well reached more than three thousand feet beneath the earth. And no water or oil had been found but chief geologist Max. Steiner key thought that they would find oil in the will and he told the company to keep drilling they did and on March third nineteen thirty eight. They struck a significant amount of oil within three weeks. The well had produced over one hundred thousand barrels of oil. In the beginning the oil was sent to. Bahrain barred for export but in nineteen thirty nine. The first tanker load of oil was shipped overseas now. That castle had found oil. It continued mapping and exploring Saudi Arabia looking for more by nineteen forty nine Kazakh. Now Aramco had reached a production of five hundred thousand barrels per day by nineteen fifty. The Trans Arabian pipeline. Had Begun Operations Aramco already paid Saudi Arabia a fee and other benefits but that year. Aramco began to split its profits but the Saudi government nineteen seventy-three the Saudi government purchased twenty five percent of Aramco by the next year it increased. Its stake to sixty percent and in one thousand nine hundred eighty all of course oil rights production apparatus and facilities came under government control by this time demaim oilwell number seven alone have produced more than twenty seven million barrels. Eight years later the company became Saudi Aramco over the next few decades. The company continued to expand its operations and production fuelling Saudi Arabia's economy of course oil production in Saudi Arabia has been an issue closely tied to economics politics and the environment today. Saudi Arabia is the world's second largest crude oil

Saudi Arabia Arabian American Oil Company Standard Oil Company Saudi Government Aramco Begun Operations Aramco Twenty Twenty Demaim CAL Demaim Oilwell California Arabian Standard Chevron Chief Geologist California Bahrain Geologist Cassocks Steiner
Democrats head to Alabama to commemorate civil rights march

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Democrats head to Alabama to commemorate civil rights march

"South Carolina's primary has shifted the race for the democratic nomination Joe Biden is closing in on front runner Bernie Sanders delegate total and Tom Steiner has dropped out the seven remaining candidates are focused on super Tuesday when fourteen states way N. including Alabama as NPR's Scott Detrow reports most presidential candidates will be in Selma Alabama today to commemorate the famous civil rights March that happened there Vermont senator Bernie Sanders will not be among them despite the fact that he regularly cites Dr Martin Luther king junior on the campaign trail instead Sanders will be campaigning in California with events in San Jose and Los Angeles California is a key state in Sanders super Tuesday strategy he spent a lot of time there and a lot of money advertising there this morning the Sanders campaign announced it had raised forty six million dollars in February that will give them the resources to keep airing advertising in organizing in a lot of states as the race becomes national over the next few weeks former vice president Joe Biden another candidates are having to scramble to catch up on the fundraising

South Carolina Joe Biden Tom Steiner Alabama NPR Scott Detrow Selma Alabama Senator Bernie Sanders California San Jose Los Angeles California Vermont Dr Martin Luther Vice President
"steiner" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"steiner" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Mr Steiner this is I think she was talking about my plan not yours I think we were talking about maths and it doesn't take two hours talk about what we let's talk about okay so here's the thing thing is what will happen senator Sanders it is my turn this was a point when a great don't you love listening to five people talking over each other for people I I mean it's like your tripping on acid listening to I don't know I can't think of some complicated music that like your whole brain for gonna blow up or something I don't yeah I mean it's like it's easy we can't comprehend it's just it's thank insanity somebody tell me a long time ago in radio that you know a coach of some sort that you don't everyone have they can't stand when people talking over each other and there's your proof him it's hard even listen that's painful and what else we here's here's more of the same talking over bickering listen to this I have worked tirelessly on this and you know I'm right you wrote the crime bill we hundreds of thousands of young black and Latino okay let let let me say something.

Mr Steiner senator Sanders
"steiner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"steiner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Came in and kicked down the door pulled a gun on my my my my little girls and and rabies and say we got to come out to his house living also issued the soldiers were taking over his property they wanted it for a military post and because they had absolute power Steiner couldn't stop them the soldiers grabbed his family's belongings and started throwing them out the window Steiner picked up what he could carry within a few minutes he and all of his kids were on the side of the road with the baby and to may crying in his wife's arms only thing I can think is getting a gun and you know it I'd suicide mission the body was because I did see him wife convinced me that that was a stupid bank van but because my children's on the streets wife looking at me like you know I'll just talk to you know just get bogged down the house I can't do anything I have no clue of what you know what I would do they ended up living in a single room concrete house in the jungle with no electricity or running water the government soldiers were supposed to bring water but some weeks they wouldn't come at all Hey you know me we as my you know who was who when they say pop it cool what they have but you do have water you know so when they say they won't want to are you more even in the in the states we have to drink from a different waterfront this year the water that was that was sort of the breaking point that thing for me because I had nothing else this idea that was born the moment the soldiers kicked in the door of his house started to get bigger and bigger until it wouldn't.

Steiner
"steiner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"steiner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Of Steiner's pub and you get a chance to win series tickets series like a series of games with the Oakland a is a home series in September and he's played pretty good ball right now right now one of the wild card teams so we will get you details on that but if you go to that link they've got everything there the the ball park dot com slash Steiner's part without further ado we welcome in more Clark's playbill dot com on the play book dot com celebrity guests on Morgan I've course going through the college football and give going out for directly so we've hit the I market we've hit the I and talking a little independent football and we've got six independence this year so they seem to be you know climbing up the ladder just a little bit and we'll start alphabetically like we usually do with army black knights Jeff market what a job he's doing thirty five and twenty eleven into last year remember thirteen games last year and arms can play thirteen games this year in the regular season so when you do those win totals make sure you know army navy and whole why those are your three teams that are be playing thirteen games so take that into consideration if you're gonna do it over under mark to me Calvin Hopkins one of the sneak your quarterbacks in the country a kid that can flat out rush the football doesn't throw it a lot but he can flat out Russian and you know through for a thousand twenty six six touchdowns three interceptions but he rushed for a thousand seventeen seventeen touchdowns he's one of those guys it'll fake it in the belly of the running back and he'll keep it a lot of times himself he's very shrewd slumped a pretty good running back kill walkers back as well left corner Jackson deep you will leave that office of line he's a senior how about plus tended to turn over department even more impressive but remember the running the ball ninety percent of the time twenty six sacks for armies defense last year the only give up three sacks that's because are usually running downhill but Christiansen Riley Maclin leave that defense mark talked to me about this or meaty because on the defensive side of the ball they did lose for their top five sack guys but still mocking doing a great job in as a navy guy boy gets in my Craw man I can't handle it because armies beat as a couple years in a row now make it three in a row Kennedy taken down the navy so good times for army football these days especially under Jeff mon can and as you mentioned their season win total nine lamp wins looks a little tall but you consider like you say thirteen games to get accomplished you go up and down there scheduler this year and I just don't see them not getting the ten wins again this football season there dominating football team they have a lot of experience coming back especially on the offense as far as returning production starters go in you're also talking about a team here in army there's gonna face only three opponents had winning records last year so it's very very difficult for me to see anybody getting in their way I think our meat wins more football games this year than those Notre Dame you know more when you look at the schedule they'll open with rice at home west point but then go to the big house in Ann Arbor we already know harbor was under pressure it's not gonna be easy for Michigan to stop that option.

Steiner Oakland ninety percent
"steiner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"steiner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The singer, Steiner Anderson. He's known for two things. One is for often performing with the famous That Iceland is vessel rock band Seger. Sweden's Ross leading and contemporary the other folk is performing band trio the the remorse. These for medieval, well over twenty ice Iceland, going on thirty poems years, that have and this is from come their down album to us called pretty rule much unchanged. of three. From We medieval heard a piece times called in Pov the Icelandic vague language has before been pretty that much unchanged. a song called So Rio contemporary Irish Icelanders song by all the understand, band known as these the gloaming these old poems. from their album So from three an EP called featuring Remar the voice of Erla, by Olen, Stein hard Anderson and with the cigarettes piano played by Thomas will Bartlett hear their who arrangement produced this of album a song called with affair a lot more till breath kind of of yarder. electronics And echo then effects a song with a things much simpler, that titled that pronounce depart from the Rayo usual acoustic an Irish sound song of the band, arranged very played subtle by the and members very of effective. the gloaming and fee. Featuring But the voice definitely of Erla a bit Olen of a ARD different sound and for the gloaming. piano, playing And by Thomas at the Bartlett beginning of who the set, is we heard a noted Steiner indie rock Anderson producer here from in Iceland, the states. And and is the in Icelandic fact, rock the producer band Suge of Rothe the gloaming collaborating three on an EP their of latest remorse. record. And These then we'll medieval. wrap up Vil the set with an instrumental epic poems piece of from Iceland, the Swedish and band the one that we heard Veselin was called offaire via. ESPN till brighter. Yarder. from their album called rule Think of I three. just hurt myself. Now, the gloaming I'm gonna take record a quick three break. And when we come back celebrates their songs third with album English titles rule of will three hear some celebrates music from three Norway's decades baroque, of so being least. at the forefront But the song of contemporary comes from Scotland Swedish folk a song music from on northern the part of them England and another and tune from from the gloaming. that album will hear We're listening an instrumental to northern track songs called this time Paul around vague, I'm which John I think Shafer. will follow And the gloaming you're listening piece pretty to new nicely. sounds Let's begin in WNYC Iceland with Steiner has declared under April Sohn listener and cigarettes. as an independent public media station WNYC's dedicated to serving you Leave. and only.

Steiner Anderson Iceland Olen Erla producer Bartlett Thomas WNYC Yarder. Sweden Ross Scotland ESPN Veselin Norway yarder. electronics Paul John I
"steiner" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"steiner" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Describing mine is mine is worthy. Mine is frothy and minus fun. Salisbury. Go that could either describe myself or the coffee this morning, but I think it's more coffee. Feel. I'm today. I guess a little bit. Oh, fun yesterday. I don't know if something's going around here, but why felt good to just be in bed and rest up. Oh, like, you were feeling sick feeling a little something. Oh, but I'm pushing it away. Don't worry. Oh, you still have a little bit of it. Yeah. A little bit. Okay. How you feeling I feel great you guys better. Not get me. Sick back from vacation. No kidding. Are not. I'm not touching. You. Not even near you. I'm miles away. So no, I'm feeling good. Actually, really good. So it's fatigue. And also, just you know. This way. It looks out there the weather in the way, it's been. Yeah. It was I was worried about the drive this morning because. Oh, yeah. Sliding this. I have to stop real quick. Because this lex there's a reporter who I think is your like soul sister. Her name is Katie Steiner on channel four and she crochet as this hat. I gotta take a picture of it because she crocheted this happy kind of looks like a blossom hat. It's a full has like a flower on it. And I started to notice that she wears it a lot. But then I heard from the grapevine that she knits these hats, and she has like every color combination in the world. So now, I'm every day. I'm obsessed with her scarf, and okay, I'm going to send it to you right now. It looks like something that you would make and she's fairly new over there on the forks flip around all the stations. But and I just started noticing, and I'm like is it the same hat, but but yet different. Someone told me that she makes them and she makes like eighty versions of them all with a flower on the side. I'm sending it to you. And Don right now. Right. Yeah. So this is a purple crocheted hat. Well, look at the big flower on the side,.

Katie Steiner Salisbury reporter Don