25 Burst results for "Steinbeck"

"steinbeck" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

07:34 min | 1 d ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"All right everybody. We are back with another great guest. Here on the crypto. One wanna one podcast in manno man. Has it been a barn burner of a first few months here. In in twenty twenty one things have been pretty crazy. Pete's i mean we're trading these markets every day pretty much every token under the sun. What are what are your thoughts right now. High level on where this market is going in. You know we're recording. This is march. Second but pete's what do you think. And what isn't projections. i actually think We're going to need to calm down a little bit. Every single indicator is just saying we're skyrocketing to the moon. Were never coming back. And usually that brings me to some pause but my head's a little cloudy a little under the weather sniffly. I don't know if i'm allergic to pollen. That's now coming up in texas or allergic to bullshit on twitter but way times are uncertain. We turn to what we know we can trust. So we've got with us on the show today. Dean steinbeck from horizon. Labs our good friends over horizon that we know are going in the right direction dean. Welcome to one a. Thank you guys. Happy to be here as you guys know pete's just moved to texas so he's loving it over there a shout out all the all of our Good citizens encrypt nation. That are in texas Dean where i mean. So where are you based out of her work where you calling in from today. Yeah so. I live in panama city. Panama been here over. Yeah almost nine years And before that. I was in uruguay which is a little country in south america nestled between brazil and argentina. Obelisks espanol by no petito so awesome. What brought you down to panama. I don't think we've ever. I don't think any guests. We've we've ever spoken to have been calling from panama. Yes so not. A real active crypto environment here There used to be. I think a more vibrant scene But i i actually so my wife is colombian and so i guess in the end. It was for a girl but Shirt her family is from bogota in los angeles grew up in los angeles so this was a really good place for us in terms of Convenience in visiting family getting things done in. it's also a pretty awesome place to live. Not sure if you've ever visited but it's I don't like a mini miami but at a fraction of the cost. I love it at that. Sounds fascinating and really beautiful. I'll be hopefully traveling to some tropical areas within the next few months but until then it's just a whole lot of work and you guys have been doing a ton of work. I mean rolling out product after product after product over there but in for for for for listeners we've recorded several episodes with other members of the horizon. Labs team that focus on the blockchain components that focuses on the technological aspects of cryptocurrency. The conversation that i'm going to be having today with dean in pizza mind. Well it's going to focus a little bit more on the regulatory side a little bit more on the economic relief plan and how that might interact with the with the crypto ecosystems guys are interested in learning about the technology Check out some of those earlier episodes. But i encourage you guys to absolutely stick around because this one is going to be I think even even even just as exciting as the tax. So pete's how's that sound to you buddy. Sounds great not often we have someone come on the show with a legal background like dean who can give us an educated opinion and some insights into that side of the world. So very excited. Take the wheel in denial. You actually tell us about your background. Catch us up. I know you started out with the horizon team as the chief legal officer the general counsel's that's correct. Yeah so i My background is. I'm a lawyer so an intellectual. Intellectual property lawyer with a corporate background started Sort of very traditional working for a large multinational firm public feminine watkins and eventually a spinoff my own shop representing technology startups. And i was at i had worked my way through the ropes. As a lawyer was general counsel for the largest clinical communications platform in the us in the healthcare market. When i got the crypto bug and twenty seventeen and i actually Had the pleasure of seeing rob dig leoni the co founder of horizon giving a presentation and it was just like you know instantly. I fell in love with horizon. And what we were doing and Everything that it represented. I think like a lot of people and very shortly thereafter. I had left my sort of cushy. Traditional corporate job and joined horizon is general counsel um and then about a year later. We spun off a for profit called horizon. Labs where. I am c. Oh so today. I'm ceo at horizon. Labs and Very much in the still in the legal space also in the business development and ecosystem building that we're currently doing awesome. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna get a bus things open with a pretty open ended question. Have you steered steer the discussion but at a high level. What are the things the themes maybe you've been paying attention to here in twenty twenty one. Okay twenty twenty one so that. That's just the first quarter of this year so from a legal standpoint from a legal regulatory perspective. I think what's unique about q one. Twenty twenty one is we have a new administration in the us and so all of the major regulatory offices are being by new people or many of them are being filled by new people and the question. In sort of hashtag crypto lawyer world is what will the impact be from these new from these new regulators. And i think we're still. It's going to take some time for everybody to to know. But i think you know upon sort of first glance. What we're seeing is more crypto. Friendly and more crypto savvy individuals being put into positions of power So if you just compare you know people at the sec or cftc today with their counterparts from four or five years ago you'll see a notable difference in terms of their crypto backgrounds. And how familiar. They are with the space. And so overall i'd say everything trends.

uruguay panama texas argentina brazil south america Panama today dean Dean steinbeck bogota four los angeles twitter Pete five years ago Second rob dig leoni pete march
The Naked Man Flees With Michael Zwaagstra

The Bible Says What!?

02:36 min | Last month

The Naked Man Flees With Michael Zwaagstra

"Today. Special guest is author of the naked man flees michael's wag stra welcome to the show. Michael well thank you very much mike. It's a pleasure to be with. You appreciate you being on taking the time. So let's let's hear a little bit about that book. Naked man flees naked man flees while the the full book title. Is the man. Fli es timeless truths from obscure parts of the bible and seek to do in the book is to highlight forty obscure passages passages in the bible that christians and non christians alike ten dimiss With the bible and passages the tend not to have a lot of servants preached about them and to take a closer look at what these passages say in What possible meeting they might have to today. i've taught In addition to teaching public high school. I also teach a part time basis at stop five college. Which is our our local bible college here in steinbeck manitoba and i've found that You can never assume that christians know their bibles really well But a lot. Don't and i i know that on your show. One of the things that you say at the end is that you encourage people to pick up their bibles and read them and i agree. People should pick up the bible and actually read it because otherwise you're gonna miss a lot of important stuff that's in there actually. Yeah there's a lot of stuff in there. It's pretty interesting for sure. Chapter two for instance you talk about one of my favorite will if it's my favorite but it's definitely one of the stories that are in there The the moses and y'all we meeting them at the lodging place and he's about to kill him mad. That is such a strange story. It makes a stranger because it's just kind of thrown in there you know you're you're reading the story then all of a sudden this happens and it goes right back to where left off so it's yeah it's it's a strange one and it's one that a lot of people A lot of christians miss and one of the reasons that we miss it is that it doesn't make it into any of the popular movies. It's not in charlton. Heston the ten commandments does make it into prince of egypt and the exact. Yeah go figure. I'll read the la read. The exact passage is chapter four versus twenty four to twenty six at a lodging place on the way the lord met him. That's moses and sought to put him to death then sapporo took a flint and cut off her son's foreskin. Touched moses beat with it and said surely you are a bridegroom of blood to me. So he left him alone It was then that she said a bridegroom of blood because of the circumcision.

Steinbeck Mike Michael Manitoba Heston Charlton Egypt Sapporo LA
Australian leader seeks conciliation in dispute with China

PRI's The World

03:47 min | 5 months ago

Australian leader seeks conciliation in dispute with China

"If you enjoy a glass of wine every now and then. You've likely tried a bottle from australia at some point the. Us is a big market for aussie vintners. So is china but now china shops wanting to carry australian wine face higher costs much higher. The chinese government has announced new taras on australian wine imports as high as a two hundred twelve percent tax on every bottle. It is a major blow to australia's wine industry as the world bank. A hillier reports. China is pointing the finger at australia and says the country is dumping wine into its market causing the chinese wine industry to crash. Australia says that's not true. Still because of the spike and fees the wine trade between the two countries has come to a grinding halt. The level of the tariffs essentially closes a market for experts. Say it will be virtually impossible for steinbeck's orders to send bottle bought into china for the foreseeable future tony lane. Ceo of australian grape and wine says people's livelihoods are already being threatened of the twenty four hundred australian wine producers who export to china eight hundred of them sell exclusively to the people's republic that now the markets that aren't still domestically they've set the businesses up puglia round the toronto market. And now. we're the next older will come. There's a lot of guess uncertainty. In fear and confusion james robson of ross hill. Weinstein is feeling the pressure. This is terrible news. He told abc news australia. That nearly twenty percent of his product exports to china where his customers usually place big orders in october to prepare for chinese new year. And we haven't done any of that this year because obviously that texting right. It's just not sustainable alley entry level one these ten dollars and that's gonna make it thirty. Even the big players in australia's wine industry are taking a hit shares in the largest one treasury. Wine estates plunged eleven percent when the tariffs were announced. But they'll be okay. Tony battling says because they can sell to other countries mainly europe the us and other parts of asia still under thirty five million liters of wine that is now going to be looking for a high finding new markets and forming new business relationships is tough though especially during a global pandemic and battling says those other markets won't be able to make up for the loss of business with china we got hundred seventy markets resulted. Even if i only christ bought fifteen percent that would still live. It's seven hundred million dollars in the red site. Clearly showtime Visit occasion is not going to work. Experts say the wind tariffs are not just about reds and whites relations between australia and china soured earlier. This year after australia called for an investigation into china's handling of the coronavirus pandemic since then china has slapped tariffs and restrictions on a number of australian exports including barley beef seafood and sugar agriculture minister. David little proud told sky news australia. That he's looking for clarification from china. Is that it is retribution. Rather than any specific issue that any whether it be one or the other commodities produced the trade war appears to be here to stay. China's commerce ministry said today the tariffs could last between four and nine months at this point. Tony battling of australian grape and wine says he doesn't see a clear path forward normally you can resolve economic disputes through negotiation. But with you can't get to the table. You can't get both parties in the same room or on the same telephone. You kinda negotiate in the meantime battling hopes australian producers won't have to sell their wines under market value just to keep the lights on

Australia China Chinese Government Tony Lane James Robson Ross Hill Steinbeck World Bank Weinstein United States ABC Toronto Tony
EP 50: expand1 - burst 8

The Indy Mogul Podcast

07:28 min | 1 year ago

EP 50: expand1 - burst 8

"But my father was a director. My mom used to be an old flatbed. Steinbeck in light, so it was kind of born into the film. Industry I guess files most. is she kind of absorb that a little bit? What was considered myself really lucky in the sense that I feel like I've had the clarity of water. was that a one or two from relatively early? I, H. I've always been really grateful for that so long story short. Yes, it's it's pretty much always being the goal sounds like from the beginning. You kinda knew exactly what it was going to be and what you're signing up for I think a lot of people. They don't realize what the film industry is, and then they get close to it and they're like. Oh, this is like way different than I thought it'd be making movies versus watching movies. That wasn't the case wasn't in the brochure. That does happen a bit. I do honestly I think I'm very lucky for being able to to start early on I. Think as well. And being up to live lane because it's, it's tough. Talk Real catch twenty two particularly when you start shooting because he used the work to get the to get the work, but you need to work to get the show on the first place ahead. He go by doing that so. So that's always a bit of a challenge for. fully what Meka's did you start in film school? Then we're the progression start for you. In terms of I left. I was like back in the video type days, I was a videotape assistant from about on. I did not attain something like that. As soon as let's go away to university. And then dropped out because I was doing crab movies, which essentially Super Super Low budget films. I would credit cards run. Max Out Credit Card. With. Mortgage their houses on some of the project. The hell that they put their relationships through with diabolical. Was Lucky enough to. To be able to be part of that and really cut my tastes on. Sixteen seventeen days nothing for weeks on end in you know hundred tend to great in the heart of summer in rural strata. Working as as standby props, person, not knowing what that is that kind of stuff so talking about? Roll onset dislike helping out in any capacity that you can whatsoever hundred percent just whatever would get me on the door and would. Give me an opportunity to say what each department didn't ask questions and watch how they speak to Catherine or you know. San Recorders was picture director Encarta. Mix All that often and help that to form your own opinion of what it is that you think you want to do and how best to go about doing it. Because, we hear I. Think a lot of the questions that we get on the show from a lot of aspiring VP's or people that are teeth, and they want to shoot the bigger work right, and we often hear the story about like you gotta cut your teeth and get onto a set. However you can write, and oftentimes means like you know working in not the best conditions like sacrificing pay and things like that is not really the only way that you see is like to be able to do this kind of worker to be able to level up and be able to do larger work. I think that there's a lot more an our speaking like a veteran I think there's a lot more avenues for getting access to the film. Industry they used is than it was quote unquote when I started to hear. It. Veteran and some degree. It's A. There was I. Mean I think. The most accessible ever being this particular time you know you don't need. Very much money will very much equipment to make something you'll sell. Literally everybody's device has a camera these days with the ability of you know multiple different soul that. Tell you about that, but but when I started, it was. Sixteen no thirty five mill- ball likes super rights. End. It was very embryonic dies of HD videography. Nephew wanted to shoot anything that had any degree of. Resolution like it was, it was film really is what you had to start. There wasn't really that many alternative, and there are inherent hod. Costs was shooting on film that you don't necessarily get shooting digitally these days. But as far as To only work, come up through the ranks on a film set. If familiar worked really well because I love the practical experience of things. V theories equally important by. Like watching somebody, do it and learning than reading about it for me. Personally I think when I started to. There was a film school auction in Australia and rejected from when I was twenty twenty one because I think I was too young. Or not good enough. To Young, you're going to blame it on that. So but to be honest with you. Blessing I remember the time thinking. I was quite disheartened because I thought that that was that was the one thing that would kind of expedite the process, a lot faster and really steamy in the in the direction. That was show that I wanted to go, but in hindsight, the amount of extra practical experience got literally working across multiple departments as well not literally, not not specifically just in the camera department. Because, there's obviously a certain amount of Experience economy. Must they had before? You get into especially if you're if you go in as a as a Lotta physically. Arolla films with four hundred dollars at the beginning of the day, but by the end of it once it's been exposed, it's worth how many hundreds of thousands of and that's your responsibility. At, the end of the night to make sure that everybody's work is looked after. So so I, don't think it's the only white, but for me. It was definitely the right way. I think I think that makes sense, too. Because a lot of people I think a lot of people do quit that point right like I. I know personally from listeners that have kind of said like. I didn't make it into films school, so because of that that's the reason why quit and left. Did something else the? The reasoning is that these people they come from this kind of mindset of like okay. There's how many working directors DP's in the world. And then there's how many students that come up for. If I couldn't even make it into that, then you know what my chances of winning the lottery and it sounds like it sounds like you're saying that doesn't really matter as much or you shouldn't take that instead. It's real sifting. Sifting crisis I think as well connor really weights out the people that the men and women that are really. have their sought set on it and are dedicated and prepared to put the. Doing it because it's very, it is very competitive. Having said that there's also an avenue now where there so much content being made and being able to be distributed in a way that maybe there wasn't fifteen years ago. So having said that there's also a lot more things I think getting now than. It was fifteen years ago, so just by that alone. There's enough. Theoretically, that should be enough you if he wanted out. The absolutely so sounds like. Find. A group of people that are mortgaging their houses and doing credit card foams. Very realistic. But it's finding. Was Dome car and had an old tonight. It was a nine hundred sixty five Volkswagen. Beetle and I had to push data, and that was my phone payment. The first from the first film that I did I didn't work. Talking about like someone was like I. Have This this car garage? Hot prop confident film and I. It was too expensive to get rid of it, so they just gave it to me the end of my that problem, even though it didn't really work. And, that was my full time. I think I was eighteen at the time in half. Something like that. This is a futures shortages of the major. Film we shot her. Five or six weeks out in in a place called book, which was it's about eight hundred Columbus, so it's at. Five, hundred miles, or so in north west of Sydney in the heart of summer. It's about fifty degrees in the shade Celsius. Everybody was. Killing with eight strike. And still summer wasn't enough to dissuade them from doing. The very end. On your show sweet i. Literally every time I had to stop I had to push the

Director Steinbeck Onset Meka Sydney VP Catherine Volkswagen San Recorders Nephew Australia Columbus Connor Beetle
Travel to Asheville, North Carolina

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

07:55 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Asheville, North Carolina

"I'd like to welcome the show music journalist. Bill Kopp who come to talk to us about Asheville North Carolina Bill. Welcome to show. Thanks for having me on to treat. I've learned a lot listening to previous episodes well and I was telling bill before we started recording that I about a week ago had a trip plan to Ashville. That's gotten trumped by some other opportunities. That have come up. But why should someone plan a trip to Asheville? Ashville is really ECLECTIC and Funky. It's it has food. Music Arts Performing Arts something for everyone in Asheville in one of the things that it's really remarkable about it. Is that not a big city? It's got very humid scale. Outside of the day trip. Everything here is either walkable or a few minutes drive. And it's a lot more artistic and cosmopolitan than one might expect of a city nestled in the on the Blue Ridge. Mountains excellent. Well what are you gonNA recommend for us to do? When we come to Asheville North Carolina a one week itinerary for example. I would suggest three days downtown two days on the outskirts and then potentially two or three days worth of day trips because in an hour of here by car. Of course there's a quite a bit of things to see and do that are different from the experience of being in Asheville proper. We started as downtown. What are we going to do downtown? When you're downtown Nashville. My suggestion would be to take as much local color as possible. Try to do and see and do the things that make Ashfield. You need that means skipping stuff that you could do elsewhere like golf and chain restaurant Golfing. We obtain restaurants those great but experiencing those doesn't really play into the things that make Ashville different from any other place will and when you say downtown. I assume we're downtown there amidst the skyscrapers. Not Not really okay. I haven't actually counted but I would say the number of buildings we have their over ten stories. Kp More than a dozen skyscrapers definitely not. It's Not New York City when you're walking down the street and you're in a canyon with giant tall buildings on either side. You could actually walk from one end of downtown to the other assuming you don't stop and there's plenty of reasons to stop in about twenty minutes about a mile across at the most. And what are we doing? Big thing to do here is to park your car and get out and walk around. People Watch dig into our local history which includes figures like Oh henry quote unquote favorite son. Thomas Wolfe Robert moog pretty much the inventor of the Synthesizer Buckminster Fuller Scott Zelda Fitzgerald. All those people have significant parts of their history. Spent living working and creating Nashville. So there's all kinds of things connected with them. Asheville has more art deco architecture per capita than any American city except Miami which is a little unusual the reason it does is because the city was in such dire financial straits after the depression that for many many many years the city was mired in debt and couldn't afford to knock down the old buildings so when things improved. Those buildings were renovated and fix back up. Now we have all these beautiful old buildings that we otherwise have and that you are likely to find in another city our size opinion down to be a little more specific here so if I want to see some of the best of our DECA. Let's say where am I going to start walking? In what direction. GonNa head start at City Hall. Which looks like a wedding cake okay. It's an unusual looking building there. A couple of their buildings right around but it started there and that's pretty much on the east end of downtown and so from there block West towards the mountain manager in every direction Ashville. Is it about twenty two hundred feet above sea level but if you go in any direction where South East or west. You're going to get to mountains in a little bull. If you go west about forty five minutes you drop out of the mountains down into the the Piedmont you drop a good thousand feet elevation. So we're right on the edge of the out range but we are in a valley so we're surrounded by aunts and you say go and People Watch best place in Ashville for people watching a place called Pritchard Park. Which when I moved here twenty years ago was a bus terminal and now it's a city park a triangular park probably nowhere near acres quite small. But it's a great place to people watch. There are permanent. Chess sets set up for people to play on and on Friday nights. One of the most quintessential Ashville things of all the drum circle. I saw pictures of this. Okay good people from every walk of life. Young old doesn't matter what show up. Some of them are serious poly rhythmic percussionist. Others of the May have never hit a drum in their life before. And they all come together and beat the heck drums and it's a communal experience. And it's not one of these sort of things. Where if you walk up with tambourine or a drum that you've just bought or borrowed or something you're not gonna get dirty looks from the local saying who are you. It's a very open welcoming thing and it's like nothing else and it's loud but in a good way and when you say drum circle I. Emily think there's a little bit of a hippy. Culture left Nashville. Am I way off base here? There's more than a little bit. Yes ashville is unique in that. I've been here twenty years and I moved here from Atlanta Bailey because I really wanted to make a lifestyle change. I wanted to get out of the rat race. A little bit and my story is far from unique almost everyone. I know who is a transplant here? Maybe not most of the people but it's quite a few of the people they've moved here because of quality of life issues. They didn't move here because they for some corporation that transfer the here. There's not a lot of work here. It's not that kind of the city so it's very very laid back. It's very Bohemian. And there are a lot a lot a lot of seventy year old hippies. Okay well and you mentioned some of well known people who have lived in Nashville including I think he's mentioned Moga and Henry and Fitzgerald there. Zelda actually died in a fire here in Nashville isn't it? It's not a lovely story. Scott and Zelda spent a good bit of time here and Thomas Wolfe who look homeward angel in fact. His novels are about Ashville. They're classified is fiction but they're really nonfiction. You've changed the names and he pretty much got almost got run out of town because there was a little too much truth in them. Perhaps so yes. We're talking quite a number of years ago. Celebrated novelist and his greatest work is from here. Enough time has gone by all is forgiven. Thomas Wolf House downtown is a popular tourist attraction. I can relate. I grew up in John Steinbeck's hometown who is much more popular. Now that he's dead kept writing about all the wrong people the struggling and up and coming and not the right people so wasn't as popular as my impression in his time.

Ashville Asheville Nashville Scott Zelda Fitzgerald Bill Kopp Thomas Wolfe New York City City Hall Blue Ridge Oh Henry Music Arts Performing Arts North Carolina Golfing John Steinbeck Thomas Wolf House Ashfield Pritchard Park Chess Robert Moog
Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

GOLF.com Podcast

14:12 min | 1 year ago

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

"This is Alan ship. I am delighted to be joined by Michael Murphy author of Golf in the Kingdom still going strong eighty nine Michael. Thank you for doing this well. It's a pleasure. You have such a unique place in the game Euro Golfing Kindo as in your early forties. I'M NOT GONNA say it was a Lark but it was a you're not you're not a Gulf writer. You're not a novelist it just emerged from you in ever. Since you've been this Oracle you've been this grand old man of letters in the game you you tell shape how think about it. So are you still tickled that all these years later people are still finding this novel enjoying it? Well I I love it. I could say channel that because it was not only the first book I wrote the First Book I never tried to ride and I started it as I was turning forty and it was published in one thousand nine hundred ninety two forty seven years ago so when I was forty one so here we are now forty eight years later and it has. His Life Taught Me. I could ride so that in itself was an enormous pleasure and a big force to shape by subsequent life. I never thought of myself as a writer. My brother Was the designated writer in our family might and he had been a successful novelist and my grandfather had delivered John. Steinbeck and Salinas or you and I were both born and You know rules can get us. Signed the kids growing up and I was supposed to be a doctor and Than the more for me Thought I'd be a psychiatrist. And then got to Stanford and found myself in class on comparative religions of that led me to the philosophy and the way of life that shaped me ever since when I was nineteen and twenty but never along the way there was thought. Start writing books so anyway. When I sat down to write this book really did come in a flood. And it's Been living in me ever since I've written eight books now but that one If it were to be one of my children Children it would be among my books. It was my first child by far the most successful and I would say influential. Books are mysterious things. I like to say sometimes. Ufo's identified writing objects you W os or you are os. Son identified reading objects that can open worlds to people. And that's what's actually happened with this book with golf in the Kingdom one of the things about our shared hometown of Salinas which is just a dusty little farming community in the Central Valley known to John. Steinbeck doesn't have that much else to recommend it. It's not that far from pebble. Beach Golf links which figures prominently in my life story and and was important part of Gulf education. So tell us about your early days of playing pebble with with your brother and of course guys would haunt the Cosby Klanbake back. When he was really a big deal with Hogan snead Nelson and Bing crosby's the star in the world so is important from Stamford but it starts with your golf education before that while. That's right I mean we've had very fortunate childhoods you and I and my brother and Yes we would there be there at the crosby so I get to follow Ben Hogan around and watched him up close and personal before and after his accident. Which was in I guess January of Nineteen forty-nine so he missed that whole year in the hospital but he used to partner with Bing crosby and that was fun and Johnny Weissmuller who was the Great Olympic champion of became Tarzan. And the movies anyway. It was those great events and of course plane pebble which to this day remains by far my favorite course and it has to be. I mean there's of course in the world I think more beautiful than pebble. There are others that when you look at them would be beautiful. But to match the incredible range of moods it gets into with the shifting light the shifting fog the filaments of fog that cut across the fairways and all but anyway quyen pebble seen Some of the players in particular Hogan up close definitely was an influence on on golfing. The King wrote about it will hoge himself makes a handful of cameos in the text. Including what was it? The moved you so much about him well his magnetism on the course then he won eight out of eleven majors. He played over that period from forty eight to fifty through fifty three and he After the accident he paid just eighteen tournaments through fifty-three thickening one ten of them. He won virtually every major so he was the top of the game. He was to golf then way. Tiger Woods has been also the quality of his presence and when he would crack this out Just by the second hole at pebble for those who have been developed. Now it's then built up but there was a big field of practice in the pros as well as the onlookers. Got To sit down and watch him. Maybe there'd be hundred. Fifty people big big arena there watching him practice and it was a sight to behold because he had an immense repertoire of shots to fade to draw low high and the silence and that meant a huge impression on me and. I'm sure that as I sat down to write though I didn't plot the book or shape the book deliberately around him that influence. I'm sure was like an acorn growing into this conscious. Us of what the game could be as a kind of If you WANNA call it Yogi you can call it contemporary. You can call Chamonix even exercise golf itself is what in the eastern martial arts. Would you could call a Kata which is a series of movements. That trigger it is said are esoteric anatomy that is the complete person we are both in the flesh and in our soul are in the consciousness itself and golf swing. You could argue is an unnatural. Act It's not like running or throwing which are species learn to do and could do To survive. But you don't take a tee up a ball and hit it at the on charging tiger you know as a member of the tribe so it's an acquired skill that requires the most gypsum concentration and commitment to play it. Well and for this reason he and other reasons it evokes corresponding states of mind which can be interfered with with strong emotions whether rage or grief or sorrow which can produce by this fiendish challenge to get this small ball into this tiny hole and to go after four five hours over the course of four miles. You know. It's on the face of an absurdity. A why are we doing this? And that can occur to while playing. Why am I doing this but you do it? And you have these incredible pleasures and experiences and then as I've discovered through Responding to the book experience you have to call super-normal Mr Cool or cold. In other words the game can do that and It helps to be in a beautiful place like Pebble Beach. The you bring to this conversation. Just leaps off the page. I mean that's I think why the book is in bird because as you say it's this pursuit of ours is is maddening. It makes no sense but we do it anyway. And we were able to put a voice to having a correspondent. Brad faxon about the book and he said what I love about it is it made it okay to to speak of these things and you gave us in vocabulary to this experience at the golfers of had. But I you can get those tools so you matriculate to Stanford and as a fellow Salinas Person. I know it's not the most open minded place to Nag towns little conservative. But you have sort of a life altering experience stafford and what exactly happened well. I was so inspired by this professor. Frederic Spiegelberg he them a born and raised in Germany and Taught was teaching Stanford Comparative Religions so I got exposed to eastern philosophy and meditation contemplation than and particularly the world view of Indian philosopher. A named Sheera window who had been educated in England very elite education. His family had instructed his patrons in England never to let him speak any Indian language so he wanted to English but he was a philosopher and writer kind of a renaissance figure and developed a worldview. That's been the most basic influence on me. There are many influences of prompted me to do what I've done and of course the mystery is. Why chose this story? I could have gotten so many other directions but I consider myself very lucky. A Norman Mailer. The writer argued that every aspiring writer is given one free one by God and that was my free one and it was the first one and it in turn golf in the kingdom has shown me that this birth of new capacities is much more common than most people realize because immediately upon publication people started letting me know about their mystical experiences called experiences on golf courses. I wrote the book on some inspiration but I if you had asked me then that people would be having experiences you know immediately lawyer. New York wrote to me and was just couldn't get over this book. It helped him understand that. How on this particular occasion he'd been standing on the T. of four hundred yard and there were no players between him and his forces have been the green said he could see clear. A ball marker the size of a dime on this whole quarter of a mile away. Two of his playing partner couldn't even see the green. I got it was there. So he wondered. Is this the sort of thing you're talking about or a woman rights to me right away and says the yearbook helped me in? Because not long ago I was playing the eighteenth hole of at my Country Club as the sun was setting and when we got to the green the sun had set but it was still shining through the green and I felt that maybe this was some after glow on my is some retinal shock or something but when they went into the clubhouse who shining through the walls and it shown like that for three days and I was in an exaltation and thank you for writing the book because I found author who bite understand this experience so when you then I started getting these things. It pushed me in the direction of seeing the genius of sport to elicit this experience but not reported by sportswriters very often. You know there've been a few writers who have glimpsed this John Updike. He recognized this and Bernard Darwin. You know the great writer grandson. Charles Darwin he read the links of either down one of his short stories. I mean he certainly could see it. The mystery of golf by Arnold Hall Taint. So there's been a vein of golf writing that shows this power of the game not only to enchant but to reveal these capacities so that in turn has led me into other sports. And so I've been out to meet with coaches and players of ever since about what you would call the inner game of Sport and that Inter has led me to appreciate how prevalent it is in everyday life but not commonly discussed and recognized until recently. Thank you God for giving me go for the Kingdom as my first book.

Golf Writer John Updike Salinas Steinbeck Bing Crosby Michael Murphy Partner Ben Hogan Pebble Beach Oracle Alan Bernard Darwin Tiger Woods Charles Darwin Country Club Brad Faxon Stanford Johnny Weissmuller Cosby Klanbake
#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

Latino Rebels Radio

09:04 min | 1 year ago

#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

"Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Mcmillan Roberto Lovato MPR Maria Hinojosa Brian Janine Ms Magazine Macmillan Salma Hayek America Folkloric Industrial Complex Miriam Gerbo Mary Ranchera Hollywood
"steinbeck" Discussed on Happier with Gretchen Rubin

Happier with Gretchen Rubin

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on Happier with Gretchen Rubin

"I'm Gretchen Rubin and this is a little happier one thing I've learned about myself is that I'm very literal I'm very straightforward I want I unfold in the linear way I think a lot about the rules and the right way to do things and while this is sometimes my strength it's also sometime James My weakness so I always watch for examples when someone sees a solution that I wouldn't see or grasps a possibility that would never have occurred to me one example of this has delighted me for years the novelist John Steinbeck is very well known for work such as the Grapes of wrath east of Eden and the Pearl for many years he worked intensively on a book that was a retelling of the myth of King Arthur which in the end became his novel the acts of King Arthur and his noble knights in a letter to his editor Chase Horton on August tenth nineteen fifty nine Steinbeck's discusses the problem of when in history to set his telling of the myth of King Arthur I know that for me as a writer the issue would have presented a very straightforward set of questions what period would I choose how much research what I need to do to be historically accurate did they have the rules of chivalry did they have horse shoes how exactly did people dress at the time and so on but perhaps because of his deep knowledge of the work of other Thor's or perhaps because of his own mastery steinbeck found another solution one that I know wouldn't have occurred to me but the minute I read his solution I knew it was exactly right now before I read this excerpt from his letter there's a backstory you should know when Steinbeck I to what Mallory did he's referring to Sir Thomas Mallory who in fourteen eighty five wrote one of the best known versions of the stories of King Arthur Merlin Granite Beer and the knights of the Round Table Steinbeck wrote to Horton one thing Mallory did he plays his time as before now there is a curious time and one I have tried to adopt time interval in the past is a very recent Conception for instance Julius Caesar found no difficulty in being descended from Venus and didn't feel the event very remote I have the following choices I can choose a period and stick with it making this whole work a period piece which I don't like because these stories are universal or I can make the past large composite curtain called before now that is actually how most people see the past in this pattern the lake village and the Tuscany merchant can both operate because both belong to the before the only things that cannot enter our the things of the present the now but on the other hand to human problems must all be of the now I read this Passage Years ago and I've never forgotten it because I know as a writer I wouldn't ever have figured this out I couldn't have imagined that I could just not worry about it and the minute that I read it I realized that for this story it was a brilliant solution if I were writing a story if I chose I could just throw in anything from the past that strengthened it whether it was. Berkeley accurate or not I have joust pilgrims gestures cathedrals castles windmills alchemists all thrown together in a pageant of before once I read that I saw the possibility when we know ourselves when we understand our strength and our limitations we can watch for opportunities to learn and to expand our sense of possibilities and we can appreciate better those the world in a different way or who would different choices John Steinbeck found a solution that I would not have found and I've learned from his example I'm Gretchen Rubin and.

Gretchen Rubin John Steinbeck Berkeley
Jeremy Pruitt Compares Tennessee to 'Titanic' After 2 Players Leave Team

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:04 min | 1 year ago

Jeremy Pruitt Compares Tennessee to 'Titanic' After 2 Players Leave Team

"The biggest story of the year to date in the SEC has been in Knoxville where Tennessee inexplicably has begun. Oh into Jeremy PRUITT. You heard a minute ago at his press conference but the biggest story in Knoxville today wasn't what he said at his press conference but what he said at the UH the Knoxville quarterback club John Adams joining US longtime columnist in Knoxville Knoxville John. Thank you for being here. Let's start with the the line at the the the quarterback club where he I'll let you fill in the blanks but he made some reference to the titanic good afternoon. Call I it should be in a coaching handbook somewhere where to a message to a struggling coach never bring up the titanic because we know how that story ended in Jeremy Pruitt with speaking to the quarterback club today. I wasn't there but he compared Tennessee to the titanic but he was relating it to a couple of players. quit the team last week. neither one was a prominent player they quit the team to loss to Georgia. Stay in. He compared that to the mice on the titanic running through the top of the ship which I think is a pretty good idea if I'm about I don't want to stay down there to bottom and drown at least get up to the top and maybe jump off if the boat and freeze to death but that seems like a better ending to me but I it just shows a lack of savviness so I think you just don't want to bring up the titanic padding because when people think about that Tadic they don't think about my think about an iceberg and people dying so I thought it was really odd. I I always thought they were rats too. But what do I know the difference between mice and Rafael you say my or I say my. Can you say rat so yeah okay. I thought it was too. That's it's getting a little too. Maybe maybe Jeremy say such a student of literature he was thinking about Steinbeck and of mice and then Maybe ending either by the way because of my thing coach okay. Let's get to the real the real crux of the issue John. I didn't think you would be in the situation where you're writing columns that people are studying examining trying to figure out where we're this program is and and she is a change imminent. I ask you I mean how bad is it. Where does this program go from here well. I I mean I think this is the worst right and there's been a lot of bad times he'd go back to two thousand and eight when Tennessee lost to Wyoming in a foreign aid. UCLA team and that's he's Got Phillip. Fulmer fired his coach but but to me despite what is what all is gone on coaches haven't lost two Sun Belt Conference team Georgia's state. It's a program that's ten years old and it's picked to finish near the bottom or at the bottom some of the sun belt. East so then the follow up that with a shocking loss the nature of the Paladin folded there the end to at best a mediocre a yoke. Byu Team MANHANDLE IN THE SECOND QUARTER GETS IN THE SECOND HALF AGAINST UTAH so no. I think you're at the bottom and I think it's fans. You can't help but look ahead and you wonder how can finish C. D. C. Gay okay you expect it to be Chattanooga this week an FCS program but beyond that you start looking at thank who'll Tennessee beat and what happens if Tennessee is one in six and I think that's a a reasonable projection at this point in Tennessee is one in six. How many people are showing up for these Games aims. I just think it would be a really bad look and it would be the critical stage program with day and it starts this week. noon game against Chattanooga. I I haven't

Jeremy Pruitt Tennessee Knoxville Steinbeck Tadic United States Chattanooga Sun Belt Conference Georgia SEC John Adams BYU Ucla Fulmer Rafael Utah Wyoming Ten Years
Asylum seekers accuse U.S. guards of cracking down on hunger strike: lawsuit

Marketplace

01:44 min | 3 years ago

Asylum seekers accuse U.S. guards of cracking down on hunger strike: lawsuit

"Of, Thursday to reunite more than twenty five hundred children five years of age and older meanwhile. Eight Central American refugees being held in. A privately run lockup in the Alonzo federal, prison complex in the high desert are suing they filed. A federal lawsuit against the company the GAO group and US immigration and customs enforcement. Attorney Rachel. Steinbeck says her clients. Were denied the basic necessities that everyone needs to live On clothes to wear dirty underwear that had already been warned by The food they were giving us with completely out of all Rock-hard Denied access to drinking, water, heating During a press conference outside. The ice building in downtown LA this morning, Steinbeck's said the eight men staged a peaceful hunger strike to. Get the, attention of ice officials she says geo guards responded by spraying pepper spray on the men from head to toe beating them. And throwing them into a wall Steinbeck says the prisoners were. Then put in solitary confinement bedroom authorities have. Not commented and singer and actress Demi Levato was taken to a Los, Angeles hospital today for possible heroin overdose. According to TMZ and us weekly also Angeles police would confirm only that officers rolled around eleven forty this morning to a home on laurel, drive in Hollywood for medical, emergency the twenty, five year old former, Disney channel, actresses struggles with addiction bipolar disorder and other issues were detail last year and a YouTube documentary bo-bottle revealed that she's fallen off, the wagon in her recent song, sober Finally the Dow Jones surged one, hundred and ninety seven points, today the s., and p. five hundred, closed up, thirteen points thanks to surprisingly strong corporate earnings reports marketplace.

Steinbeck Demi Levato GAO Angeles Hospital United States Heroin LA Youtube Attorney Disney Rachel Hollywood Five Years Five Year
"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to weekend edition from npr news and from news i'm queen kim this steinbeck festival is an annual three day event down in the monterey bay area and it celebrates all things john steinbeck this year the festival focuses on the women steinbeck loved and admired here's rachel myrow this year's festival is called the women of steinbeck's world and its focus goes beyond the characters in john steinbeck's books like ma jody in the grapes of wrath there wanna in the pearl to include real life women who influenced him like first lady eleanor roosevelt photographer dorothea lang and the environmentalist rachel carson why because steinbeck said the book that he most wished that he'd written was silent spring susan showing law directs the national steinbeck center in salinas when she's not teaching english at san jose state she says she wouldn't call steinbeck a feminist but he so admired strong resolute women he married three of them and he was very close to his sisters and his family and fished with women had women as companions et cetera there will be lectures local tours home brew fest and a taco lunch but the highlight of the weekend happened saturday night that's from a musical based on steinbeck's classic of mice and men which will have its west coast premiere it's one night only though unless the theater called the western stage and the steinbeck's center get the.

kim rachel myrow john steinbeck dorothea lang rachel carson national steinbeck center salinas npr monterey bay eleanor roosevelt san jose steinbeck three day
"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to weekend edition from npr news and from k q e d news i'm queen kim this steinbeck festival is an annual three day event down in the monterey bay area and it celebrates all things john steinbeck this year the festival focuses on women steinbeck loved and admired kiki witty's rachel myrow has more this year's festival is called the women of steinbeck's world and its focus goes beyond the characters in john steinbeck's books like ma jody in the grapes of wrath there wanna in the pearl to include real life women who influenced him like first lady eleanor roosevelt photographer dorsey alang and the environmentalist rachel carson why because steinbeck said the book that he most wished that he'd written was silenced spring susan showing law directs the national steinbeck center in salinas when she's not teaching english at san jose state she says she wouldn't call steinbeck a feminist but he so admired strong resolute women he married three of them and he was very close to his sisters and his family and fished with women had women as companions it's after there will be lectures local tours homebrew fest and a taco lunch but the highlight of the weekend happened saturday night that's from a musical based on steinbeck's classic of mice and men which will have its west coast premiere it's one night only though unless the theater called the western stage and the steinbeck's center get the go ahead to do more i'm rachel naira kiki dee news we'll tweet linked to.

kim kiki witty rachel myrow john steinbeck dorsey alang rachel carson national steinbeck center salinas npr monterey bay steinbeck eleanor roosevelt san jose three day
"steinbeck" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

WLRH 89.3 HD3

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

"I gave you a couple of clues so we're going to give you five points steinbeck's only pulitzer winner is the grapes of wrath five points for telling us what he was quoting with that title and another five for revealing what it was that that source was referencing well let's see grapes of wrath a quote from the bible that's an original source and what was the intermediary sore via the battle hymn of the republic champing out the measure success there you go ten points out quoting from the battle hymn of the republic by julia ward how which quotes from revelation in the bible chapter fourteen to be specific deb yes here's steinbeck writing excitedly to a friend about a recent purchase quote they cost are amusement quote for this month but are worth it you never saw anything so beautiful in all the greenness of our garden unquote but weeks later he had to confess quote i sold them to buy paper unquote much later still on the same subject he reported quote i mounted a ten gauge cannon over the pool with a trigger string going into the house i pulled the string and the great explosion went over their heads you never saw such a reaction it was glorious unquote so what the dickens is he talking about children ground up the ponies put them in cabin so wait a minute greenery or amusement all right they were beautiful and then he sold them to buy paper and then he launched them she'll get a long way to go.

steinbeck julia ward dickens
"steinbeck" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

WLRH 89.3 HD3

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

"Steinbeck wrote to radio free europe quote my sadness is for the poor official writers sitting in judgment on a book they are not allowed to read they are the grounded vultures of art who having helped to clip their own wings are righteously outraged at flight and contemptuous of eagles unquote eagles what literary work had been so spitefully judged geez i thought it was going to be lonely no no that's a nice gas so it's a work by steinbeck no it's not it's a work by another author yes from nineteen fiftyeight way past ulysses by judges by the authors fellow writers you know peyton place really did have strong literary value it's just that it wasn't between the pages of the book it was would it be a norman mailer book very good doctor zhivago by boris pasternak which had just won the nobel prize in literature and then the authors fellow writers were just falling all over themselves in their haste to denounce him so ten points for aaron side murray yes sir in nineteen forty four steinbeck telegraphed his agent quote please convey the following to twentieth century fox in view of the fact that my script was distorted in production so that its line and intention has been changed and because the picture seems to me to be dangerous to the american war effort i request my name be removed from any connection with any showing of this film unquote wow which film is he complaining about caroline knows i don't but my guess is eaten no later so early no i'm almost positive the grapes of wrath is before forty four i guess grapes of wrath.

Steinbeck eagles nobel prize caroline official peyton norman boris pasternak aaron
"steinbeck" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Exactly and it actually reminds me of this quote by john steinbeck and he's not directly talking about what we're talking about here but the comparison is is just beautiful he he wrote the knowledge that all things are one thing and then one thing is all things plankton a shimmering fos forescent on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe all bound together by the elastic string of time it is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again our is protected not from wind and ways but from the full blast of solar and cosmic radiation instead of rocky seawalls were protected by a robust atmosphere and most importantly the magnetosphere yeah the interesting other side to the fact that we've got this kind of connected consciousness that we're aware of like there is no real division between the earth and the heavens they're just different places the only real division is distance and so all the universe really is connected and does have a common origin and the big bang but at the same time that connectedness we use the word connected in such a happy way it's nice to be connected to things but you could also think about that is extreme vulnerability like you are right next door to everything in the universe that would crush in annihilate you and what we've got standing in the way of those those crushing annihilating forces beyond our power to control is essentially a big magnetic field and a thin layer of.

john steinbeck
"steinbeck" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"La la la arrive who gene gene the world came to know only made three movies three really big movies fits hail elaine at dang venue gonna do about you're listening to hollywood india they are you on the change gene was born in marion raised in fairmount and became an actor during his time at ucla and james whitmore's acting store and 1950 53 ilia kazan was casting for an adaptation of john steinbeck's highly emotional novel east of eden he and steinbeck were looking for someone like marlon brando lakewood east of eden come it wasn't just james dean it was honoured ted mcchord who's the cinematographer for east of eden and then the screenwriter was paul osborne um and i help if i'm recalling my research right hall is the one who saw dean performing in the play and told kazan to come look at this kid catherine pop culture expert at the indiana street museum have three who's years i'm one of the most iconic movies from the 1950s and in both osborne and dean were nominated for there were a clip from dean auditioning for easter here next paul newman now in the other dean wasn't brando says david lure the dean of do use a new type of actor free gift teenagers identity air.

hollywood david indiana street museum paul osborne ted mcchord james dean marlon brando james whitmore india elaine dean paul newman john steinbeck ilia kazan ucla fairmount marion
"steinbeck" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Urchins ball of which are edible by locals and command a high price today on the agency food markets as i look at this colorful tied pull i don't hear in my head to scientific names of all the critters but i hear the voices of the people who looked at tied pools like this and thought about them in a new way i'm i'm curious about what led them to this new thinking who they were and how they came up with their ideas 1500 miles down the coast from sitcom monterey bay california is where all these big thought started for ricketson calvin john strilly chance husband is an alaskan author who was a historical research on the ricketts calvin reserve aid project he says that monterrey in the 20s and 30s had the ideal ingredients for the creation of american thinkers who are passionate about what they were doing there was a lot of great food great weather and could be chilly there so it was an overrun with uh sunseekers it was just a great place and it attracted a lot of mount guard thinkers so you had well john steinbeck uh jack calvin who had been in california people would come from the east coast joseph campbell edward western john cage the musician all kinds of people were thrown into this melting pot and they were x people of the period after the first world war was a very creative time in american arts and letters when you think of ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald in paris this was the same period of time in monterey with a lot of.

bay california ricketts monterrey jack calvin john cage ernest hemingway scott fitzgerald paris monterey john steinbeck california
"steinbeck" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hundred two hundred but one correct answer gives you a thai here goes questioned five for five hundred points among this novelists greatest work are the titles the grapes of wrath and of mice and men wendy when do you know him sam go ahead junked plan book john steinbeck's absolutely correct you now have 1200 points kelly don't worry you down a thousand but there's five all questions left each of them worth a bunch of point six hundred thousand so you're not out of that they'll do it easily not that we want you to but well wake up one area sam you have 1200 kelly your two hundred six hundred points for this question question number six under the category of current events this oak park illinois based actor who passed away last week israeli kelli john own again i watched time is up you ever prima time another problem them with the rest of the question you can steal this oak park illinois based actor who passed away last week is probably best known as the father of frazier and niles trained denotes sam john maloney john maloney's incorrect the right i let her off john mahoney mahoney sorry that's good news for you kelly sam you remain a 1200 kelly you're a 200 there are four questions left question number seven is worth seven hundred points the great actor keanu reaves starred in three films with john johnny or jonathan in the title name one of those three films wow kellie kellie did johny nommik cnn when do you tell me your clothes john work john wik a john work i can accept that when i can accept i don't even know that janni pneumonic john whic and john whic chapter two were the correct answers you got that when kelly gives you 700 you now have a total of nine hundred sam you lead though with 1200 there are three questions left three hundred points separate you questioned number eight is worth eight hundred points here goes according to the children's song his middle names are jakup and jingle highmore them who jungle hammerschmidt sam waves fears bandages lead gm them so gyms as somebody named your must now kalinin answer you're using your lifelock jim call quick three one to ninety one seventy two hundred sam sam.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Critics referral come to your fair share it and i should explain do you want to explain were with which has to happen when the mother is screaming oh oh yes what would just happen is the actress social ronen playing christine ladybird mcpherson she just drum jumps out of the car out of the moving car this is the daughter she's the daughter just like she's so angry with her mother she just jumps out of the car that's right and it's the only like totally crazy unhinged thing that she does during the movie why did you want her character to start by doing something so extreme well i i think everybody knows what it feels like to be in a car particularly with your mother and or with your daughter and either you want to shove them out of the car or you when a jump out of the car there's a there's a quality to fighting in cars where you're you're trapped and it felt like it kind of gave the right tone for the movie and it's going for something that's emotionally real and then the entire seen to me it starts off with them listening to john steinbeck's grapes of wrath on book on tape that they checked out from the public library in the they're having this moment where there was crying at the end of the book and they're really connecting and then within two minutes it's completely off the rails what did you want a mother daughter relationship to be so central in your did over at torio they view well.

john steinbeck two minutes
"steinbeck" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"A week ago when a gunman opened fire alarms biggest codger gore's from highrise hotel are being collected from the same by authorities clark county deputy fire chief john steinbeck says all agencies are working to help the victims and the local community he as as all of our recovery now and we made get that messaging out of our recovery is going to be a very very long process while we wanna work as hard and his focus as we can on it and help the people that are in need for recovering from this and hailed together as a community a 64yearold gunman opened fire and killed fifty eight people at a country music festival hurricane they brought a burst of flooding in power outages to the us gulf coast before weakening rapidly sunday sparing the region the kind of catastrophic damage led by a series of hurricanes but at the southern us and caribbean in recent weeks nate the first hurricane to make landfall mississippi since katrina in two thousand five quickly lost strength with its wins diminishing to a tropical depression as it push northward into alabama and toward georgia with heavy rain bill price analyst trilby lundberg says gasoline prices continue to head downward as refinery or as refire 's hit back up to speed after hurricanes harvey and arm and they duly down seven fair the new average by regular is if hick and this is the same amount as in the prior to a total of fourteen have down momberg says of i could continue the fall from the current average of two fifty six per gallon in crude oil prices don't bound up gil not regain or spike up dan i think we're going to see more declined anywhere between ninety four and eight fans in devil day authorities say a small plane crashed into a home in virginia and thirty three people on board.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Senate senator mccain senator graham had been you know political grows so to speak for quite some time we've all watched that dynamic on ford especially when it gets to foreign policy on the issue of russia but i think that in terms of where all this is headed a senate majority leader mitch mcconnell saying he would like to see there be a vote at the second half of next week kentucky republican rand paul is that second no vote a third maine's susan collins says she leaning against the bell two towns in western puerto rico are being evacuated with the wall had talk at damn failing causing flash flooding downstream the national weather service calls us an extremely dangerous situation it is the latest aftermath hurricane maria now moving away from the turks and caicos islands as a powerful categorythree storm cuba's top diplomat says they still don't know much about who or what caused a series of health incidents that have affected american and canadian diplomats in havana with everything from string lost of brain damage foreign minister bruno rodriguez parrilla spoke to the un general assembly today reiterated his country's denials of what secretary of state rex tillerson has called health attacks global news twenty four hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries what are your business priority real canadian superstore presents real canadian super stories today paolo from our steinbeck manitoba store the we cut our beef fresh so that doesn't matter if it's a this stay horror or anything along those lines then we put on a shelf our customers like the wolves and we cut off from tripoli canadian is kind of how we've always done it not just a store superstore real canadian superstore are you looking.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"The john steinbeck cases sort of fascinating because it's been dragging on for decades ever since his death in the late '60s when he left the bulk of his estate to his third wife elaine stein back at the time he just gave each of his sons were previous marriage fifty thousand dollars and so all the copyrights and rights to adopt the work were with his then third wife elaine when she passed away the rates for that pass to her daughter who's his stepdaughter in this week who wow yeah that's interesting that's thatthat's part of that is not fair i guess what you would imagine um you know quickly after his passing his sons sued for more rights and they were eventually granted a portion of the royalties they leader reached a settlement with his widow to basically split the royalties with her but now this fight has gone on for so long that the two women involved neither of them are a blood relative of john steinbeck you have on one side his stepdaughter waverley scott khafagi and that is the daughter of elaine stein back who passed away in two thousand three and on the other side you have his daughterinlaw gale stimac who is married to his son tom steinbeck who died last year and gil steinbeck married tom after johnston make it already passed away so she never actually knew him and yet these are the two figures who are now clashing over rights to the estate in particular they're fighting over who has the right to sell film adaptation rates in theater adaptation rains to this suit was brought by his stepdaughter waverley scott khafagi in two thousand fourteen she busily filed the suit because she said that gale steinbeck was interfering with her plans to sell the film rights for east of eden grapes of wrath.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WCTC

"I think like ninth grade than that i was a huge john steinbeck fan so and ninth great i remember reading something about texas written by steinbeck for though i couldn't remember so i looked it up and i figured it out and this is what it is this is from travels with charlie in search of america cam i've said this is from steinbeck i've said that texas is the state of mind but i think it's more than that it is a mystique closely approximating our religion and this is true to the extent that people either passionately love texas or passionately hate it and as and other religions few people dare to inspect it for fear of losing their bearings and mystery or paradox but i think there will be little quarrel with my feeling that texas is one thing for all its enormous range of space climate and physical appearance and for all the internal squabbles contentions and strivings texas has a tight cohesiveness perhaps stronger than any other section of america rich poor panhandle golf city country texas is the obsession the proper study and the passionate possession of all texans i got i got like a chill when i read that uh this morning because that's the way i feel about texas i'm not from texas by spend a lot of time there is you know and and have just happen to have a lot of really close friends who are who are texans from all over the state way out west to to the gulf coast two awesome to dallas to houston and up in the panhandle an data pulled together man and this is as it beyond brutal i mean i everyone is watching these these video their miles are open the new york post has an very interesting quickie piece that you can consult just to like really taken the enormity of the problem and which is why i want you all to help and drew its i'll i'll send it to juve it will posted on facebook so you can see it it's a before and after about one and a half minute video clip and so they show the the buffalo bio and the surrounding neighborhoods last week i guess last week the week before and then they show it today and.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on KOIL

"This this is a lot of differences but i mentioned this on fox earlier today and i knew that there was something i had read and i don't know why the stuck in my mind from ninth grade a huge john steinbeck fan so and ninth great i remember reading something about texas written by steinbeck for though i couldn't remember it so i looked it up and i figured it out and this is what it is this is from travel so charlie in search of america cam i've said this is from steinbeck i've said that texas is the state of mind but i think it's more than that it is a mystique closely approximating our religion and this is true to the extent that people either passionately love texas or passionately hate it and as in other religions few people dare to inspect it for fear of losing their bearings and mystery or paradox but i think there will be little quarrel with my feeling that texas is one thing for all its enormous range of space climate and physical appearance and for all the internal squabbles contentions and strivings texas has a tight cohesiveness perhaps stronger than any other section of america rich poor panhandle gulf city the country texas is the obsession the proper study and the passionate possession of all texans i got i got like a chill when i read that uh this morning because that's the way i feel about texas i'm not from texas by spend a lot of time there is you now and just happen to have a lot of really close friends who are poor texans from all over the state way out west to to the gulf coast two austin to dallas to houston and up in the panhandle and data pulled together man and this is.

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"steinbeck" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:35 min | 4 years ago

"steinbeck" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Uh in georgia and i told him of those awful malloy he threw the tara below lift andy told me that there was a screw assumption that broke off it was stuck between the adler road any change the screw in particular myself he couldn't told me the odds you're gonna roeder was gone could have jobs or five hundred bucks are so much e i will i owed him not not just places go don't worry about how long did it seem like an hour up our end and uh other going back to pretoria on august mechanic a total strangers the time he he good friend of mine now he it but uh abby how would you uh come across guys like that now that often so at living data if i live in ghana in uh if i might guy can get over to georgia at wired room i got all the talk russ steinbeck yup iraq with what nepad the getty uh right before you get the feels quarter if you go up for the pods circle beautiful exactly will wrote a thank you to ruston back for coming the work every day and being a good honest dude and thanks to you joe thank you joe and debt him i at let me do this one before i forget also in the north end is a guy a young guy named steve who is a businessman he's got his own place and he makes custommade hats and their expensive but there beautiful genius that caps who make ball caps style i like the hat band it is real leather wide and thick and he can put your initials in the hat and he will make you want to order or it's easier really just a by wanna shop his skull william carlton and actually if you go by monica's than bovis he got halfblock up and it's on the left he's got a bunch of old singer sewing machines in there he's actually the guy the guy me interested in working the leather and his is hats are distinctive and they will ask you a long time so i go there and i buy stuff off him and i kind of it feel it helps me feel justify reid because he's a small business mass wbz cbs news special reports.

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