19 Episode results for "Steinbach"

Nicole Trick Steinbach  Helping Women in Tech Build their Brave  Episode 170

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

50:46 min | 6 months ago

Nicole Trick Steinbach Helping Women in Tech Build their Brave Episode 170

"Is this episode 170 of extraordinary women radio? Welcome to extraordinary women radio. I am your host Cammie Kellner women are being called to lead with voice vitality and bigger each week join me for wisdom field interviews with extraordinary women living out loud and making a difference in our world. Their stories will uplift Inspire and Spark your own Purpose Driven Journey. Hello my extraordinary women friends. Happy October. I invite you to pause and reflect on that for a moment. What a year. We'd been through right? Yes. It's nothing like we've ever been through before and we still have a journey before us and at the same time. I'm guessing that you've had some pretty special moments in this year that you're extremely grateful for so pause in those as well perhaps moments with special people. Life moments of achievement moments of making a difference for another and all the disruption of this year and all the unexpected happenings. There is good and I invite you to celebrate that for me when I pause in these questions. I'm grateful for more time with my husband as we work just down the hall from each other. I'm grateful for special time with close relatives in the small circle of connections that I was able to make over the in real life over the year with my family with my dear friends. I'm grateful for my circle of clients some whom I've been able to see in real life and have been just virtual some of them been in small Retreats and some of them been VIP Gatherings. It's it's been a good year for my clients and I'm grateful for all the things that they're doing. Now the world making a difference that's something I'm super grateful for. I'm grateful for this podcast and the many women that I've been able to connect with here dead. And the mini podcast I have been able to join that's been one of the funnest things of this year is being on other people's podcasts. I'm grateful for the virtual stages. I've been able to join and I'm grateful for my extraordinary young women ignite event that is coming up November 5th and 7th and the amazing lineup of speakers who will be joining me these past few weeks as I've just been back from vacation have been a spent putting together the foundation of the first virtual ignite ever. Well, this is the 6 year of Hosting ignite. It is the first virtual ignite and that in an in of itself has opened up so many opportunities for people to join us from around the world to try for me to try new Platforms in new ways to create connection and engagement and speaking of grateful and very grateful for the team that is formed around me to make this the best damn virtual conference. That's out there. I'm smiling as I think about all of its unfolding. It's going to be super exciting the flow of this month. The way it's going to we're going to be creating engagement and as an extraordinary woman with big things to do in the world, you should be there anyone who has been to ignite before knows that there is not another conference like this. There's more connection. There's more real strategy. There's more listening to your inner wisdom. There's more breakthroughs that occur in ignite all the details are available over on my Camry Gilmer.com forward slash ignite and I hope you will join us. Today's guest Nicole trick Steinbach. Well be there Nicole is one of my dear clients doing big things in the world. She is a Global Executive career coach and change Management Consultant helping women in tech level up their Brave. She is a former senior director has served in companies like sap and has worked in over 25 countries around the world Nicole innately understands and lives a skill of Bravery in the job. Failure. She was born into a struggling single parent family and with a speech impediment now, she's financially secure and biling both Nicole helps others around the world build their own bravery so that they can turn their dreams into reality like accepting executive roles relocating internationally doubling their income and thriving in the career of their dreams. She's doing amazing work around the world in her coaching practice. Let's meet Nicole trick Steinbach. Welcome to extraordinary women radio on the coal. It is so great to have you join us today. I am is so excited. I've been listening to your podcast basically since it started. So this is exciting job. Well and I have been watching you grow your business and you are so inspiring and it's it's just so much fun to see you all around the world pack out doing just amazing things impacting people helping them step into their Brave. You just should be so proud. Thank you. I yes, I am. Thank you. Well, you've built this extraordinary business serving women in Tech helping them find their Brave and you've been on Virtual stages around the globe this year. I mean, I know they would have been a life stages, but you went you had to go virtual with the with this crazy year and had been on podcast all around the globe and you've got clients around the globe and you've hit six figures in your business and a year off. Which is just that's that's so inspiring. What's your biggest lesson in this crazy year we call 20 20. I mean this is you've grown this business like this in this year and I think it's really important for people to to realize that we you know, we can stop and we can you know, step back and wait for this time to pass or we can just jump in and go out and serve what you're doing. So what what have been some of your biggest lessons? Oh, thank you for saying lessons cuz I was like, oh my gosh, which one so a little bit of an infomercial definitely get coaching join a mastermind and I had the advice and I grant this everybody listening, but you want to find a place where you're welcomed and uncomfortable. And so I got coached by Cami Giltner and I joined the Mastermind and I even log Went on this horse weekends, which has right there. It was amazing. Yeah, so that that was a piece of advice that I got home from every single person. I talked to about going out on my own and it definitely was just crucially important to listen to you, you know, ten years ahead of me in this journey at least and then women who are starting who women who have struggled and learned and can share that and also women who you are so nurturing but also very challenging so they they really push and Challenge and not that sounds interesting. I was an excuse Nicole butt off and that has been just incredible for my growth. There are things I would have never thought of and walls that I didn't have to scale. So that's been amazing. So that's definitely the first the second choice. Wine is to fail. Oh, I love that just screw up. It's going to happen, you know get it over with fail again, Um, so the the example that I use a lot of the time when I speak and and you know, people think failure like, oh, I I didn't get paid for services that I did or I broke a law or something crazy huge and that's not what I mean. What I mean is I started going out onto LinkedIn and putting what seemed to suit at the time and then based on, you know, how I felt about that post maybe two days later, maybe two weeks later or the conversation that Drew I realized that's not actually what I meant. That's not what I wanted to say month or that is what I wanted to say. And wow, did that pick up a storm? You know, right, right. So you started to see where conversations could really yeah Place think what engaged people And they're probably shaped your message and I'm guessing oh a hundred yes hundred percent. So at the beginning because I have been called Fierce throughout my entire life home. And that's what I was talking about because for me and where I come from that just feels very real and I didn't understand cuz I have a global business. I didn't always understand how that would translate even though. I looked it up. I didn't look at it enough. So that was a foul but also learning and then the other thing is a lot of native English speakers have this idea of a walk earlier, but if your fears you go to war, right, right and in reality what I actually met was Brave, so what was the difference is between a a warrior and brave? Yes. So being Fierce for me feels like kind of firing up right and external. Image of being Fierce of being a warrior, right? Cuz you're a warrior to or Warrior against something. Right? So your Warrior for the environment your Warrior against the environment being ruined right and bravery Can it can definitely be external but in reality it's a lot more that internal work, right and when I got out it was this huge moment. So when I know I'm in the right place when I start to tangle, right like you can feel that all in your body. Yes, like that gives me goosebumps as you say that by the way, and and even in the scalp, it's like oh and that's exactly how I felt. I I posted this I posted something on LinkedIn which is my main Channel and it got into the foundation and moved over to private message, which is where a lot of the actual activity. I was LinkedIn happened and we were this woman and I were going back and forth and having a great conversation and she's like actually that kind of feels like bravery wage. And when she said not to me and I said it out loud, it was like, oh my gosh, that's absolutely true. And what is so funny about this Cammy is that my husband had said to me, I think that's bravery. Like, oh kind of funny our husbands see things. Right, right. Yeah. Yeah. He was right. So I had now tell him that he's the reason I talk about them all the time. But yeah, so that is the failed. Peace. Is it will if you let it you'll always learn right? Right and it took a lot of courage to break so and and I watched you from the very beginning getting onto LinkedIn you now have LinkedIn live originally you were you know, you were uploading videos. So congratulations on getting LinkedIn live. I know it's always a big win when when when somebody can can gain that status and the reason you got it is because you create really interesting conversations on on LinkedIn page. So what what makes for interesting conversations? Oh my gosh, that's such a good question because it's being real. Mhm. And that's actually one of my lessons from this whole year and why I've been so successful I experienced as in my corporate space as well. The more me I was the more success I had yeah and online then I don't so, you know there there are some people who look like they have an app and it shows them what is trending and then on that day they go and they start a conversation about what's trending. There's a lot of power in doing it that way and if that's working for people go right for me and the interesting conversations that I'm in are definitely about things. I'm truly engaged in your living you're living in that experience in that moment. Exactly and that are a little bit kooky. Sometimes ya know. I've seen you doing and it worked so beautifully wage. Yeah, it's cuz I'm kooky and you're owning that part of you you're owning that that gift of you to be a little bit kooky and to be able to say guess what I can step into this and I can own it and I can share it and be vulnerable in this moment and let down the walls of protection what you have to do. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, so that's that's so cool. I love it. When I tell everybody a little bit about your corporate background cuz I think this is really relevant to this conversation. You have worked all around the world. How many countries have you worked in over twenty-five which is just amazing. That's amazing to me. So you worked in over 25 countries around the world you you've been in the world of tech for many years. Tell us a little bit more about that. Yeah, so I fell in love with them and check when I was a secretary at the University of Pittsburgh computer science department. I love that. I didn't know that. Yes, so I actually I don't play em. No games. I am not someone who's like, oh there's a new version of whatever phone and I run out and get it. But what I do really enjoy is being around people who smoke at the world differently who approached conversations differently and problems differently and that was my first experience of being around primarily check people found. I found it at first. I told my best friend. I'm like, I'm not going there. I don't fit. It's uncomfortable instead of. And then she reminds me that I was earning like fifteen dollars an hour. And this was in the nineties, right? Yep. Yeah. That's right. That's right. I'm going back and just it just I realized I was being stretched and I fell in love with being in that space. And so I my original plan was to actually teach English to refugees which is something that is very near and dear to my heart graduated right after September eleventh and there just weren't jobs in that space wage. Imma, just day essentially disappeared in my then-boyfriend said well, I'm going to Germany for eight months Max 2 years. Would you be interested in that? I was like eight mines. That sounds great. So I lived there for thirteen years got married to a German fella had two kids a mortgage and and I start working as fast so I did some actually English teaching for a while. As I was my first business. It didn't go well fail feel feel and then I worked at SAS which is in business intelligence package. That's where I started traveling and my boss just for some reason was like, oh, oh we have someone who's sick and can't do that. You know what Nicole can go up and he gave me this Prince with liquid questions. And that's all the prep I had. So I went up to the Norwegian oil company, which is, you know, not a small deal. Right and I was twenty-five years old and I had never been to North Pole. Adam speaking English and I never thought it would be there and I was just going question by question. My question there was no flow. It was just like okay question one is blah blah blah question. She was blah blah blah and and that's just started traveling around the world. Thank goodness. I was young and I had a sense of humor because he survived and I kept doing it and that took me a bunch of places and then I worked at a company sap and EM. Yeah, and it's the world's I think it's now the 18th most valuable brand in the world and it worked there for twelve years. I started in Communications and in this is one thing that I love sharing with younger people or people who are looking at a horizontal move is I started asking myself the same question over and over again. Can we change better price change better? Can we change better? Cuz you're constantly changing things and it was always painful and that's how I got into change management and management. I kept traveling I got to stand on a lot of stages. I messed up in every way you can imagine including calling the CEO of the wrong name. So I'm Awesome on the stage now. And and then from there I got thrown into coaching. It wasn't my choice. I wasn't certified. I wasn't trained. This is the worst of all possible cases and I still was effective and I loved it. Yeah, and then from there I just continue to build the skills. I never got bored of building the skills. And now I am precise certified. I do coaching through. I have Erickson. I have a European education and then I also have the sap coaching shirts and and I'm just looking for the next opportunity to grow. Yeah. That's that's my background. So that's so cool. How did you how did you get to the point where you said? Okay. I'm going to leave the safe corporate world because there is a safe safety around working for you know, a brand like sap and having taken off. Gone down a pathway within an organization like that that that was so so valuable to you. How did you make the the okay, I'm making the choice Elite. Yeah. That is that's a good question. There were so many different pieces of it. And so the the few that I like to focus on is I never so first of all, I say these are great place to work. I know I know a lot of people that work for them because yeah, very supportive and and I said that I never got tired of building the skills and wage. I got bored by the problems. I had been in the company for so long cuz it's always a pendulum right Library. I'm everything centralized everything's decentralized right and wrong. I had been facing the same like growth of problems and I realized that I was looping back and I I just I was in a meeting with someone who I had wage. For over a decade who really believes in me and I was like, okay. Well, you know team project team just make the decision and let me know and I'll do the whole change plans and we end the meeting and my phone is not as we're ending the meeting and it's him and he's like you need to leave because you care about the decision you care about the wet not just the how so that was huge. It was wrong, but I think he was the foundation of my income but also my community and so much of my public identity. So not my heart identity about my public identity, right. I did therapy before I left to prepare myself for the shift, which is really important, right because you had you had why did you choose to do therapy before you did? I mean, I think it's brilliant. Yes. What was what was the call? There was a global senior director. So I got a lot of confidential information and I knew that there was going to be another round of severance packages off. And my first thought was like, oh I can accept that and then my second thought just spontaneous was oh my God, I can't leave. What would I be? What would I do? What would I because we own those titles and the brake the responsibilities and the people you were with me and I mean we wear those I totally get it. Yes, and it was that fear and I refuse to live my life In Fear Factor. I was like, okay I then this is a moment where coaching isn't going to cut it cuz this is really like back deeper ma'am, please Steph and and this is going to be very important wage me and it was actually through that and through continued conversations with mentors and sponsors and friends that I realized. I was going to risk it and I actually got offered a pretty amazing job and I turned it down. I stepped out of the process and I'm pretty sure I made multiple family dog. Was cry when I did that but there was something in my soul that that said peacefully calmly were going this way and the right. Okay, and we don't know how we know what and we're going to work. It's going to work out and it it absolutely has so far and I just I am deep. Hope as a JK Jeep. Hope that it will continue to work out. Yeah so many moments of your own personal bravery that you've just shared here and and I love the fact that you decided you actually wanted to go do that internal work first to to to maneuver through that because I am guessing that that's a part of how you teach need to be brain is by helping them to an end to this internal work that we have to do. What what first of all what does bravery really mean to you when you yeah. Oh my gosh. So yes, I do and I've actually turned away a lot of money because the person didn't need coaching they needed therapy and okay pretend that my therapist. Yeah. Yeah. So am being able to to know that distinction. Can you put words to that? Yes, I can. So therapy is is going to help me and help others with a set of beliefs that go back into past relationships experiences et cetera to help me Resolve that issue and then set me up for coaching which is re-establishing maintain those choices and then putting them into action inside of the mindset that you have the feelings that you have the relationships you choose to have is that forward-moving now, of course, I'm hearing poaching. You're going to talk about your past experiences. Right right hard stop, right, but when it comes to age Diction right which is a symptom of trauma the symptoms of trauma is something that in my situation I would not I would not try to be therapeutic on that. But if someone else is already dealing with those past experiences and they're ready to look forward to those new beliefs patterns of behavior. They're not great time for poaching. I mean not not because I support women and Technology who were building Global careers and their bravery, but with another coach well, but what I think is what you're what's important here is that you're identifying that sometimes we have these limiting beliefs that that are behind us. We need to set free. Yeah where you can step into this next part, right? And I think that the fact that that you experienced that you maneuver through it you help assess help your clients assess that you know, and then and then help them when they're ready. I thought I think that's really so important to look at it. So how so yeah, let go of the we've done the work to let go of the the bow ties to the past and you're ready to start looking forward. How do you help your clients? Build Brave? Yes. So the okay. So the answer the general what is bravery for Avery is doing what is right for you. So disappointing everybody but yourself so, you know, for example sometimes being brave is not doing what you're supposed to do. So I was supposed to become a VP and then an SCP and then a corporate officer and then another right right you very setting your whole life up for that exactly. Right and and being brave is choosing not to do that and then a few years later realizing. Okay. What I what I'm going to choose to do something completely different wage. Yeah, so it's all about you know, just it's okay to this point everybody else, but do not just point yourself. And and then how do I help people? Well, I'm a bit kooky. Anyway, so based on tons of research. It's like it's from Pro side to Cotter to the European Psychiatry associations surveys and all of these things that I worked with many years. I've put that together into a fun simple action focused framework for how to build your Brave and it has three parts off and there's no right way to start and there's no wrong way to start but the first part is all about Clarity and I call it tell it to your dentist. And so it's about being so clear and so specific about your goal and where you're going, but even when you're done to us has you in the chair and the hands are in the mouth and they're talking to you and asking you questions you can describe wage. That you're going right? Yeah, don't just tell your dentist. You tell everybody else is left. Right? And I think that's a really important part of it is is you're actually setting the the vision of what can be by giving voice to that. Yes in in and the the advanced level of that of course is in doing it in a way that people can help you. Yes, ma'am. Someone says a lot of my clients will say like well, I want the next promotion. Okay, cool. Cool. So what exactly is that promotion by when what are you looking for, you know by influence or authority or you know money do you want to globally relocate et cetera? And the reason that that information is a is a really important is that if someone says to me I'd like a promotion off my answer is okay, but if someone looks at me and says I'm looking to become a software architect in the cloud space within the next two years and I thought To be at headquarters. Well, I know someone at headquarters I can connect you with right but the more specificity the more people can actually respond with. Oh, I have this opportunity wage rate and there's a whole brain piece that the more specific something is the more people can plug in like a puzzle and get more active. So it it triggers activity in the other person is really really cool. Yeah. So the second part is to learn it like a kindergartner and this for me, it's the most fun because this is where people realize how much agency they hack and how massive change actually happens with tiny little steps. Right? Right. So the way I described it, especially when I'm off stages is, you know, you think about the kindergarteners and and how small they are and they're doing the monkey bars really thinking about it the first time that they're exposed to that they tend to age Check into two camps. So we have a one Camp my son who's older one and he kind of like he walks up. He looked skeptically he watches some kids try it and then he tries it off. He he learns first and now that he can read and he can use Google he tends to research and then act right so he's learning and he's acting my daughter is the exact opposite. She will page run up to the thing hasn't even seen it yet it sleeping forward-looking go with reality. She usually fails and then she looks up and she learns right? Yeah. Yeah. So whichever one is fantastic what's important is that you get going you keep going and that we acknowledge. It's a spiral. So I like that so when people say to me, but I keep having these interests interviews and they're not going somewhere like really what have you learned already, right? What kind of connection did you Jeep in the connection? Did they introduce you refer to somewhere else cuz it's not wage. Bout of Finish Line is about that. I roll and you're always you're always on that Journey. Yes. Yeah Journey. Yeah, that's great. That's a great word. And then the third wage are honestly this is where most people spend the majority of their energy and their mind space and their heart space especially is called own it like black box. This is the resiliency and the consistency and the new habits and the relationships which is usually a huge part which relationships are really supporting you which relationships do you need to identify for the Future and Rich relationships are here right now to strengthen off and then of course habits take time to change asking different questions speaking less or more meetings et cetera. So this was only like a boss. I love this because it's it's yep. Been up and really stepping into the game. Right? It's it's it's it's that and I think what is coming to mind for me is how you have owned it like a boss and this year. So can you give a couple of examples where you have really had to own it like a boss as this entrepreneur versus in the corporate world in your own in your own Journey. Yes, so I have had primarily primarily people who identify as men to negotiate me down to less than 50% of my fee and you're really good at sticking to your fee. I know this. Yes, but it comes by hard and learning right? Cuz I I totally underpaid at the beginning of my career and when I say totally underpaid I mean like over 16% underpaid. Yeah, it was painful but data is important, right? So, yep. A situation even when I didn't have any income coming in. I still said no and I said no with confidence in my voice and a smile on my face practically lost the contract cuz they were people who were willing to go down really really low. Right? And I cried afterwards and I was been done the wrong thing and then I called someone that I really trust and I just said I did not mess up and I need you to tell me that I did mess up because you didn't mess up your game. Here's the story and she's like girl didn't mess up. And so that's an example of owning it that was really hard going out to my first podcast was I love podcast sandwich had put podcasts up on this pedal stool and so my voice was so shaky that she actually said hey, you know what? Let's just start over again. Let's just turn the recording off. Let's just have a conversation. Practice humans and then I could go but to own it like a boss in that situation was to say yes to the podcast cuz she found me over LinkedIn talking about Fierce and brave and the difference in the grass and then also being so humble to let her to accept the offer right but she was so who generously giving to me right and not letting her coach me through it was it was just incredible. Yeah, that's awesome examples. Yeah, those are great examples and and I know that some of your clients have had amazing breakthroughs and results having worked with you through this Own It Like a Boss perspective here like a story or two of you know, where where your clients and I know there's like the ones that are coming to mind for me are the ones that have really, you know up to their their earning levels because of The Bravery. Yes, I yes. I am so excited about this. So I love money down. Is going to be really open about that. But I also love when other people have money because I genuinely believe that we all the water but you know, the tide comes in and we all are boats rise being that and keeping the progressive moment going is very exciting for me. So I actually haven't shared this story yet because I only found out about it yesterday. Oh, okay cool. It was on a call with a client and when we first started working together, everything was in maybe Thursday or perhaps of you know, it was it was just a lot of searching big big growth and a shift and understanding of what was possible for her. And what about if it's possible then does she want it that kind of conversation and she had been offered a job on I believe it was like March 4th, and then we all went into quarantine. Yep. And she couldn't go back to her home country. She was stuck here. And in this job that she had been planning on leaving and then the other job disappeared because of the quarantine and the economy etcetera etcetera. She didn't give up she kept going and she had been offered a senior level job at a pretty small company was about about three thousand people if I remember correctly and she just let me know that she accepted a director role Global director role at a leading company that we all know the name of promise that super cool. So she she was really able to grow and expand in the kind of role that that she was at. Yeah, and she increased her off base salary by a little over a hundred thousand. Oh my gosh. That's awesome. Took my breath away. Oh, yes that made that investment in you very worthwhile job. Yeah a good point coach going. Hello. Oh my gosh. What's the value you just brought to her and that's her base salary. So she because she director level and going to have bonuses on top of that exactly and potential for stock if it goes that's awesome public. Yeah. So the other client I'm very excited about this is just happened the last couple of weeks like maybe six to eight weeks is that she has wanting to go Global has been very scared and definitely have the skills absolutely has the language as she's European, but she's also very close to her family and has been torn and that has shown up in the interviews. And so a number of her career a number of tech companies have offered her the chance to join them in the country. She's in cuz they they want her skills and her personality is fantastic. She's so khong And they could feel the tension of moving globally and she kept expecting them. So when we started working together, she's like look, I just want to get my goal. I wanted to do this often. I graduated University. This is what I want to do and a couple of weeks ago as soon as these are possible. She's actually going to move out of the European Union and she's going to be a flight away and Country of her second. I believe it's her second language that might be her third as an architect in a pretty cool space walk around a and robotic learning. So it's very exciting and it was about that belief that so quality time is her loved ones, right? You will have quality time and not live in the same Village right still be connected to your culture and not live in the middle of kaveh or birth. Their Mardi Gras, whatever we want to call it. Yeah Etc. So so those are the two I'm very very excited about and what I love about that one is is that she gave voice to what it was that she wanted this like feeling that telling the dentist right is telling people what you want and owning it and stepping into it anyway and owning a exactly yeah. Yeah and and and owning it to a point where the person across the tables like. Yeah, of course, that makes sense. Yeah. Yeah and and and not letting it Be Your brave not worried about what other people were attaching. Mm. That's really good. Yeah. Yeah. So what concrete steps can our listeners take from this conversation today really to start amping up raising up if you will change their their Brave So I have do ye remember choose? I have to so the first one around learn it like a kindergartner. Mhm. What I would love is step into a week just a week to learn acts a piece of your learning spiral every day for a week off. No expectations. See what happens and what I have seen and what I have heard from so many different cultures is that everyone is shocked at how far and how much more confident and more committed they are after just a week and explain the learn off a piece happen to that. So let's save our let's take our example of the last client that I was talking about. Right? So learn for her was well I can I can log Reach out to some of the hiring managers originally or the recruiters and ask them. What what told you that I was hesitant to actually move. What did I do? What did I say wrong? And that would be a learn and act would be writing writing down the opposite. What is The Confident? Right? And then the learn for the next day off an example would be hey say that in front of your mirror and experience what that feels like when you say it confidently and then and then go act exactly any I'm just even putting them to the terms of an entrepreneur you might stop and and and hear some reflection back to you from a you know, that really resonated with me today what you spoke about what what that message was and then to go act with that one step further the next day. Yeah. Yeah and in some times for the really high achieving clients that I have cuz my clients have already had success and now. Not next level sometimes the ACT is slow down taking it. That's so important right read a book plane holiday and then actually go on the holiday. Yeah, so it can also be it doesn't always have to be more or sometimes. It's do less have less take care of yourself learn out of that. And then yeah, you have to be able to receive that learning right to be able to even acknowledge and if you're going so fast, you can't even see what that learning is. You might just blow past it and if you're pausing to just say what am I learning today or how might I act on that learning that that's that's where would you have to pause to feel that? Yes. Yes. Yeah. Okay yourself and then the second one from them like a boss and and these to these two questions are so powerful. But please don't do them more than once a week because they're exhausting of people off. Had people try to do it like every single day and I'm like, oh my God be nice to yourself. The first one is what opportunity is there and you're not grabbing it hmm opportunity is there so many people just had a name pop up in their head because it's someone that has shown interest in mentoring you and working with you and supporting you and be supported by you being your mentee. What is that opportunity? What's that relationship? What's that negotiation? What's that habit? What's what is there that you're not taking putting your hand out and really experiencing who I like that. Yeah, and the next one is what obstacle is there that you need to address them again. A lot of people just had a name pop up right where like, oh my gosh and being aware of what like just with that simple question how something can pop up for us without Then you know just that little short prompt exactly. Yeah, and that's why it's important to do these and it doesn't always have to be exactly those words. But this concept of like wage opportunity obstacle benefit disadvantage Etc to do it regularly, but but also giving yourself space to respond wage. It was an easy opportunity, you know, I've already done it if it was the obstacle you'd already addressed it, right? Those are the ones that if we take those those big leaps that can really help us catapult forward as well catapult is the absolute. Correct word. Yeah. Yeah. Awesome. Awesome. So why do you why do you love women in Tech wise that your focus because I was one. Yeah, I started off like I said as a secretary and I was the woman in the room. Yep, and then I was a consultant and I was frequently the woman in the room and as I became more birth Senior and has more and more years went by there would be more women in the room. And then I was the woman who had responsibility who had the budget who had Personnel, right? And then as the meetings became more senior again, I was the only woman in the room and the reason that that bothers me is that I am human and I would like to see all humans. I'm a mother and I want to see my son and my daughter in the rooms that are calling them but also every single industry wage, which means essentially our world runs on the spine of Technology before covid-19. Thing so we've got to be really grateful for technology in this year. Yes. And now imagine if every identity every culture gender sexuality generation was a part of making those core decisions about design investment implementation coding, etc. Etc. How much more opportunity would we have? Because for example bility people who have hearing loss significant hearing loss are living right now almost like it was ten years ago, right because most software wage doesn't nobody thinks about that because he was making the decisions. There are two identities who make the vast majority of the decisions. It's the white straight male dog. In North America and it is the mandarin-speaking straight Chinese man, right and and and imagine how things would be different. If we're not open that up from a design perspective from a user interface perspective. I think that's definitely the opportunity that's in front of us to to Really create more of that kind of diversity. Exactly. And so that's why women and Technology I can speak to it. I know the feeling intimately and it's the first step towards full representation. Yes. Yes ya no. I totally get it. And I think that's I think that's why I'm so passionate about women's voices because it's it's it's the same sort of thing. I thought into many rooms the only female back in the executive days and and you know, I think the opportunity really to shift things in our world is going dead. You know, I believe that woman's wisdom is is is going to be the medicine that really heals our Earth. And so I love that you are really focused in on that area. Thank you. Kami Yeah Yeah Song can people learn more about you and your business Nicole. So for the fun cookie thoughtful insightful LinkedIn. Yes, fine Mama. Come on over definitely follow also send a connection request. If this is interesting to you, please do let me know that you found me on kami's podcast and then I do have a website and my name is quite long. So I took the Nicole part off and it's trick Stein box.com and it's Steinbach with a seat with a c h at the end. Eh of the end. That's right. Yeah, surprisingly. Nobody had taken that one. It's very interesting. I love it though. I am literally the only Nicole trick Steinbach on Google. Yeah, very cool and awesome. So you're trending him trending. Actually, that's awesome. That's totally awesome. So what the final question I always thought what three Pearls of Wisdom. Can you share with our audience today? I know you've given us a lot of really juicy ones already. But let's let's hear free more. Okay. So because I listened to your podcast I had a heads up this one. I got to think about it for a while. So the first one that I just always always always go back to is know your values. I was born in Southern Ohio to a single mom and I had a daughter and there were all of these ideas about what was possible for me and one of my values Choice growth and curiosity that has never changed other things have changed but the value of growth and curiosity and and later in life. It became also fun is birth. Usually important and know them and live them and when you are in those spaces life is better. It's just walk so your values experience the joy of failure. That's a good one. It really can be a joy. There's no master way to connect with people to learn to practice humility and then people are generally kind when when we are open to that right near open to sharing those stories a hundred percent. I mean the CEO who I called the wrong name. There was this millisecond of annoyance on his boy his face and then he walked onto the stage with this, you know, great smile, but his hand onto my shoulder. He was standing next to me. So he didn't put his arm around me. Well my shoulder that was important to him and he just said well, look at that. That's what's how long When we fail fast fail Early learn and move on like wow, you know and then the last one in this accomplished so much is different for different people is do less have less. Yes. I like that being finding that minimalist approach to living life more lightly. I just was on that page Summit Series with Heather artema and it was about just living life more lightly and I love that concept because otherwise we carry so much with us and if we can live more lightly, I think that money is a a beautiful way to just feel differently and showing up. Yeah. Yeah, that's cool. That's very good. Well Nicole it's been such a pleasure and not an honor to share your stories. Thank you so much. Thank you for being part of my community. Thank you for all the amazing things you're doing in the world and the women that you're impacting around the world and Thursday. Super proud of you. Thank you Kami. I'm so grateful to be a part of your grade Community. We do have a pretty darn good Community don't we have purchased a horse as well though? That's true. That's awesome. That's awesome. Well, Nicole thank you so much and you have a great day you too. I hope you enjoy this episode of extraordinary women radio. If you did, please share this podcast with your own special tribe of women and help spread the love the dreams and the inspiration. Are you ready to raise up your voice your visibility and your business. I invite you to join the conversation in my Facebook group extraordinary women connect this group brings together changemaker women entrepreneurs who want to elevate their business or impact. It is a place for powerful connections and collaborations. It is a place to be inspired uplifted and fired up for Action to learn more about my birth. That helps women entrepreneurs make heartfelt connections to mindful of growth strategies. Visit my website at chemical no, till next time my friend listen to your heart follow your dreams and be you.

Nicole trick Steinbach LinkedIn Global Executive career coach sap senior director Google CEO executive secretary Cammie Kellner Germany Facebook Cami Giltner North Pole North America Um Southern Ohio European Union
LinkedIn Data Platform with Carl Steinbach

Software Engineering Daily

52:49 min | 1 year ago

LinkedIn Data Platform with Carl Steinbach

"Sheen's running the dupe distributed file system in order to run calculations across its large data set Lincoln needs to split the computation up using linked in is a social network with Peta bytes of data in order to store that data linked in distributes replicates that data across a large cluster of me Shen and model training for machine learning and four analytics as well so by the time I arrived who really cemented its position patchy spark with the popularization of machine learning there are more applications for data engineering than ever before but the tooling around in started using Hud oop back in two thousand eight this was near the beginning of the age of modern data infrastructure give me developed around storing and computing large amounts of data full disclosure linked is a sponsor of soften engineering daily in two thousand eight and in the last eleven years the company has adopted streaming frameworks distributed databases and newer execution run times like it in working on tools for data engineering in today's episode Carl Discusses The data platform inside linked in and the strategies that the company has done engineering means that it is still hard for developers to find data sets and clean their data and build reliable models. Carl Steinbach is an engineer at least breath towards the site that pretty soon it was taking upwards of a week to complete a single run and at that point the results were becoming increasingly stale and scaling using a process called triangle closing so if I know you and you know Stephen Sitting over here chances are I also may know Stephen so that would be a good suggestion there's a huge success and they were able to bring the time required degenerate this index down to just a couple of hours and they found that by adding more machines they could bring it down even lower so point in time the site had future called people you may know which suggested to members you know here's someone that you should consider acting with and it was very clear based on metrics that this was the engine of growth for Lincoln at that point in time when they first introduced this feature they were using Oracle to actually build the index for people you may know within Lincoln's broader data infrastructure. You know one interesting thing about link Dennis there's this division between online serving systems near lines dreaming systems and brief history of how data infrastructure at Lincoln has evolved yeah well let's start with the introduction of back in two thousand eight so linked in had a big problem with that that first big success than inspired other people to start leveraging Duke for other problems and pretty soon it got to a point where within the company it was just known that standardized process by which somebody stood up a hoodoo cluster or was given access to hoop resources or people just spinning up clusters off line batch analytics systems so duke was basically the offline Bash analytics solution at Lincoln when you joined was there Jura and search for the first mention of that I could find and I found a couple of tickets where people are discussing how to set up the first cluster discussing the first use case which was py can you know in my feet so when the future was first introduced to take a date to build this index on Oracle but it was such a successful feature at drove so much it wasn't really an option so people started looking around for a better approach something that could be horizontally scaled so when I joined Lincoln in two thousand thirteen one of the first things I did was to go was we're all of the data was stored all of the tracking data all of the derived data sets and things like that so we started using it to build search indexes we started using it for future generation incidentally like G. Krebs was heavily involved in this you know and he's the guy who later went on to start the Kafka project so the application of Paducah to the pin k. problems rick and things like that so the model at Lincoln has always been fewer larger clusters over many smaller clusters was there a distinct point at which it went from being a single large cluster to that single arts cluster got so big that you had to instant she eight additional clusters kamini smaller clusters that simplifies management because you have fewer things to manage fewer services to manage at least an it's also good from a data standpoint because you can so call Steinbach welcome to suffering daily the very much it's great to be here so linked I don't know the exact timeline for win a second or third cluster was introduced but by the time I joined linked in two thousand thirteen it was well established that we had one large development just go to one cluster and know that all of your data is there as opposed to having to think okay this data set may only exist on the small cluster that also causes other problems title Hoodoo operations team was built out and we then inherited the model that Yahoo had been following for running these clusters big clusters as opposed this would be around the two thousand eight two thousand nine timeframe at a time when the Renault vendors out there that you can consult I think Tom White published I had duke book is discovery ability it also would make it very hard to join data sets together which are located on different clusters you wouldn't be able to leverage data locality anymore get slowed down by the MR and one large production cluster and there was a process then forgetting your job promoted from development over to production and since you at the time mm it was hard to isolate one job from another job it was important to make sure that the jobs that were running on the production cluster well behaved and had been vetted later on through a Riley may be around two thousand ten soup the only place that you go for help about how to deploy large do cluster how to manage it would be the Apache mailing lists or meet ups related to this so I think the easiest thing then for people that Lincoln was to recruit some of the people from Yahoo had been working on dupe and that's how the original Lincoln was not alone in this problem even before the open source who do pico system this problem manifested Google there's data bread lines basically the cue that you're referring to where you have to get into some kind of q either to get your job to run or in some cases they were just told okay well you have to fix this and then get back in the queue and wait another month so one of the things that I did after joining Lincoln was to try to figure out if we automate that process and that are we couldn't promote immediately we were able to offer actionable advice to the owner of the workflow you know these are the things that you need to change or to get a green signal from Dr Elephant interview I did a while ago with a guy named Tomasz Tonga's who wrote a book called a winning with data alluded to this book a couple times because he talks about what he turned Chris Dickson diagnose performance pathologies things like skew in terms of tasks too much memory too little memory and stuff like that and very quickly we got to a point we are we could take the human reviewer completely out of the loop and we were able to might say promote to production probably eighty percent of things as well as for the cases resulted in a doctor elephant which is a service that we run which looks at the exhaust basically from the duke jobs it applies ristic's to those logs and use those infrastructure efficiency and we don't want to require that everyone who uses her dupe or spark needs to be an expert in these systems it was a perennial problem for people building data infrastructure people who are working as data analysts are data scientists in those nascent days of a dupe infrastructure with that process of vetting individual flows actually became a major problem people would sometimes wait for up to a month for someone to sit down and review their job and better Richard Gabriel wrote this really interesting essay in the late eighties and I think it became well known in the early nineties describing this concept of worse is better and he was yes they have better things to worry about right they are machine learning experts or their analytics experts and to require that they spend a month or maybe even a year coming up yeah that sounds very familiar and I think it also points to a larger issue which we create a Doctor Elvin to help address which is this inherent tension between developer productivity and despite they could figure out a way to do so we actually read shouldn't say we but the people at Lincoln at that time recruited folks from Yahoo A to have the data scientists go and write a custom Hudood job just for you to get data to get the nightly report back to you the to explain why lisp had sort of failed in the market whereas CNC plus plus we're doing really well and he sort of identified what he described as the Mitt beat with all of the intricacies of these systems would severely impact their productivity I think this is kind of another interesting example of this concept of worsens responsibilities over to the user for the sake of keeping the implementation very simple and I think a dupe is a really good example of the worsest better philosophy album or was it more of a progression of additional solutions that alleviated this issue so I think the doctor elephant help us solve this tension right between I actually just get their jobs right their jobs in an autonomous fashion without being blocked by was Dr Elephant the thing that just solved this of language but that's not true at all really is a declarative language with some nice escape hatches for you to insert imperative logic through UDF's and things like that so while he was still incubating at Yahoo the introduced pig which was sort of a new take on sequel tickets often described as an imperative you should be simple and it's acceptable to push complexity over the implementation in order to keep the API simple versus the other approach of saying we'll actually were willing to put imperative scripting language than it does declared if language like sequel if we take the lineage of query interfaces forward a little bit further cool and the New Jersey school where New Jersey was like a stand in for bell labs and he compared the mit school where everything has to be in a sense perfect right the people who wrote pig were coming at it from more of a scripting language approach and that's why superficially pig looks a lot more like so that helped to provide people with higher level abstractions that they could reason about similarly at facebook the introduced Hoodoo hdfs map an action and benefit of versus better is that you're able to get this thing out very quickly you're able to innovate on it and make it better over time to appoint personal productivity and infrastructure efficiency but there were other things that it also helped people become more productive I mean when I was first introduced your programming. API was Ma- produce which is I think that lineage goes from pig to hive and the next thing along that lineage might arguably be presto would you say or is there I mean when you Russian rules on top of that one implication of this though is that if you need to write your own user defined function you can't just correct yeah and I think a big distinction to make between Presto and things like spark hive and pig is with those ladder systems the job it's a prime example of that winded the Hadou P- infrastructure problems at Lincoln get alleviated to the point where it was much easier for why did facebook produce high and Yahoo produced pig I knew for fact that a lot of the people who worked on high at facebook were ex Oracle engineers so the the assembly language for data processing and W Handwriting Assembly essentially right or you could also like to I don't have a database so instead I have to write the query background or people who wanted to do ad hoc queries right if you are writing could produce it means you have to compile your code you have to deploy the jar files all of that stuff inherits their permissions you can allow them to run whatever code they want inject whatever could they want so in terms of sort of velocity iteration speed it's a lot faster and that HDFS usage is still pretty prevalent today people are still largely running HDFS clusters although the large distributed bucket storage systems have has changed over time so whether we're talking about a duke map reduce being abstracted into pig or hive I think definitely looked at Duke and thought well what we really want here is the interface that a database provides but the scale ability that who provides and I think the those other systems if however your coming at this from a database background and you're comfortable using sequel you can solve your problem using sequel in the standard built in UDF's this placed some of that HDFS usage if somebody is on aws three or Azure blob storage but the query layer they using their account have access to that data so the code basically runs with their privileges whereas in a system like Presto the whole service runs as the press or being displaced by something like Apache spark and people pulling you know if I understand that the usage of patchy spark people will pull distributed plan by hand and if I want to optimize it I have to go and retrieve the statistics myself so it wasn't very productive for people who were coming from more of a database due user it's understood that that press do user has access to all of the underlying data and then Presto is able to superimpose its own authoring thing about these higher level interfaces for querying large data sets in had duke is Presto the next thing in that series that Linnea jer working sets into a district memory system and then they'll query those working sets that are in memory now you can have this ad hoc data science process aw big data processing can you give me your perspective for how spark changed the data landscape yes so for starters sparked we are you know it's ninety five percent of what the right thing would have been had you gone for that initially and in the meantime it spreads like a virus and I think you're looking at there's no reason not to use presto I think I probably jumped the gun here in the evolution of a dupe usage so early days of on it knew about all of these tricks they knew that forced materialization between map reduce stages and different jobs was away the lineage of Presto is a little bit different so Presto is very much an MP database running on top of HDFS or that's able to access data abusive you've got an HDFS cluster the hoop distributed file system that's the place where you're storing all your data the quote Unquote Data Lake and very quickly realized that they needed a higher level programming interface for the majority of people at facebook and that's hive came from is interesting to consider like NHTSA's so comparing it to something like verdict or Green Plum. I think it's ancestors I in a way whereas something like aps massively parallel I just to clarify what you're talking about here this is the fact that in a map reduce you often doing these three operations map shuffle reduce and your check pointing ABC user triggers runs using their ide- so whether they're able to read data on S. or from a blob store depends on whether could immediately that forcing people rather only allowing one reduce stage per map job was an issue if you wanted to group by multiple keys for added that to Presto because that's a code injection vector I could very easily sneak some code and use it to access data that I'm not supposed to be able to have access to so when people became a much bigger problem so while everyone was united and understanding like these are the next steps for the project exactly how to accomplish that became a problem model where you could have multiple reduce stages per map stage I think paradoxically though since dupin map reduce were such a success it is more efficient lie caching data and memory as opposed to materializing it to disk between every stage like map reduce does but right off the bat it meant that the project instantaneously had a very large community both of users as well as developers and finding consensus within that community similarly users definitely validate project but they also make it very hard for you to evolve API's and I think with API's you're always going to make a handful of mistakes you want to eliminate later on but The more users you have the harder it is to do that so I think that the people who that's right you don't want one if those transfers to fail and then you have to go and repeat that work but if you're talking about let's say a fast query right which looks at a little bit of data a little bit more of an interactive workflow than the batch Hadou workflow and my sense is that the spark usage that really changed how people saw start the spark project had the advantage of looking at hoop recognizing the problems that had duke had and then starting from apple you'd have to chain together multiple map reduce jobs even though you really didn't need those map stages in between so what people really wanted was an m. r. star data at each of these operations which makes it a costly series of operations right so if you have a really long running map task big sense checkpoint before you hit reduced need to find that that forces materialization actually accounts for most of the time or it's something that slows you down definitely at every stage another issue was that I think everyone under old application verticals on top of spark in a manner that it isn't really possible with just map reduce another thing that I think has really benefited spark at least in terms of that project do ab UDF's depressed oh they need to be vetted to make sure that they're OK whereas with the dupin spark bottles since everything runs as the user who's actually triggering that job so with big data I have the option of using more than just sequel to analyze data I have the ability to leverage different file formats depending on which format suspects of big data ecosystem so we want to leverage abstractions from the database world things like tables of views the d a performance problem but the aired on the side of making sure you know that they could recover if a job's failed right because they were optimizing for these very long running jobs albums just by keeping everything in a single repository let's fast forward to today you work on managing Paducah Infrastructure Lincoln doing was creating a problem that then vendors had to solve all of these projects had their own release cycle they were not necessarily tested or integration tested against the version that I'm a clean slate without the baggage of a large user base in a large community they were able to integrate very quickly and produce something so when did he just I'd like to just say that as soon as map reduce was released as an open source project and my guess would be even before it was released as an open source project the people working ability to integrate quickly as the fact that it still located in a single code repository and it's a single project that governs it whereas with the Duke model so in effect trying to introduce a level of indirection at each one of these layers but also provide the abstractions necessary to really decouple implementation it out does this all fit together because you could count on the fact that no one from these individual projects had done any integration testing for you so that really was the the value that vendors you would want so if you weren't using vendor your distribution your first task was to figure out well for this version of hive what version of Duke do I need what version of pig do I need prototypical example in your head tell me the problems that Dolly would solve for a prototypical application so I think one thing agents from API's with the goal both of making things simpler for users so that they don't have to worry about physical details that they shouldn't we just looking at paths in HDFS mid also allows you to search by call him names and annotations and things like that so just the process of discovering data sets this is the best support for the engine that I'm using or the best performance for the query that I'm running a similarly I'm able to take advantage of different storage layers and swap those out what's happening above when you say user you're talking about an internal application developer linked rucked give an example of an apple really rich we've been working on for several years now our goal with Dolly is really to combine the best aspects of a relational database with the best really need to know about in the first place but also with the goal of making it easier for the people who provide the infrastructure to make changes underneath without disrupting as well as understanding who produces the data set and what the contract is between you the consumer and the producer as another thing that is aided there occasion that let's say I'm maybe I'm building a dashboard or I'm building a some kind of reporting system within linked in I'm sure you have but the sad thing is I can't think of a better a better term to use what is your day to day consists of these days I'm focusing most of my time on a project called actual implementation of the data set so overtime right I can evolve Schema without requiring that consumers migrate in Lockstep with me because it solves the discover ability problem we have a data set catalogue that searchable and that's typically I think easier to discover things in that catalog than it would the thing is that we are able to over time improve the performance of data set by looking at the queries that people are running against it and using those to inform it started as a single project but then you had projects spinning out of it so hive and pig both started as a duke projects but then they spun out into their own projects in would that really ended up fling between your logical view of data and the underlying physical details a combined knees with the freedom and flexibility that people are used to in the big data ecosystems are we partition the data set of the format that we encode the data set in and things like that so I think efficiency is one thing another thing that Dolly provides what was the motivation for starting this project well I think that one big motivation was simply to make things easier for people developing application this basically I think probably the best way of explaining this is to say that if you think of data sets as services which have an API this allows us that I'm actually materializing on HDFS otherwise right when I make a change to the Schema it becomes instantaneously visible to everyone who's consuming it using ally as a suffix on names of projects that linked in icy originally started this data access Edlington now all catches doesn't stand for it at least in the early days there were just cleaning up this mess that had been created I don't know really what the motivations for doing that but I think that spark has avoided those he's like I've you spark as like a version two and you another nice thing about spark is that the API very elegant they're very clean it's very easy to be map reduce style jobs Lincoln has been developing its data infrastructure since the early days of the duke ecosystem linked in started using make things easier for themselves but in this situation it was bad for both sides it makes it very hard for infrastructure providers to make any change without talking the of anything because we've gone beyond just data access to other things like data management data catalog discovery issues like that okay I don't think any other system at this point as yet provided the ability for a data set owner to decouple the API of their data set in other words the Schema of the data set from the they have this level of interaction between the Schema that they're consuming which is provided by the view on top of the data set and the scheme of the data it needs to be or where developers have to manage more details than they should it's because the people who are providing that APR slacking off right they're trying silence and by the way is it Dali or Dolly Doll Do L. L. Y. D. A. L. I. D. A. L. The artist right so there's a history of set is using or which clustered data said is stored on her how that data set is partitioned but also to give the people who are running that cluster and into every user who's going to be impacted in helping them to migrate of so we really want to improve the velocity for both sides and then I think support multiple EP is on top of the same data set in a manner similar to our service can have a v One v Two v three of the API that it presents to is that your day to day job. Yeah I would say even though I don't really like this term big data infrastructure in general yeah why don't you like that term because you know it's a buzzword people I think use it too frequently managing that data the ability to make changes behind the scenes without impacting them one interesting thing is that usually when you find a situation where the API is more complicated on top of the dupin spark by hiding details from them that they shouldn't need to worry about anyway things like what file format adidas us and the underlying details if I'm using my sequel or post Chris it's irrelevant to me how my sequel and post-chris in code a table or how they write it up as a female inspirations what we're really looking out was conventional database where you have this nice separation between the view that someone writing a query Azure over the next couple of years were enforcing a policy where all public data must only be accessible using Dolly. API's just to make sure that we don't find back in your client because then it hard dependency on where that data set is physically in your data center so by adding the additional level of indirection where we have instead a data set view of

Carl Steinbach Lincoln Stephen Sitting Lincoln Sheen Chris it engineer Peta Shen Ma Oracle Dennis ABC ninety five percent eighty percent
November 20: Amazing grace

As It Happens from CBC Radio

49:55 min | 5 months ago

November 20: Amazing grace

"Did you know you can get all your favorite fall drinks delivered right to your door. Well you can with drizzly the number one app for alcohol delivery compare prices across your local liquor stores on a huge selection of beer wine and spirits. Then get them delivered in under sixty minutes right now. Drizzly is giving all new customers. Five dollars off their first order. Just enter promo code fall five at checkout download the drizzly app or go to drizly dot com. That's dri z l. y. dot com. This is a cbc podcast. Hello i'm carol off. And i'm chris bowden. This is as it happens. The podcast edition and tonight amazing grace. One victim of the sword attack in quebec city on halloween night was a cellist who is blow hand was badly injured tonight. He explains how he was able to forgive his attacker and inconclusive conclusion of fredericton. New brunswick man is found not criminally responsible for killing four people. A verdict the widow of one of the victim says provides no real sense of resolution church and stats as covid nineteen numbers rise in steinbach manitoba. The city's right and mennonite communities face and unjustified backlash because of false rumors. They held an anti mask. Rally pop idol threat after ugandan singer and presidential candidate. Bobby wine was arrested again. this week. Compal erupted in protests in. His lawyer tells us the powers that be your cracking down. Because they know he can win. Litmus toast british celebrity chef. Nigel lawson divides the united kingdom by revealing. she butters her toast twice. Which left some armchair critics feeling pretty crusty and lightning rod. The new season of the crown left our guest reeling. He stunned that. The actor who plays prince charles is so bad at fly fishing and he won't let him off the hook as it happens. The friday edition radio that knows a bunch of famous actors. Don't necessarily mean an all star cast for much of today. Ramey bay don't j. d. power was in rehab. The quebec cellist is working to regain the use of his hands. And much of the rest of his body mr bellagio. Poor is one of the survivors of last month's sword attack in quebec city on halloween night. He saw a man dressed in medieval costume with an unsheathed sword. That man attacked seven people. Only five of them survived. We reached arabian all j. d. power in quebec city rehabilitation center and a warning. His experience was violent. Anyhow did we have today so it was a pretty quiet day. But i still every hour. I'm doing these Hand exercises and then four times a day. I'm doing these arm exercises because my both my right hand needs a lot of work and all my left arm and elbow special. Eat a lot of work. So i'm busy with all these tiny exercises so far that you spirit sound good in the video. I saw view. And i'm hearing on on the phone. You sound strong. It's so strange. What's happening to my periods. Right now i am in high spirits and I don't let anything hate related or violent related filter through. So i guess my life right now is painful in my body but everything that enters my mind is all the this positive thoughts and all this support and also. I'm trying to be patient with myself as a as a musician. I wanna work. Go hard until it hurts and keep working. But they tell me here. I have to keep my body in check and really respect not to go into too much pain. It's just extraordinary to hear. You speak like this after what you gone through. And i wanna ask you about the halloween nights and when you were in the old city of quebec and you encountered this attacker wearing. What you thought was a halloween costume. At what point did you know. This was no joke when the ford had my have really because what i saw was this guy wearing the costume. And then he's got the big big sword then he lists the word up and i thought he was a drunkard. He's gonna pretend to hit me and he's gonna find it funny that my reaction is the be all Fearful i thought. I'm i'm not i'm not gonna react to any of this but then it was all real and the hand was so bad he really beat me up and i'm sorry for your listeners. This is all really graphic. I'm not gonna go into too much details. But i think i really think he beat me up with a store using like baseball bath like this guy is no professional for sure. 'cause otherwise i i'd be gone. I mean i was really close to. I spoke with the police who saw video evidence of what happened and they couldn't believe i was there standing in front of them. How did you get away. I scream for help and a part of me still things that i dream so hard for held that anything that was left of the guy in this violence body had to turn away for a second. I don't know why but at one point he just would no longer there and i was alone and in a pool of blood in a fountain did you. How did you assess what point. Did you realize how badly you had been injured. So after he left me in this fountain. I ran to mac and I was met there with great workers there and they called the ambulance and the ambulance last and then they realized they had to put some dudes inside of me and the breathing thing and everything they had. This ship meets montreal to face my finger and then When i finally was waking up from this. I knew i was badly hurt. I had broken bones everywhere. But i think it's really. I think last week or the week. Before when i spoke with my therapist and she explained to me how my muscles were hurt. And how my bones were hurt and in which direction they were cut and with directions they were broken and i could like the whole scene in my head and see all of these heads i. It's just horrible. You had something in your hand and the doctors wanted to know what it was. What did you show them. So as i was getting beaten in front of sorts of max At one point. I guess the most horrible thing to happen to musician happened to me. I saw my hand. And i saw a couple inches away was my finger my index finger. I i remember taking it from the ground putting it inside of my hand and closing my hands around it and thinking and never gonna let go so they were x-raying my hand at one point and they're like what's in your hand and i'm like well it's my finger and then i said i'm a musician and point. They decided to submit to montreal where this surgeon words. She's my hero these days i think about her a lot. I still don't know her name. I don't know now who she is. But i'm going to find out and She connected my own finger back into my own hands. And now i guess the narco of scientists happening. And maybe i get my finger back and we'll you play cello again. So as i was in montreal under much much sedation. I was looking at my severe hand and My my arm. Right now is not functioning at all and i thought. Can i still play cello with these limbs. Were these broken limbs and I thought i can play with any limb i can fight seller with. I'm nothing can stop me. I can play silo with my feet. I can play itself with my knees. I can sit on the cello. Here it crack. I wanna hear it crack. I wanna i'm i. I'm getting all these ideas where i've always worked with the limits of my body as a creative art now. These limits are really different. And i'm going to have to probably make art. That's different and i'm throw down to do it. And i i'm not gonna play baugh anymore but i i would never playing your spirit is just amazing something else i wanted to ask you because you also spoke of this in your video is the feelings. You have an had about your attacker. Can you describe that for us. Yeah i'm it's really hard for me to explain to people who don't know me perhaps but I remember so as i was in the ambulance for me. It was clear that i'd forgiven the guy. Because i don't right now. I'm just speculating. But i don't think anything of the guy was last in the body that i met. I met a violent body in crisis. And i feel like the whoever whoever this guy is he wasn't there and you know what i want know who he is. I can't have any hate towards this guy for all. I know i think he's. He's a broken soul and I really wish him all the best anyone listening to this would be inspired by you your strength and and sending you a lot of wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery and thank you so much for speaking with us thank you so much remi balin. Oh poor as a cellist. And a survivor of last month's halloween sort attack in quebec city. We reached medica beck city rehabilitation center On his drive to work this morning. Manitoba's chief public health officer was discouraged by what he saw. On the streets of winnipeg they were full of people. At a press conference today. Brent rousson pleaded with manitobans to stay home whenever possible after the province announced four hundred and thirty eight new covid. Nineteen cases and winnipeg. Wasn't mr roussin's only concern in steinbach. That ten day tests positivity rate is forty percent forty percent of people getting tested or testing positive. For comparison the winnipeg region is thirteen point seven percent today in steinbeck alone. We have three personal care. Homes that have declared outbreaks three assisted. Living facilities have declared outbreaks bethesda. Regional health center is seeing high volumes of covert patients. There have been twenty four deaths in the community since the start of the pandemic seeing a lot of Disproportionate numbers And we need to end that. We need people to follow the orders staying home leaving only for essential reasons reducing our contacts and we need to continue to try to bring down. These numbers. steinbeck was in the headlines this week for reasons other than the high covid nineteen case count last weekend anti mask. Protesters marched in the community in a hugs over masks rally. Many of the protesters appeared to be part of the local hutter right or mennonite communities but they were not kyle. Penner is an associate pastor at grace mennonite church in steinbeck. We reached him there. Kyle when you heard dr rusen. Say that number attest positivity rate in steinbeck out forty percent. How did you react shocked We knew it was high. This was the first time they've actually given us a number in steinbeck's specifically and none of us expected it to be. That high were shocked. Were scared or sad. Were anxious and we all a little bit traumatized. I know you're not a health professional. You can't give an expert opinion. But what what are your. What's your sense. As to why steinbeck is seeing such a high prevalence of covid nineteen. I've been asking around with my friends and family and peers here and we can't quite figure out what it was they haven't named any super spreader events and my friends and family are their first or second degree of these people. The ones who are testing positive. They have got it from trying to visit friends at a distance. they've got it from accompanying Their parents and their grandparents and their last moments And a lot of that just simply do not know where they've gotten it from. We've heard reports from doctors and public health nurses in my church and they have said right. Now we are assuming that every indoor space has cova in it every indoor space in steinbach has basically infected. That is the assumption that we were supposed to make part of that is because they're doing lots of contact tracing here in town and they're having a very hard time pinning down where people are getting it so they are assuming that it is just so widespread that it's everywhere. I mean we heard that your matter mattos chief. Public health officer in that clip. He said that we need to end. That people need to start following the rules and doing what they're supposed to do some finger pointing going on at the community itself. It's not just like. I don't know how i got this. But our people observing the restrictions that people have been asked to stay home to wear masks to keep a distance is that being observed in steinbeck. Manitoba has a color coordinated system from yellow to orange to red. And the now. We're in. Read what i call so in a matter of two weeks. We run from yellow to orange to red to blood red. So this kind of sprung up on us very very quickly so what we were doing at the end of october we had the same public guidelines that were in place in august for us when there was probably close to zero cases in our community. Now we are seeing. Oh my goodness it was. There was probably all sorts of covid in our community at the end of october beginning of november before we ramped up the public health system. The news on the weekend. Was this anti mask. Protest a against masks about one hundred people in steinbach in a rally. Hugs over masks insisting that that was what where did that come from. Is that actually ascension that you find common. They're not going to say it's not here. But that rally specifically was there was some organizers from winnipeg who've been planning rallies around manitoba all summer and fall and i think the dates for steinbeck last weekend just was our turn coincided with reports from our hospitals that they were full and overflowing so the timing was not great. The speakers from that event were not from our community. The elected official was from the town next tour. The church members to half the people attending reform may small church twelve miles. South of steinbach. I've seen pictures. My friends have seen pictures and except for the elected official. We don't know any of the people who attended this thing so we did happen in steinbach and some people attended it but the majority of them were not from our community and unfortunately we get to wear the headline of anti mask protest and signed back at the same time that our hospitals are overflowing community. But your church because people blamed the mennonite communities for that rally. You are a pastor at grace mennonite church. So how is it that they came to blame people. Like the congregants of your church. Yeah there's one group that in in the area that has a Very specific dress code so they can easily identify that. And so i think it's a little bit of A character to a really easy way to slander spivak as a whole for the actions of a few you. You wrote a piece that was published in canadian mennonite. And which you say that there's all kinds of finger pointing on and meanwhile you said we are dying. Here was the message you wanted to send to people after the rally last saturday. It was very frustrating because People not somewhere community were blaming all of us and slandering all of us. I notice people saying. I'm never going back again today. I see back has a forty percent test positively. You guys deserve this. An anti mask rallied. And i just wanted to communicate to people that if i take is smugness or arrogance or sanctimoniousness. That's not helpful to us. I really want people to lead with empathy and compassion. I and what responses you'll get from people to even saying very positive so my own church. We invited all of our congregation Candles facing on the street window as a sign of support and prayer in solidarity all of the healthcare workers and all of the patients in the hospital and all of their families. This last weeks whenever the uniting for all of us. I kind of joke that two of my friends who would never vote for the same political party. Text each other saying you got the liberals. I'll get the conservative and we will. We will show support to our healthcare workers this community of yours. Sixteen thousand people in steinbeck. And so when you got a test positivity rate of forty percent it would seem that almost everybody knows somebody or has someone in their family who has covid twenty four deaths. People would know them. How can you move on from there. What do you think needs to happen in your community to help you heal from that. I don't know it's hard because all of our rituals grieving and funeral. We can't do those really well. Over zoom a lot of it is is simply trying to rely on relationships and our connections with our family and friends and doing our best to take care of each other. Those of us who were younger going grocery shopping for those of us who are older Those are able to work from home the employers letting them even though there's four year olds running around the house. It's a lot of kind of pulling together and trying to be as patient and empathetic and compassionate as possible. Kyle thank you very much for your words and for speaking with us. Thank you very much for having me by kyle. Penner is an associate pastor at grace mennonite church in steinbach manitoba which is south of winnipeg the new season of the netflix show. The crown is being criticized by some historians royal watchers for what they say are inaccurate portrayals of moments in history or even the complete fabrication of some events in the lives of the royal family in the nineteen eighties. Dominic withrow certainly has one major criticism. When he was watching the show last week there was one scene in particular he just could not ignore for you. hello boy i'll ranking in politics. Well must be an hour ago. I've been put through to the extent where we finally reached new iceland in the river off. Sow doing that salmon fishing with friends. You classy boone with the whole gang tribe asking you mr with road doesn't have a problem with the historical details there but he does have a serious problem with the fly fishing technique displayed by josh. O'connor the actor who plays prince charles reached dominic with row in chaba surrey dominik. How would you describe. Prince charles his technique for fly fishing in the crown. Well i imagine the real prince. Charles is something of an expert fisherman however the the fishing is displayed in. The tv show was just atrocious. What really struck out with the way the line was cost. It obviously crashed into the water with absolutely no technique. It's all it would scheduled any fish for miles around. It will so. I'm to the time that i felt. They should have got it back so it was just awful. Any fisherman would have went to see it now. It wasn't just a flash frame which wasn't a fleeting moment was they actually went to details of showing the scene in fact showing charles opening up his little his box of flies and choosing when carefully. And why did you feel good. Go to all that detail and still and just be so. I guess ham fisted in their cast. I honestly i think things like looking at equipment and making sure you've got the right basic kit. That's all pretty easy to do. We have to do is get these fishing shopping. Say what do i need to look like. I'm a good fisherman. But the actual skin of costing line is something that you learn but yes in some cases and it is a real lot and it's not something that you could fake but i think the filmmakers simply didn't cat that this was something that they had to get right they didn't consider does it. They were millions upon millions of of avid fisherman. Might be watching that show. Prince charles in the actor does land of really quite large fish with this. So what does that say to you. They really wanted to show him dispatching it and say they have apps bludgeoning it to bit goodness as what was left of it at the end. I think it was to shave it emotional turmoil and and also the story building to a particularly brutal lind and catholic cosmic events part of foreshadowing that. But it wasn't convincing won't remain the well. It's a very good point. I mean that it was a metaphor right this this brutal killing the fish. His rest of the royal family is out hunting. Everyone's out killing something. And meanwhile of course was building toward. And i guess no spoiler alert necessary here because it is history the this is lord mountbatten is about to be assassinated in a lobster boat so all this is going on so i mean. Isn't it more symbolic than instructive. It is absolutely but that's a show that has millions upon millions of pounds and dollars straightness it. It's exquisite to watch. The acting is superb. The cinematography is magnificent. And then they didn't pay any attention to really important details important to certain people berries no question to the fact that the terrible display of fishing from a man who in reality extremely accomplished that so thinks he's doing his whole life one of the few things in the kennedy rightful or wrong and they wrong. It's lazy so you decided you needed to put pen to paper or a or to send a letter to the daily telegraph. It kind of shocked and appalled laughter. What was your intent with that well to be. Honest is primarily a joke. There is a bit of a tradition dating telegraph which is very much the establishment newspaper the prime minister. Boris johnson used to work at and there are frequently quite possesses People getting upset about things that really seem insignificant. I wanted to write a latter. I thought oh this will be funny. I'll come across like some o. Convention colonel sitting in his tweets and getting thirty frustrations that these people who don't want that day. And i thought that the very opening sentence in which i said my wife and i were watching it specifically say that we could pick it up on the inaccuracies. Total prejudgments is a thing. And i defense but is significant. But as i've explained could be important would be the thing to pick up. I mean there were plenty about the things that i spotted but this was so blatant and so i tend this subsidy i laughter and sensitive with. I really thinking it could get through to. The left is editor tool. And i must say i was very surprised morning when a friend contacted me and said oh what senior will actually in the newspaper and then of course couple absolutely expected the place now talking to people of the world that isis children. Okay so you so you kind of went viral. You have. i understand. You went to his twenty-seven followers on twitter narrates forty something. Apparently so people agreeing with you or saying. Oh get a life or what. What kind of response is a mixture mixture. Most people seem to recognize that. It's it's a joke at the expense of the daily telegraph more than anything else. But there are plenty of people who are responding with. Oh i winced about name as well and also people greased by the fact that the fishing was so poorly executed. All right good to talk you dominic. Thanks thank you save much. Goodness dominic with row wrote to the daily telegraph paper this week to alert readers to the poor fly fishing technique displayed by the actor playing prince charles. In the new season of the crown. We reached him in. Shaba surrey Did you know you can get all your favorite fall drinks delivered right to your door. Well you can with drizzly the number one app for alcohol delivery compare prices across your local liquor stores on a huge selection of beer wine and spirits. Then get them delivered in under sixty minutes right now. Drizzly is giving all new customers. Five dollars off their first order. Just enter promo code fall five at checkout download the drizzly app or go to drizly dot com. That's dri z l. y. dot com. We can get anything delivered from furniture to toilet paper and now adult beverages with drizzly drizzly. Lets you compare prices from local liquor stores on a huge selection of beer wine and spirits than get them delivered right to your door and under sixty minutes and right now grizzlies giving all new customers five dollars off their first order. Just enter promo code easy five at checkout download the drizzly app or go to drizzly dot com. That's dri z l. y. dot com not criminally responsible. That was the verdict in the trial of matthew. Raymond the fredericton man who shot and killed four people in two thousand eighteen. The dead included two police officers were responding to the shooting. Two psychiatrists diagnosed mr raymond with schizophrenia during his trial he testified that he thought he was shooting demons. Not real people but the crown argued that matthew delusions weren't severe enough to cloud his ability to understand what he was doing. Jackie mclean is the widow of constable. Rob costello one of the police officers killed. We reach her in fredericton. Jackie first of all our condolences for your loss. Thank you very much. Can you tell us how you reacted. When you heard this verdict of not criminally responsible while i did sit through the Closing arguments and the judges instructions and based on that. I had a pretty good idea of what the verdict might be. And so i was mentally prepared for it. But it was still shocking. You will have a chance to give a statement as to how would have what impact this had. Do you have an idea what you want the court and the public to know about the effect of the loss you have of your husband in this shooting. I think it's really important to recognize that robs loss is not just felt in my life and in my family's lives. His loss has been one of for the whole community. He was a an amazing police officer. He specialized in diffusing situations and working with people with mental health. Issues and the entire city of fredericton has lost him as a police officer and as a part of the community. What is it about that job. You're that he liked. What was it because you you said elsewhere. That the every day he went to to work he never lost enthusiasm for the job. What is it that was so important to him about being a police officer. One of the things that drew me to rob initially was his commitment to the community and making the world a better place. And i'd never really known anybody who had such a strong commitment to their community and did you. Did you ever discuss the possibility that it might end. Tragically as it has Yes actually we did very early on in our relationship. He brought me a book called emotional survivor for law enforcement and he asked me to read this book and then let him know. If i was prepared for that kind of commitment and i was i was committed. I was on board. He was worth it and did he not also promise you that he would always come home. Yes he did. He promised me he said it might not be at the end of shift could be hours and hours later but he said i will always come home and the day that he was killed was the first time that he did not come home. You said at the time that you you couldn't stop waiting for him to come home that that would be the hardest thing for you to adjust to. I still have moments. Where i think he's gonna come home. And i have actually had moments where i heard the front door slam and i heard him bang his boots on the door frame. Lanky did when he would pop home while he was working. And my heart breaks. When i realized that those footsteps don't come down the hall and greet me with a smile like he always did. I'm so sorry every day without him is painful. And it's not gotten any easier with time. I didn't realize that about grief when he first died. I thought that it would get better. But it doesn't really never really goes away. This man matthew raymond. He killed Your partner also. Another police officer. In two other civilians and he is found not criminally responsible. You sat to his testimony in the trial. What did you make of him. Gosh if i spoke honestly i would probably say some things that would hurt some feelings. And i don't want to do that. I volunteer in the community with mental health. And i understand the complexities of mental health issues. I don't feel one hundred percent. Like he was sincere is testimony. I feel like he hold the wool over on us on some degree and yet at the same time i don't want to has judgment because i don't suffer from the same mental illness that he does. I don't understand what it's like to be inside the head of someone who has schizophrenia or delusional disorder. But that being said his lack of remorse israeli insulting for me as a family member of one of the victims. He testified that he believed he was shooting demons and humans the crown indicated that he had modified his rifle to double the amount of ammunition. It could hold. He barricaded his door and he shot with intention to kill. Are those the the aspects of this that that give you pause give you question about his testimony. Absolutely he said in court that he was shooting at anything that moved except that there were several individuals inside of apartments and in the parking lot. That were moving that he never took aim and fired on. I don't want that to sound. Like i wish he'd shot more people but i just i don't understand how he made a conscious decision to shoot certain individuals and not others. And that's the part for me. That i have the most difficulty with your concern for people with mental illness has led you to open a home for adults in fredericton and at you named after your partner rob castillo. Why did you want to give him that. Honor prior to rob's death we had planned to open new facility and it was a good opportunity for rob to be remembered. There is a very Very strong need in our community for more housing for adults with mental illness and We would like to open three more facilities and name those facilities after the other victims. You think a home like the one the like this one and the others. That is someplace that could have helped matthew raymond. Maybe some unlike him to prevent crimes like this from happening absolutely. I think that had someone anyone said. Hey this guy needs help and there have been resources available for him that this tragedy could have been averted. In these cases of someone found not criminally responsible. There is the possibility that they could be released someday. How do you feel about that possibility. It's utterly terrifying. I never want another family to have to go through what our families have gone through and this has demonstrated that. He's unwilling to take his medication. Unless he's forced and for that reason alone i feel like he will never be able to be released and i just hope that whatever review board is assessing him for that will also see that but given today's verdict. I don't have much faith in the jackie. thank you for your openness and thank you for speaking with us. You're very welcome. Thank jackie mclean. Is the widow of constable rob costello one to fredericton police officers who were shot and killed along with two other people in two thousand eighteen. Today jury found the shooter. Matthew raymond not criminally responsible for the deaths we reached her in fredericton new brunswick and you can find more at cbc dot ca slash h for two weeks. Rachel maddow has been away from her show on. Msnbc and her time off was the opposite of vacation. Ms maddow has been at home taking care of her partner. Susan who contracted covid nineteen and was so sick that at one point. They thought she might die. Susan is still sick but now she's recovering rachel. Maddow revealed all this last night in a segment broadcast from her home. Where she's in quarantine and with thanksgiving around the corner in the us. She warned americans to do everything in their power to not get or transmit the virus. Here's part of what she had to say. I don't know you at home except through this medium but just believe me whatever you have calculated into your life as acceptable risk as inevitable risk. I'm just here to tell you to recalibrate that. Frankly the country needs you to recalibrate that because broadly speaking. There's no room for you in the hospital anymore. But please just also know that whatever you think of your own life and however much risk you are willing to take on for yourself. That's not how this works. Why you need to know is that whoever is the most important person in your life. Whoever you most lavin most care for and most cherished in the world. That's the person who may lose our who you may spend weeks up all night freaking out about calling doctors all over trying to figure out how to keep that person breathing and out of the hospital. Just whatever you're doing however you've calibrated risk in your life. Don't get this thing do whatever you can't keep from getting it for thanksgiving next week. You really are going to have to just have it at home without people coming over and yeah that's gonna suck but that is going to suck so much less than you or somebody in your family getting this and getting sick. Trust me won't necessarily be. It'll be the person you most care about in the world. And how can you bear that. And whatever you've been willing to do to risk getting it don't just don't do it. Msnbc out broadcasting from her home where she's in quarantine. If the idea was to suppress bobby wide popular support his arrest. This week. only did the opposite bobby. Wine is ugandan popstar star and a candidate for uganda's upcoming presidential elections. He's hoping to unseat longtime leader. You wearing seventy. Mr was arrested on wednesday and accused of breaching covid nineteen regulations with his political rallies. His arrest sparked two days of massive spontaneous protests to which the ugandan army responded with. Live ammunition police say. Thirty seven people have been killed. Bobby wine was released on bail today. Nicholas oh peo is one of his lawyers. We reached mr opio income. Paula this gop. Oh i know you have spoken with your client wind tonight. What kind of spirit is he in. He's a tough guy so he was expecting this. He's in good spirits. He was hutton to know about. The widespread support expressed For him across the country while he was in detention is looking for to resuming his campaigns. Tomorrow and in the weeks to follow it charge. He is faced with his for contravening. The public health act which could face to face up to seven years in prison for that. The claim is that it was a contravention of the rules around the the corona virus. Do you think that's really the reason why he was arrested. Absolutely not nobody in. Uganda believes that this is about covid. Guidelines members of the ruling party including ministers Have been holding large rallies across the country and nothing was done to them. So clearly this is not about covid guidelines. This is about a politician so popular. Who was now approaching the city having done his tour of northwestern northern not enough is a new gonda an attempt to try and talk him from holding rallies in compiler or an arch of the central district. The police have responded to the rallies and the protest. Against the arrest of bobby wine. They have responded with live ammunition and The reports are between twenty eight. To thirty seven people have been killed. the minister of Security has said that Police have a right to shoot and You for nothing. Do it at your own risk if you wanted to protest. What does it tell you that the security forces are being so severe with these protests. First of all they're now. Fifty eight reported dead bodies as of this in coppola. I think that the security forces have taken a war was job. They have taken these demonstration as a declaration of war and therefore deployed war tactics. We have seen non uniformed armed individuals moving in the city and shooting at people who are simply chanting. Bobby wines names. We've seen individuals driving private cars. Shooting people randomly. The national cammisa for the uganda people's defence forces was on tv yesterday and declared this situation of war the mini sub security. As you said that declared this shoot to kill policy landing but demonstrates so the situation is really worrying as you point out. Mr moussavi seventy has been the president of uganda for thirty. Five years and now Bobby wine is is contesting his his presidency. Wh what kind of a threat does he pose to. Mr moussavi bobby wine. Uganda's young population official government statistics. Show that seventy five percent of our population below the saudi fife bobi winds candidacy as sean renewed interest in public life in politics by the book nation. If indeed this supports translate into votes it represents a real threat to present. Misogyny is such a it yet. All individual who was born just a few years after seventy came to bala who only became an mp three years ago and musician of humble background is inspiring to believed to reimagine nevada. Embodies was threatened present. Seventy president was avenue said yesterday that the protesters were being used by outsiders by homosexuals and others. Who don't like the stability and independence of uganda. We shall not tolerate confused. People they playing with fire. What is the message. Do you think the president lewis avenue. Sending two ugandans with those words is a common refrain of president seventy everytime. He's back used to walk to blame an amorphous. Group called foreigners is very clear what that means but it does so deliberately one to put the international community on the defensive to guilt trip them so that now when you're speaking to the government you you begin by footage izing saying that you're not after regime change in uganda. In essence you therefore fended off from holding into account for what he does second reason and that's why he goes to almost sexual is that he will talk a sense of nationalism and seek to blame. It might not a very small manage in this country who are already vulnerable who are targeted who intimidated. Who harassed everyday so. He's seeking to use to scapegoat this minority two time publicity against a Open it but mr moussavi is not going to go without a fight. And he has the security apparatus of uganda behind. How how much bobby wine. How can you stand up to him. Given he's been arrested many times often violently can he can he resist. I think that inconsistently arresting wind and the political position president seventy is shared to us is becoming more brazen the people who sands and dotas. They're killing on the streets and not people who are being one of our and will support the link patted creating more discontent shooting and killing can only time people against in and precipitators exit from power. This repeal. We'll be watching. And i appreciate speaking with you tonight. Thank you all mind. Nicholas opio is a lawyer representing bobby. Wine ugandan pop star and presidential candidate. We reached him in the capital of uganda. Come pala To be fair making ordinary foods seem. Extraordinary is nigel lawson's bread and butter. The british celebrity chef can literally butter bread and a five minute how to video and rack up thousands of views but as we know also split her country into in a recent segment on her bbc. Show night jealous. Eat cook repeat. Ms lawson broke down her method for making toast a few minutes and after spreading generous layer of butter on the hot toast. Ms lawson did the unthinkable. I favor The two stage buttering approach and so far any stage one has taken place. And that's to say the minute is came out of the toaster and still loved in holt. I spread it with butter so that the butter has melted down into it. And it'll give it a fabulous competency bite stage to now ready for it. I need little more butter and it will stay in some golden patches on the surface. It's unsalted butter. I always prefer to use part. What high need to do is sprinkled some so flakes ova now. Don't don't get lost in the fabulous crump eighty bites and golden patches. You did just hear. Nigel lawson telling viewers to butter the toast twice. Reaction spread quickly on social media. Now keep in mind. This is coming from a nation that also frequently spread marmite on its toast. So let's take these takes with a gag inducing number of grains of salt heart attack on a plate right there. One user tweeted shook to the core that nigel invented buttered. Toast added another but some people were on board with the extra butter. I this and thought i was a monster. Thank you for normalizing. It is a monster and one fan. Took things even further tweeting. I stand nigel. Lawson's twice buttered toast. I'll do it thrice for the love of butter proof that when it comes to butter on toast you never know which way people will churn. You've been listening to the as it happens. Podcast show can be heard monday to friday on. Cbc radio one and on sirius xm following the world at six also. Listen to the whole show listen app. Download it for free from the app store or from google play. Thanks for listening. I'm carol off. And i'm chris how to for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

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Mustang Panda leverages Windows shortcut files.  Research Saturday

The CyberWire

12:09 min | 1 year ago

Mustang Panda leverages Windows shortcut files. Research Saturday

"Hello everyone and welcome to the cyber wires research Saturday presented by juniper networks. I'm Dave Bittner and this says our weekly conversation with researchers analysts tracking down threats and vulnerabilities and solving some of the hard problems of protecting ourselves in a rapidly evolving cyberspace. Thanks for joining us and now a quick word about our sponsor juniper networks NSS labs gave juniper its highest rating of recommended. Can It's twenty nineteen datacenter security gateway test get your copy of the NSS labs report. Visit juniper dot net slash secure DC or connect with juniper on twitter or facebook. That's juniper dot net slash secure D.. We see and we thank juniper for making it possible to bring you research Saturday and thanks also to our sponsor and Vale whose revolutionary zero reveal solution closes the last gap and data security protecting data in use. It's the industry's first. And only scalable salable commercial solution enabling data to remain encrypted throughout the entire processing life cycle. Imagine being able to analyze search and perform calculations relations on sensitive data. All without ever decrypted. Anything all without the risk of theft or inadvertent exposure what was once only theoretical is now possible muscle within bail learn more at N.. Vail Dot com be founders during our regular data collection. That's part of on. He's a security researcher with anomaly. The research were discussing today is titled China-based Abt Mustang Panda Enda targets minority groups public and private sector organizations this particular cluster off Indo shocked piles were peculiar because the window shortcut files. Pilots were having hedge TA fines admitted to them so which basically they are using it to download another set of malicious files from the Internet because usually take a shortcut files were not used for downloading any content from the Internet. So that's how we were able to narrow it down that there is something religious going on here and upon closer inspection. We were able to confirm that. This particular cluster of of industrial Actually used by the threat group called Mustang Mustang Panda. What can you describe for us? What exactly is a windows shortcut file and how is it? Normally used of Indo shortcut files are called us. Alan Kay files so irregular undershot. Could files will have an extension dot. Alan Kay windows. They use it to open. Applications using using window shot good finance so for example a lot of people might come across. The shot could files in the windows desktop so they just use it to call the reapplication which is towed in a different location. I see so it's a link to an actual file and like you said it's kind of put on your desktop as a shortcut to the the actual executable. Yes I say before we dig into some of the technical details here. Who Do you presume that Mustang Panda Is Targeting based on research believe Mustang. Pandas targets are the Chinese government's neighboring countries as well as the countries that are involved in Belgian road initiative so that is Mongolia and multiple South East Asian countries like Vietnam Myanmar. We also found a mother. Target countries suggests Pakistan because Marcus as one of the countries that enrolled in Belton initiative. I see in other particular picula groups within those countries that they seem to be targeting so the specific entities dot Steinbach targets are most of the government entities as Fellas are nongovernmental entities nonprofit groups D Mustang found out primarily collects geopolitical intelligence. So they primarily. Luke collect intelligence from these governments that the Mustang pond US targets. I say well. Let's dig in and go through some of the lure documents that have been sent out here before we get to that. Do you think that they're planting these documents. spearfishing or or how do you suppose folks are finding these documents on their computers. I don't have a definite answer today but I can say like most of these. APD groups they believe the standard should be using spear phishing emails to Areco to their targets. Well let's go through some of these lured documents together. You gathered quite a few of them. The research here has fifteen different documents. Why don't we go through a couple of them together? What what were some of the more interesting ones that you found but it starts off with a particular sample that targets Vietnamese Embassy that is in China China so in this case Lee believed the email has been sent to the victims? Who Work in? I'm busy off Vietnam China so this particular document talks about vowed to different activities. One is a military drill. That is going to happen in the South China Sea so the government is asking them. I'm not to let go any civilians or any fisherman's over there and the other one talks about China's latest icebreaking ship so it's just a little document but in in the background so once it has opened in the background so Payload has been installed in the background. And it's reaching out to the Saito so this is one of the sample and I'll talk about the other sample that talks about United Nations Security Council Council. So we believe this is targeting. The name think-tank in The Southeast Asian But we don't have any proof Tainting targeting it is Jolie based on the content of the document so in this case it is very interesting because this document has been downloaded from United Nations agent's website you can go to the vets Atlantic download it by the attackers. They are very clear in this case. They don't know that a real document attached to the the avondale shock profile. And then even the documentary shows that the real filename downloaded from the UN's upset and in this case. The Lou document wildly victim. Views allure documented. The backbone Doug expelled has been installed under to start communicating to the fetus. Ever so what they're doing. Here's is taking documents. What's that Their targets would likely to be interested in. They're taking the time to choose documents that they would likely want to read. That would strike their interest and taking advantage advantage of that of a bit of social engineering. There yes exactly so the targets and the lure documents are very related to each other so it gives the attackers percents bandaged. The victims will definitely open it because it is a relevant and very timely for victims. Now your research also describes how L. They've been targeting some police in Pakistan and they're using the plug smell. Where for that? Yes in that case. We didn't find the initial infection we were able to find that the declare sample voting off the IOS's that we don't find on the previous infections so in that case that was targeted against a Police Department in Banja Sind province. Well let's go through what's going on technically behind the scenes here while I'm reading this document that they've sent as is the decoy. What's going on on my machine? What tools are they using an in house communicating with command and control? What is the victim opens the window shortcut? Find a serious set of activities will happen in the background so for example once the victim opens. Stephen does There is an animated hetchy script tripped inside the File and then it opens another. VB's file so the VP skirt file performs different activities so it basically basically opens the document to the victim as well as in the background. It executes a partial strips that is going to download a plug. Knicks are cobalt strike. Depends on which payload as an adjusted for that particular victim. And then it's GonNa be out in case of cobalt strike. It's downloaded stadium. It's a reach out to the command control in the French. For the victim the lure document will be opened so none of the militias activities will be shown to the user. I mean no visible dialog. Boxes are any click yes or no. Since the Mustang Manda Group is using windows shortcut files so there. There's no need to enable or disable macos Vich by the most commonly used tactic so in this case the victim thinks that he he or she did inside open legislative document or a paedophile. And where is it reaching out to what what have you learned about the C.. Two servers there is no specific countries. He's our region that all the servers located so it's all spread across the globe. So that's about it. What sort of information does it seem like? They're interested in. What are they sending back? In this case it group is specifically interested on collecting intelligence from the neighboring countries our countries as involved in the belt initiative so at the time of research most of the leaders servers are actually down so we cannot do. Hr to the not to our economic able to find what exactly does trying to accelerate from the victim because all the activity that the militias sheltered files status it installs the the first stage payload and it's GonNa retrieve the second level payload from server so once the victim receives the second Lowell payload it has gone upper from the next set of activities. And what are your recommendations in terms of people protecting themselves against this be very about deamid start your opening because the most common infection vector is the email so please be valuable. What's your opening and especially emails attachments? So it was just the sort of thing that antivirus would catch or endpoint protection. In this case I would say no because there is no malicious payloads or any other Khalifa's activities are embedded here. It's just a plain window shocker file and it's all it's going to be having a citizen you are just giadonalds Level Payload in this case even the next day or the day Mustang Panda or using legislates joke service as like a google drive. DROPBOX are publicly known story services to retrieve their second lower payload so de Ante whereas in this case you're not be enough to help and our thanks to parsipone from anomaly for joining us. The research is titled China based ABT Mustang Panda targets minority groups public and private sector organizations. We'll have a link in the show notes thanks to juniper networks for sponsoring our show you can learn more at juniper dot the nets slash security or connect with them on twitter or facebook and thanks to unveil for their sponsorship. You can find out how they're closing the last gap and data security purity at Vail Dot com. The cyber wire research. Saturday proudly produced in Maryland out of the startup studios of data tribe. Where they're co- building the next generation of cybersecurity teams technology the coordinating producer has Jennifer Ibon are amazing? Cyber Wire team is Stefan Missouri. Kelsey bond. Tim No Dr Joe Kerrigan Kerio. Nick Valenki Bennett. Mo- Chris Russell. John Patrick Peter. Kilby and I'm Dave Bittner. Thanks for listening

juniper networks juniper Vail Dot com Panda Dave Bittner Pakistan facebook twitter NSS Alan Kay Mustang South China Sea China theft D Mustang dot Steinbach Mustang Manda Group Mongolia Maryland
Philipp Steinbach  CEO and Co-Founder of Game Composites

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

44:01 min | 5 d ago

Philipp Steinbach CEO and Co-Founder of Game Composites

"Speed up your number one big. Lingering dot com. Hello and welcome to the green dot is podcast for anyone and everyone who loves aviation my name. Is hal brian. And i'm the managing editor here at yay for print and digital content publications. And i'm one of your house and sitting there across the table. Socially distance and ready to go on the mike again. Our producer. christina baskin terrific and christina. What's your job title here. I'm are multimedia journalists. i know that. But who just making sure and christina. We've gotta guest joining us remotely Somebody that you've recently written written a story involving. So why don't you tell us who our guest is. Yes it's my pleasure to welcome philip steinbach to show Philip is the ceo and co founder of game compensates lockett located in bentonville. Arkansas philip welcome. We're glad to have you appreciate your taking the time to join us today. Thinking so philip before we get into talking a bit about The company and and game bird airplane I always like to get to know a little bit about a guests and visitors and things like that and understand your aviation background. How did you. First get in contact with aviation. Was it something you interested in as a kid. Anybody in your family and that sort of thing yeah. As a kid and started playing with motola planes was five six years old. At that time it was living in germany and grew up in the northern part of the black forest at that time was to entrance point for a low-flying area for military jets Thurs things coming through a garden. One hundred fatalists frequently and that deviated my attention from tractors and farm equipment to airplanes. Very nice that's D schwartz fault. Yes yup beautiful area. It is and that's the extent of my german. So i will stop trying to impress anybody. Well that was over my head. So i'm good. That's one phil. Why don't you tell us a little bit about how you met stewart the other co founder and how it became essentially what it is today so understood and i met about ten years ago in england running another airplane company at the tournament toy seller planes minister selling one and shortly after another one and the when he took delivery of their first. Airplane actually asked me to deliver it to arkansas. That is nine years ago. Meanwhile and so we got to know each other became friends and also my first time. I came here Quite liked what. I saw It's a great place to fly great place to live grade weather most of the time and so then a year later two years later i decided to leave extremely for various reasons and originally the plan was that We relocate extrema from germany to england built up an arabic center there with joe copa. The time was multiple times. You're uk national champion reported negotiating the purchase price for extreme at didn't go very well and stewart for the nfl of from the paper. That i was thinking about who to approach for approach for a program like this for a project like this. He was to basically i. I called also the one that came up with the best idea. Now we are partners in a business which is way better than a bunch of them and so we decided instead of taking away. Extreme metal restart the business from scratch to a new product. New company set up. Everything and i have zero regrets of this. It's been very interesting time to say. The least we started in office contain lincolnshire. Which is about the size of the little of sitting in right now. Progress into a disused fueled station to build the prototype. Which was you know from the outside related. Look like much but Managed the first airplane in there and completed type certification in. This moved to arkansas in a facility. That i was able to plan with an architect of build way. We were still working in england then restarted hiring in may two thousand seventeen and the now we get since yesterday twenty nine airplanes completed and flying where sixty people right now and More order so we're really really busy. Which is a very appropriate to have and company sped. I bet everyday. I enjoy getting up in the morning and getting to work every day which is probably as much as anybody can ever wishful. That's that's terrific and just for our listeners who may not have read the story in Sport aviation magazine a stewart. Your partner is stuart walton. And he is among things i've a longtime supporter. Va and serve on our board of directors. So we're we're very happy to have that That connection to stewart and And threw him to you. Happy about that too as you can. Imagine all right so philip. Tell us kind of the mission behind game compensates you and stewart. I started to get the ball rolling and talk to us about how you eventually Started come coming up with designs for what is now the gameboard so both stood an i when we met flew aerobatics in competitions stewart in the pits at that time and been poured an exit. Forty one forty two I started their design of the say. Forty one back in two thousand three We made about a few of those before. We realized we needed to see that there except for the two was eventually that airplane initially was marketed. As extreme three thousand than an exit forty one and forty two as almost as many names as airplanes. I do that sport. Sins also since two thousand rape have competed in a limited for a number of years and Of great memories of you know course still. I would still like it but a businesses has taken priority. Of course now. This is how how to to begin with ten when we decided to go into business together. I was not so much based on the excitement for the airplanes more than on the actual business case that is to be made for robotic airplane and the opportunity the actual opportunity to build a business aerospace business on a budget and that's may seem a little bit out of place in his context but one of my main things that i said early on when we talked about starting came composites together was i want to prove that always saying wrong that you need a big fortunate to make us more fortunate nation and this is this one of the inappropriate one of the worst things that happened in the last thirty forty years that almost very in from what i can see at least since i read magazines and sport aviation of course that fewer and fewer project actually get completed and so there seems to be an arabic plain to me. Is a project still a lot of work because you need to answer all the questions. That almost as many questions as a boeing to answer but it is other scale where you can successfully build business at at a healthy growth rate and learn everything that you need to learn to organise out organization about certification and so on and so forth to be prepared to retake on biggest tips from there and both alarm bishops. From the start where that we found game composites to build the game bertha was the mission. My had some kind of experience from flying from my previous jobs doing this but both of our ambitions are actually going a little further than this. Of course you have to take the first step before the second. That's why we started out with two people in the container number. Four people in the container and people in the little shop up to the stage where we are today. And that still i think the way to do it healthy and saliva berlin remain at some sort of sin sanity whereas if you look at people try to take to buy too much of the cake at once like on a greenfield. Try to build a jit. There is not a single successful example in history. Where some something like this ever worked. And i'm not saying we want to be legit but the game but it's been very rewarding and exciting experience far. It's been a steep steep learning from me moving from germany to england and entered to the us culture. Different sisters businesses are differences significant differences in how to run a business but after four years and again no regrets and looking forward to it. That's great to hear so it's interesting to me. You pointed out you you had the the business case and everything laid out So you started with a business plan and then worked on designing an airplane Trying to think how to best phrase this question but you know the game bird. The is a clean sheet design. What's the first thing you do. I mean if you were figuratively or literally looking at sort of a blank piece of paper. And saying i'm going to build You know sort of the next great aerobatic airplane and and certainly had some other features. Where do you start. What is what is your first day. Look like i. It looks like okay. How many people putting it so and says you know. Probably not for because it doesn't make a lot of senses too. Many sick box to carry one doesn't sell enough so kind of obvious choices to then. How do you place them side by side tandem and in tandem in case you wanted to enroll as fasting does otherwise you had banks through the window all the time and then the next question is what engineer pick. There really is only one choice nowadays on the market which is five eighty. I know that there have been various to seat. Four cylinder airplanes but If somebody asks me where cillian the standard answer is. You can always thought back. You can nibble get more police than you built in into the plane in the first place. So that's basically the start and that also gives you about fifty percent of the flying muscle already and then you design. Try to design the prettiest most useful back to carry two people in an engine around. That's pretty much job of nfl manufacturer so when we met in arkansas you mentioned that aerobatic airplanes had long been built for power and not necessarily ease of handling and your goal was to essentially do both which spanned tastic Can you tell us about your background and experience in arabic. And what things he kind of took away from the industry as you were designing this so over has been interested in plant Like i said earlier on and there's really nothing to invent in subsonic aviation anymore. Everything has been done so the big advantage. I think that we had with the cambridge worst that we had some experience. Plus where the budget to see through and this way and we took time so we could actually sit down. Compare existing designs look at available acknowledges. Look at what we actually want what the customers want. Not what we want and formulate this into into a job description for an airplane and basically you can. I mean this is a little bit to simplify it but you could take components from airplanes for the last eighty s. And they would on. They must almost make a game bird altogether already. Because there's like. I said there's everything has been done. And everything has been tested and we just took things that i found useful for this application and put them together and that goes in construction that goes into design certification that effort selection aerodynamics. Pretty much everything as cell already proven technology there so we haven't like broken any ground-air because that's another kind of golden rule in particular even worse in small aviation if you try to if try to do too many things at the same time. It's not gonna be a business so you know there's to sing new engine and you add frame is always going to be a disaster. In proven airplane approved f with a new engine could be a disaster. The easiest part to do with what we did. We build a new friend for an existing engine. and it. that's still enough work Probably seen that when you were here. Everybody in the building is fairly busy but it. It seemed to be the most feasible way to do this. And that's also well. My composite and design background comes comes in handy. I couldn't design an engine for example so one aspect that i found to be interesting to the bill does that. It is designed to stall abruptly but also regain airflow equally as fast talk to us about how you achieve that in the design and build of the airplane. So that's something which actually mostly comes from plains if you watch a jc has a very popular 'cause operate now flying in extreme flights crazy model. Those things they literally corner. That's not even a radio's anymore. And this is mostly achieved through lightweight construction also using composite even on mortals but also effort selection and conventional efforts are more designed for benign stall characteristics and a kind of shallow lift tracker even behind the store to keep keep lending survivable whereas everybody got plenty supposed to snap supposed to spin supposed to recover from snap very very precisely and also recover from a spin as precise as possible. That means you don't want any kind of hysteresis in the store. Meaning if you if you stole fifty degrees you want to unstall at fifteen degrees at five and This certain criteria apply to nfl of this program so data can do that and that was part of the experience from playing with other airplanes prior to designing the game bird and the wing actually works pretty well on this airplane also does is it. Creates what their plane has. That's why if you will walk around the game radio where notice. It doesn't have a stall warning in a little flap on the leading edge. Which rips up your finger if you try to wash too quickly and this is because the toss have natural natural stall warning for once and also it has such a low power loading that you can pull. Even it's fully loaded. You can pull out of a store without any kind of significant altitude loss or not close at all. That's that's remarkable something. I've i've wondered about with almost all competition. Aerobatic airplanes That you would see see on the circuit. I'm not thinking of many exceptions. If any in your opinion why they all tailed drivers. It's really moss and wait. Aeronautics makes the tender is lighter than swayed and the the arrangements of gravity and everything of or the the attempt to build the lightest possible airplane notably leads to this so the game is rather robust piece of machinery has to be able to withstand certain aerobatic maneuvers And when we were doing the factory tour with you you kind of picked up for example. A rudder and it was quite thick compared to like an average water that you would find an an aircraft talked to me about the design to make it as robust as it is so composites. Don't like low concentrations so the first thing you try to do when building something out of carbon fibre is to distribute the load over the largest possibly area surface and that means that in in terms of a wing for example it goes for any any material the other window stronger. It's going to be and the road is just like a small wing eventually. Essentially and the ace the speed at which you can legally fully deflect dorado is one hundred and seventy five knots cambridge. One hundred seventy five knots. You have around a thousand pounds genetic on the distributed over those three inches and that means if you want to do that many many times over of the life of the airplane they need so good idea to give it enough structure to essentially keep it in place all the time and the rudder and aileron on whatever you pick up. It is about the weight of a cessna. One seventy two control surface. But if you try to apply the same loads to undertake training airplane it'll just cease to exist so that's where the actual compensate engineering comes in out composites. A very different approach compared to middle plano to a witness plane because the load plus just have to look different. The deloitte introductions need to be different and Basically by applying what glide up left what other manufacturers have done as basically as thorough as we possibly could during the design phase we were able to produce an airframe that weighs about as much as the engine and landing gear together so the engine and let me go make about fifty percent of the empty weight of the entire plane and now everything is done in house at the factory in bentonville arkansas except for their components that made in australia currently. But we're right now. We are expanding and replant to bring the capability in house within an x. Six to twelve months. Does it take to make one airplane. So we're on three hundred and fifty combs reports it make one plane and then plus of course welding jason simply fixed So but The airplane is about eleven hundred individual components counting nuts and bolts and everything. Well that's really a really amazing now with three hundred and thirty molds All those all that material making these the welded fuselage or weld components coming in from From austria that you do have to bring plan to bring in house. How long does it does it take. How often is a new game. Bird rolling out your factory door so right now. It's about one every three to four weeks. We're trying to get up to two planes a month but the the biggest well or main objective is quality not speed. Luckily we're in a position where we can afford this and all right now we're focusing more on getting it right and getting everybody in the team trained up to deliver the best possible quality. Only when we're really happy with how everything we're extending we're gonna try to speed up and get twenty to get to two planes now not going to ask you to divulge any company secrets or anything but It's been interesting for us to see. How a general aviation activity has been in some ways impacted Certainly by the by the pandemic which is which is affected all of us around the world and so many different ways but in some ways. Generally vishnu activity is also flourished because it's it is a way to You can be socially distance you can sort of be by yourself. You can go and fly How has the pandemic in impacted you and and gain composites. That's one of the advantages of being in arkansas We never had to shut down to single day. Government has taken some very moderate decisions. I think part of it is that arkansas is not very densely populated to begin with have been. The outbreak itself has not been elsevier's in other places in the weather has been very favorable. Lost broke out in spring. It actually occur very very flat over most of the summer and so we kept working through the entire time. We had never shut down a single day up to today. Knock on wood and we had only. I think five or six cases in in our team and everybody came out all right after a week or two with with no long lasting effects on anybody. So we've been really lucky here and on the sales front it's been slow for the first tooth raymond's while everybody was insecure about were in a harvest would pan out to what everybody an individual but then it actually picked up Having talked to other general aviation manufacturers saves paypal That seems to be effected goes across the board in particular in the ah slightly foster played world simply because nobody wants to sit in and out nobody that can afford. It wants to sit in an ellen anymore. I think that's also a good thing for. Let's say use planes. Suddenly it becomes a viable option again to have something that is thirty years old or even older just as an alternative to an airline absolutely. Yeah so i had the opportunity to fly with you. While i was there and i briefly was able to take over the controls and one thing that surprised me was how light on the controls. It wasn't how responsive it was talked. Me about what. It's like to to fly one of these. Because i mean you you fly one of these almost every day giving demos. It's fun i mean that's the line it's to me. It's the ultimate fun toy airplane. There's a lot of airplanes that have more ramp appeal or faster or slower. Whatever you want. But a combination of Just strapping yourself to to tiny plastic books or the big engine in the front and having all day. Jalousie of one is that to me. Is there in the freedom of flight or the pure fun of it. There's really nothing that the plane couldn't do that. A pilot can do or the other way around pilots. The weak link. So that's that's one if they really really nice features of these more than everybody. Planes that The you can play with airplane as long as you don't hit the planet you're in good shape going somewhere. It's fun i mean. Of course you can sit in the back in something faster with pressurization it citra within you. Don't see us much it took. I took various cambridge around the country. In the meantime over done learn flying in europe and to me via flying still is the best way to see any place. I really enjoy it and see it in something like this is even better so it doesn't have enough space enough places to take the kids if i if i go somewhere with my own. This is my preferred mode of transport. I was really surprised. When i read christina's Story about the The airplane that how impressive. It was in terms of range and endurance. And things when you think about. That's just not something you think about when you a as you say when you think of the plastic box the engine on it Meant for for aerobatics maneuvers. Can you talk a little bit about range. And endurance is what those numbers are. Yes so two years ago. I flew the plane spectrum. Idaho customers places there and that was eleven hundred and fifty. Miles added that nonstop in five hours and ten minutes and had forty five minutes. Endurance left in tanks when it landed in pepperell and that was pretty much with no wind. Some tailwind the first hour. So then a little bit of headwind coming out of the hills into the flats around denver so pretty. It's that averages out just slightly above two hundred not true. That was between ten and eleven thousand feet. The airplane carries eighty gallons of gas and up their drinks like eleven in half gallons and does like a little bit more than two not. That's that was hitting altitude. Which again for a little plastic books isn't that bad. And what what do you use what you get for a useful load after the tanks or fall so the airplane is around four hundred pounds empty. Twenty two hundred pounds is max. Takeoff weighed in eighty-one gallons. Need to help me out here. Because i'm not really into those units at home are how many pounds or even gallant gallons is four hundred eighty six pounds. Okay so leaves room for two two hundred pound people okay. Great sort of that was that was impressive. That was live math. That's not something we normally do on the show. We don't do math problems but okay. Now you're ready for your next or alexa. Who's who's interviewing whom here. We're find out light of so sell philip. If a customer wanted to purchase through game compensates what can they. What can they expect You mentioned to me. I want point that you do offer proficiency upset recovery training When a customer comes to purchase a game bird yes. We include ten hours of flight training with the purchase of regain bird for us customers simply to keep insurance companies and customers and ourselves. Happy christian bolton hike onus robotics team and ripple areas fame has started to work it in january. He has five-year background of working for flight. Safety as a as an upset recovery instructor he has trained a lot of people on on On this type of airplane and has trained a lot of people information aerobatics. And he's now our main guy to to do that kind of stuff with got some very very good feedback from customers who work with christian. I like learning robotics formation flying from him as well. So it's been it's been really good. Diversity plays the business. That's that's great. That's nice to hear that That it's not just a matter of here's a check of the airplane and go on the way that ten hours Must go a long way towards as you said making everybody feel more comfortable It does lead me to another question. And that is if a pilot comes to you We sort of an average Private pilot may with a tail wheel endorsement but hasn't flown something Taylor that this high performance in maybe it's more champs and cubs maybe decathlon or something like that. I d have an idea of how long it typically takes somebody with that kind of average level of experience to get comfortable in the airplane. That is no real average drilling. Depends on the ability of the individual to learn new things. And i would say if somebody can fly who pretty catherine. Then it's really much unites a handful of landings and full of ours and the plane is actually not take off and land. I mean take off his four second thing. There's almost no time to do anything. On ending the main difference to piper cup flakes study doesn't stall when it sits down so the sits at nine degrees it stalls at sixteen which means you're twenty five notes above stall speed when you are two or three point landing that also means you're in full control. Nothing mush ao anything and doing flight tests and also here. I flew they apply to nearly forty notes crosswind which is absolutely no problem. Are you lots of lots of control for the left. And that's probably the only i would say challenge is the to deal too s. to well to learn their control for that's really the thing it's more initially when you start flying the plane. It's more like flying helicopter with fingertips and not like ham fisted. That's unless you do the more at them the easier it is essentially. Lets interesting and forlani so you mentioned doing doing three point. That's interesting that attitude being so much lower than than a stall attitude Do you do you have any particular rules to you. Always three point. Do you do three point than we land in crosswinds. Or what's your philosophy there. I mean i know this as many opinions as possibilities data. So i don't really have a strong opinion either one personally. I always three point. It's just a habit. Because i i think it's the best way to just how taller wakes me since a number of years and but if somebody wants to we learned please we learned if you pay for your brakes yourself. You know. come on a long long runway again. This is this is not an airplane where you need that you have to we land because you have a bit of course win because it's all always enough control to keep the thing on the runway. There's really no excuse not to and recently delivered in her plane to european own is one of the most prolific taibbi pilots. I would say in europa even wide as you choose collection decided to easiest taxiing airplane but he's flown tailed at least and so we put some work into this and then combined with big data in some reasonable sized disappear a recently good visibility considering the pacer configuration. It's really hot airplane parade and bacteria question about the type of person that we sell airplanes too. I think there's a bit of a shift in in customer. Focus right now for at least getting complaints by Paper to date pure. This is pure robotic airplane anymore. This hate to say that way. But it's almost a series of everybody up lanes you get you know a little light mice things inside you can uniquely good good seeds and paint and everything. It's not a achieve toy anymore. We're far away from thirty thousand dollars pits and this is by no means this being disrespectful to the pits but if somebody would manage to build a thirty thousand dollar airplane nowadays i would be very very interested. How they're supposed to work and to make a business wicks. I think the minimum you can you have to do is what we actually do. So that comes with a price tag and that unfortunately you know kind of restricts access to these airplanes to people with a big checkbook but to get to those guys you know that i mean. I've i've started flying competition robotics in my not. I don't know a lot of people who have done that level of sports when they were much younger outside of france which is states huge degree so the our focus in the development of the plan has been different but i also think that's a huge chance of making the planes more accessible working together with the communities out there like aarp as a very good example. Because we're talking with each other right now at this club. Element of has been has never been a thing as long as airplanes cheap but now plants have to be more More expensive to just meet environment. That in may be The regulatory side debate litigious side off. This is the the budget you have to deal with and then it starts to make sense to share airplane. An airplane is a very good example of where sharing can actually really work because nobody usually takes it away for a week and to the bahamas with it. Which by the way something we're about to do but it's a different part of the story but if you want to train competition i used to started out with four people owning an extra three hundred of Plan and we basically trained each other Which was great. We have hang coast. Which have the insurance which had the maintenance and that was for me personally was a i think. Still the best way to get into Let's say higher close aerobatics more than intermediate. Because i could never afford to the plane like this in my own but when you fly something that is let's say thirty thirty five thousand euros anuron dollars. That's not gonna take to unlimited anymore. So that's in this context Game composites williams might be out there to try to publish that sport. I think that would be a good way to facilitate Shadow ownership concepts club concept. At least would be in my opinion with people s talking about other than the guys who can afford it any way way when they do with it. And and philip. What is the price point for purchasing a game bird right. now it's hundred twenty five thousand dollars for the version. That comes as you the that you and i flew together. So it's got the key in it and eighty s beaten an isp on it good po seats in it for the money already. Which is nice. I think the options that we all fall in what be difficult to spend more than four hundred fifty in the plane and cut options are customizable for a customer purchasing a game bird. Hey mostly then you have a second radio that kind of thing. It's not a huge offering pipeline options or something right well that obviously that that that price point is is is well. Let's face it. It's out of out of reach for a lot of people but you made a great point about shared ownerships and flying clubs and things like that and it's it certainly Certainly competitive when you look at the landscape of brand new. Airplanes brand new airplane certified. Airplanes are expensive. And that's that's certainly why so Why the core of our organization is about Is about affordable flying and and why homebuilding has been has been at its heart for pre since the very beginning but but it's always exciting to see innovation. It's exciting to see see great ideas and and especially interesting to me when you said that maybe to paraphrase. You just a little bit philip. That the gameboard is really kind of culmination of Of the best of lots of other things that you've seen over the years how they come together but that that combination of a range and endurance with the the maneuverability in power is is Certainly impressive and obviously You guys are not Not having trouble finding finding customers when you're rolling rolling out every every three weeks and gearing up to do that Twice a month. That's remarkable. Yeah it's been quite the experience in the last few years him of admitting bacterial divide affordable flying. I mean one thing that i learned is that Cheap at planes on like cheap brain surgery you find out what's wrong after you should have found out. I appreciate everybody who makes the effort. But at the end of the day in everybody's even somebody who makes kids in the business because to to make it a business i took abe on Business has gotten the ball has been raised over and over again because essentially the nature regulatory bodies to make every occurrence transform every occurrence to law and that does that keeps raising the ball every day. In a you know the times are changing everything changes with it on. I think it's a good as pittsburgh's it would be would be designing and helpline today. And it wouldn't be for the same price that it was in the nineteen sixties or seventies simply because he would need the same amount of overhead that we need and Fixation and supply us in everything. Just look engine. Prices over the last fifty dave dave gone up for the amount that a new pits to soured in the seventies. You can't even blame engine anymore. Nowadays so this is this is all that stuff plus inflation cetera et cetera. Lists a lot of things. Why if you if you just say if you just compare the numbers. That doesn't complete the picture. Let's be like this and if you even if you look at an rv an rv is not the price of the ticket by time it's radiant done and the somebody has invested in said the modifies of his life into this machine. I would say quite an probably a significant amount of these bills could go to work the same time in probably just by plane off the line from us from somebody comparable actually lose money by doing this. That's not to discourage paper Payroll started the same way. it said. it's great. That's one of the fantastic things in the us. Did you can actually do this. Anti but for people who don't have time on what to put the work in say i don't have the experience i don't want cheap brain surgery you know. We offer a tank solution. That's excellent So philip is there anything you can tell us about. What's next for game composites at a reading between the lines. It sounds like you've got some big plans for the future. But i'll understand if there's nothing air-raided to share yet but any Any hint hint that will be gb in question for the now. It's going to be more game birds. That's the focus. And the whatever we you know we need to do the first before the before the second and We have completed Quite yet so. It is pretty exciting. We keep the yes to the ground and see what's out there are ideas of course but right now. Everybody's really focused on the job at hand. Which is doing what we're doing. And it's another fund most of the time and that's something you regardless of which direction the company is going to go. I have no intentions of giving that up on a robotics has been a focal played around in my life for the last fifteen years spent a lot of fun of course with fun comes frustration but a good side. Good sites by far outweigh backsides. And it's been hope for much more right now. The lost this week with katsuhiko tokunaga here from japan. Who is the world's most renowned aetna photographer. We've done some exciting formation. Things hopefully seat him soon. Yeah more to come in. It's been fantastic sofa and knowing stopping all. That's great While philip by we're just about to the end of our time today. So i wanna take a second again and thank you for taking the time to join us and also Big thanks to both you and and stewart for taking such good care of our team when they were down to visit Visit you in in arkansas. Hopefully everybody out there. Listening has had a chance to read. Christina's story and the christina. That's the march issue station. Correct march twenty twenty one. Yes that is the march. Twenty twenty one. I feel so we're always working on a working. Two months ahead so i always forget which is which but anyway. I have no idea but with that philip. Thanks so much once again for joining us. We really appreciate your taking the time today. Thanks for giving us the opportunity to show talk about the game. But i talk about the company and if anybody wants to come visit us you know we got. We got the website whale always happy to she. Applied share experiences and bill is a great place to be within a good have a great f. b. with a great restaurant in it. It's a. I think it's a good few stop in the heartland of the us so please visit us. That's terrific all right. Well thanks again philip. And thanks to our producer christina for stepping dot exactly away from the board's bringing the board with her and then stepping behind the mic Thanks of course Most of all to everyone out there. who's listening. We really appreciate all the support. All the feedback. You can comment on our podcast by going to our blog. Inspired ita dot org. Each episode has a page there with a common engine associated with it also always grateful for the reviews on itunes and other platforms. We do apologize to anyone out there. Any i tunes listeners who were missing a couple of episodes for a little while I'll will just say that. It turned out that there was a php configuration problem. That messed up our feet and we found it and fixed it so glad to have our tunes listeners. back Please keep those comments coming. You can always email us feedback at dot org and with that We look forward to catching up to you next time when you're cleared the land on the green dot.

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Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update, Autonomy Regulation, Vanguard (02.10.21)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

23:38 min | 2 months ago

Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update, Autonomy Regulation, Vanguard (02.10.21)

"Everybody robbing our here and today we're going to be talking about the semiconductor supplier issue that has been affecting the automotive industry as a whole and we do have a few other topics to go through as well. This is a live episode because after we go through this. I do have some thoughts to share. But i thought it'd be best shared live so we're gonna do the kind of normal episode structure But it will be live so bear with me as always but we'll get into it will start off just looking at the stock today so finish down five point three percent to eight hundred and four dollars eighty two sons. I compare to the nasdaq which is on the video. But down a quarter of a percent so it was a tough day for tesla today especially relative to the broader market other automakers. Did you know at least the ones. I looked at fare worse than the market today as well thing. Gm ford were right around down to percents neo. Probably in that ballpark as well So i don't know that this drop was entirely isolated to tesla but certainly tussle moved a little bit further perhaps related to the supply of semiconductor. So let's move into that topic For whatever reason. I've had i don't know fifty to one hundred people. Ask me about this over the last two days whether that's in the youtube comments or on twitter or on patriae on a lot of people for some reason seem to be incredibly interested in this in the last forty eight hours even though this has been something that's been discussed in the automotive industry since back in mid december And tesla has already talked about it a little too so we'll go through tussles comments. I'm here as well. So essentially what's going on. I'll go into some links here in a second. But what's going on here is that there is the semiconductor supply shortage which is a factor of multiple different things that factored into it so primarily what has been driving it is two things the pandemic and then the rise in some areas of consumer electronics. So the work from home movement during the pandemic has caused increase supply for things like laptops and stuff like that. That people are upgrading for working from home. The five g cycle with phones has caused an increase from what i gather in semiconductor needs and then the next generation consoles with the xbox one whatever it's called now and the bs five launching those things have worked together to create more more demand in the consumer electronics base and then in the automotive space because of the shutdowns that were experienced in the first half twenty twenty the a lot of automakers cut their orders or their contracts with semiconductor suppliers to help get through that period of time. So what that is caused. Is those autumn those suppliers to necessarily want to cut production. And things like that. They worked through Their safety stocks. So let's let's get into you some comments here from Chipmakers the first one. That i wanna look here. This is from microchip technology. So this is from a couple of weeks backer. Just not only one week back. But they kind of talk about how they got into the situation that they're in In terms of semiconductor in the automotive supply chain so they're talking about how their customers generally pulled back very hard. During the pandemic there was no backlog visibility in this environment. They had no choice to down inventories and safety stock to protect themselves from what looked like severe economic contraction and they saw similar similar actions from their suppliers that worked that they were together for Actually producing their semiconductors so they said during his time no one in the industry was adding capacity. Obviously given the uncertainty about win things would recover And that uncertainty extended significantly as the bottom of market as well so one of the things that they talk about here. That will come back. A little bit later is that they're offering this microchip. Preferred supply program called bs to offer the prioritized capacity to companies. That are willing to work with them. To order. twelve months of continuous non cancelable non reschedule will supply So they're not guaranteeing capacity for that but they're prioritizing people that are willing to make those longer term commitments and because if we rewind it back to the for salvatore nineteen because other because a lot of other because a lot of automakers were uncertain about their demand they were unwilling to give a lot of certainty to these two suppliers. So that's kind of brought the semiconductor situation into where it is today and they're trying to work through this now and that's impacting. A lot of different automakers couple other quotes here just from people in the industry so this one is from continental Major supplier in the space. They're talking about lead. Times for semiconductors saying what with lead times of six to nine months. The semiconductor industry has not been able to scale it fast enough to meet this unexpected growth. In automotive demand which really is a return to previous levels not necessarily new growth than they continue saying quote the bottlenecks from the semiconductor industry expected to continue well into twenty twenty one causing major disruptions and continentals production. So that gives us a bit of a timeline in terms of how this issue looks. We don't necessarily have a scale from that. Then let's move into one of their quote here. This is from Tmc one of the obviously major manufacturers. I think they do like seventy percent of some semiconductors or something like that so specific to their automotive customers They continued to decrease demand for cms t s emcees semiconductors in third quarter of two thousand nineteen. The chipmaker only began to see southern recovery automotive orders in the fourth quarter. Their ceo said earnings call earlier this month so they kind of highlights just the issues that were caused into the channel that were brought into the channel from the decrease in orders from automotive companies in the first half of the year so anyway getting forward to this year. Then i've been doing like hours of research on this all day to see where everyone is at So i've got like the ten major automakers here and all the comments that they have made on the semiconductor issue and how it's impacting them so to start off. We'll just kind of go through these volkswagen. They're saying that it's affected their. I'm qb flat platform both in volkswagen passenger cars volkswagen commercial vehicles than they've had impacts on skoda seat and i don't know if that's pronounced that way or asiatic but and to a limited extent they said audi is affected so somewhat limited in terms of what it's affecting Obviously there's no mention of porsche there or anything like that And certainly not all of their their production toyota. They've reduced production on the tundra. So it seems relatively isolated there renault nissan. They said that nissan expects one hundred fifty thousand fewer vehicles this year for full year. And then i the lantis i. i'm gonna put some of the renault stuff. Install lintas but regardless they say that still social stone into says the new company between psa and fiat. Chrysler the merger. There they said that they've delayed restarting production on the jeep compass pas production on the chrysler three hundred dodge charger and challenger and a brief positive opel and citron and peugeot their tvd on delays. There as of the last thing that i saw hyundai kia. They said that south korea's hyundai and kia have afforded material chip shortages at the as they have maintained larger orders so that goes back to what we heard there from tsmc and from microchip technology. Talking about how the orders that they were getting cut impacted their ability to supply these automakers and they had to work through that backlog safety stock but if these automakers stayed firm in their commitments than they would have just kept rolling and kept things on their original original plan. So automakers that did that should be less impacted. Which obviously we'll come back to when we talk about tesla which on the next slide here as for gm. They cut production at four plants. Aside from that it was a little bit unclear in terms of how much production was caught. Or what models Bud seems pretty broad there for gm they stuck on the civic and the accord they expect a hundred thousand fewer vehicles for the full year. So like i said there with neath nissan. Obviously a lot of that impact is gonna come in the first half of the year. But they're just saying for the tunnel year out of the four to eight million vehicles or whatever that we produce about one hundred hundred and fifty thousand that is going to be reduced from the semiconductor shortage as for ford. They said that they reduced production on on fifty. That happened in the last couple of weeks. They've also pas production on ford escape. The lincoln corsair and they said that they expect ten to twenty percent reduction in global production for key want as rhode island. They said the production and the bremen and rasta plans. Add whatever however it's pronounced but they said that is primarily for score problem. So that's there in those two plants. Generally they're c class In bremen and the neurologist at the and glass for bmw they maintain a production But they are watching the situation intensively and then volvo avoided shortages so forth so far so when we look across all these different automakers we can see there's variability here right like not every automaker is being impacted to the same degree. You've got forward. You know saying ten to twenty percent reduction globally. They seem to be among the worst situation here. But of course not. Every automaker is commenting in that way. It seems like volkswagen has also been hit relatively hard with this. But some like bmw and volvo are saying you know really not changing anything but monitoring the situation closely. So as i said tesla has made a couple of comments on this flip over here. Both in their ten k. That was filed on monday and then of course on the earnings call back in late. January zach talked about this briefly opening comments That he men's cfo. So in the ten k they said you know. Basically just addressing that there might be port congestion supplier shutdowns delays because of the ongoing impacts related to the pandemic and that they talk about the increase and man for personal tropics has quote created a shortfall for microchip supply and it has yet unknown how we may be impacted later other section. They say that quote for example. A global shortage of microchips has been reported since early. Twenty twenty one and the impact us as yet unknown. They continue to talk about the unavailability of suppliers Or components four suppliers could result in production delays etcetera etcetera. Stuff that we all can understand. So essentially what tusla saying is like. Hey we don't know. We're doing the best that we can to manage through the situation. We don't know the exact impact of it yet. Zac earnings call said that quote the global semiconductor shortage as well as poor capacity may have a temporary impact And on again tesla. They're not giving us much information as some other. Automakers are an hopefully that is because they haven't had to deal with any production shutdowns because of this if we go back to you kind of the comments earlier about the orders and how the shortage is somewhat of a result of cancelled or reduced orders from automakers and key one in two of last year. Tesla wasn't in that situation as badly as these other. Automakers were if we go back to think q. One maybe was to you. Tussles down five percent year over year whereas the rest of automotive industry was on average down thirty percent in terms of production and deliveries so there wasn't as big of a drop for tesla and because tesla was probably among the more confident automakers knowing that they had a lot of demand seeing that they had a lot of demand that period of time they were probably able to give more secure orders and contracts to their suppliers whether that semiconductors or elsewhere so i think tesla just naturally as a result of those circumstances is going to be less impacted by this tesla also has a less diverse offering a vehicles so it should be a little bit easier to manage the supply chain with just four models versus who knows how many models from these other automakers so there should be an tussles just a a smaller scale company right now delivering hundred and fifty thousand to two hundred thousand vehicles per quarter. So i don't expect major impact here from tesla. And if we look at this this next line here. This is just a a note that i offer my just market that you market research. They say that quote fewer than six hundred seventy thousand or sorry more than six hundred seventy s. More than six hundred and seventy thousand. Fewer cars will be produced in the first quarter of the year as a result of the shortages of research by the provider. I just market so if we assume. The automotive market is around eighty million per year. A reduction of six hundred seventy thousand fewer cars on twenty million quarter is only about three percent. So i'm not sure why. This has been receiving so much attention over the last few days again. Because it's something that we've known about and the estimated impact is relatively small worst case it seems like automakers are being hit maybe ten to twenty percent of production some are being hit non not at all and maybe the average there is a more between you know five percent of three percents or something like that so i don't expect this to be a big impact for tesla and this relates to the tweet that had earlier. Today of any of you happen to see. That is at yawns aggressively. This tweet is directed at short-term thinking. This is a result of me. Going through stuff that i doing like hours of research on this and then you're sitting there and thinking about how little any of this matters. This is such such a short term issue if we think about the semiconductor industry these people are manufacturing millions and millions and millions of units. every single. quarter This is a you know. A very robust supply a very robust area of supply that's experiencing a temporary shortage for you know a myriad of reasonable reasons so there shouldn't be any. That problem is going to be resolved. Maybe for a couple months here. It has some impact on automakers. Maybe that impact extends to tesla but even if tussles manufacturing operations the production were reduced by fifteen percent. Quarter over quarter so looking out that ford number. That's probably where for it's gonna come in even if tussles production down fifteen percent quarter over quarter that would still give them their second. Best quarter ever of production and if we compared to last year one they be up like fifty percent from that one hundred forty thousand vehicles versus One hundred two thousand last year so not quite fifty percent but they're still be significant growth even if there was a large impact from this which it doesn't seem to be the case as of yet even if there were that impact the industry would resolve that very quickly again we there from tsmc or maybe from continental they were saying you know three to six months in terms of how long it could take a to fix this issue so this is tweets not entirely directed on that. It's a combination of that. And then just a lot of i dunno short-term discussion that i've been seeing over the last few days that seems to just be sort of creeping in and it's just i don't know it gets a little bit frustrating at times and it's kind of weird because this is like tesla daily and you know we kind of talk about all those little short-term things often but the way that kind of view this as sort of like hand holding through things like that because at the end of the day we should be thinking in decade-long terms and the day to day stuff doesn't necessarily impact that all that much and part of tussle daily is just kinda to be a reminder that hey on a decade long time horizon. The stuff isn't necessarily all that important. Now tesla makes fifty thousand fewer vehicles because of this. It's not a big deal. They're still going to be able to continue their expansion on their gigafactory. Is there's still going to be able to continue their d. They're still going to be able to develop their full. Self-driving continue expanding the beta making that more robust and more accurate. They're gonna continue to be able to work on construction. Add gigabyte len gets axis. They're going to continue to be able to work towards model to building out the cyber truck. None of those things are going to be impacted by a semiconductor shortage show. It's just a really a really really small issue in the grand scheme of things that you know. I don't know if the stock was down because of that today but if you're thinking about tesla's a long-term investment something like this is really at the end of the day just noise so that's kind of my thoughts. I'm just looking at my notes over here to make sure i didn't miss anything there. kinda ran kind of iran's there but i at that captured most of it So just a couple of other topics for today if we flip over here. This is a report from cash In germany and it is on. Tesla's gigabyte lynn battery manufacturing plans. Obviously that's going to be sort of a separate facility berlin And this is from york steinbach who we often get information from the minister of economic affairs from brandenburg. He saying that this is translated quote. I guess this requisites. I won't say it that way but cash says that at tesla battery cell production could begin in about two years with which musk wants to supplement the electric car plant in grenada. So i think that date is a little bit surprising. I'm sure many of us would expect battery cell to be earlier than that. But we also haven't seen a whole lot of time on that so i think it's going to be interesting to watch this particularly and see what we might find out. I think as tussle progresses down this will see more from when they have to sort of get approval for things. I think we'll see some of those documents. Come out so definitely be keeping a close eye on that because if tests wants to ramp up giger berlin and i've said that will use internal battery production. They've only got you know. Best case from fremont ten gigawatt hours per year once that gets fully ramped up to support that. And that's just not gonna. That's not going to cover the production at giga berlin for very long so certainly not for two years and i think if we think in the context of tesla's goal of one hundred gigawatt hours of battery production internally twenty twenty two. It doesn't really fit with this time. Line either two years from now about two years from now. It'll be twenty twenty three so i don't know if that's you know a conservative date from we've heard from york steinbach so far he hasn't really. You know followed that sort of tactic most of the time but it was interesting to see this all just wanted to pass that along the next thing here also sticking with germany kinda. Some good news A lot of at least in parts of europe on pilots functionality is a little bit restricted due to some of the regulation. There looks like there might be some progress here. A little bit in germany So teslarati here reporting that. The german government is working towards passing something. I don't think it's fully passed. It's working through legislation right now that would allow level for driving and vehicles so level for as a reminder is essentially fully autonomous but it just required it doesn't function and you know every single circumstance that a human could drive so you can't necessarily like take out the steering wheel take out the pedals from from a level vehicle but otherwise it is fully thomas's capable of operating Fully autonomous it. Just needs to give you some morning or give you some warning. If you need to take over or just can't operate in some certain circumstances so germany. It looks like they're you know really focused on making sure that that is removed as a regulatory hurdle at least up to that level. Four level redundant level there But as part of the this update's one of the people working on it said that quote. Germany will be the first country in the world to bring autonomous vehicles out of the research. Labs onto the today. We have taken a decisive step toward the school. I'm delighted that the cabinet has cleared the way for law on autonomous driving. Now the draft will go to the bundestag and produce drought for the consultation. We need swift implementation for the innovations in the transformation process. I am sure that we will reach groundbreaking agreements here too so that the germany so that germany continues to be the international number one in autonomous driving. So definitely good to see that You know you almost continues to talk about how the regulatory environment he sees that as being not necessarily about a bottleneck but slowing down the road option until tests can really prove that technology out. So it's good to see that you know as we saw with nitsa a few weeks back with some of the legislation changes here in the united states. Now we're seeing this germany. It seems like governments are at least aware of this trying to get ahead of it to some extent. And so the next topic here. Just a quick update tulsa filed on. Sec filing today sharing that vanguard has exceeded the five percent ownership stakes. Just like we saw with brett blackrock. A couple weeks ago the collectively across vanguard they now own fifty seven point eight million shares of tesla. So i think that's you know six million more or something than black rock For a six point. One percent stake in total. The shouldn't be too surprising. Just like when we saw tesla added to p five hundred we saw blackrock steak increase because they added it into there. S and p five hundred funds. Somewhere thing that we're seeing here with vanguard. I don't know exactly what their steak was before. But i it was around thirty eight million or something like that so djembe too surprising to see a jump up of this five percent threshold and likely all due to be The s p five hundred inclusion Just looking at a couple other quick things and then we'll wrap it for today the. Us federal tax credit on electric vehicles. It looks like there's been a little bit of progress in there. I don't have an article on it here share but From and we'll probably talk a little bit more about this tomorrow but it looks like they may be extending that from being sort of the. I two hundred thousand vehicles to get that. Us federal tax credit to now being about six hundred thousand vehicles and then of course. There's always that little short phase out period so overall i would actually expect. This tanabe. a huge impact tesla or maybe even be slightly negative because it gives other automakers much more time with that credit just like we saw with the two hundred thousand vehicles because tesla's going to burn through that like instantly so it would just be around for a few quarters of tesla if it's introduced in this way. Sorry there's a dog barking out there. Classic livestream Anyway so that's kind of the update on the federal tax keep an eye on how that legislation potentially advances There was a report by bloomberg. Today i don't have pulled up here but That riviera maybe looking to ipo september So some people were speculating that may be attributed to the drop tesla today. I don't think that would really be the case You know five percent drop in tusla's many many billions of dollars. I don't think that would be capital. Shifting out of tesla to prepare for ravina vio. Ipo seven months from now. That's unlikely or even just getting out of the out of the stock because there's going to be you know more competitors in the market. I don't know it just. I don't really think that line of lot Checks out to me And then the last thing for today just a quick comment here on the common sections on youtube so there are these accounts. Impersonator accounts that you know. Make their profile picture tussle daily. They say their daily and then the comments and say you to connect with them on like what's app and they have like hints on or you know trading strategies for crypto. I'm never gonna say to you guys never ever going to do that. If you see something like that. Report the comment. You should be able to see a little check mark by my name or some sort of like black highlighter. Outline that indicates that it's me. If it ever seems weird you can click on the town's And go in there and just you know. See if it's this channel or if it's an impersonator channel. But i'm sorry about that as soon as i see those i do. Delete them Super frustrating takes forever but yet just let me know if you see him. And i'll take care of it. And i'll never ask you to contact me on whatsapp so don't ever do that. But that will wrap it up for today as always thank you for listening Hopefully that wasn't too randy and we got through it. Okay but other than that. I will talk to you tomorrow for the february eleventh episode. Tesla daily the meantime can make sure to follow me on twitter at tesla. Podcast and i'll see them thank you.

tesla volkswagen ford gm nissan lintas hyundai kia tsmc chrysler tusla york steinbach volvo germany
TSLA All-Time High Close, FSD Beta Updates, Consumer Reports, Giga Berlin (11.19.20)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

12:02 min | 5 months ago

TSLA All-Time High Close, FSD Beta Updates, Consumer Reports, Giga Berlin (11.19.20)

"A little bit quieter day for tesla's stock today but nevertheless we did see an all time. High close for the stocks are not quite an all time high print that actually happened and extended our tradings around five hundred and thirty eight dollars per share but all time high close still a nice milestone. We'll talk a bit about that. We also have some news on the full. Self-driving beta news on gigabytes lynn. An update from consumer reports as well as from gm their electric vehicle strategy news on tesla tequila and then a bit of follow up to yesterday's warren buffett episode. All right so tesla. On the day to day finishing up two point six percent a little bit less than the eight percent. Ten percent rises. We had seen on tuesday and wednesday but that compared to the nasdaq up zero point nine percent and the clothes just shy of five hundred is the all time high close as i said before by about a dollar previously that was on august. Thirty first volume. Today was what we've kind of seen for the last few days about sixty two million shares so again basically double the volume that we've been seeing for the last month prior to the snp announcement but pretty much in line with the three month and twelve month. Averages are moving into the news. Then we have an update here from ilan on twitter about the full. Self-driving beta actually a couple of them. He replied to a tweet from a few days ago by tesla owner silicon valley. He's one of the members of the full. Self-driving beta nealon says quote next week's release is special lot of fundamental improvements both important bug fixes and entire new areas of functionality and quote so tesla has continued to push these updates. We heard from ilan earlier that they intend to do that about every five to ten days. But it doesn't sound like this one will be even more significant. Andy lon also added in a separate reply boat. If next week's release looks good. We will widen the beta and quote. So if you remember the original timeline on the d. beta roll out the target was really to have it in wide release in the us by sort of mid december two end of year. Doing that will help us recognize a lot more of that deferred revenue from full self driving sales in the us. So there is a financial incentive there to do that and then i think we've seen things progressing pretty much on schedule so far although stuff to know for sure but the review seem to be pretty positive so far and then we have this tweet from you on here as well as the tweet a couple of days ago talking about a pretty big release for at around the holidays which is hopefully at least partially a teaser for the fasd beta. Next up here is. I don't know that. I would necessarily call it news but we have an update on giga berlin. From york steinbach. The minister of economic affairs over in brandenburg. And after thank one of our listeners. Tim over in germany for sending this over and helping me translate but steinbach in an interview. Last week with rb did talk about tussles gigafactory and he confirmed a little bit. More of the information that heard him allude to in the past saying quote if this is set to work out as laid out by tesla and also the extensions as imagined. By tesla will have a car. City like volkswagen's wolfsburg that will be even bigger than wolfsburg as a carries less than one million vehicles annually. Here we will eventually see two million vehicles per year. get off the lines. that's a whole different dimension. I've seen some architectural proposals. And i am sure are people will eventually recognize it as part of their local identity and quote so again. This isn't really news. We've talked about this before. But i continue to think that the targets for each of these new factories continues to be underestimated. I think between giga shanghai giga berlin and gigi texas where easily looking at a targeted production rate of greater than five million vehicles per year and as each day goes by to me it continues to look more and more likely that can do that pretty easily not easily but they can achieve that well ahead of what. The fifty percent compound annual growth rate would suggest which is only about four million vehicles produced in twenty five. Anyway good to see that target confirmed again if you wanna check out that full interview. It is in german. But i'll put a link to that in the show notes and let me know if there's anything else interesting in they're all right next up. Today is a report from consumer reports. This has been generating some headlines today because the model s. has lost its recommendation status from consumer reports based on its reliability score which came in as worse than average as did the model x. and then the model y was rated for the first time by consumer reports on this metric at believe and it came in with a much worse than average reliability rating. Those of you that have listened to the podcast for a while. Now that i've already gone way way down this rabbit hole with consumer reports. I've talked to jake fisher the director of automotive testing at consumer reports multiple times on the podcast linked to those in the show notes. If you want more information on their methodology but essentially the conclusion that i have come to you after those conversations is that tesla tends to get dinged pretty heavily for cosmetic type of reliability issues under the theory that if those cosmetic issues exist well perhaps. That's a sign of poor build quality that will later show itself internally as well which i do think is reasonable to some extent but i think because electric vehicles are a little bit. Newer consumer reports methodology has not necessarily evolved along with that and perhaps doesn't give quite enough credit for the reliability of the drive train versus an internal combustion engine for example now i don't have a consumer reports subscription so. I can't see the report and full detail. I'm certainly not saying that. The only issues are cosmetic issues but those do always seem to be the focus of consumer reports comments to the media. So in a reuters article. Here from jake fisher. He says quote. I'm surprised that we would see the paint and trim type issues and body panel fitbit issues. You would think that would have been worked out a long time ago. And so i pretty much maintain my previous stance on this. I know we would all like to see tesla have better initial quality. That's no argument from anybody on that. But the model three went through this model three has been wildly successful. The motto is gonna go through this. It's going to be wildly successful and overtime tussles gonna continue to improve these things and the one thing that i would add on the consumer reports methodology. Just because they say the model y is much worse than average doesn't mean that they're like all of these issues necessarily it's being compared to the same model year car so it's against all these other new cars presumably. All these new vehicles should be relatively low in terms of issues so even if there are you know a really high percentage of new owners that are completely and totally satisfied and they read their vehicle completely. Reliable which i think is already a weird metric to have on a brand new car anyway the motto. Or whatever car we're talking about here could still come in as worse than average or much worse than average even if for example and i don't know the numbers again i don't have the full report but even if something like ninety five percent of owners report now issues but if that were the case and the average was okay. Ninety seven percent report now issues. Then it's going to be worse than average or much worse than average depending on how the distribution looks so. Those are my thoughts on that. But again if you want more detail on that literally. We had like a half an hour conversation about how this all works. It was really interesting. But i also don't have enough interest to you. Dive all the way back in again. All right next appears a couple of stories on gm and then we do have a couple quick tussle things to wrap up with so i hear on gm. They announced today that they will be accelerating their investment in electric annonymous vehicles that they'll be increasing their spending plans up to twenty seven billion dollars through twenty five from the previously announced. Twenty billion dollar plan which was actually just as recent as march. Gm says they will offer thirty all electric models by twenty twenty five two thirds of which would be available in north america gmc. yo. Mary barra said quote. We are transitioning to an all electric portfolio from a position of strength. And we're focused on growth. We can accelerate our plans because we are rapidly building a competitive advantage in batteries software vehicle integration manufacturing and customer experience and quote. We'll come back to that in a second but a couple of other things noteworthy here. Gm says that forty percent of the companies us entries won't battery electric vehicles by the end of twenty twenty five and the more than half of gm's capital spending and product development team will be devoted to electric and autonomous vehicle programs. So i don't know that sounds okay. But then on the other hand that means that sixty percent of their entries by the end of twenty twenty. Five are still going to be something. That's not all electric. And they're still planning on spending almost half of their resources on non electric thinks so doesn't sound all that great to me and then over the course of the last week or so. You also have jim ceo mary. Barra selling some gm's stock just over a million shares or about forty three million dollars normally. I don't talk too much. about insider. selling destler obviously has its own insider selling on occasion and though sales are preplanned so the timing is often overemphasized. But this looks like a pretty big sale. If focus dot com is correct. That would be more than half of her stake. I haven't double checked to that myself but it does seem like a pretty significant sale. Obviously if he on sold half his stake in tesla that would be something worth considering. So just something. I thought was interesting here also with this. Gm even announcement. I also hadn't looked at gm's market cap for a long time and it's actually back above sixty billion dollars which i was shocked by suffice to say that's not where i would value the company at are shifting back to tesla here then just a quick update on tesla tequila. I know a lot of people are curious about this alone on twitter yesterday. Saying hopefully more tesla kua next month kind of funny that he's still calling it s akilah but sounds like there will be another shot at that task ula and then he had another tweet today responding to somebody asking if it'd be available in europe soon and he said quote unfortunately there are too many rules around a liquor distribution even in the us however we will be selling the lightning bottle and shot glasses worldwide and so it sounds like there will at least be a second run tassell tequila. Sounds like they're working on some sort of tandem shock last to go with it. And they'll make the empty bottle available everywhere so i think what remains to be seen is do they plan on continuing matt for a long time or is this still limited quantity type of item a believe that glass was hand blown. So it's nice the Getting another run out there for the people that couldn't get it getting away for to acquire. Maybe that can't purchase now. But i would still say if you are interested. Probably jump on that earlier rather than later when a second batch does arrive. Because unless we get some clarification who knows how long that will last all right leslie today. I just want to briefly. Follow up on yesterday. Second episode the speculation and exploration of warren buffet and berkshire hathaway potentially taking a stake in tesla. One of the counter arguments being made was charlie munger and warren buffett's comments on tesla and on. Musk in the past. I do think that's valid but a few commenters have noted that berkshire hathaway has changed a little bit in recent years. Buffet has been giving more control to other people within the firm specifically to to investment managers. Todd combs and ted wilshire and they each manage a chunk of money for berkshire hathaway perhaps they could be the ones that would be making a move to invest and tesla. A few people also noted that berkshire hathaway recently invested in the snowflake ipo which would at least be an evolution if not a complete departure from the traditional investment style from buffet. And perhaps something that could have been pushed by combs or wilshire so when we think about the possibility of berkshire hathaway investing tesla. I think this is probably the most interesting angle my gut still says. It's not tesla. But i think those are some good arguments on the side. It looks like in terms of the amount of assets under management for combs and washer. They got each about fourteen billion according to reports thirty billion in total. That's of the roughly two hundred and fifty billion that berkshire has invested. So if part of the logic that is pointing us to think that maybe this investment is tesla is that it's you know ten billion dollars or around that level that's capable of an investment to be made just by combs or wilshire. So i really don't think that's something. They would do as individuals or even in tandem. but maybe they could have influenced in that direction. And as for the snowflake investment that was a much more investment about seven hundred thirty million at the time of ipo. So anyway thanks to those of you that share those comments. But that'll wrap it up for this episode as always thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and sign up for notifications following me on twitter at podcast. They'll see tomorrow for the friday november twentieth. Episode of tesla. Daily thank you.

tesla jake fisher gm thirty eight dollars eight percent three month twelve month nealon Andy lon york steinbach shanghai giga gigi texas warren buffett berlin nine percent six percent Ten percent snp steinbach ninety five percent
{wednesday rewind} no. 37 - The Grocery Delivery Episode

This Unmillennial Life

41:40 min | 2 years ago

{wednesday rewind} no. 37 - The Grocery Delivery Episode

"Hey there. This is Reagan, and you may be wondering why there's a new episode of the podcast here in your feet on Wednesday. We have so many new listeners to the podcast, and I wanted to make sure that each one of them gets opportunity to check out some of our favorite episodes from season one. If you're a long-time listener, you may find one you missed so sit back and enjoy this Wednesday rerun. If your skin doesn't know whether to break out a wrinkle, if you're caught between planning the third grade class party and researching retirement plans, or if you want to work out at the idea of cross, it makes your forty something needs AAC you've come to the right place. Welcome to this unrelenting life. I'm your host Reagan Jones and welcome to today's show when I started planning for today's episode. I struggled a little bit on what to call this episode. Was this going to be the grocery shopping app episode? Maybe this was the online grocery app and ordering episode. Ultimately, what I realized is that the way technology is changing and shaping the way we shop for groceries is too much to cover simply in one podcast. So instead of covering all those different aspects what we're covering today is specifically the idea of being able to order groceries and have them delivered to your home. You will hear my interview with Sherry stunned by my guests for today that this is an industry that is booming and is intimidated to grow even larger over the coming years. If you haven't looked to see if you have. Grocery delivery in your area. You're gonna want to check out some of the services that Sheree mentions today, you may be surprised to find that you have grocery delivery available in your area. I know that some of the criticisms I've heard at least in this Molyneaux life podcast Facebook group about grocery delivery, are that in the past some people feel that may be the quality of the products, especially fresh produce that the individual who shopped for them and did the grocery delivery, the quality might not have been the same as their own. So that is something to think about, but as you will hear when I talk with Sherry, and I know from my own experience. There are certainly certain things that we're all buying on a regular routine basis that don't really vary that much in terms of quality that you may find grocery delivery fits four easing your shopping burden. I hope you enjoy this episode of hope it gives you a little bit of insight. Site into some new technology that might be right for you. And with that I'll introduce my guest for today. My guest is Sheree stunned Baugh. She is a registered dietitian with over twenty five years experience as a health professional working in the retail supermarket landscape. There really is no one else out there that surpasses Sheri's knowledge when it comes to specifically nutrition within the supermarket arena. She really understands the retail landscape, and I think you're gonna say she does a great job of giving us a good overview of what some of these services are that are available to us and with fat Alsace sharing. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much publicity here while I know that this is a topic that has been on the minds of my listeners. It's a topic that has come up in this among lineal live podcast Facebook group and emir. Mmediately when it came up as a topic. You were the first person that came to my mind, as I've already told my listeners, they're seldom is another dietitian that you would ever find out there who knows more about the retail grocery shopping landscape than Sheree does. So I am so appreciative. You take time out to talk with us about this. Because as unrelenting I feel like we are primed to adopt technology, even though we may not be native to technology the way our millennial counterparts are. So you can kind of help navigate what this new online ordering experience is all about what it looks like who the players are what the expense is that's involved in how we can use it really in our own lot. So with that lead in the first thing that I would really ask is, you know, is this the future of grocery shopping. Well, you know, I think it really is in it has been interesting over the years. Like you say I've been in the repeal. Industry almost thirty years now and to see the changes that have taken place, and they used to say, well, I think online shopping is coming. Well, it is here it is here is here to stay. So even though the vast majority of grocery shopping still takes place in what we call those traditional brick and mortar stores, according to the industry experts out there that pattern is really gonna probably change during the next decades. Not only are the shoppers getting more tech savvy, but as well, the retailers are and so they're offering these grocery delivery options to the customers, and it kinda like I think about it. This is really bad. But like the milk ban used to do in the past, right? Bring milk to the house. That's what's happening fellers are now bringing food right to the doorstep. And it's I think it's really based on the convenience of it. So if you think about it, it's still it's still small, but it's growing about and last year about thirty one percent of the US consumers. Are likely to buy groceries online. But they're estimating that the online grocery sales that we're about fourteen point two billion in two thousand seventeen we'll go over double that by two thousand twenty one. Yes. So quite some growth there when you do look boys. I said it's not just something that we should just keep an eye on it is happening out there right now. But this is another thing to think about only nine percent of consumers placed an online order for groceries at least once or twice a month in the last year, which sounds super low doesn't it does sound lower. It's surprisingly loud. Does it sound very low to me? But then I'm like, okay. But this is again, I say growing, and we have to remember too that shoppers often still like to see and touch certain products before purchasing, and I think your listeners will agree fruits and vegetables or perhaps fresh meat products. Right. Yeah. And and some people like myself just because I've been the industry I actually enjoy the shopping of you know, experienced brother of shopping in stores how ever what you're going to see is lower prices. And the convenience of shopping online are really both going to become those major factors that are going to persuade more consumers to give online grocery shopping, try, you know, in the future. My prediction also for the traditional grocery store. The brick and mortar store is that. They're going to be changing no longer. I believe are you going to see well again, this isn't going to happen tomorrow. But in the future, you're going to see. Some of the bigger stores go away when people do want to go to the grocery store. They're going to there's going to be a focus on those fresh, high-quality offerings and more prepared food. Because again think about this, you know, I don't have to touch and feel my can of tomatoes. Right. I know what that looks like my toilet paper. My paper towel some of that center of the store products. However, when I do go to a store, I wanna see colors and freshness than and high-quality prepared food. And we're also gonna see and talk about this a little bit later. We're going to see healthier offering some healthy things happening both in the store and with online does so pretty light and stuff it's super exciting. Especially for those of is who walk that fine line of enjoying certain aspects of grocery shopping, just like what you describe. I love going in a grocery store and looking at all the different fresh produce. And maybe even seeing the pre prepare. Heard meals or meal kits that they're serving like the things that I feel like I get inspired to think about my shopping list, or what making for dinner, or, you know, new recipe creations that inspires me going down aisle after aisle to pick up bags of pasta bags of rice cans of tomato things that I love and that I need at home that just feels more like routine. So the idea that somehow technology, which is what we focused in on a lot of times here on this Omonia live, how new technology can actually solve some of our problems, but not hopefully create other problems by paying his opportunity to, you know, see the fresh foods in the pre prepared foods that is super exciting. Now, I know that one of the things that came up in the group was really just a lack of understanding about what grocery shopping options online are out there right now because when you say online, groceries you're really talking about a lot of. Different things. Some of those are things that you can purchase in be sent to your home. Some of those are things that you can order in advance in go pick up so walk walking summary. What options there are right now in in kind of water, the differences in all of those sure I'll talk about several of the key actions that are out there kind of what they are a little bit about maybe where you can find them in some cost involved as well. The one of the first one is in the cart and insta- cart is a delivery program available from a variety of grocery stores program in albertson's being two of the biggest and they also include some drugstores some pet supply stores and in some areas even liquor stores, but it's a valuable in forty states, plus Washington DC, and with a lot of these two you can go to the website and check and see what's available, you know, near you. Specifically when it comes to pricing insect cart. Does. Let people know that they're their pricing is available through. It includes the notes on each retailers pricing policy. Now, I should say so it depends on the store in. So well, most rotations offer, you know, our everyday store. Prices others do make it clear that the convenience of insta- cartman, you might be paying higher prices than you would if you come to the store now membership is not required to use the service. But if you'd rather skip the delivery fee every time you order you can sign up for what they call instead cart express though in exchange for a fee of I'm sorry so exchange for that every time delivery fee will pay a hundred and forty nine dollars per year. And then what you will get free delivery on every order over thirty five dollars, and you'll see this as a as a trend Reagan that that most of them do have, you know, those those limits those lower limits for ordering catching and so if you if you don't. Have that one hundred forty nine dollars per year into the cart express, the delivery costs are between five ninety nine and eleven ninety nine per order. An and again orders under thirty five dollars or even cost more than that. And if you want your order to get you within an hour, that's an additional cost. So you're gonna pay for that that very quick convenience as well. And what you'll find very consistent with most of these programs is they do not on or manufacturer's coupon which for some people have, you know, some people who are real coupon clippers that has been an issue. I believe and that's something to look forward to in the future. They're going to solve for that. I believe that's something that they will solve for because. Oh, I'm gonna stop right there. And just ask one question about instant car because the reason that they don't or can't right now is because these are not just so we kinda clearing this up. And I'm kind of asking this is a question. So you can clear this. These are not employee's of Publix or Kroger or albertson's, for instance, when you're when you're buying from the stores, these are individuals that insta- cart has hired in third party individuals Arete hired to go into the store and do the shopping in my assumption. Is that with the manufacturer coupon you really get into a case of what you've got someone who's going in and doing your shopping for you. So that's one more thing that they have to handle and and the reimbursement all that. So that's at it just kind of wanted to put that out there yet the framework. I think why that might be the case is that your understanding. Yeah. If too difficult to maneuver around right now to accept those coupons. However, you know, sometimes there are special in an infant has it. It does offer special promotions that they say that you'll see those when you log into your account Cadeau in lieu of coupon there, sometimes these other promotions going on. But again, I think they've been a figure out a way to. Aw. That at some point. We'll we'll have to wait and see. And that's true. The play for the next one which his shipped S H I P P. And this is the one that's available here in my area shift delivers a variety of grocery stores, as well it's available through much of the southeast in the Chicago area in parts of Texas as well as Michigan where I am located as I said shift prices are slightly higher. They say if you then if you've taken the trip by yourself, and it's usually typically the order fee, they say they're members can expect to pay about five dollars more using ship than they would on a thirty five dollar order purchased in the store, they do offer which I like, and I know a lot of people have taken advantage of this is a free two week trial before they charge you there ninety nine dollars annual fee or or teen dollars a month. So both you can get the. Ninety nine dollars annual or you pay fourteen dollars a month. And then all of your deliveries unlimited are free as long as you spend at least thirty five dollars, so similar rights against a cart bear. Okay. And again, they do have some inap- specials on items. But also like I said they do not allow these of manufacturers or store coupon again. Sometimes those coupons can really add up. So it just depends on the convenience factor there and the willingness to pay a bit more. The other one that I want to talk about his peapod and people have probably heard of this for quite a long time with peapod items, actually, don't even go to the store, they go direct from the P pod warehouse to your home, and they are affiliated with a whole del Hayes grocery stores and those include the giant and stop and shop stores which are out east. They also have unintended delivery is that they will both. So you don't even have to be home when your grocery groceries arrive and they'll come in an insulated container. I don't you know, I don't know how some people feel about their groceries thing left on their doorsteps. I think if you're having groceries delivered where I live in the southeast that would never be advised during the summer, but you know, the country maybe so right and peapod is available in New England. You know, because like I've talked about their stores are located there mid Atlantic and in the mid west their pricing. They say, you know, delivery price. Comparible to in-store prices, but there are some differences because again pea pods warehouse operates separately right from the stores, and you do not have to have a membership. However, they offer what's called pod pass, and that provides unlimited unlimited deliveries for orders of one hundred dollars or more at a set price, and what they have for twelve months of unlimited of for a year right is one hundred nineteen dollars plus tax. But you can also get a three month or six months of description at forty nine or sixty nine dollars. Okay. So, you know, anything beyond that again, you'll pay for addition of you have lower. If you get a an order us under sixty dollars, for example, you'll pay an additional delivery fee. So, you know, sometimes it's hard to decipher when I was even kind of researching the cost and like, okay now, wait, if I do this, and this and this so I think that something your listeners really have to pay attention to. To to make sure they're wrapping your head around all of the costs that may be involved. Yes. Absolutely. It's kind of almost like buying a club membership to some of the big box club warehouse type stores where you buy this membership because you're gonna get this great value that you're perceiving value. But if you only go in there two times a year, really how much money are you saving. So you kinda have to really see like are you going to utilize the service at I do have one question for you. That's a little bit more of injury Buell nature than it is about the tactical part of each one of these in. It's just a question about peapod in general, a take just brief sidestep to ask do, you know, if this is the same brand of peapod that we knew about years ago when when online grocery ordering I ever cropped up which would have been way back in the days when when us unwilling hills were a lot younger millennials were not even the consumer. Shopping experience. That's the nine peapod that I remember is this the same service. You know, I think it has morphed into what it is today. And you know, it's interesting you mentioned that because several years ago like you say, I was still working in retail, but one of the quality assurance managers left, our company and went and was the quality assurance manager at peapod. But she was located in Chicago. And I remember that really know the full connection I'd have to research that a little bit. But it definitely more. I believe it was probably out there before it's time. Yes. And that's what a lot of people had said, and that it really needed to go through that growth, and, you know, make changes to make it really a viable business option wilder time. The time is here. So we so now, we know. Yes. And one interesting thing with peapod is they do accept manufacturer's coupon, and in some cases, sometimes they even double them. So I thought that was an interesting. Oh, yes. Yes. The other biggie that will of course, have to talk about is WalMart, and they have the to grocery ordering options that you mentioned at the very beginning Reagan, and that in some locations, you can have your order delivered to your doorstep in many more locations, you can place your order and pick it up at a pickup window. So you don't have to get out of your car and a lot of people find that very convenient as well. I know locally with Meyer who I mentioned hours using ship. They had several stores who are doing the pick up them, and they called it curbside in fact, but they actually had to retro fit large rooms in every store to organize this. And my sources are telling me that it was too expensive for them to do that. And that they might be getting out of that pickup business. Wow. That'll be interesting. Yes. So it'll be interesting to see where that may go with WalMart though, they have same day. Pickup is available pretty much everywhere except. For a few states. There is no cost whatsoever. Delivery and pickup prices are the same as if you shopped in store yourself through just getting that convenience no membership. However, again, they do not accept coupons for delivery or pick up orders. I think again, it's just the time to do that. And the logistics around that, however, they have this what they call a saving catcher app, and you can verify that. In fact, you're getting the lowest possible price, and that they give you reward dollars for that kind of something connected there. And then the new big one that we're we've just been hearing a lot about lately, of course, is Amazon fresh, you know, the grocery delivery service there, they had the unintended as well as the attended delivery. So you don't have to be there really hard to find out where exactly Amazon fresh is delivering now, I know they are not in my area. But if you go to Amazon fresh website, you can search for your zip code. To see if available in your area, and they've been changing it around they opened up in more areas. Some of them have closed down right now. I believe Seattle. Boston Baltimore, Philadelphia. DC Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, you know, some of those big hubs do have it. But again, I they're testing this out. They have to make it a viable business option for them as well. So they're testing things they do offer a thirty day free trial, which then costs fourteen ninety nine per month, which is on top of the basic ninety nine dollars per year Amazon prime membership so fourteen ninety nine per month on top of that that order and then orders under fifty dollar have an additional nine ninety nine delivery fee in the orders over fifty dollars or more to get that. I always like it's interesting because I keep saying free delivery, but you're still paying a price right right to get free delivered. But but you've already paid for. Eighteen ninety nine a month. So funny to say that and as well, they're coupons coupons are not offered. And so they're expected Amazon food and beverage sale. They're projecting right now that they're going to rise from about six billion beckoned to two thousand fifteen they're looking at rising themselves over to twenty three billion by two thousand twenty one is a mayo. Yes, a lot of growth happening a lot of growth happening. So those are comparison them some of the main online shopping apps that are out there right now. Well, you've given us the price reach of them. And I love to get your expert opinion on how you perceive the value of that. But I do have one additional question that came to mind or one clarification before we move onto value. And that is with all of these services. Are you pretty much able to get everything that you would need if you were going in? Into that brick and mortar store or are there. Limitations on what you can actually order. Now. It's it's pretty much anything that you can get in the store there might be a few exceptions. But they're really paying attention to that. Like, why offer it right? If I can't get everything I need, and what I found, you know, when people say, no gashes this even worth it and the quality that's been a major concern. I'm not sure about kind of bananas. Am I going to get right? They kind of go overboard. Okay. Who make sure the quality is there and what's interesting to my daughters. Both are using the ship's service and quite new to them as well. They just like oh my gosh. Mom, I can't believe how easy this makes our life. But what they're saying is to and I've heard this from others is when the item you order is not available. They'll call you from the aisles and say. You're still Monte canned tomatoes are not available. However, we have this brand, and then you can tell them. Yeah. Your day, which I think is break you can order. I want three green bananas. And I want three yellow ripe bananas. You will get those. So I think to be viable they have to offer that quality of service in those high quality products. I had posted in the Facebook group. A while back an article that was talking about how retailers like WalMart, for instance, were entering into these different opportunities to provide basically, a personal assistant shopper and means little different than what we're talking about right here. But as soon as you said that I thought it's that same thing that we we are truly now going from in my lifetime going from seeing really small retailers were you do everything yourself, and you go to a ton of different stores to I've aged through huge retailers where everything is under one roof, and you're gonna do your banking and get your is examined. And you're you're going to do everything in once more. I'll just kind of a hodgepodge mixed together. And now we are kind of entering into this. What feels like a season of things breaking part a little bit more, and you having this digitally facilitated almost personal assistant to get some of your shopping done, which is really kind of interesting to see that livestock life cycle. So I guess then my question would be future prediction future. Taylor retail grew that you are when mother features do you think are coming for online shopping apps, while you know, you mentioned that personalized shopper in love that because it's going to get more personalized and one of these services that I love or one of the at that. I love out there. Kroger has a new one called up up hope PT UP. Have you heard about that? When you got. No, okay. This is this is pretty amazing. So it really makes healthy shopping easy. And what they've done is Kroger can take the guesswork out of better for you shopping. And we all know that. Health and wellness is now becoming almost more important value. When people look at food. Yes, I want taste. Yes. I want affordability, but health and wellness is right up there when people are making food decision. So what they have done program programs an inside company that they worked on to help develop this book thousands of products are rated with a one to one hundred score based on their overall nutrition. And it's typically what you'd think about right. The lower scored products are going to have more saturated fat more, sodium or added sugar and the higher scored ones are going to be no good, fiber and protein in vitamins and minerals. So what you're going to do. This is amazing to me your coin to receive personalized recommendation based on your current purchases. So let me give you an by the way, you can download the app up at that's hard to say I've up Pat at Google play or in the apple app store. An example, let's say that I'm ordering online, and I choose the Dan yogurt a regular Danan yogurt, and it's the score of sixty eight. It will pop up for me another option. Maybe it's the Dan and post triple-zero that has an eighty six I can click on that if I want to opt up to that healthier choice and put it in my on my shopping list. It's it's amazing. So you're going to have they kind of groups force together. What they call the green products. Right. Green. Meaning go the healthier ones are going to have a score of seventy one. Or over yellow products are gonna have a score of thirty six to seventy and the red are going to be thirty five or under. And this by the way, just as a note, the UK food standards agency nutrition profiling system is where this was derived from at Oxford. So just I kind of looked like don't have time to go through all the science, but has got some good science back. The other interesting thing there's going to be a dash or so customers can see how they're doing now and make improvements. So over time I'm gonna be able to evaluate what I buy make a change and then track myself. So the goal is going to move people to building healthier shopping cars, right or home deliveries. So if you are a Kroger. Plus card customer what you'll get is very interesting. I've seen the photo. You can get an average cart score. Oh, gosh. Your average cart score the fifty eight and they're encouraging you to increase your score by ten percent. The other thing is you'll see a little circle graph. If you will. And I'll be able to tell oh my gosh. You know, this is the percent of green items. I bought yellow and red and the goal there is to have over fifty percent of your items green and less than ten percent read. So this is real I think this is going to be fascinating to see how this really does impact purchases and moves people to some better for you products. Oh, it's amazing. I mean, if we talk about having a personalized assistant to go to the store for you. This is like having a personalized dietitian walking the aisle saying, right? Yeah. This is probably better. And you know, I know number of retailers have had over the. Years where you could walk the aisles, and you will get you know, whatever that particular store, whatever kind of guiding system or rating system that they are using that's good. That's definitely a step in the right direction. But if you truly are wanting to say, hey, my putting more of those in my car because a lot of times, I think we think we buy a couple of those off the shelf and we've made a better grocery cart for ourselves. But when you look at it in comparison to maybe all of the reds or the yellows that's really interesting to be able to see that into track that and kind of know get an idea of how you're doing and I'll have to say that for our audience. This really is in line with already what I see with what we are using on our phones, I just did recently the apps episode. And in that episode, one of the things that I learned was that in surveying millennials versus unwilling heels unbelievable, actually almost all of us have some sort of health and wellness at that. We are using. Hang on a regular basis where that didn't turn out to be the case necessarily with millennials than I think, Sherry both you and I understand at this stage in our life. It's because we realize hey, we gotta do this. Now like, we don't have the rest of our lives to wait to make improvement star health. So the time is here. This is a the fascinating program, and I'm super excited to hear about that. Are there other changes that are coming that you think people should be knowledgeable about well? And like, you you mentioned Kroger has some dietitians. But this is the way to expand that writing like having that dietitian with you. Because the dietitians are working so close with it. I think some other things you're going to start to see as we look forward with this. You're going to see even specific shopping lists that can be generated and recommended for specific disease states. So, you know, I need you know, you can put in but attributes that you want to filter for I want just for example, I want organic gluten free. Okay. It's going to show you those items with those. Attributes I think you're gonna see more linked to specific meal planning and recipes we mentioned meal kits. There's going to be more supermarkets delivering meal kiss Coburn's out in Minnesota their diet Titians work with chefs all their kids are only delivery. And now, they have dietitian choice where certain ones are specific to different nutrient requirements. They're gonna see more voice ordering right? We have a Lexus and all of these things so voice ordering. You know, what about the coupon circulation? We talked about that. And faster faster faster is going to become a very big competitive edge as well as that service because you know, we all know, we still want that service, and connective my daughter just told me the other day. She said, you know, mom McKinley was sick. She's almost five years old. She said I couldn't get to the store I called shipped. And I told them about about that. She. Of course, they just mentioned it. She said not only did I get my groceries. I got a personal note saying, I hope your daughter is feeling better. You think my daughter's now connected to this. You know, what I may Lutely? Yes. Yes. And I think all of that is going to happen. And as it gets more competitive, you will see that the convenience the Festa livery, the the the special services that the link to health and wellness. It's all going to be there. It's pretty exciting. It is exciting. And I would also add that you and I together both throughout the years have worked on trying to get people to cook. More at home make more meals at home together, we know that when people are eating together and cooking meals that overall they're just healthier in their diet quality is better. And where we hear about millennials so frequently using meal delivery, which definitely has a time in a place. I do think for this unique set of unrelenting where we actually still many of us do know how to cook and do want to cook. But we are so limited in time because we are. Balancing, our children's schedule. Our schedule our work schedule that this is technology is helping to make that happen. That's super exciting now series there anything that. We haven't covered about online grocery ordering or apps that you think people need to be aware of people are adopting online ordering in. It's again is not going to be a matter of if it happens it is out there happening now, and it's just going to continue to grow and as the younger generation who with online all the time. Anyways, right. This is gonna be the normal thing for them. So as a lot of us are just adopting it and seeing the value. It will become the norm down the road cheer. Thank you so much. No. That people are going to wanna know how they can find you online. So let them know that. Yes. You can find me at Sherri Steinbach, which is my Twitter handle. And then also my Facebook or my sorry website nets, Sherry Steinbach dot com. All right. Thank you so much Shihri. I really appreciate you. Joining me today. Okay. That wraps up. My interview with Sherry stunned Baugh. Hope that gives you something to think about when you are making out your shopping list for this week. I'm going to take a quick commercial break. But come right back a making one an announcement about a break that this. Unbelievable. Life will be taking for the summer. And I'm going to be sharing some odds and ends as a wrap up from last week's skin cancer episode on some of the product recommendations you heard in that episode. That's coming up next. Today's episode is brought to you by audible listeners of this. Unbelievable. Life can get a free. Download and free trial of audible by simply visiting audible trial dot com slash millennial. I had asked in the this lineal life Facebook group recently, four book recommendations, and there were some great authors recommended Louise penny Karin slaughter. Steve berry Brad Meltzer. And more one of the things that was also. Recommended was to join a book club, and specifically the recommendation came up more than once to join Reese Witherspoon book club, Hello, sunshine. If you're interested in finding new things to read this summer, but simply don't have the time to sit down and break. Open a book. I hope you'll consider trying out audible for all your summer listening and reading needs. Welcome back. Now Alice we close out the end of this episode and want to give you a preview that we are actually closing in on the ending of season. One for this. Unbelievable life podcast. I'm going to be honest. I have some hesitation about being out of sight out of mind for all of you listeners this summer, but the next few episodes, you're gonna hear on this. I'm lineal life. I'll go ahead and give you a preview are specifically dedicated to issues that we as parents who have children still living at home that are being touched by technology and being touched by social issues. These episodes will be stark reminder that podcasting is a love of mine, but parenting is my first job. My kids will be out of school for the summer. And I'm going to take a little bit of time to ensure that I am present in the moment with them and also spend that time gearing up for season two which. Will launch in the fall for this podcast with that in mind. I would of course, always left to hear what's on your mind. What topic suggestions you'd like to hear more of what you like to hear less of? You can always do that by visiting this. I'm Alenia life dot com slash contact. I love to hear from you. I will be doing interviews throughout the summer to get ready for season two. I already have many of them scheduled. I am very excited about what's coming to the podcast in the fall, including some fun announcements about ways that you can get even more unwilling to life in your life. And with that I want to make good on my promise to share some odds and ends from last week's show the skin cancer episode. I decided to take a little trip to my local Alta to check out what they had available in the way of the tinted son blocks that Dr Keller mentioned, and I found that while they did not have. Have the Elta MD product. They did have LaRoche posts say anti Leo's, which was the tinted sunblock I purchased it, and I have been super happy with it. This is all information that I've shared in this millennial life Facebook group fear an active member of that group. You've already heard me say this. But I know we have many listeners who are not member of that group. And I wanted you to have this follow up as well. The tinted LaRoche posts say Leo's sunblock is very sheer. And I really liked the coverage of it. I would not say that it really changes the color of your skin. So one of the Facebook group members a fan of the show had commented and said, oh, she was hoping maybe it would give a bit more of LeBron's ING effect. I don't think that it does that. I don't actually think it's intended to do that. I realize now after also having purchased just some traditional sunblock that contains the mineral. Combination mostly zinc that what you get with that product is a whitening effect. So when you're using that traditional product that doesn't have the tent and is not very sheer when you use that on your face. If you have any color on your face at all it really whitens out your face. So the tinted basically just brings your skin tone back to a more normal shade, it doesn't cause that whitening effect. So I really enjoy bet product I was also given at Alta. I guess as a result of my purchase a different brand that was called coats, CO tease, e it is a much darker tint in a much thicker paste. I did spread it on my hand to say in. It does go on fairly sheer. So if you're looking for another recommendation beyond the Elta MD, the Dr Keller mentioned the LaRoche post say, then the coats is another brand for you to consider any product. That is mentioned here on the podcasts as a recommendation is. Now, also always shown on the cool stuff page on the this Molyneaux life dot com website. So you can go to this lineal life dot com slash cool stuff and find products that have been mentioned here. So that will wrap up the show. Thanks again for for listening subscribing and downloading if you aren't aware you can now. Subscribe for weekly updates from not only every episode of the podcast. But also any of the new recipes were post that are being posted on this among lineal life dot com blog if you'd like to do that simply go to this among alive dot com slash subscribe. If you want to take part in conversations on topics both before and after the show just a quick reminder that you can always join the this lineal life Facebook group by. Going to Facebook dot com slash groups slash this millennial life if you'd like to reach out to me, personally, you can Email me Reagan at this Emma lineal life dot com, or you can find me on Instagram at Twitter and Facebook at Reagan Jones Ardy I look forward to bring another new episode to you next week. Thanks so much have a great day. Thank you. For listening to this on Molyneaux life podcast with host Reagan Jones musical support provided by Ben Williams at kudzu studio website support provided by Katie Wittig at make media over dot com. I'm Robin Plotkin of Robin, spike dot com, and on behalf of the podcast. I invite you to join us next week for another episode. Thank you for listening.

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Giga Berlin, Megapack, Short Interest, Musk NYT Interview, BMW EV Plans (07.27.20)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

14:58 min | 9 months ago

Giga Berlin, Megapack, Short Interest, Musk NYT Interview, BMW EV Plans (07.27.20)

"Everybody Rob our here and today. We were talking about some news on Tesla's Gigabyte. Lynn Tesla Energy updated short interest on Tesla stock, a new Elon Musk interview with the new. York Times and some news on BMW's production status does stock on the day to day bounce back from the end of last week getting some macro help with the Nasdaq up one point, seven percent tussle stock on the day today up eight point seven percent to one thousand, five hundred thirty nine dollars sixty cents. We'll start today with some reporting out of Germany on. On gigafactory, Berlin they relates to tussles cell production plans at the gigafactory as we can recall from the earnings call last week. Elon Musk was asked by analyst about their battery plans for Berlin and he said quote okay well. We can't say too much about this. Except that there will be local cell production, and that will serve the needs of the Berlin factory and quote well over the last couple of days we have had some reporting by German media on some comments made by Brandenburg. States Minister of Economic Affairs Labor and Energy your. Your Steinbach that may shed a little bit more light on tussles battery plans in Germany bear in mind that for both articles here I am working from Google translated versions, but the first article from Deir Tagespiegel quotes Your Steinbach as saying quote Tesla has started planning for the production of battery cells and Grenada. The company told us that and quote then on the same topic, another article from our BB. Twenty four wrote a quote. Completely new technology and quote is behind the electricity, storage said Minister of Economics. York Steinbach on Monday Antenna Brandenburg. Brandenburg the new batteries are smaller and thanks to their higher energy density allow for greater range. The Minister set so in that translation I assume antenna means from broadcast from Vandenberg or something similar, but setting aside some of that translation weirdness, our focus is on him, saying that it's a completely new technology with smaller and more energy, dense battery salts now obviously smaller could mean a lot of things it could mean a physically smaller battery cell, or it could just be a way of clarifying the concept of higher energy density, more energy and. And a smaller space for volume metric density or more energy and less wait for governor metric energy density, so we'll probably have to leave it up to. You are German listeners to provide a little bit more context on maybe how that would more directly translate, but no matter the translation nice to see these comments and I think they would align very well with our expectations. The other information shared in these articles is that any battery production would to be part of a second phase of the factory and thus would require a separate approval. Approval process from the one that Tesla is currently undergoing, but clearly tussle has been in discussions because of the ministers knowledge on the situation. This does give tussle the benefit of not yet having to publicly disclose the detailed plans for that portion of the factory, which is potentially helpful, keeping the mystery alive as we head towards battery debt, according to the RB twenty four article, the Minister Steinbach did not know when battery production could start from Berlin. The other little tidbit that we got from the dare Tagespiegel article is that Tesla is still. Still searching for a location for design and engineering facility near Gigabyte Berlian, apparently they had been and prospecting. A site called the Europe campus, which is a sort of sustainable and technological pilot project district in Berlin, but apparently that has been now ruled out and the location search continues in general, though we continue to see really rapid progress at Gigabyte Berlian, there are a number of different youtube channels doing drone flyovers almost daily on the site, and the construction is progressing rapidly late yesterday you on replied to a tweet from Queen discussing this. This topic and said quote. Gigabyte Lynn will come together at an impossible seeming speed. The prefabricated construction method in Germany is extremely impressive and quote. I think in general because of how quickly tussle was able to get to production in Shanghai. There's a sense that does can't replicate that anywhere else. And it was only made possible because it was done in China and that train of thought is not without reason certainly, but Tesla Germany is doing everything they can to prove that logic wrong and so far comparing the milestones date by date which. To Lynn at toby. Lind has done a great job of tracking. It looks like at least at this point in the process tussles actually a few months ahead of the line from gigafactory Shanghai so probably worth remembering what you onset on the earnings call last week. Better factories for less money in less time. That's what Tesla is aspiring to do. Next up. Today is news on Tesla Energy. This is a ground-breaking announcement on a significant energy storage project for TUSLA. So I'm not sure if the project itself had been announced beforehand, but late last week, technology infrastructure company switch announce the groundbreaking of three energy projects in Nevada which will comprise five hundred and fifty five megawatts of solar and eight hundred megawatt hours of energy storage. The solar side of the project is not Tesla. That'll be provided by first solar, but for the storage side Tusla will be delivering megaplex for what it sounds like the. The entirety of the project, considering tussle delivered four hundred and nineteen megawatt hours of energy storage in Q. Two, clearly, the eight hundred megawatt hours that this project will scale up to. You is pretty significant next up today. I just wanted to provide a quick FYI that the New York Times did an interview with Elon Musk that they published over the weekend. In this case I think the new. York Times did a much better job covering Ilan and providing context than they did back in I. Think Twenty eighteen when they had their last interview with. Longtime listeners will remember my thoughts on that at the time. This did seem quite a bit better. We're not gonNA. Go super into detail here because it is more a personal peace, a lot of the tussle, stuff or business related stuff is a lot of stuff that we've talked about or heard specifically Tesla. He mentions how difficult it was from two thousand seventeen to mid. Mid Twenty, nineteen, and there's some discussion on short-selling and how personally Yulon has taken that, but once it here did stick out to me as being somewhat knew. This is from writer Maureen, Dowd. Who wrote quote Peter? Thiel who helps build a company that became pay pal with Mr Musk told me quote. He's on top of the world. All of the people who have. have been shorting stock who constitute a kind of hate? Factory against the company have been totally crushed, and that makes him very happy and quote. They also spent a significant amount of time in the article discussing Musk's relationship with grimes, which seems to be going very well, so it looks like you want is in a really good spot right now, which is always nice to? To. See All right next up today. I want to go through tussle short interest. We got an update on this on Friday. This is for the settlement date of July, fifteenth, and as of July. Fifteenth Tesla had twelve point. Seven million shares sold short down nine percent from June thirtieth level of about fourteen million shares. This one is particularly interesting because over that period. Period of time Tesla reported cue to deliver and production numbers, and also released short shorts, and the stock over that same period went from one thousand and eighty dollars per share an all time high by the way at the time, at least to one, thousand, five hundred and forty six dollars on July fifteenth that means the valuation of shares sold short went from fifteen point. Point, one billion dollars on June thirtieth all the way up to nineteen point seven billion dollars on July, fifteenth an increase of about thirty percent, despite the fact that the share count actually went down so for shares sold short, we continued to hit the lowest levels since two thousand eleven while the valuation of those shares sold short continues hit new all time highs so. So far year to date short interest is down about thirteen and a half, million shares, or just over fifty two percent from V roughly twenty six million shares that we had sold short coming into the year. The next short interest update will be aftermarket close on Tuesday August eleventh, and that will be for the Friday July thirty first settlement date, which will be our first. First visibility into short interest after q two earnings all right next up today I WANNA talk about a couple of pieces of news from BMW, the first is that the company has announced New Sustainability Targets for twenty thirty, which they described by saying quote. The aim is to significantly reduce co two emissions per vehicle by at least one third across the entire spectrum and To achieve that BMW wants to reduce per vehicle emissions by eighty percent and the production process, twenty percent and supply chain and forty percent in the use face as a part of this emissions reduction plan, BMW said quote in ten years. The goal is to have a total of more than seven million electrified BMW group vehicles on the roads around two-thirds of them with a fully electric drive train and quo remember. BMW, often uses electrified to include a plug in hybrids so far through the end of the. The year in two twenty nineteen BMW had to with more than half a million of these electrified vehicles like the I three or the I eight meaning the target is for about six and a half million more over the next decade, six, hundred and fifty thousand per year, two thirds of that being fully electric would be around four, hundred, fifty, thousand per year BMW had previously said that they intend to double the amount of electrified vehicles in their fleet by the end of twenty twenty one so if If, we assume that's a couple hundred thousand vehicles per year for the next couple of years than two to six and a half million cumulatively by twenty thirty or through twenty thirty, rather BMW would have to grow electrified vehicles sales at about twenty percent per year compound. If that were the case, BMW would be doing about half a million and twenty, twenty five, and approaching a million per year around twenty nine, and beyond, and that would be just electrified vehicles, so cut that two-thirds and that gives you. You your full e. v. sort of numbers, Tusla, as we've talked about as targeting more than four million per year and twenty, twenty, five, and more than twenty million per year, rough numbers here by twenty thirty, so clearly BMW doesn't have ambitions of that scale they never have. That's not their market. Obviously just highlighting the differences for those that like to compare the company's, but regardless of those ambitions. It would be nice to see BMW. Be a little bit more aggressive with their targets for electric vehicles. Vehicles within their own segment BMW continues to emphasize the importance of flexibility to their design and manufacturing process. In this release. They noted that the BMW seven series will eventually come with a full electric option emphasizing that it be then available in four powertrains, standard gasoline diesel plug in hybrid and electric. BMW then continues on to announce the same for their BMW X.. One and BMW five series, saying quote further examples of the quote, unquote power of choice will be the high volume BMW X. One and BMW. BMW Five series, which will also be available in the future with all four drivetrain variance, fully electric plug in hybrid, diesel and petrol with 48-fold technology and quote so BMW again fully buying into this flexibility in manufacturing model, which from everything that we have learned from Tesla. Everything that they've said on their quarterly earnings calls for years now combined with a healthy amount of common sense I just cannot see that being a cost effective strategy. Yes, you do leverage a little bit of the scale from the other. Other powertrain lineups, but I just really cannot see that offsetting the downsides that you lose from starting with a Queen Design for an individual type of powertrain or through benefits from focusing on one powertrain setting, even aside the added difficulty of designing manufacturing system that incorporates more flexibility as Tesla talks about all the time. That's the real product that's where the innovation is being made, and BMW is sacrificing their opportunity for innovation in this area for the power train of the future specifically, which at this point is? Is Pretty clearly electric in favor of the so-called power of choice for some period of time that will help BMW feel like they are transitioning when in reality, the plan that they have will never allow them to be fully competitive with ground up electric vehicle, and as those become more and more of the market, share, BMW, or it increasingly difficult to compete whatever reputation they had that allowed them to sell cars in the past will fade in the blink of an eye and in my opinion BMW. BMW will probably be out of business or be sold off I think they would be much better served to follow the strategy of instead of saying we're gonNA electrify everything parts of our entire lineup to just focus on making one good electric vehicle from the ground up, differentiating it from Tesla with interior trim, fancy paint, options and wheels may be exclusive owner benefits taking a page from the credit card model. These luxuries that Tesla just doesn't really care about dominate that niche. Get Your scale up and expand. Expand from there that seems to be portion is trying to do with Ticon, so we get a little bit of visibility into that strategy from Porsche. Though I do think they focused on slightly the wrong things may be trying to be a bit too true to the Brandon terms of track performance over some of the bare essentials for an electric vehicle range and charging network, anyway, getting sorta sidetracked there, but I do want to cover one other release here from BMW, and this is about their Munich factory. Factory which produces about thousand vehicles per day and two thousand engines for vehicles burdette? BMW announced last week that they would be temporarily shutting down this factory to convert it to the more flexible manufacturing that they're targeting. They say quote. We are gearing up our Munich plant for the future. Once remodeling is finished, we will be able to produce vehicles with diesel, petrol and hybrid drive trans as well as the fully electric BMW, I four all on the same line. This will allow us to respond flexibly to. To customer, demand and quote okay, so we talked about that, but case in point here they're shutting down their vehicle factory for forty five days. That's forty five thousand vehicles ninety thousand engines that they are not going to produce now for BMW. That's probably okay. Because of the coronavirus situation, they probably have a lot of excess inventory right now, but a lot of that is circumstantial, so let's assume that BMW didn't actually want to shut its factory down if we assume the average selling price on those. Those forty five thousand vehicles would have been forty five thousand dollars that would be two billion dollars in lost revenue from the shutdown period to convert your factory that is a significant opportunity cost to reconfigure factory for a product that is likely going to be a lower or negative gross margin for you initially. BMW works around a seven percent roughly operating margin, but because economies of scale those very last units that you produce or end up, not producing carry an outsized impact on that operating margin. That's also. Also known as the contribution margin, which on these vehicles out, guess would be more than ten percent so best case this downtime, and that lost revenue is costing BMW, one hundred and fifty million dollars in profit worst-case well over two hundred million, and we didn't even talk about the additional thousand engines per day, which could potentially double the impact if that's stopping vehicle production at another factory, so these are the hidden costs that other automakers have to deal with because they are not starting from scratch. Yes, they. They don't have to build an entirely new factory, but that's not as advantageous as it may seem. At first a couple of hundred million isn't going to get you entirely new electric vehicle factory, but a nice first step, and like we said before the factory is just as much a product, and that also benefits from a clean ground up design, so BMW for that when it comes to the product or for the factories. I don't mean to rebuff BMW. I just don't think the strategy is sound strategy. Strategy the one thing I will say for them. They did tie or said they planned to tie their board. Management compensation to the sustainability targets which I do still feel are not aggressive enough, but at least they are tying them into the compensation plans all right, so that will wrap today as always. Thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe in sign up for notifications. Make sure we on twitter at Tussle podcast and I'll see you tomorrow for Tuesday July twenty eighth episode of Tesla Thank you.

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Digital Production Buzz - Oct. 25, 2018

Digital Production Buzz

54:07 min | 2 years ago

Digital Production Buzz - Oct. 25, 2018

"On the buzz. We are looking at the impact of artificial intelligence on media as we talk with industry thought leaders about the current status of AI where it's used and how it impacts the work that we do we start with Philip jets. The CEO of lumberjack system is a technologist who is thriving the discussion regard to media tonight. We talk with him about what is how it's used and what we can expect in the future. Next candy Steinbach this assist and founder of paradigm shift talks with us about the new science of AI machine learning versus deep learning and how AI is being used today. Next Sambo Koch, the CEO of axel explains. The practical uses of AI in media. He describes how it can be used for speech to text transcripts. Object. Facial end local recognition. And tagging footage to allow us to find exactly the section. We're looking for all of this. Plus James Rubio with our weekly Donal news update. The buzz starts now. Since the digital film-making. One show serves a worldwide network of media professional. Uniting industry experts Russian filmmaker Russian and content created around the plant distribution from the media capital of the world, Los Angeles, California digital production goes live now. Welcome to the digital production. Buzz, the world's longest running podcast for the creative content industry covering media production post production and marketing around the world tie. My name is Larry Jordan almost every day some emerging facet of artificial intelligence. Makes the news headlines like will robots take your job 'cause all of us concern in two thousand thirteen Oxford University estimated that forty seven percent of all jobs today were at risk of being automated reports since then have lowered the number. But while no one questions that Amish in will have an impact there is a lot of debate on how much tonight we take a closer look at artificial intelligence in post production. We talk with three different technologists to help us get a better idea of where is being used today. And where it's. Likely to take us in the near future, by the way, if you enjoy the buzz, please give us a positive rating and review in the I tunes store. We appreciate your support to help us grow our audience. And now it's time for our weekly Donal news update with James to Rubio. Hello, james. And welcome back. I'm back ready to rock. So what's our lead story this week? This is like a really sudden breaking news kind of story lex are has decided to drop their plans for executing media card production and will instead focus on compact flash express. They cited difficulties with Sony and other parties in getting the approval status. So therefore, the resurrected media card maker will instead focus on the future with the more eight K friendly, compact flash express card standard, and that's not a bad thing either. Because cameras like canon Nikon's f. Series and panasonic's new S one camera support compact flash express with a simple firmware update. The cards work in the exact same executing media card slot. So what does this mean in real life? Well, sonny's always been rather proprietary in their thinking and with insecurity being one of the few exceptions. So now, I'm wondering if after lex are closed its doors the first time, then Nikon Panasonic avenue. Mierlo cameras that support the executeDi format Sony may have decided just to start dragging their feet in order to just completely control the Cutie media market on the other hand since compact flash can work in the same cameras with that simple firm where gate and is up to eight times faster than execute for file transfer. Perhaps this is just a case of lex are deciding you know, let's just move forward and not backward because we're looking at an AK feature. All right. That's story. Number one. What story number two? Well, canon has finally patented and ibis image stabilization system that will have the DSL our body working concert with the image stabilization of the canon lenses to create a more five access kind of image stabilization system, but it could only be further DSL ours. The description doesn't engine either DSL are or merely camera in the patent application, but the patent drawings feature a DSL our camera and not the use are merely design. So where do you see this fitting in well knowing the snail's pace, conservative nature of canon? It wouldn't surprise me. If this new ibis technology would make its appearance in lower end use camera like maybe a seventy or sixty or maybe even a five d Mark five before it goes into the EOC are merely system. That's just the way they test. Out feel test. Their new emerging technologies they did it with dual Seamus oughta as well. But Canada's also said it's focusing its attention on the Mierlo platform. So perhaps a Mark to Yasser Murless camera could get the either way if good news or Karen fans. What does the ibis system do that lend stabiliser doesn't the Ida system works in combination? You'll have basically you'll have to image stabilization systems. You'll have the system inside the camera body itself, and you will have the image stabilization inside the lands both working in concert to damp out any camera movement. It's just a more efficient and affective image stabilization system. Thank you, James. What are the stories you follow in this week other stories we're following this week? What media cards are best for the EEOC are merely camera and the black magic pocket cinema camera. Four K, our friend, heath McKnight returns with a review of film convert color. Grading soft. And Panasonic puts out a new jets g h five update only a week after its last one. That's what we're working on what's tonight show about tonight. We're looking at the impact of artificial intelligence in media almost every day. I'm seeing new articles on the growing impact of a on our lives and industry. So it's time to take a closer look. Well, as long as his name isn't how I think we'll be okay. And James where can we go on the web to learn more about these and other stories you and your team recovering all these stories and more can be found at Donald news dot com and James to Rufo is the editor in chief of Donal news and joins us every week. I'll talk to you next Thursday. Have good weekend. Here's another website. I want to introduce you to Donald news dot com dot on news gives you a portal into the broadcast video and film industries. It's a leading online resource, presenting news, reviews and products for the film and video industry. Donald news also offers resource guide and crew management platforms specifically to sign for production. These digital call sheets along with their app directory and premium listings provide depth organizational tools for busy production professionals dot com news as part of the failure arts community, a world wide community of artists, filmmakers and storytellers. From the Tara feet of filmmaking performing arts define arts and everything in between is filled with resources you need to succeed. Whether you want the latest industry news need to network with other creative professional's require state of the art online tools to manage your next project. There's only one place to go, Donald news dot com. Philippon is recognized as a leading technologist as well as the CEO of lumberjack system. Even better. He's a regular here on the buzz where he specializes in explaining new technology. Hello, philip. Welcome back. Philip tonight, we're looking at artificial intelligence, but before we start talking about AI, we should probably define a and some other terms. I've heard used with it like machine learning and deep learning. How would you define AI? Umbrella him, but everyone is locked onto. And they needed to go to that. Oh tournaments intelligent machine. Unfortunately, no, we need that out of people. Somewhat tournaments Shane's that can make decisions narrative, my that would be out of intelligence in at proper. Machine learning where I particularly Shane can be trained to make decisions based on very specific remedies recognize the skin cancel something like that. And then we have the date learning stuff wear training, the machine come sort of challenging, hey now go for that's kind of devote maybe couple of examples of h wanted clarify different way into that into the landscape term. Intelligence is would be something like a self driving car. Fabled Thomas make you, but it's within a limited to mind, I would not expect mile tournaments. Casa my my loan. For that. Machine learning is what we we've really come to get a lot of benefit from Shane when he behind all of these speech takes transcription software. We've we've benefit from now we behind immigrated in recognition, it's behind DIVY sense. As Kalama matching the latest snow for me pro and automatic docking in in rerun. And condition for that matter. I hadn't caught up on that. These may she thank you. And. And things like predicting which mile ball up particularly Email not going to in in f- amount. Simple application machine. When colorizing was lot of a lot of ways machine Lenny has been used and the loonies way give a computer shown, so. Have of humanoid characters by humility character that they gave it environment included, gravity, basically move forward. The upright and interested open over Philo thousands and thousands of million times until it work at how it will could move forward. Under those conditions. Mrs closest figuring a computer, but it it's. The challenge and machine composition music is getting Shawn's to get better and better with time. And sometimes they say machines against each other. I actually waking pieces over is challenged by it. Thanks generating self like face is not think they find. Take a breath for second. If I'm hearing you correctly. I just want to summarize this if I'm hearing this correctly, a is an umbrella term and machine learning is where we are teaching the machine we meeting some subject matter expert and deep learning where the machine is iterative learning on its own if I summarized that accurately. Lovely. Yes, exactly precise. As other categories of artificial intelligence between aside from how the machine learns. Or another words, what are the categories? Are. We going to hear buzzwords about. Sure, I understand. That question. Sorry. That's all right. I'm just curious if I've used to terms that are ways that are out official intelligence is taught machine machine learning and deep learning, but I don't know enough about a I know those the only two categories if there's other categories as well. Well, that is the autonomous artificial intelligence. But but medication you, right? There's machine leading their leading there. They were very Asians on learning. But that's not I think. All right. Well, I'm just thinking that seems to burst into our consciousness over the last couple of years, though, I'm sure it's been a development for a long time. But what's happened in technology that suddenly made a is so accessible to everybody. It was. The history of intelligence as the umbrella tone. There have been many to get a little bit of progress, and then Ryan's it wasn't. So we Newell networks which are able to have feedback mechanism. So they can train machine money thought of it becomes impossible and out of a different strains of research today. Quitting had come as well. The generally thinking they have research project, the don't touch most people's lives, we most benefit from the end of a model being trains and and run on on Aaron Ave systems. You used to term that I also needed to find you talked about a neural network. What's that? You know, it the metric blackbox. Series of indignation liars as the things we and that his has the trading feedback loop, which is what needs some sort of trying to be trying, but the neural network just basically gets his about what if it's close and twitchy to gets more in that direction. It's close to the right treatments. Open the office direction. They did possible to trek through believe very school for insignif- magicians and look at exactly how a machine making the decisions that gets trying to might. But basically, it's a black FOX that trying just run is the neural network. The hardware is that the software that the hardware is running or is the data that computers can fed. I really want to say, yes. Because it has all all as I see. I mean, it is obviously has a hobby because all computers have layers some point. But it also as a way of of tiny theater in soft with and without training data. It's probably not get actually happen. So that that tiny day to provide the feedback loop, which is why? So essential has noted the data that you will also the ranking that you want so even if it was theoretically possible to generate a machine models that would recommend an ADA way, we find thousands of millions of examples raided Edison, if agree on the grade that much more suited to recognize. He's in cash has very precise. Accuracy to mention some of these things that we can make you and successfully guide in the Shane Cologne. Okay. So far we've been talking globally about what is but let's drill down into media. I mean, we've got Syrian Alexa to consumer level. And extremely sophisticated industrial machine control at the enterprise level. But for the purposes of of the buzz, how is being used in media today likely what I group under the heading coordinates of these things that are shame little already trained, and as I mentioned earlier things like they should take tricky nation in him as an emotion recognition entity recognition, loco recognition these things that can be trained object detection, these things are very common in exit. Well, no, common SMS major assistance. But it certainly want asset management system that office as great Mesa office of excellent. Hey, I is none that uses machine learning these services to help find it. So it media, and I certainly see that we should have this sort of indie and speech building. Editing. So in the future taking Biro is nowhere near as fun. As it seems like when you think about it. Use the word training multiple times. And I've got a picture of you at a whiteboard. Talking to computer was training actually mean. Well, you have to teach the machine what you wanted to do. I know that very day. But. For example. I think it's such an easy. It's amazing example machine has been trained on numidian of radio allergy and images of skin cancers and been ranked by radiologists as this one has no scene came. So this one is being cancer prisons this when I was in this location, and so on so we have been lodged at data that he's scribes a team each, and we get the we feed each image Tuesay hero network that is the machine again to try, and and it says, well, I'm gonna guess that is a cancer in this corner. And it says no sorry try again. And it does in a deter tries again, and again, and again until it gets ninety five ninety six ninety seven accuracy, and we could use you can live with. Italy you can use a apple provided have to get back into the my Koro mill framework that can do any recognition, but he might want to try on the meticulous set of images that you want your act to to recognize that they've done the heavy lifting and tried it on the last mile that we still need this training data and have to train the middle. We need another day to actually pissed with kind the modal. There's nothing spiking out cheating on the test. So to speak. Because we can deployed into the real world. So in order for a machine to be trained. We have to have an expert. That knows what the answers are to say, this is the image. And this is the answer in the machine learns from that over the course of repeating multiple times one by the that if that if that machine that data said is in a machine readable full will that would make it much easier. So no whiteboard. No. Like this. Your software lumberjack system integrates into it software. How are you using it for your stuff? Well, I wouldn't based on reviews, I wouldn't call it. I would close the shade money. Certainly we've checked completed the integration of speaking to take in the southwest. So that you can once you import your event final prochaine, you can choose which clicks, you send away for transcription ends up back in staggering eight times real time, and our so if for example, if you had a forty minutes that would all be back in about five or six minutes. What go ahead? And then the next step is to do extraction and t would extraction from those transmit that date or this out that down except. What's the advantage to editors to having this machine language applied to our clips? Well, it makes everything easy to find out. Typically, they were too hot to doing the role of editor one is finding the material wanted sequencing material in an acidic leasing the emotionally compelling way. And if you can't find anything in the project, then you're not going to be out with get discover ability when we first transcriptions into final pray for those AK incensio commensurate seven they found that they could they located footage locating satellites that they would not otherwise fine because they could search the entire transcript by would and behind by content rather than having had something tagged to be on the line. And. What do you see is the future for machine learning for the medium-term not future future because that's impossible predict? But like next year or two. I think we go to find more and more smart assistance, Ivan bilking, assault where or edge up to out arid software, and I work for processes. I mean smarter search of find ability of exit. That's going be pod smart column, attaching smarter audio schools a lot of the things that we we do is part of that process can be assisted. I like to to talk about state Yeltsin, his metaphor, all you know, I manage not cross the fastest animal on the planet. But a man on a bike is close to the faucets and blue on the planet and thinking with the smartest systems we're going to be closer to the the man on motive. Because you know, a lot of a lot of what gets in the way of people being created the open is eight. I if rate creative ideas what it comes down to actually old with hero and finding story in the they they run into this wall and become homeless possible them to progress. And I see these the tools that hope through what we've got and pull out storylines and fees that we can build on apply creativity to I think that that's the next couple of years and Philip for people wanna keep track of jor thinking and work in this process. Where can I go on the web, Philip Huggins dot com? When it's my put the playground and lumberjack is builder can be found. Both of those are single word. Philip Hodge it's dot com. Lumberjack system dot com. Filipacci is the CEO of lumberjack system. And thanks for joining us today at my take your. Andy Steinbach is a physicist with a PHD from the university of Colorado boulder. He's led to GMs developing some of the world's most revolutionary technology, including the world's highest resolution microscopes novels, so my conductor processes and high speed optoelectronic devices at companies like Invidia Kalay ten cores ice and J D S Uniphase most recently, and he has launched the consultant company paradigm shift, which is dedicated to helping other prizes develop a and deep learning applications. Hello, Andy, welcome. Hi there. I don't get to talk to physicists, very often. You're at the leading edge of making this stuff happen as opposed to the rest of us who are trying to figure out how to use it after it's been invented. Which brings me to my first question. What interested in AI? I thought it was starting to solve problems that were so complicated. You can never. I thought that they could be solved. Can I ask myself wine is businesses? You know, what I realized is it? We're calling one of the most difficult problems that we face in physics imagine that you have a system where you have a complicated computer network, and you're trying to detect cyber security attacks. It's just an example. There might be a thousand different variables that allow you Entschlie repet- when a pack it is an attack or not an attack. But the problem is that when you have a thousand variables get something called the combinatorial explosion. Those variables take all the values. They can have you very quickly get sort of an infinitive combination. What I realize is that as neural networks started to finally come into their own and really started working around about two thousand twelve that they were actually solving this problem. Did you ever wonder why people's brains? You might have heard that the synapse. Is in the brain fire at five milliseconds that's two hundred times of second. Well, that's really slow. If you think of the computer as a big powerful brain question is why is it powerful? Because we know that these wonderful chips, we have nowadays operated gigahertz, and even gigahertz the what is the brain works. So well when those connections fire thousands or millions of times slower, and it's really two reasons. One is that it takes all the input in parallel. Like envision these narrow networks take all the information in parallel. But the second big reason is they process the information through a series of steps and the way that these algorithms that neural network essentially, execute it's designed as sort of decision tree like a flow chart where at every step you eliminate a whole set of decisions in this big combinatorial space. And then you never go back and look at that. Part of the space again. And so you can imagine a big sort of fear, and you make the sphere of where your answer could be smaller and smaller and then eventually gets to the right answer. And it happens exponentially quickly when you step through a series of steps, and so long long story short these narrow networks finally started working, and they solved this combinatorial explosion this cursor dimensionality. And so we can finally solve problems that were just simply off the table and the performance that companies like Google and Facebook getting and researchers demonstrates that they're succeeding, and so it's really a new scientific revolution. And when I saw that I I wanted to get involved. Well, before we get to deeply into the subject. Let's take a step back. How would you define artificial intelligence, and do you consider those two words to be synonymous with machine learning simpler end of the spectrum artificial intelligence, you can think of that very simply as a framing a problem as a question and answer pair with machine learning you need a domain expert to do what's called handcrafting features. So it's not very scalable where people earning will automatically discover or detect these features. And so you do not need the main specific knowledge in order to make people earning work. Really? Well, so it works better higher, performance and it works without the knowledge to that. It's scalable, so that's a winning combination for her heap learning if I were to summarize could I say that artificial intelligence of the category on a subset of artificial intelligence machine. Learning and another subset would be deep learning. Yeah. Absolutely. I think the way to think about it is artificial intelligence is very general term people that technically studied the topic would say that machine learning is is a large classes message and deep learning a specialty class inside of that. You're absolutely right. You recently gave the keynote the storage visions conference. What was the topic of your talk? Artificial intelligence is now science this coming to town with some of these technical innovations that I explained earlier it really is a new science where rather than again going back to the sector with most sciences means people that spend essentially their whole life studying a specific domain, and they've become world experts in it with planning and de Niro networks, you can now take large amounts of data, and you can train models his to give you answers. So it goes back to this sort of question answering capability without having these. Domain experts just feed it all the data in the beginning. And it sort of figures out the domain knowledge on its own, and that's really a revolution or paradigm shifts in in the way that science is able to be done data science is really going to be a new science that sort of on the part of other sciences like physics chemistry and biology some examples a good example and in -application area that I'm really excited about is. So called IOT IOT censor the internet of things any machine or instrument nowadays, it could be your toaster. It could be an automobile or could be some industrial piece of machinery is in manufacturing. Plant has a bunch of a bunch of sensors that are typically wide computer network and the sensors bid out data, and they're monitoring all the inner workings of the machine whatever it is. And turns out that you can take that time. Data and you can you can apply. Deep learning algorithms, and you can analyze all kinds of things about the state of the machine. I'm particularly interested in the case of what's called generally industrial IOT, big pieces of machinery that you would have an industrial company or factory with these industrial IOT deep learning algorithms, you can do predictive maintenance. So in a maintenance cycle, you can say when the tool needs to be maintenance. And of course, normally you do it by some preset time period every two months, but sometimes it needs to be service faster and later, and it can affect the performance of the outcome of the product that it's producing. And so wouldn't it be great to be able to understand where you are in that cycle? So that's called a predictive maintenance, you can also do what's called health monitoring, so many of these complicated. Industrial tools naturally have failure modes that occur from time to time in some. Cases frequently. And so wouldn't it be great to get an early? Warning prediction that something in the operation is looking just a little bit different than normal. And it hasn't affected the performance of the the thing or the parts let's say that that that tool is producing, but that it will. And if you could predict that you could really improve yield in factories. That's a I used a monitoring obligation are there other examples of how I can enable an enterprise another example that I'm excited about is something called reinforcement learning. So imagine that you're doing this industrial IOT application, and you're monitoring some tool, and you can predict that something's going wrong with the tool, and so that you should perhaps take that one off line and services. So that's what's called predictive intelligence, but even when operating normally wouldn't it be great not to just be able to predict what's going to happen to actually optimize the performance of that tool. So that you can increase your. Yielded the performance of your product it's producing and so there's a way to do that also on with learning and that optimization is called reinforcement learning or reinforcement learning that's a very exciting area. And some of your listeners may have heard that for example, Google plied that to optimize the power usage of the giant computer data centers. And so they were able to save something like thirty percent on the cooling tower required. So that's a really nice example of the real world application, you've talked a lot about a in tech. But can help us in medicine one application medicine that I'm particularly cited about is something called precision medicine alien rhythms. For example, can take a look at patient data records and so one application, and I'm working on is g electrons Graham, which is electrodes on the brain. And you can take a patient, and you can. Diagnose some for example. Are they are they with for depression? Are they risk for having an epileptic seizure? And that kind of thing anything classify them as normal or having a problem, which you detect, but when it's great if you could use those learning algorithms on that data, not only the to tell them, this is what problem you have to actually help treat that problem that basically look in more depth at the information, those medical records contains and what you planning is really doing is comparing that particular patient with finding similarities between that patient and other patients that has an database or training data, and it's comparing them to successful treatments, and what those treatments worth from other patients and by doing that you cannot only predict that you're at risk of epilepsy. Seizure. Let's say, but it can actually discern what treatment would be more effective than advise the doctor on a how they might best treat that patient and says that the whole world, and it's definitely coming. These are very very exciting powerful applications as learning in medicine, and in all three examples that you've given you've used the phrase one thing I'm really excited about is. Why is being excited about a subject important to you? I guess I'm excited for numbers reason. And that's a great question. But I think for me the reason that I get excited about an application is there's a technical side says the Cest on really thrilled every day to get up and be working on these amazing algorithms like I said to solve problems that we never thought were solvable. But what I love is nesting that -nology to the end up location and vertical. So I've spent significant parts of. Krier on teams building these industrial machine factories, and I know what it would mean to those customers to make that machine better and not only to those companies that make the machines, but to their customers, and so it's really enabling technology that can improve how we live in society. And so medicine again, it's other sample. I love the algorithms with the idea that you can now apply. Those and make health care better is is in mazing that it passes through. So clearly to such a clear line to the end application and the impact on people society is the province only of the largest companies or does AI filtered on we all with Alexa with Siri. We take the benefit of AI. But in terms of smaller companies, can they harnessed the power of AI for themselves. That's a great question. And it is challenging and that's actually what led me to start my consulting company paradigm shift. The I because. It is the new technology. It's wonderful for companies like Google that have thousands of researchers doing it, and they have twenty years experience, and they can get the dust people. But it's a challenging if you're smaller company and you're asking yourself. How could I get started in two problems that they say if you generalize it, which is one piercing veil all the buzzwords trying to understand how all these moving parts together. What's machine learning learning and things like, you know, what what sort of applications could. I do once I decided not what should I use? What what would be biting off more than I can choose versus what is sort of feasible to get started. And so all those questions. Some of them are strategy questions and some of them are simply technical and at the end you end up with an application that you want to try to do. And then it's very hard to get because there's really a supply demand in balance if people that that, you know, how to do this work. And so the reason I started my company is to provide a resource both for that early sort of strategy formation say's. And then also for the ability for companies to outsource this finding and hiring technical talent. And to get started in and maybe they want to eventually build their own internal team or maybe they're happy to have customized engineering done to create applications that we help them decide on we can decide together. And so that's an interesting challenge. And we're trying to address that, but is very cool for people to want more information about what you and your company can do for them. Where can they go on the web our website isn't quite up yet? It'll be up in about a month when it is. They can. Go to WWW dot paradigm, shifts dot that website is all one word paradigm shift dot A I P A R A D. I G M S H I F T paradigm shift dot, hey, I an Andy steam Bach is a physicist who's been studying and Andy thanks for joining us today from my. You're welcome. I want to introduce you to a new website. They loaded dot com. Falem is an artist community and networking site. For creative people to connect the inspired and showcase their creativity. They low dot com features content from around the world with a global perspective on all things creative. They load is the place for creative folks to learn collaborate market and sell their works. They Lewis apart of they low arcs of worldwide community of artists filmmakers and storytellers from photography to filmmaking performing arts fine arts and everything in between. They low is filled with the resources you need to succeed. Visit they load dot com. And discover how their community can help you connect learn and succeed that stay low dot com. Sambo Koch is the CEO of axel, which has developed a new approachable system for asset management also called axel AI, which prominently features not surprisingly, they I as part of its technology. Hello Sam combat. Thanks much. Great to be with you Sam before we start talking about artificial intelligence itself. Tell us about axl what is your product. Do it. Basically scans the contents of folks storage, usually containing lots of video because that's our intended customer base, and we have over five hundred customers today or from a number of different walks of life. And basically it scans their storage makes lower as versions of all the media that it finds and then dispatches those to be analyzed by one or more. I engines some are on board built into the software and others are outboard as in the case of say Microsoft's the index product. We're starting to work with a growing list of vendors because the space is getting very diverse and and very competitive in terms of who can analyze things the best. Well, this is an interesting concept that I hadn't considered before they I is sort of a description of machine learning and deep learning, but you're plying that there's different products that do a I meaning there's different functions within it. How does axel use? An what do you mean? By different engines to give a short list of the possibilities. There are already a engines on the market that will do things like transcription rights speech to text where you can just take them soundtrack of something. And and spit out text of what the person or people said, there's they shall recognition where you can actually identify who is in the video, especially if they're celebrities or public figures there's object recognition where you can pick up. That's a chair that's door car cetera. And then there's things like. Brands. So you could pick up brands when they appear on screen, you can do OCR character recognition where for instance, if if it's a player, and you can these wearing number forty five number forty five will show up in the meta data, and there's even things like emotional analysis. You can tell if the scene involves people getting very excited or happy or sad. That is actually just a short list of what's available right now because the options are proliferating and video is getting a whole lot easier to analyze as a result. How does it work not in terms of hot as the recognize the characters because I think that that's too deep, but in terms of my operations hot do I get to determine who the people are on in a video or the speech to text. What do I need to do with our software? We're trying to simplify it. So that you basically need to just let the software loose on your storage. It scans all the videos makes low rez versions, and then you can pick from a menu say I want all the videos. This folder to get sent off and analyzed for transcription. Or I want all the videos in this other folder to get sent off to identify the bases there in the video. And so we give you literally pull down menu. You send these things off to the right engine's in some cases like with object recognition where able to do that on board in our software without any external fees, in other cases, there are plowed vendors, for instance, that will let you do a few hundred hours a month for free, and then above that, they charge you a certain amount per hour typically anywhere in the range from four to ten dollars an hour, but occasionally more than that. Why did you decide to implement this because AXA was doing fine on its own? Why the shift into a? Fundamentally media management is is a chore. It's something that's done way to sell them because nobody wants to do it. And in the past required, a whole bunch of interns or a bunch of time that people didn't have. And this is even in big famous broadcasters will go nameless. But I I've met with some of these folks, and you would think they would have their act together and everything would be catalog, but they literally don't have the time. So it Kerr does that with the advent of AI, you really can change that and you can make media management and search ability the core of your work because it can be done automatically and just a compound that. Because of the way video is being watched today, which is in all these bite-sized flavors, whether it's on mobile devices or or on laptop screens or on on ipads across that spectrum. The video needs to be sliced up into smaller chunks that it's actually critical to. Have all the descriptive meta data back in the day. When you would just watch the prime time TV shows, you just needed to know the name of your show, and you'd sit down at eight thirty or whatever and watch it for half hour, and you'd be happy. But now everyone wants to I wanna find that, you know, the part of Walking Dead where he tells that story about the, you know, and and they they wanna go directly to the ten minute clip that they wanna see that's only possible. If you have all the descriptive meta data in there with the clips now, what does descriptive metadata main to you? It basically means some combination of stuff I was talking about the transcript who is in the frame what's in the frame. And then there's also stuff that you don't need for like the name of of the episode the name of the series. What aspect ratio was shot in the duration of the clamp all of these things. So all of that. If you add all that up. That's basically the meta data. So do you see this as an enhancement to the deters role a replacement for some of the work the used to do as it stands? Right now, the role of the craft editor is not going away. Right people need shows to look good. And fortunately at the moment, the only good way to do that is with editors I will say that a lot of the routine editing like splicing together back to back highlights. Let's say or putting together simple. Sizzle reels. I mean, something where like someone just wants to see a bunch of stuff back toback. There's evidence that hey, I can start to do those things. But anything that requires judgment is is going to continue to be a person is going to be required in the loop. Thinking about the pow the problem, we've got what we barely have enough room to store the stuff we've already as we start to shift into a I do these additional files take tons of storage space. They actually take relatively little space compared to the video itself because videos already so huge, especially nowadays when it's being shot in four k or eight k typically you might have hundreds of gigabytes video, but only. Hundreds of megabytes of meta data to go with it. So it's it's usually quite a bit smaller than the video itself. And because it makes that video so much more searchable invaluable it's well worth carrying around. Do we need to change the way that we operate to be able to leverage our meta data more meta data, by the way of simply labels for a portion or all of our media is act. Do we need to retrain ourselves to use meta data? I would say so I would argue that the good editors were always doing stuff like this. They might have been putting it as comments in the time line or doing some logging when the stuff was first ingested, nobody likes to rummage, right? If you're working out of feature length though, and there was a ton of footage shot to make up the movie, nobody wants to be the guy who's just rummaging throw that footage to to find the right part. So all this is really an extension of best practices that were already followed. I would say by the most efficient folks in the industry and the other thing that is changing though is that the motive. Storage is shifting because you generally can't do this. If you're driving are just sitting around loose on the shelf right to catalog all material it probably needs to be organized in a central folder structure. Our recommendations you buy some kind of shared storage, but the cost of that is coming way down. And then once you have on the material on a storage pool of some kind then you can start clicking on different. I engines to analyze it and enrich it. So in other words, we gotta move the media that we would normally have undirected attached rates and put it up to a server so that the server can then be accessed by oxo and dealt with in the background while we're busy doing other stuff in the foreground. I think that's right. And that's obviously true, not only of axel. But really of any kind of logical system that's gonna do this stuff. There are ways you could catalog individual drives and put them back on the shelf. But then the minute you need something you'll be going back to the shop to get the drive and that could get pretty tiring. So, you know, back when shared storage was really expensive in required, fiber and a sen- and costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. There were lots of good reasons why a small teams wouldn't wanna do it. But nowadays, you can get a very powerful, but inexpensive Nasr put, you know, a few eight or twelve terabyte hard drives in there and have a very powerful system for not a lot of money. One of the new products you released a product called connector what's the advantage of connector, if we look at it in terms of AI, the big thing is that once people have more meta data, and they have a better global view of of their media. It's only natural that they'd wanna do. Stuff with it and connector makes it possible to visually. Cook up connected workflows where you might say publish something video send somebody in Email FTP, something, you know, these different steps trance coatings another example in the past. These were very arduous to do because you would have to just rinse and repeat manually and connector makes it very easy visually to build automatic versions of those workflows sound for people to learn more about the work that axel AI can do for them. We're gonna go on the web, WWW dot XL, X L, E dot A. I'm Sam Bogota's the CEO of actual thought. Hey, I and sound thanks for joining us this week. Thank you. Thank you. You know, I was just thinking in nineteen sixty six the national commission on technology automation and economic progress wrote in its final report, quote, the basic fact is that technology eliminates jobs, not work close, quote, the technological shifts caused by our unstoppable and have been equated to the changes created by the industrial revolution more than a century ago. In January of this year, the Harvard Business Review wrote, quote, humans have always shifted away from work suitable for machines into other jobs. This is true in the nineteen thirties. When the shift was away from agriculture through the nineteen nineties early two thousands when the shift was largely out of manufacturing. The challenges of automation, extend far beyond media into a discussion of education public policy and society returning to that nineteen sixty six final report of the national commission on technology. They wrote quote, constant job displacement is the price of a dynamic economy history suggests that it is a price worth paying, but the accompanying burdens and benefits should be distributed fairly, and this has not always been the case as the Harvard Business Review continued quote, policymakers should focus on cushioning the necessary transitions following job loss by strengthening the social safety net such as unemployment insurance, Medicaid and a wage insurance program for all displaced workers to help and courage. People to remain attached to the labor force. The challenges automation presents media, creators are as with most new technology, a two edged sword the benefits are that we can work faster or better or accomplish tasks that we could never do before the trade off is that in many cases, there will be fewer of us doing it with a resulting decrease in budgets. We can't stop this change. But we can start preparing ourselves and our companies for this change by continuing our education, strengthening our client relationships and helping clients understand how to take advantage of all this new technology. Hiding our heads in the sand won't make the problem. Go away, the digital production buzz concentrates on media. But that doesn't mean we're ignoring the changes going on in the greater society. Just something I'm thinking about. I want to thank our guests this week Filipacci with lumberjack system Andy Steinbach with paradigm shift. Hey, I Sam Bo gosh with axl. Hey, I and James to Rupo with doddle, news dot com. There's a lot of history in our industry, and it's all posted to our website at digital production buzz dot com here, you'll find thousands of interviews all online and all available to you today. And remember to sign up for our free weekly show newsletter that comes out every Saturday talked with us on Twitter with DP buzz and Facebook at digital production buzz, stop on our theme music is composed by Nathan Dookie Turner with additional music provided by smart sound dot com. Our producer is Debbie price. My name is Larry Jordan and thanks for listening to the digital production buzz. Digital production. Buzz is copyright two thousand eighteen by fellow LLC.

AI CEO James Rubio Shane Cologne Andy Steinbach Google canon Larry Jordan panasonic philip Donal Sony axel editor Sambo Koch sonny axel AI
Trailer: Probable Futures

Future Hindsight

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Trailer: Probable Futures

"<music> welcome to feature hindsight. I'm your host meal at Moss each week. I speak with citizen change makers who spark civic engagement in our society. We're about to return with our next season on what are are probably futures could look like I spoke to guests with a wide range of expertise like Jim Nick men on the economics of healthcare. The problem in health economics longtime was that when we looked at this question we were focusing on how do we. Deliver and receive medical care effectively but the real question I think economists and everybody else in the health field is beginning realized now. That's not the focus medical care. The focus is health. How do we get more health? That's what we're buying or spending spending resources on his health and that leads to beginning they think about the efficiency of investments in education income and social services at the same time. You're thinking about the investments in medical care so I think that's sort of the changing perspective in the Field Donaldson La Fontaine on the challenges of Climate Abatement Things are going to get very uncomfortable for people living in coastal cities particularly on the east coast of the U._s. in the mid Atlantic. Were you have subsidence going along with sea level. Rise is the real potential that major American cities are are going to be in real trouble and if you look internationally places like Bangladesh are going to be in real trouble with persistent flooding and they'll be very likely immigration issues as people can no longer live where they're currently living. We'll begin to migrate and so I think that if you look at the migration crisis that was sparked by the Syrian civil war I think it's maybe an example of what's to come in terms of really desperate people that are fleeing their countries trying to find somewhere where they can live and be somewhat safe Robin Steinbach on disrupting the cash bail system. It's enormously expensive to have a pre-trial justice system the. Way that we operate it American taxpayers spend fourteen billion dollars annually holding people in jail cells that have been convicted of crimes and if you calculate the collateral consequences of that it's estimated to be as high as one hundred and forty billion a billion dollars a year. We spend to hold people in these horrible dehumanizing jail cells who have not yet been convicted of a crime and likely won't be convicted cry we have created an industry of punishment and to to dismantle that industry punishment we are all going to have to reckon with the size of the system and really begin to commit ourselves to car saving America but with that comes the requirement and the commitment and the dedication to downsize ourselves. Ourselves as eleven on the future of democracy after trump in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven there was no grassroots movement demanding democracy reform legislation and we think that can be different in twenty twenty one individuals lls we have pulled we have surveyed. We've talked to all across the country and when we asked them. What is your top priority? What do you WANNA see the new president put as their number one legislation? What do we want to see federal leaders lead on they care about everything they care hear about healthcare and abortion rights and Immigration and Environment Education you name it but when we asked them to prioritize the number one priority for indivisible groups all across the country blue states red states purple states is saving American democracy? And so much more I'm also excited to announce that are new episodes will feature a slightly different format than before and we hope this will help you like this show even more let us know what you think by emailing us at hello at future hindsight dot com be sure to tune in next week to hear my conversation with Melissa Mark Viverito on gender parody in government and we want a just an equitable society the voices prices of those that reside within our democracy have to be heard after reflected in government and so women being fifty percent of the population. Maybe fifty two percent to have equity in governing is critically important as we're looking at budgets as we're.

Robin Steinbach Immigration and Environment Ed Melissa Mark Viverito Field Donaldson La Fontaine Jim Nick president Bangladesh America fourteen billion dollars fifty two percent billion dollars fifty percent
Best of Giants Splash: The 1989 Earthquake

Giants Splash

37:01 min | 1 year ago

Best of Giants Splash: The 1989 Earthquake

"Hi I'm Greg Thomas host of the wild West podcast tune in for personal interviews with the world's top. Rock climbers surfers skiers ultra runners. And much more. If you like getting outside exploring you'll dig wild west. Find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hello and welcome. Welcome to a special joint episode of the giant Splash and as plus podcast here on the thirtieth anniversary of a night at candlestick park that none of us. who were there will ever forget? I'm Henry Schulman. The giants beat reporter for the Chronicle and I'm in studio with chronicle features writer Ron Croatia on October Seventeenth nineteen eighty nine. We were both Oh candlestick to cover game. Three of the first and so far only bay bridge world series between the giants and the as at five Oh four. PM The bay area was struck by what what is now known as the Loma Prieta earthquake. A six point nine magnitude Shaker that did so much damage in the bay area killed sixty three people injured compounds in postponed the world series for ten days. This podcast is part of the chronicles extensive thirtieth anniversary remembrance of the Loma Prieta quake. Besides besides Ron and I. You'll hear from our colleagues John Shea and Bruce Jenkins who were there as well you can find. Complete coverage of our thirtieth anniversary remembrance at SF SF CHRONICLE DOT com. That includes an oral history of that night from candlestick compiled by Ron krawczyk including interviews with players executives. In the Mike including will Clark and Dennis Eckersley and we also have audio clips from others who Barrett candlestick chronicle non chronicle of the light. Hi I'm Greg Thomas host of the wild West podcast want to know what's going on with the world's top adventures checkout wild west where I recently chatted with photographer. Chris Burkhard who spends his life traveling to the most remote corners of the world. Some ways I always feel like. I'm just pulled the wool over. Everybody's is always told them like. I'm not good photographer by any means. I've just been the person willing to go to these places. You'll find my conversations with Chris and many more ride adventures. Wherever you get your podcasts wild west? I'd like to bring Ron in here. Now Ron how are you doing good. Thanks for having me thirtieth anniversary boy. I think that we're really this. Also be a podcast About the the aging process and how we're both kind of transitioning into senior citizenship young then we were both young and I was in my second year covering the giants. I was working for the Oakland Tribune. They made me a baseball writer. You're at the Sacramento. Beat now which year of that was was it for you. I was actually backing up. That was Susan Four Nas last year on the beat I backed up on the as most of that year and then took over the beat in nineteen ninety because I was determined only to cover you know. World series champions actually had five good years from nine hundred ninety four. Very the as you know very good team very interesting team full of dynamic personalities But I was writing sidebars during the postseason I was in Toronto with the as and the Al Lcs and then obviously at at the stick that Unforgettable nights and I I was I was the beat reporter for the Oakland Tribune and I it was my second year and I'd covered the one thousand nine hundred eight world series at the A.'s. Were in so. It wasn't my first Rodeo in terms of world series but it was a huge deal. The giants were playing the as it was a world series that people talked about as being not interesting to the people outside the bay area you know other than the fact that you had the bash brothers and the Pacific Stock Exchange Exchange. And you know we all talked about how the networks really didn't think it was anything that was going to garner much attention and then at five. Oh four it garnered a heck of a lot of attention and maybe you could just just. We'll just take turns here. Reciting are most vivid memories of that night. How about you were thinking you bring up a good point that I think it's lost in the history books and rightly so because of the earthquake but before the earthquake hit at least here in northern California? That was a big deal. I mean it's literally a once in a lifetime thing for the as and the giants to get in the world series. I mean I grew grew up in Chicago never happened with the cubs and the White Sox didn't happen to New York until what two thousand and of course New Yorkers thought that was a big deal so it was a pretty cool event sporting event in those that context before the earthquake struck and then obviously acquired a whole new dimension. I was actually sitting in a very small room beneath the upper deck. And I'm one of those makeshift media. workrooms eating a box lunch that we're all used to and going over some game notes and getting ready not a good place to be if you think about it. I mean cement ceiling probably eight ten feet high. Thank God candlesticks stood but my vivid memory is looking up and seeing Tony Kornheiser and I believe it was bill conlon of the Philadelphia Paper freaking out to east coast guys who hadn't been through earthquakes. They they did the right thing. They were in a door doorway and held. But I mean to me. It didn't initially feel any worse than any number of earthquakes we had gone through as Californians. I'd moved moved here at age twelve so I've been through a few in southern California and then a couple of my college days in Berkeley So at first it didn't seem that devastating. And then you start hearing the buys and you go outside and you see some cracks in the upper deck and you know we're getting out about the bay bridge and such and it obviously was a whole lot worse than than a normal earthquake. Yeah I mean my first memory was that I had agreed foolishly to speak that afternoon at a luncheon of a Rotary Club in Oakland and I just remember driving to the the Rotary Club. Lunch in the game was supposed to start at about you know just after five and I just remember thinking to myself boy this is GonNa be a long day. I had no idea and You know the earthquake itself. I mean well first of all it was it was a big deal like you said and The the giants had gotten smoke. The smoke them in the first two games stewart and Mike like more pitched jams the giants. I think scored one run total in the two games and there really was a sense that now that those two pitchers were out of the way that the giants at home actually had at a shot to win. This is completely aside of course with a ten day break with the World Series Stewart and more got to pitch again and That's all she wrote. The thing I remember most is is the press box itself at candlestick. It was really just a football. Luxury box That had that is converted to a press box during the off season. It had some tables but had these big you know kind of fluffy chairs that you sat in and you really couldn't move in them and the press box itself at candlestick it was connected to the upper deck. Structurally you didn't worry about it. But it's still kind of hung over the lower deck. If I stood up and looked out my window there was nothing below me other than people in the lower deck and you had the sensation that the thing could just fall apart and would go diving down into the into the first deck back and I had been through the Sylmar earthquake in Los Angeles when I was eleven years old in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. It was a quake that It was over a seven. I believe it was was a seven and actually killed about seventy people in a brand new hospital that collapsed and I just like you I. It just didn't seem like it. was that big an earthquake but I do remember all the East Coast Writers and mid the midwest writers were trying to get out of these big overstuffed chairs to try and get out and they just couldn't move and they kept running. We knew each other. And I remember Nick Peters of the Sacramento Bee the late Nick Peters and I remember him yelling as loud as he could. Don't panic don't panic and then of course yes I heard just like you did like everybody cheers from the crowd. You saw that Famous picture of a fan holding up a sign. Saying something like if you think that was something wait till the giants hit And then my first notion that there was not going to be baseball was when I looked up and I saw that the lights standards were out and that the scoreboard org was all jumbled and I think a lot of us We saw really quickly that the action. The news was now all the way onto the field Did you ever have a sense going to be baseball. One senators quake-hit not really know and it was hard to understand it. I what was happening because you know we're so a accustomed to instant information in twitter and cell phones and none of that really existed at the time so you didn't know right away. One of the people I talked to for the oral history you mentioned was George Kosta. WHO's the head of security and operations at the giants And he said they were trying to put together information in the immediate aftermath around around that police car right behind home plate And one of the you know they kind of said okay. We don't have power we don't have a PA system We don't know when the lights are GonNA come back on or if they're gonNA come back gone and that's when they started sort of going through the list and realizing even before they heard the extent of the damage throughout the bay area. He probably wasn't practical to play a game with sixty thousand thousand people In that facility and who knows about aftershocks so they sort of made a very rational Decision after a a conversation about the situation in you know and and ended up Postponing the game fairly quickly after that and of course the people back home really had no idea what was going going on Because the the broadcast which was just starting was the pre-game show It got cut off and you al.. Michaels was one of the He was one of the announcers. He was the announcer was on the air. let's listen to our colleague John Shea here. At the chronicle he was working for the Gannett papers at the time including the Marin Independent Journal He talks about that briefly at the end of this short remembrance so at five Oh four. PM I was visiting my editor in the last row right behind the plate. I add a bird's eye view of the entire stadium so when the quake hit I saw sections the ballpark. Shift away from other sections of the ballpark. Like the thing was about to come down. There was silence from the crowded. I in then there was a sense so hey that was an earthquake. And we're GONNA be okay and then loud applause like let's play ball. Well no I grew up here so I've been through few of these and none like this. I mean I was not applauding arrest down the steps to the press box behind the plate and tried to check in with the office US then I went down to the field. All the news was happening down. There players rushed out of the dugouts and club houses because they felt safer on the grass and their families families came on down to join them the faith incident. The commissioner at the time was in his cart police everywhere one with a blow horn telling people what to do a police car on the field Didn't it didn't take long to realize the magnitude of it. All and fans to their credit filed out orderly. I was on the story throughout the next day. I was at the Saint Francis Hotel for Candlelit press conference in Catalan walking up those stairs at the entrance. Listen into the room. Where Vincent laid out a schedule? There'd be no baseball for a while. Obviously and the giant state town and waited it out in the as were we're a little more baseball oriented especially after losing the eighty eight series to Gibson and those guys and they flew to Arizona to work out for a couple of days. Of course they were better anyway and more focused and finished off the sweep but I remember a few east coast writers who vowed never to return though I saw at least he's one of them. Come back for the two world series giants angels so yeah just reflect. The quake hit a half hour before the game was to start. Sixty thousand thousand folks. Were settling into their seats. Willie mays was set to throw out the first pitch. The Gatlin Brothers for whatever reason were going to perform the national anthem and of course those watching TV were into the pre-game show ABC which was showing replays of game. Two Day Parker pulling into second base with a double and then their screens began to lose reception and Al Michaels was heard saying. I think we're having an earth. Yeah that that clip at the end there with Al Michaels sort of become iconic. Now you talk to Al for your oral well history remembrance which you can see on. SF CHRONICLE DOT COM. What did he say about that? Well it was interesting. He has more bay area background than I realize. As I knew he had announced for the giants for three seasons in the seventies nineteen seventy four to seventy six And he told me he lived in Menlo Park at the time and actually stayed in Menlo Park after that when he went to ABC so he lived in the bay area for about twelve years so had some history with familiarity with the area and also with earthquakes. He initially really thought it was kids. 'cause the broadcast booth Much like the press box was sort of tucked in between the upper deck in the next level and he thought it was initially kids heads banging bats above him because the floor of the upper deck was directly above the broadcast booth. That was his. I thought but very quickly when they start when the the stadium ADEEM started moving. You very quickly realized it was an earthquake. As you mentioned Tim. CARVER was commenting on the video. Highlights from game to Dave Parker had doubled in a run Parker's coming in the second on the highlight they're showing Cans Saco scoring then going back to the dugout. And that's when the earthquake hits it's and they lose the picture in Michael's interrupts macarbre say we're having an earth and that's it and that's all he said quake but it obviously got Covered up by the static and the loss signal But michaels was interesting he he. In addition to living in the bay area it described himself as a map freak so he had all the above San Francisco above Paris above New York maps so he kind of knew not only the bay area area but he knew it from a visual from overhead perspective which became relevant because they had the blimp there for the world series. They sent michaels down to the production truck and he basically told the blimp where to go and he provided the commentary and analysis as the blimp was showing the Bay Bridge Judge. The Marina Michaels had lived briefly and Cyprus structure in Oakland so michaels was explaining to viewers. This is the bay bridge. Even though so people in the Midwest and east thought of the Bay Bridge as this majestic thing between your boy island and San Francisco and Michael's explaining this is is the rugged side of the bay bridge between the Treasure Island and Oakland so his background in with bay in the bay area became relevant when he actually was nominated for news emmy for that coverage that night. You know Obviously this was before cell phones right actual phone communications wired phone. Communications were really cut off. It was hard to get a hold of anybody and there was no internet. We we really didn't know what was going on until all a couple of people in the in the ballpark in the press box. Even some of the fans they had this thing called a Sony watchman I have to you know I I mean and I have to explain this to our younger viewers You couldn't just watch. TV on your phone They sold these. It was it was really quite a big deal at the time. The Band Walkman was the the Stereo that you'd listen to music. The watchman was a little TV that had about a three inch screen on it and it worked worked with an antenna so you could actually see broadcast not cable but broadcast and that's how we got our first pictures that the bay bridge had faltered that one section and then of course more shockingly the fires that were consuming the Marina district and then even more shocking than that the site of the Cypress restructure having pancake and and of course at that point. We had thought that there were hundreds dead. I believe the chronicle headline if I'm not mistaken of the examiner actually Aronie Asli. The next morning Said said something like hundreds dead because they base that on what the traffic would have normally been liked at five o'clock and of course. Traffic was lighter than usual. People left work doc early so they could go home to watch the world series and you know there were many many fatalities in the dozens of course but it was a lot the better than it would have been a had there not been a world series and that was our first real sense for sure that you know that baseball was not going to be played in thoughts just started going going through your head about. What are they going to do with the world series? I mean You know and that became an issue. We'll talk about that later. became an issue Down the line what to do and then we just you know realize that again. The story was on the field. The players were on the field They were you know they had brought their families out there. There's a famous picture of Terry Steinbach the as catcher comforting his wife. Who is in hysterics? There's another famous picture. That was on sports illustrated of Kelly downs. who was giants pitcher? And he had his. He was holding carrying one of his nephews off the field that became the cover photo for for sports illustrated the following week. We we gathered up all of our news. We talked to the players. We talked to the stadium officials We both had to write about your situation. But communications with the newspaper newspaper was almost impossible. and you know once we had gotten a hold and talk to all the players and you know we got all our news and we had to write it on our really rudimentary. The Memory Radio Shack laptops You know that that became tough in itself. Because they kicked us out of the Ballpark and I think you and I both had the exact same name experience on how we wrote right. I remember them saying okay. We need to evacuate and some of these coast writers or other writers honestly east coast host but resisted because they had a right and I remember thinking fine. I'm Outta here you know. I didn't want to be in that building I mean my. I'm happy that the one phone call. I made two phone calls one of the office but I I called my mother to assure that was okay. And you're right. There were very few phones available but then when they said evacuate the Press Fox. I'm good I'm gone. Don't have to tell me twice. Yeah exactly and that because the parking lot if you think about it the parking lot seemed like the safest place in the world to be right. Nothing was gonNA fall on you you so yeah I had the same experience you did. I went into the parking lot. Found my old the Toyota Corolla and wrote my story by the Interior Light. Probably draining the battery artery. But it worked because I had like you gathered reaction In the BALLPARK. And and Nick Peters and I Susan Foreign off and others from the be Contributed should be to our coverage. So Yeah I wrote my story in the parking lot I think I dictated from a payphone in San Mateo Because I had been assigned to go on on the peninsula look for damage. Someone else was in the city downtown so so it was a a memorable night I Dunno if you remember Bob Cohn who was with the Arizona Republican time He was a friend of mine. He kinda latched onto me He had nowhere to go so he came with me and rode with me. The same thing he wrote in my passenger seat and we drove around the peninsula and then a friend of mine lives in Daly City. We went to his parents. House slept on the couch that night. Yeah you know the kids can Google payphone phone while. You're also googling Sony watchman you can see. He's older than me. I just want for the. I'm older than than everybody. Yeah I actually wrote my story in the front driver's seat of my Datsun. B Two ten and Alongside of me in the passenger seat was Dave newhouse who was one of our columnist almost for the chronicle I also put the interior. I'm sorry the Oakland Tribune. I also put my interior light on but I also turned my engine on my dad was a very good car repairman and I knew rudimentary things. Like if you don't turn the engine on the battery is going to die and other writers who evacuated actually sat in front of my car and used my headlights to write their stories and teamwork. Yeah so one crazy thing happened We had there was TV. Truck there. right where we were all writing writing and they happen to have one wired phone line and you needed a phone line like that you can you connected up to send your story in an analog fashioned and it took about two or three minutes to send a story now it's instantaneous. You email it and it's a millisecond but then it took about two or three minutes to to send your story it was also taking taking about like ten minutes just to get an open phone line so each one of us was it was taken about thirteen minutes person and we were taking turns and this one radio guy who is still working in the bay area. So I won't mention his name and he. He does a lot of radio for Latin America. He does writing and radio and TV for Latin America and he got his turn on the phone and he wasn't saying anything nothing was happening and it was one of those situations where they're back in whatever country they were in that he was talking to a Venezuela Venezuela or the Dominican or somewhere in Central America. And they said we'll get you in about ten minutes just stand by. And when he told us that people started going crazy and they told Oldham to hang up and he said No. I'm not going to hang up. It's my turn and Somebody actually went to the phone. Put his finger on the the little button hangs up the phone and clicked it and I thought we're going to have a fistfight Fortunately there were no fistfights. Now you know driving home from that we of course had a lot of time to reflect and one of the things is that you know we we came to realize was that the infrastructure in the bay area was it was just dead. I mean there were there were power outages everywhere you. You couldn't cross the the bay bridge. Our colleague Bruce Jenkins who had just been named a columnist for the chronicle not too too much earlier He gave his remembrance remembrance to us on on that night and talks a little bit about what it was like in the city that night It's Bruce Jenkins from the San Francisco. Chronicle I had just gotten my column with Sporting in green a few months before and I was up in the upper deck when the earthquake hit and the thing really almost remember most is the sound coming before it hit us. It was his tremendous rumbling. Sound coming from the south heading our way and nobody could pinpoint what it was. Accepted was getting increasingly. Frightening as it got to us and then next thing and overall rocking and rolling up in the upper for deck and I remember. I was standing right next to a guy named lyle. Spencer from the New York Post to I went to high school with played basketball with wrote on the school paper with in Santa Monica Way. Back in the sixties. And we're looking at each other like we're going down. This is the big one and it was pretty frightening to be unable to control your body and watching things sway back and forth but eventually calmed down and there was a lot of cheering and everybody thought. Hey this is great and then the reality hit home very soon when people came to realize what was going on around the bay area We had Several people on the field talking to players and I took it upon myself to Get back to the chronicle office and transport a couple of very important Sports writers along with me. Ken Rosenthal the Baltimore Sun and Tom Boswell The Washington Post. They were very grateful to get a ride down third street to the chronicle which was a heroin trip in the darkness and there are some pretty menacing characters out there. Look like they were bent on mayhem and when we got to the city I remember Tom. Boswell saying where are we. We were in downtown downtown San Francisco with no lights and that was an experience in itself so we met her way into the chronicle building For some reason that we had complete power outage here The third floor was not accessible. assessable were on the second floor with emergency power in extremely dim light trying to hammer out stories on laptops from the war of eighteen twelve and and it was really really primitive creative and as it turned out we printed just an eight page edition for the following morning. There was only one sport story kind of a staff conglomeration and the work that we did Ernest cornices it was didn't appear then the following day we were still dealing with a power outage and a bunch of US managed to get some pieces into a sixteen page chronicle that appeared the following day and that was It was it was definitely an adventure trying to to pull off something like guess with basically no assets but no. We were all rewarded that we're able to do something and you know basically felt lucky to be all in one piece As opposed to some of the horrors does that were unfolding in in the bay area. Yes in a darkened city That's where all the reporters that's where the teams all came to try and find out what what was going to happen to the world series and and we know obviously that It was sort of secondary to the all the the damage and the death and injuries in the city Baseball was relatively attuned to that. And you and I both had a very bizarre experience. Probably the most bizarre press conference that that both you and I had been into five incident had just become commissioner of baseball upon the death of Bart Giamatti the sudden death of Bart Giamatti and he held a press conference inside a ballroom. Home at the Saint Francis. Hotel with no microphones. No lights no anything. It was actually a candlelight press conference you remember that absolutely will after right you know done my duty and San Mateo on Peninsula. You know I slept at my friend's parents house on the couch. Daly city got a few hours. Sleep came to that press conference difference on as it turns out as I learned in doing this oral history preceding. The press conference was a candlelight meeting with Vincent and Bob Murray and the Haas's they were talking about what they were going to say the president's what they were going to do and Mayor and the police chief apparently kind of burst into this meeting and said I'm not going to be able to send anyone to candlestick to inspect it for a while right. And and the and the well. Not only inspecting the ballpark but also The police required for a world series. As I think that ultimately was why they made the decision to postpone the world series You know at first there was talk about canceling all together which had had that had never her that it never happened and they were talking about canceling moving it out of the year? We're moving it out of the area right finding a neutral site and You know the police the lack the say we need our police elsewhere. We need we need all of our People elsewhere and ultimately the decision was made to restart it Ten days later. And I I got the sense And I don't think this is an original thought that you know that at a p at by that point ten days after I think that people wanted the world series they I needed the world series as a as a diversion to You know sort of sort of get back to baseball now. The giants as had two very different ways of approaching this The giants held these workouts at candlestick everyday they played a couple of simulated games I remember having to take the ferry from the East Bay to get there To to get into the city because of the bridge but the as did something completely different And I did you. Did you travel down to Arizona with the as I did. Not because like I said Susan Foreign Office still the beat writers. I just think she might have But they had talked about doing it. You know within a day or two after the quake sort of realized it was too soon and I think waited awhile. I don't think they went bound for five or six days. Might have been that weekend right because it was. The quake was on a Tuesday. The seventeen th. The series resumed Friday. The twenty seventh which I think we can say given the detachment detachment of thirty years was inappropriate delay. Absolutely my Dad always tells me about the NFL. Starting playing games two days after Kennedy was assassinated. And how horrible no decision. It seemed at the time and it looks even worse now you know given the power of time and detachment so I think baseball made the right decision on many levels the the practicality of not having the police officers but also the respect for the victims and and you're right at some point life needed to go on but not two days later maybe ten days later and the as Were credited for bringing taking their players away to a warm weather place where they were free from the distractions. I'm not minimizing. What happened to the people who passed away and and the damage and the injuries but From baseball since those were distractions and actually in your oral history. You Talk to Sandy Alderson. He told you something interesting from a baseball fan. I I couple of things. First of all he said The Night of game three which I never heard this until recently Steve Kroner actually talked to sandy in contributed contributed to our story That they weren't sure Bob Welch was going to be able to pitch You mentioned you know Stewart and more had had shackled the giants and the first two games and as it turned ironed out Stuart Moore came back and Games three and four given the delay but originally Bob Welch's scheduled pitch game three but apparently he had strained his hamstring. A few days earlier shag ing fly balls and batting practice so the as were not sure at all he could pitch in game three they were going to let them warm up. See how it went and if he could pitch Kurt. Young who more recently has been the giants pitching coach but was on that a staff was gonNA pitch that game So that I had never heard that before that I found that kind of interesting and the other point sandy made about about going Arizona was that he thought at some point. People were going to get past the earthquake. It didn't seem like it immediately. But he's right. Eventually you move on. And he wanted their fans to remember world series victory. You know that thirty years later as we hear we stand in two thousand nineteen that people were GonNa remember the outcome almost as much as the earthquake. Maybe not but certainly people remember that the as role to victory so that was part of their thinking and to their credit. You know Dave was very very involved in the community efforts here and they sold ten. They sold out Phoenix Municipal Stadium and donated all the money earthquake relief so I think they did it in a in in a respectful way and they played a couple of inter squad games in in Arizona. Much like the giants did at candlestick. And kind of got away from the the mayhem or the Uncertainty here in the bay area for a couple of days and then came back and obviously finished off finished sweet. Yeah there's a revisionist history that If they had gotten to play an uninterrupted world series the giants would have no. You're shaking your head. No no giants were a very good team. Diana's team once they acquired Ricky Henderson in June. It's one out of the best teams of all time. And and you and I covered the eighty nine reunion this year for the giants and I talked a lot of the players and they they all said we were GONNA get smoked. One way or another I will tell you the Sir my one of my lasting memories of my life not just of you know that series and the earthquake was when they did resume before game three at candlestick when people were filing in to a ballpark that actually stood up extremely well. The the damage that had occurred to candlestick was it was cosmetic it was like there were some. I mean. People said there were holes that you could look down from the upper deck but that was just the expansion joints doing their jobs and swim and moving back and forth which had the effect of maybe pushing some of the concrete stairs stairs out. But that that's cosmetic that that was not structural. I'll never forget this and and really it. It may be the only time I ever remember crying at a baseball stadium. Liam was when vowel diamond and the members of the beach. Blanket Babylon show They came out onto the field in full costume and Sang Sang. The Song San Francisco which was from an old an old movie and You Know San Francisco Open Your Golden Gate etc.. And that's that's when you you know how it is when you have you know ten. It's like riding a bicycle. You have ten days of this. You're just working working working and you didn't really have a chance to kind of fully appreciate. She ate what happened with this earthquake. And that was the moment I fully appreciate it And I just kind of broke down a little bit in the press box. Now I had mentioned earlier that Terry Steinbach wife in that iconic picture was was crying and he was comforting her but she came back and you actually talked. Talk to her At the You know you actually talked to her for the oral history story What did she say I did? Yeah I mean I know the Terry pretty well from my days covering the as and Mary was always around very sweet person So she had the the the reason behind that was they only have three children three grown kids now but they only had one and child at the time a two year. Old Girl named Jill who usually came to the Games but they decided to keep with the babysitter and Alameda that night Just because it was the world series and want what the distraction of a two year old and so they couldn't reach her you know and they were there for Minnesota and and they were unnerved obviously by the earthquake and ah even though they thought she was probably okay. They couldn't get a hold of the babysitter to confirm that. So that's wise. Mary was so upset. She didn't get Terry said she didn't get hit by brick. She didn't she wasn't isn't physically injured at all. She was just unnerved by the uncertainty of it all And that's why that picture became sort of famous and the funny little story. I'll tell on that or she told me two things one. Her three kids as they went through middle school in Minnesota would take earth science class and they would learn about earthquakes and and in each of their three classes they would be shown the video from the world series and they saw their mother crying hysterically. Oh that's amazing so. She actually apologized to her kids because her kids became very self conscious about this middle school right seeing her on the video and the other thing is she did go back to the world series ten days later when it resumed and she walked on the wives bus US and all the other wives gave her an ovation because they weren't sure she was coming back but she realized after ten days. You need to be there. Wanted to be there to see Terry the NBA's play and it was just sort of emotional. Momentary Reaction Yeah you know and I mean obviously the as have not won a world series this since and You know the giants went on to win three. That remains a very iconic moment In as history when I believe the final out was it was a ground ball to first that The ball was thrown to Dennis Eckersley and he caught the ball and celebrated as she would celebrate. One thing. I do recall. You can tell me if this is true or not. True this is was I do know that the giants and as clubhouses houses were They were next to each other They were you know the two doors were about ten feet apart in the same tunnel down the right field line and the one thing that you know. I don't remember hearing was a lot of screaming the whole Champagne Party and what we were told and I think what was written was that The the celebration was a little bit subdued just because of what that world series represented and for the people who lost their lives said it was that all right yeah. I don't recall specifics but I do know it was subdued. I believe there was no champagne. I believe there was nobody spraying champagne. The way traditionally is done and that was I think ink on order of the houses the owners who are very civic minded and community conscious and and it was an awkward line to Balance Right. Because that's a big achievement achievement to win the world series and they hadn't done it since the run in the early seventies and to be their cross bay rivals So they had to find a way to kind of celebrate respectfully and I think they did and it was kind of subdued and the players You know the the players didn't know how to really handle it. I mean it was really you know. untried ground at that point but But it was definitely muted because of the circumstances. Yes right but I mean that was a great team and you know I think some people thought that the championship was At least a little bit You know tainted because of the ten day delay. I don't feel that way. I think the as were the best team in baseball that year as they were the year before when they lost the world series to the dodgers and They certainly deserve the championship We'll listen Ron. This was this was a great shot and I wanNA thank you for for for joining us on our giant splash as plus podcast and This is going to be an interesting day here. Remembering the thirtieth anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake quite thanks Henry. Thank you for listening to this. Special giants splash and as plus joint. podcast make sure to visit. SF CHRONICLE DOT COM for or are extensive coverage of the thirtieth anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquakes. And we'll have more podcasts. As the off season continues giants double plays part for the San Francisco. Chronicle podcast network. Audrey Cooper is editor in chief. If you like this show please subscribe Tele Friend or give us a review you can support the giants double play in a lot of great journalism. With subscription to the chronicle there are print and digital editions you can find out more at SF CHRONICLE DOT com slash. Subscribe describe. If you WANNA find me on twitter I am at Hank Schulman or you can email me at h Schulman at S._F.. CHRONICLE DOT COM.

giants baseball bay bridge San Francisco Arizona Oakland Tribune Baseball US Terry Steinbach Oakland Al Michaels reporter candlestick park Ron John Shea Sacramento Nick Peters Dennis Eckersley twitter
2020 Outlook

Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

1:00:35 hr | 1 year ago

2020 Outlook

"INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC insured nor are they deposits of or guaranteed by a bank or any other entity so they may lose value. American funds are not available outside the US us the following is not intended as an offer to purchase or distribute American funds outside the US wrapped. I'm Matt Miller. This is capital ideas. Your connection to the mines and inside shaping the World of Investments election-year stock picking next recession prognosticating and central bank rate. Cutting I liked this episode conversation as we bring you capital groups twenty. He twenty out equity portfolio manager. Rob Lovelace Economists Daryl Spence and Fixed Income Investment Director Margaret. Steinbach join. My colleague will will McKenna for a wide ranging discussion of global markets and economies in the year head topics that matter most to today's long term. Investor this podcast is eligible for continuing education credit. So pay close attention while you listen you'll find instructions for how to earn ce credit in the show. Notes for this episode now here is my colleague in your moderator Will Mckenna with our twenty twenty outlook hello and welcome to Capitol Capital Groups Twenty Twenty Outlook. I'm your host will McKenna today. I'm joined by ROB lovelace. Daryl Spence and Margaret Steinbach three of our investment veterans Prince. Who are going to help us? Make sense of the market and economic environment as we head into twenty twenty. And there's plenty to make sense of. I think next year also WANNA extend a warm welcome into those of you in the audience on now. We literally have thousands of advisors on this event. Or thank you for joining us and I also wanted to thank many of you for sending in so many thoughtful out for questions in advance and I literally have page after page of those great questions here and as we look through your questions. We saw four or five key themes emerge number one. We're entering a pivotal election year. So what are the implications GonNa be for markets and investors number two. We do see slowing growth in the global economy economy although the US continues to do pretty well. Do we see any signs of recession on the horizon in two thousand twenty weather in the US or elsewhere around the world in places like Germany. And of course we'll get into that with daryl them are three. International Markets have lagged the US in eight of the last ten years. Now this has been a recurring theme on a rob Bob. You'll help us tackle this question. When do we see that turning around? And maybe more importantly what's the right way to think about investing in international today because I think some things have changed. And you've got some perspective for us. They're finally Margaret you know rates in the US around the world going lower for even longer How low can they go and we got quite a few questions about negative rates? What are the implications? Could they ever show up in the US. So I think a good question for all of us to dig into and finally what does all that mean for for client portfolios in two thousand twenty so excited to dig into this safe to say we're going to cover all of those kinds of questions and more with this program now before we get started this. This event is available for c credit if you have a CFP or Sima designation now to get your credit you need to stick with us for at least fifty minutes so so stick with us to the end of the Webinar and we need you to pay attention. Because they're going to give you a short quiz that you'll need to pass in order to earn your credit. I should say this event is being prerecorded prerecorded. And that's so that we can qualify for c credit so now let me formally introduce our speakers. Starting With Rob Loveless Rob is an equity portfolio. Oh manager with thirty three years of investment experience and he is responsible for a number of our global investment strategies and was also vice chairman of the capital a group companies. Welcome Rob Daryl spent many of you know Darryl. He's our US economists he's been in the business for twenty six years and he will be addressing the US and global the economic outlook and also providing the exact date of the next recession. Margaret Steinbach is a Fixed Income Investment Director with twelve years of industry experience and a first time guest on this Webinar. Welcome Margaret Thank you for having me. I understand your husband is also in the Fixed Income Business and you guys are writing Children's book. Tell us a little bit about the title title of that book. Yes so he thought goodnight. Bond mass would be a good title for that one and it would ensure that our two year old son falls asleep quickly at night. Okay so folks lookout for that connects year some time. Good night bond math great to have you all with us. Happy holidays a ton of things to discuss. So let's go ahead and jump right in Dan Rob. I thought I would start with you. And no shortage of interesting things happening in the world and I know you just got back from China. I want to get to that in a minute. We often this has become. I'm a bit of a custom for us. Your Global Equity Investor. We usually start these by asking you to take us on a tour of the World Talk About your outlook for twenty twenty across the major ager markets around the world. You know I'm happy to do that. But it is important to remember that the world has changed and While it is important to focus on the different constituent that you in parts Correlations between the US and international markets went up substantially really starting in the mid to thousands accelerated accelerated by the great financial crisis. And they've stayed high ever since and so I think through the conversation will pivot more to a conversation around how how the world is actually one big investment pool as opposed to the traditional model that frankly most of us grew up with which was thinking. US and non us. You even frame the question that way and I think lots of asset allocation structures are set up in this sort of US non us in getting that number right. It may still be a fair in the in the fixed income world because of currencies and other things but I think in the equity world with the integration of companies and these high correlations. We've really moved into a different area so with that in mind. I guess what I'd highlight is most of the economies are being affected by the same thing relative to interest rates and monetary policy and coordination and other things that others will touch on And really that. The giant debate that the equity markets are wrestling with and have been for a decade around the globe is is inflation versus deflation every country I go to has some aspect of it. Just in Asia's you highlighted was in Japan. Japan is thirty years into this debate and so a lot of countries now and investors are looking to Japan to see if there are lessons learned. We did some things differently. which which I think has been one of the things that's helped the US and the US has also benefited from the fact that most if not all of the Internet companies are basically here? You're obviously there's a big group that's in China but they function mainly in a Chinese Internet and there's a fair amount in Russia but they operate in a Russian Internet so the rest of the world's Internet is really driven by companies that are predominantly in the US and it's led to this interesting situation where the US markets have done so much better over the last decade as you highlighted eight of the last ten years in any given year but really if you look at the compounding number it's it's really spectacular but if you look at the spread and the price earnings ratio. It's actually not that great. Which tells you that there's been value being created mainly by these tech and internet companies? Also by some of the pharmaceutical companies that have really allowed allowed the US equity markets to do so much better so when you go around the world as we used to go to a place like Europe what you find is those European companies that have done well are are the ones that diversified out of Europe and are doing business in the US or doing business in China or other emerging markets and when you get to Asia and you look at which companies are doing well. They tend to be the ones that are focused on doing business in China or doing business in the United States. So this is part of where this broad correlation comes in across the world. And you're you're left with the the economic discussion that we need to get into the two big engines that are doing fine right now. China and the United States. That's why the questions ended up there. Japan as I said has been trapped for for thirty years. Europe is pretty much trapped in a similar situation for at least a decade and the big question is are we destined for twenty more years in the developed world of what Japan is head of the lower for a lot longer or are we going back to the world that most of us have investors grew up in which is some inflation and and A A lot more volatility in in interest rates so. I think that's the big debate that we need to talk about today. SORTA way thinking much more on global frame rather than in these regional pockets. And we'll dig into that a much more. We get into equity markets in more detail and as you point out the US and China drivers in some ways. You're kind of stuck in the middle of this. This trade skirmish book come back to that. That's a great star Darryl When you pick it up and talk a little bit about the Economic Outlook let's start with the US? I want to hold hold off on our word recession. We got plenty of questions about that but just start with. US What's your outlook for the US. Economy in two thousand twenty. We think we're going to get a bit of a reacceleration. I mean maybe a different different way to phrase the inflation deflation. Debate is even though you said. You didn't WANNA get into a recession or no recession. And I think we're starting to get the answer to that but what we've had add in the US economy for awhile. What we've been calling this tale of two economies? You have kind of a weak industrial sector because of the trade war because of the inventory stocking eighteen preceded the trade war while at the same time you have a really really healthy domestic economy which is largely the US consumer and so you look at the growth of those two areas as of the US and they've diverged pretty dramatically. It's very similar to what we saw back in. Twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen and the end of that episode essentially the Industrial Austria sector recovered. And we think that is likely to be the case this time around so as we move through the remainder of two thousand nineteen and into twenty twenty. We think some of these fears will. We'll be moving out of the markets and you're starting to see that I think perhaps with some of the bond yield movements equity price movements that we've seen over the past couple of weeks But a lot of that is predicated predicated on no further escalation in the trade war. And we seem to have found some type of truce here and we don't think you need to go backwards. Terrorists don't need to come off to you. Continue to have a more optimistic outlook in twenty twenty but You probably can't have much more of an escalation either and again. We think we've found some type of truce but it's kind of day to day when it comes to this type of stuff. So that's the one caveat and all that I would say you mentioned a pickup again in manufacturing. What do you think will help drive that? Well one would be a truce in the trade war for sure. I mean. The two areas that have caused the manufacturing sector weakness or exports. We're starting to see some indication that those are rebounding and the other had been the inventory. Stocking that occurred in anticipation of the trade war when you look at say inventory sales ratios across the manufacturing sector. They're starting to come down so a simple turn. In those two things. We think will lead to better activity and better output again. That assumes no further escalation in the trade war to any signs of recession session on the riser. You and the team don't see that certainly twenty twenty and and maybe it's pushed out a ways we don't I mean there's always a chance you get some type of shock that by definition. You almost can't can't see coming but keep in mind. That recessions aren't just about the amount of time that's gone by or how long the economy has been in an expansion there about excesses and imbalances that a built up in the system that ultimately need to be corrected and we do actually see some late cycle excesses and imbalances building up. A lot of it is concentrated in corporate corporate debt and leveraged loans. But even then just because you have a lot of excesses and imbalances building up doesn't mean they have to cause a recession you need some type of catalyst that automatically causes those things to be problems and then the excesses are the accelerate but ultimately push the economy into a recession and historically and we think this time around to the most likely catalyst is tighter monetary policy and in fact over the course of two thousand nineteen we moved in the opposite direction so even though these risk areas are still out there until so we probably get meaningful tighter monetary policy and tighter liquidity conditions or essentially a reversal of the conditions. That have allowed this this debt and this leverage to build up. It's probably not a reason that it has to unwind anytime soon. So our best guess and guess is the word I would emphasize there is probably some time. Late twenty twenty one would be the most likely timeframe again assuming that the Fed eventually gets back into the tightening game. That could be a while. That's a good segue Tamar one quick. Follow up you know. I saw you speak recently at a Barents Ernst Conference and you mentioned a couple of things one. Was this idea that corporate debt. And we'll get into that. Margaret in terms of the growth in the triple be part of the market may not be callous. That might be more of an accelerate writings. Get going you also mentioned. There's a sense that recessions that emerged from the corporate sector are tend to be a little less severe than those that emerged from banks or housing. Or Taylor about that. Before we transitioned Margaret. Yeah I think one of the biggest concerns that investors this happens when we do inevitably most likely get into a recession that is going to be two thousand seven two thousand nine all over again and you know it's really hard to determine harming how bad these things will be in advance but are read of history. Is that recessions that originate within the corporate sector tend to be less severe than those that originate within then the household sector or certainly involved the banking system and even though we're talking about a fairly significant amount of debt a lot of that debt is actually held outside of the banking banking system. So if there is an issue with that we don't think it will impact bank balance sheets like the housing bubble did when it blew up in the global financial crisis so again that's a read of history. I mean an example of a recession originating in the business sector of the corporate sector would be the Internet bubble lot over investment ultimately that had to be unwinded but in terms of its impact on the consumer in the overall financial system. It wasn't that large and the recession ended up putting miles. We love hearing from our listeners. So keep those reviews coming to tell us how we're doing by reviewing capital ideas on Margaret. Let's transition to view from bond. Land House the Bond Market Outlook Luke Shaping up for twenty twenty. Yeah so. I think it'll be an interesting year ahead. So we've seen heightened levels of policy and certainty both geo-political in trade policy. He would expect that. Uncertainty to remain heightened. Going into next year will get clarity on the direction of the economy. So we'll find out in the coming months whether or not this is is what we would classify as a late cycle slowdown. Or if it's the beginning of more protracted downturn and what we've heard from the Fed is that they're done cutting we think there's a high bar to further cuts from here so the bond market is pricing in about thirty basis points of additional cuts from here but I think what. The market's actually pricing is. Some probability that we do inter more protracted downturn in the Fed has to cut to zero and some probability that we come out of this and the Fed does doffing now. We think there's a high bar to the Fed cutting from here but we think there's an even higher bar that the Fed continues to hike this cycle. We think there's not enough momentum. I'm in the economy. We think inflation is unlikely to rise to a point where the Fed feels that they need to hike from here. And what's interesting is that they're really reevaluating. The tools that they used to target inflation. So we expect to get an announcement from the Fed next year in regard to that. So they're going to probably be using some kind of an average inflation target target which really means that. They're going to be easier for longer. So we've been talking about lower for longer interest rates for years and so now when I go auden and speak to advisors. I'm not just saying for longer. I'm saying lower for longer and longer and longer they'll give us a sense of you. Know is that years. Here's it many years is it. At what point does our team see them having to come back to to hiking again. I think there's a really high bar for the Fed to hike the cycle barring a significant pickup inflation and I'm talking sustained inflations above two and a half percent so the feds preferred measure of Inflation Corp.. Pe today is about one seven so we're pretty long way away from that if you look at the forward market it's pricing lower rates for a very a long time so as of this morning. It's suggesting that the tenure yield will be two and a half percent in ten years time preloader so that gives you a sense of time. Exactly exactly that's great. Daryl I WANNA come dig into the equity markets in more detail with rob after this but One of the things you mentioned that that parents conference which really really struck me and would love for you to share with our audience. His good to remember that the cuts. We've seen this year in two thousand nineteen. It takes a while for those to flow through the system. I don't know if that at six months nine months whatever the case may be but sale a bit more about that and when might those cuts really started filtering into the economy. Yeah I mean. Monetary Policy Works with a lag essentially essentially what that lag is can kind of vary cycle to cycle. But let's call it six to eighteen months as a as a range and that would suggest we would start to see more of the impact of it as as we exit two thousand nineteen and head into the first half of twenty twenty. You're already starting to see it in a recovery in the housing market with sales and construction activity. Picking up and you would start to see it again. In some other areas particularly of the uncertainty surrounding the trade war starts to be reduced because that will encourage firms to maybe ramp up their capital expenditures. which is a little bit and low rates can certainly help with that as well but I'm an agreement with The Fed staying on hold for a long period of time if anybody wants to head into the holiday season with some and cocktail party Trivia. Here's one if you look back over the past twenty five years The amount of time that core. PC inflation has been at or above two percent which which is the feds unofficial target is twenty five percent so they have a inflation target. That is really actually pretty difficult to hit. And they've kind of put themselves on record is not really doing anything until they actually hit that. So I I think Margaret's up spot on at least from our economic point of view that there's a pretty high hurdle for them to raise rates dates given that it's just very difficult to get inflation rates at that level to start with. That's pretty great those of you in our audience. If you're multitasking. I would pay attention right now because that will probably end up on the quiz so twenty. Five percent of the inflation has been above the two percent target. Rob Back to you you reference some of this. In the way the world is changing for equity I investors one of our initial audience questions that I thought I post you is here. We are in the US US markets are at or near all time highs. You know how long can this continue to see this Heading into two thousand twenty. What's your perspective on the the? US market on market levels. It's interesting when I talked to some of our younger associates because they're nervous because the equity markets hitting all time highs as a thirty four year veteran. I have to say I've seen a lot of all time. Highs in the market. The Equity Equity Market has this bad habit of going up over long periods of time. In fact that's the core of what we all do for our investors It's kind of premised on the fact fit equity markets over time will be positive without that we wouldn't have the money for people's retirement and other needs so that's the good news so I kind of celebrate every time we hit an all new high and especially in this case when it's really Pretty linked to underlying earnings. There has been some multiple expansion that we've seen across the world but it has really really been driven by underlying earnings. I think what what's getting everyone's attention right now. Is there definitely has been a bit of a roll over on margins so corporate profit margin's Were expanding Post great financial crisis in part. Because I think people were planning for a slower economy and slow revenues that actually didn't come mm-hmm and with the general technology implementation that's come across. It's made companies more efficient at least on a cost basis so margins have been steadily increasing. And then that's really peaked in the last year or two so with a slowdown I think people have extrapolated from that slowdown in margins and then concerns about a recession. Shen are we there for in for some type of correction in the market and I think that would be a very logical thing in the world that most of us grew up in the seventies eighties nineties into thousands. The challenge right now is with interest rates as low as they are. It's very hard to see alternatives to equities and again having having been in Japan recently and looking at their thirty year experience and they're it's not a total analogy because they were able to invest outside of Japan and other equity markets. The chance sounds we have now is the kind of only one market. It's all one market and so you can't move as easily from one place to the other so there is no sort of free lunch anywhere in the world at least in the equity markets. That's a bit of where I think that homogeneity comes from and so that search for companies that can continue to grow the top line or more impressively actually expand margins during this period gives them a value. That's higher today than maybe it was in the past and this is what's allowing I think those companies to have and sustain high multiples. And if you look over again. Long scopes of history when interest rates have been this low for sustained periods. Peas do tend to be high So in some ways what's remarkable is how moderate the price earnings ratios are Because we have enough of these fast growing companies so the ratio is pulled up by very high multiples support for a handful of companies. That are very big and growing fast that are generally in the internet or healthcare area. But they really are growing their businesses so they are actually growing going into those multiples in a way that wasn't true in the late nineties with the Internet companies where I think at that stage the Internet stocks were twenty five percent of the SNP or twenty five percent of the US. That's mark in only five percent of the earnings today. They're twenty five percent of the US market and twenty five percent of the earnings so that rings are supporting the earnings are there. I mean it's just a very different world MARQUESA. Hitting all time highs multiples are high margins enrolling. There's there's a whole bear case that we've all built and you know we said it multiple times this has been the most hated bull market ever I don't know that we have a measurement of that forever but I'm going to go with it right And it will continue to be that because everyone knows because they learn these lessons in the seventies eighties nineties. Two thousand. They know all the lessons they know all the things that look for the flags are up. We should it'd be concerned and even if it does happen even if there's a recession it can't be a very extended bear market inequities because there's nowhere where else to get the returns right that you need. And it's going to continue to be driven towards particular securities that either pay high dividends or that are able to grow their top and better yet at bottom lines. That's great so some of the fangs. For example like Google alphabet that have the the kind of earnings that might support their he or some of the so-called defensive defensive stocks that pay those steady dividends are are the ones that people are focused on. I think it's across different sectors of the market but certainly in technology but a lot of the software as service companies are also creating value. Right now there are areas in healthcare mainly biotech but some others. That are doing that. So all through the tech food chain and it but it's not every company you can't really do this by sector. It is absolutely a stock picking environment and a lot of times. It's been recognized and so everyone looks around and says well everyone already knows that this is going to be growing. I have to look somewhere else to find value in this. Is that question between value versus growth right but in this environment actually. The most valuable thing is a company. That's growing it's top line. And if there are actually even expanding or maintaining margins through that that's an incredibly valuable and hard to do thing in a environment mid that isn't expanding and so I think we've created another false debate of growth versus value because people think value has to be these sort of ugly companies. That aren't growing. I think the rare commodity is that company. That's actually able to grow in this tough environment right. I think that leads us into a a great way to think about companies in the international sphere. You brought up a little bit of this earlier and for those of you. In Our audience rob and his colleague David Pollak Black recently authored a Great piece of content. I think the guy to international investing the gets into this quite a bit of detail. I know a couple of charts that you helped develop some of your favorites are this whole theme that If you think all the best stocks in the US again there's almost this conundrum of eight at the last ten years the US market better but this year forty five of the top fifty stocks were outside the US. How can that be? And then I know you also focus a lot on the the the composition of the index in the US versus outside and the fact that those indexes kind of mask. What's really happening underneath? Talk a little bit more about that whole concept that's up and help borrowers understand. How should they be thinking about that? In today's world I don't guide to international investing is as compelling good night bond map it is it it is a good read and has some interesting slides. And No I. I think the conundrum that you highlight really well is. The conversation usually starts with how impressive. What's what's going on in the? US is The companies that are here that are really unique particularly in the tax base somewhat in biotech and or healthcare areas in in particular and those are the ones really driving growth and the US has done better eight of the last ten years the compounding since the great financial crisis has really been remarkable will. So why would you invest anywhere else. thirty percent of the revenue of. US companies comes from outside the US. Why wouldn't we just consider the SNP Great Global Fund to invest? And I think maybe that's the first piece that begins to show you the flaw in the logic which is okay. Thirty percent of the revenue comes from outside the US. But that's a really badly constructed global strategy right right. I mean right. Wouldn't you rather by the best companies than just say. Oh great I'm getting some you know. US companies that do business outside the US and a lot of that non US exposure. Actually it comes from supply chain as opposed to being the Coca Cola's or others that really have real revenue outside of the US. So why don't we look for the best companies around the world. And Ah again we've got a slide that shows over the last ten years a majority of the stocks in any given year. That did better. We're based outside the US and a lot of times it's because they do business in the US so a lot of the consumer products companies a lot of the luxury companies and other companies have done well are domiciled outside the US. So the great thing that we've noticed is you no. We don't care as much about zip code anymore where a company gets. Its Mail is not a good proxy anymore for where they do business. You really need to get in on the fundamentals and think about where companies are doing business in some of the best businesses to get exposure to growth in China are domiciled in Europe some time in the US and some of the ways to get it things that are happening in the US or actually domiciled outside of the US So you really want to just focus on the best companies wherever they're based because of this construct that we've had for so long of versus non. US We tend to have regression to the mean kind of an approach and think well the US has done well so non. US necessarily will catch up. I have a hard time arguing that because the difference in the multiples forward pe of about seventeen in the US and maybe thirteen and change outside the US is mostly explained and by structural differences in the index outside the US. The index is dominated by financials and commodities and materials companies mainly oil companies the US this is dominated by Internet technology and healthcare sort of old economy outside and new economy inside the correct for those to the multiples are actually pretty similar. So what it tells you. Is that actually. Everyone's doing their job. And when you have a fast growing company like a SNL that's based in Europe. Guess what it trades at say multiple as the other technology equipment providers so you have to change the mindset of US versus non us to find the best companies wherever they're based. Make sure you're finding someone that's doing that analysis says because why would I limit my universe to one third of the companies arbitrarily because they happen to have decided to be domiciled in the why not invest in great companies companies. That happen to be based in Japan that happened to be based in China that happened to be based in Germany And this is why the conversation what's happening with the German economy. Or what do I think. Income Brexit almost becomes moot. It's not what matters anymore. What matters is where the companies are doing business? What the business lines that? They're in and are are they able to grow in this tough environment and we're finding as many or more opportunities outside the US in the US. Even though I think overall the US market will be one of the best market. Market's going forward. So that's a conundrum but the reality of it is if you can find those great stocks based outside the US you'll do even better than the US market. That's great perspective if give us a little flavor you mentioned SNL and of some of those top industries company examples within those. You know I think you guys have talked about luxury. And you're you guys have talked about certain areas in Japan automation you talked about healthcare and some places. TSMC semi's and others give it gives a sense of those best industry industry leaders there. Well I think there's two categories. I think they're those industries now. That where you have logical pairings one of the other things that's happened over the last ten years maybe longer is there's been a lot of consolidation in almost every industry and so you're now down to a few players and interestingly there's usually one in the US and one outside the US so oh you know Intel and Tsmc Boeing Airbus Have Nike. And so so. What's interesting is again you you could say I'm just going to arbitrarily? Say we should buy the one in the US because the US market is going to be better. But in fact Airbus's done better than Boeing even before the recent issues Addidas has recently done better than Nike. So you have to look at each of these and know what's driving each of the companies. That's great so let's turn to you Margaret. Thank you rob great perspective respective. Our audience really wanted to understand you know within the bond market. What do we see as relatively attractive as you look out? Twenty twenty whether that's treasuries corporates high-yield mortgages oranges. Amd How are we thinking about those different areas. I would say it's hard to argue that anything is really cheap today and so it's a matter matter of what's relatively cheap and we're finding that higher quality areas of the bond market more attractive today so treasuries agency mortgages we really see. Corporate valuations is being pretty full. So if you look at investment grade corporate debt spreads there at about one hundred five basis points today if you look at high yield spreads spreads about three ninety today and that's very close to territory where on a go forward basis over the next two years corporate tend to underperform treasuries and so it's not necessarily an outlook on the economic environment but at this point and economic cycle and in the market cycle looking at valuations. We think it makes sense to bad higher quality. I know we've been using the phrase focus on upgrading your core portfolios at equivalent to what. You're talking about stay focused on that higher quality at this point in the cycle yes. That's that's right. Bonds more or less attractive or appealing following the tax cuts. How are you thinking about that? yeah so there's a lot of volatility around tax reform and questions is about whether or not unions would lose their tax benefit and with cutting tax rates for individuals would still be attractive and once the dust settled what came to light. What is that? News actually became more attractive for many investors so for corporations that buy Muniz because they have a lower tax rate Muniz became less attractive for them on the margin margin but even though tax rates came down for a lot of individuals effective tax rates went up especially for those of us who live in California New York Getting rid of a lot of the deductions and so Muniz continue to be attractive today. I mean if you look at relative valuations compared to taxable markets. I think the break even tax rate is around twenty twenty five percent today so anyone who pays twenty to twenty five percent in taxes or more actually benefits from owning Muniz compared taxable bonds are still attractive for a lot of investors Rosen high. You'll have been very tight. You have to be very selective there but we talk about emerging markets debt as an interesting being perhaps alternative to getting that kind of enhanced income as long as you're kind of comfortable with some volatility would tell us about emerging markets bonds and how we're thinking about that absolutely it's a really compelling sector so structurally speaking it's high quality I think more so than maybe the market perceptionist receptionist so over half of the emerging market that Universe is rated investment grade today the sector over the last fifteen years has produced strong risk adjusted returns compared to high yield bonds compared to equity markets emerging market equities. What I found is that individual investors tend to be a bit more comfortable emerging market equities but actually emerging market debt has produced stronger risk adjusted returns over the last fifteen years and again looking at a landscape where nothing is is really cheap emerging market debt offers pretty reasonable valuations today so the yield is about six and a half percent if we're looking at a blend of half dollar half local local-currency and that particularly attractive to US probably just a newer less familiar asset class for folks? I mean difference between equities and bonds. There shall we dive into the deep end of the pool with negative rates. Maybe Margaret just frame this up for us. I mean how should we be thinking about this phenomenon. I know the number behind negative data. There's a very are large. One has a tea in front of it. How should we be thinking about it? I would describe negative rates as An experimental policy. It's really a crazy easy idea. It's certainly not something that we all read about. When we were coming up through school I think it will probably be future textbooks for children and our children's earns children but this is a brand new concept that's come into the markets in the last few years there's about fifteen trillion of of negative yielding debt? Today and this is because central banks around the globe including the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have embarked on negative policy rates as a way to try and stimulate growth and their economy is now we can talk about whether or not it's been helpful to growth. I think the jury is still out but as a result and the fact that we continue to be in a pretty muted growth low inflation flation environment across the world. That's also suppressing long-term rates as well to cut him an anchor on the US rates and other long-term rates. That's right. We love hearing hearing from our listeners. So keep those reviews coming. Tell us how we're doing by reviewing Tampa ideas on. Let's pivot now to the trade in the global trade outlook raw. Why don't you start us out? Just in China be curious to hear what the mood is like over there around this topic but also how do you think this is going to play out. And and then maybe are you thinking about doing things differently in your portfolio as well. Yeah no we really do have to pay attention to this. Being in Hong Kong in particular was was a pretty stark reminder that the world exchanged Hong Kong everyone knew had changed since nineteen ninety seven. I think until the current regime in China what Hong Hong Kong was hoping for was that China would become more like Hong Kong and and with the way the reforms were going. It looked like that's where it was but president. Xi is definitely taken China in a different direction and so now it's very clear to Hong Kong that those rivers flow together. The way that they had hoped is not happening. And that's where you're seeing the tension come from And I think we really do need to step back from the trade war and realized this is a broader conflict. It's happening on multiple fronts. Clearly there's tension in in the Internet area that most of us don't see every day but it's happening and lots of other areas in which we see tension the only consensus in Washington right now now is around a hard line on China. You could literally take the extremes from both ends of the political spectrum and not how we should achieve it. But they're in alignment on that right. That's something to take note of. So we're in that challenging transition of the rise of an economic power China is the second largest economy. It will be if it isn't already the second largest largest market and so it's very interesting for us as investors to try to figure out. Should I invest in this or is this tension something that should scare me away. And it's partly why I we're looking at a whole array of things to invest in because there are some goods in companies that China can't replicate and those those seem like great places to be They're having a hard time manufacturing planes for example and they wouldn't want only one supplier and Airbus so Boeing is a very valuable company to them one day. It won't won't be but it looks like a decade or more before they can really get into volume growth emerged demanded skyhawks. We have to understand that. The trade negotiations Sion's are the piece of a much bigger puzzle and it's a very political puzzle and only seeing slight parts of it so again. The market's going to be overly focused on it. Both bond and equity markets are super focused on our the tear center. The tariffs out. But I think the signaling of that is masking this much broader and more important trend trend. That's going on of a major transition happening around the world and right now the two sides aren't talking. They're not even using the same language in terms of what what that transition really means. And that's something that is going to dominate conversations for awhile going forward so we may recite in the short term the trade trade negotiations for either. US political reasons. Because we're coming into Christmas. And why would we want all the consumer goods to be taxed because that might hurt someone politically and or an election period but the the reality is whoever's elected it's going to have a big impact on the US. I think it's going to have very little impact. On our approach to China branch is going to the hardline going forward and you look at a lot of companies obviously are the multinationals taking a lot of actions to adjust. What are you seeing out there in your travels with companies and who was positioning themselves? Well to kind of adapt to this new situation. Yeah I mean this is what makes multinational such interesting bellwethers to watch because as they are very adept at moving so with the change in Hong Kong. That we've already seen and you know. It looks unlikely that China's going to allow as many Chinese tourists to go there so the luxury a good companies have already begun to adjust. You know most of the more you have stores and other Chinese cities order to Singapore Korea and other places that the Chinese tourists are now going so for for some of them actually. They're not seeing any change in their top line because it just shifted to other stores. But I just think it's a signal that there'll be a hollowing out in Hong Kong going forward from from a business standpoint and what we're seeing broadly to your question in terms of changes are most companies that have manufacturing in China are trying to figure out other other options but Vietnam Malaysia Thailand. Even Latin America can only take a very limited amount of it. The scale of. What's it's happening in? China is so huge. So that's a multi year if not multi decade change. But you're seeing it happening. Those are the kinds of trends that we try to identify. Get ahead out of investments that were making because it will lead to build up in other places so you can't turn on dime but somebody's benefiting from this and I don't know if you're starting to see that yet in economic data data in some of those other countries but I know you guys try to measure or quantify what are the impacts of this and tariffs and so on Darryl. How are you seeing? This unfolded folded. You mentioned some of the potential mini deals. That may happen for political reasons but house economic seem looking at this. Yeah I I think to the extent anybody is benefiting from it. It's very very very incremental on over a long period of time whereas those who are being hurt by it it's much more immediate At least from a US perspective we talked about the difficulty Z.. With exporters right now. Global Trade is actually starting to fall even though the global economy is not in a recession and a lot of that just simply has to do with the impact that this is having on global trade but a lot of the higher prices haven't really been flowing through to the US consumer if you look it. Broad measures of inflation. Barely see him flipping address at earlier. I'm there are some isolated things like washing machines. Where you've seen more significant price increases but for the most part the people who are really bearing the brunt of this are the producers themselves? Also if you're on the Chinese side there's a couple of things you can do You can hope for a currency depreciation which we've gotten a little of that offsets some of the higher tariffs And you can just take you get in your margins and a lot of Chinese companies. It seems like they're doing that. So that's where the damage is occurring. I guess from a macro perspective the seems pretty manageable again. Given even where we've gotten to in assuming that we can kind of stay here. I guess where we'd start to worry is the more unquantifiable stuff. If you get into world of embargoes boycotts you know firms on either side of the ocean physically can't get the products that they need to produce the goods that they sell. I mean that's how companies go out of business and that's how this thing could really become much more economically damaging but for now it seems to be pretty manageable and a lot of the pressure is being put on the corporates. It's not flowing through to the end consumer at least in the US. Can I just as important additional trivia fact to this I think global trade actually peaked four or five years ago so long before this process and this is just an acceleration of that in terms of physical goods But one of the things that we've focused on is that actually it's hard to track it per se but digital trade. In other words the movement of information information across borders has increased and continues to rise so another one where a lot of the indicators a lot of what people think about is moving cars from from continent to continent but actually the integration in the digital world is increasing and you may not see it in terms of shipped goods but it could actually be manifest in terms of delivery every a product in country the benefits of which though flow to a US company. which is set up the chassis on which that transaction happened the way we measure trade has not caught up with some of the realities of how it's done it ties into that international story in the way we measure those indexes And Margaret Incredibly Monetary Policy. You know I know. We have a chart. Just a picture of all the countries that have been cutting rates and some just admittedly in response to the amount of policy and trade uncertainty out. Their houses affecting monetary policy team thinks about it so trade policy uncertainty certainly has fed through to the industrial side of the economy which errol described earlier tale of two economies. And it's a large reason that we've seen global central banks easing policy including here in the US. Now that we've gotten a little bit of clarity or a little bit of respite. That is is done cutting for now. But I I would expect if we see in a reemergence in this uncertainty going into next year they they they could cut further. It's a very fluid situation. And as rob mentioned you know sentiment seems to Change Day to day depending on the headlines and so I think a big takeaway for us as investors ours is to stay focused on the big picture the long term stay invested. That's a very good segue. I wanted to now begin to election years and margarethen investing testing and the topic. We got a lot of questions on very much in our clients minds and I think a lot of the audience's questions had to do with or what I read into them was help us help our clients understand that they can stay invested and don't have to be so uncertain. I Know Rob you've talked about and we went back and looked at the data and in these fourth years you do see not a real decline in people investing in mutual funds and a real acceleration in money to money market. And you've talked about that idea of it's not the people redeem money. Just they stopped by mutual fund. So we see that coming through the data you know. At the beginning of this report we looked at. I think all the election and years going back to nineteen thirties a call at twenty two cycles. And what we found so interesting was when you compare that election year to all the other years. There's you see this real volatile period in the primary season so call it. January through may wear where the election years very sideways choppy markets. While the rest of the years. Do Fine but then at the end of that kind of uncertain primary period here we go. We get back on track and often those election years from that point forward did better than other. You're so I saw that is really a roadmap for what we ought to expect for for twenty twenty and to help stay the course amid that volatility but Darryl as we think historically speaking overall hasn't really made much of a difference whether a Republican or Democrat crowd wins the White House as it relates to investors. Well you can make data say whatever you want it to say as you know and I'm sure you'll start to see it over the next year that the stock market in historically has done better when Democrats have been in office versus Republicans. But that doesn't mean necessarily and I don't mean this is a political statement that Democrats for better for the stock market's causal it's a term in the course of both economies and stock markets. And even when you look at those averages bridges there is great variation underneath those averages that you need to be cognizant as well so even though one number may be bigger than the other. That doesn't mean that it's any more consistent so you know in my mind presidents in administrations get far too much credit or blame for the state of the economy and ultimately the state of the market simply. Because a a like I said before there's far too many different variables that determine where the economy is going to go and there's actually very little influence ultimately that a president can have probably the biggest ones would be tax changes like we saw those tend to be temporary tend to be one time boost or headwinds to economy and then the economy kind of comes back to do what the fundamental suggests it was going to do anyway and so you know looking out over four years you know. Our outlook is that the next year or so we'll start to see an improvement in growth. What it's is going to look like at the end of the next four year presidential cycle? Frankly I have no idea. But that's what's going to determine what the market does not necessarily whether it's a Democrat or Republican Publican in the office. Yeah well said I mean you know robs you think about investing through this this kind of period this change anything for you thinking differently about it. I mean clearly certain areas areas for example in this cycle healthcare stocks and a focus on pricing are very much in the news. And you see some pressure there Maybe those are good opportunities for long-term investors astor's like us but are you kind of looking past the horizon on this. How are you approaching this inside your own portfolios? Well I think you summed up well at the beginning and I think this cycle will be particularly I pronounced in terms of that uncertainty during the primaries in particular and maybe throughout because we have a few candidates in the Democratic Pool but have a pretty fundamentally different view of how the economy shaped and so you know that uncertainty that would come if those candidates are the ones chosen rosen a real different visions for how the economy and government is going to interact with the economy leads to uncertainty and uncertainty always pushes people out of equities equities and into into more conservative investment. So I think that's why this primary period will be particularly pronounced because we may not have a lot of centrist the voice And so if you have extremes that tend to get people worried depending on who. The candidate ends up being on the democratic side. I think we're pretty clear. You're on where the Republican policies are not going to be a lot of course change. I don't think that will be what determines whether we're off to the races once. We have a candidate because we have you know sorta centrist in whatever pro-market they are right We'll determine it but we have candidates that are pretty challenging to to the structure of a lot of the capital markets that we need to pay attention to so I think that makes it a little bit different. What am I doing? I turn over my portfolio about ten percent a year. I'm trying to take the long-term view. I think that's the advantage that we we have a capital group is really taking that longer term view and so I tend to look for opportunities that are presented particularly in the healthcare and other areas where there's always as a fear of regulation coming in but the reality is those companies with good drugs. That actually are helping people and better yet. Maybe even cures so permanently only helping people will be able to get into the market and they will get paid for it so when everything becomes a concern because a new policy is going to come in. It's going to destroy a sector that's usually overblown those present those opportunities so I try to always turn it into a buying opportunity but on the margin I think even our pharmaceutical and drug analysts have. I've been saying let's be really specific about the companies. We want to own through this period. Because it's proven every election cycle to be one of the choppy as sectors. It really has ask. And then I think to the extent that the capital markets and some of the financial companies would also be ones to watch cycle depending on what happens with the Democrat candidate. Right I WANNA get all three of you on a kind of a closing statement speed round but let me pick on you for one second rob because one of my no cars here. It's probably buried but it just said innovation evasion at the top of it. And you saying you turn your portfolio over ten percent so you basically have a ten year horizon you think about the last ten. We've had a number of great innovations probably the smartphone pocket being the top of that list but some true game changing innovations in pharmaceuticals healthcare. Other places is let's take a step back away from all the uncertainty and and clouds that we've been talking about would love to get your views on what are you in the team thinking about and seeing out there in terms of innovation over that longer term that we might be excited about watching closely really anticipating over that long horizon. Yeah you know it's interesting that I'm actually GonNa Start on the opposite side of that a little bit because one of the concerns that always come up when you're investing in Internet stocks is what's that next platform platform because you know as we move from desktop to mobile You know that had a big change on who the winners and losers are and so. What's interesting right now? Is actually how how few challengers there are coming up in the Internet space. I mean you're just you're not hearing about new social media platforms there. There is software as a service the SAS stuff but that's where the innovation seems to be. But it's not really challenging the Google's Alphabet Amazon like that all seems is to have calmed down a bit so interestingly. There's a lot of runway there and I think for a while. People were thinking of virtual reality as as maybe that new platform. But but you know from what I can tell. The goggles are still too big and happy and ready player. One world is just not here yet and I think the real leap cheapest probably quantum computing But the technology is a decade out. So if you probably hear it talked about more that is a game changer. The winners and losers will be completely different. All the current encryption is rendered vulnerable by these computers so talk about a game range right so all the governments are gonNA need to upgrade. Everyone's going to need to think about how they upgrade to these hyper fast computing capabilities. So you're going to hear about that for a longtime before it actually becomes a thing kind of like a We've done with a Well Yo hey I am and other. Ai Comes in kind of. I mean I think that's sort of arrives one day. It's sort of a there's a destination whereas AI keeps evolving and developing in. You know blockchain is in there too but again i. I'm not sure I've seen that thing in terms of the technology world where I'm clear in terms of innovation in healthcare. We're just beginning now to see. It's customized therapeutics. You know to your genome to your specific areas where they're actually identifying the mechanics of how things work and being able to really get at it the cost or it's crazy high right now but the exciting thing is is as with many things you know. I think the first computers were unbelievably rights. It's if we got better at them and then they you know they figured out how to do an in more efficient ways right now. It's the issue on the on the personalized medicine is the turnaround times or too long and the the cost too high and the getting better at both right right. That's fantastic. What I'd love to do is maybe come down the line here and if each of you would please summarized Brize Your Thoughts Your Alec for Twenty Twenty leave our audience with a couple of key takeaways darryl? If you don't mind I'll start with you. Yeah I would say you know be relatively constructive active on the outlook. Obviously geopolitics is a risk very difficult to predict those types of things but we do think it will likely settle out in the short term acknowledging analogy some of the long term issues that are going to be around for a while and so that's a fairly constructive market outlook. But there's no doubt in our minds that we are late cycle particularly ticky Louis in the US and as we talked about earlier there are excesses and imbalances building that we need to be wary of and to start preparing at some point for how we might want to you. Act when those things start to become a bigger issues and particularly where they go from being tailwinds to activity to ultimately being headwinds. That's Great Margaret. Your thoughts uh bond markets in twenty twenty and a couple of key takeaways share. So I think we've covered the potential for heightened policy uncertainty. How that could lead to higher volatility the and maybe a better buying opportunity particularly in corporate von spreads than the Fixed Income Universe which we mentioned earlier have been very tight I think? In terms of portfolio construction were really recommending balanced between interest rate risk and credit risk and then based on relative valuations. There may be skewing it to taking a bit more interest rate risk than credit risk again hoping expecting a better buying opportunity and this type of a late cycle environment. You really want. We think for the bulk of your fixed fixed income allocation to come from the core universe and from there you can get a good balance of interest rate and credit risk great so typical sixty forty if that forty he is bonds. Call it thirty percent should be core. Yes something like that Not core plus in disguise. which is maybe a different topic? And there's enroll for a portfolio. Certainly but you know those higher total returns come at a cost and keep those on the margins. Yes exactly great. Good could advice and for you Sir Twenty Twenty Outlook in key takeaways for the audience. What I think my key takeaway to everyone? WHO's managing money right now? Make Twenty twenty the year in which you create a new framework for how to invest globally. move away from the US non US construct and think about really how to invest in the best companies companies wherever they're based that old structure served us well for forty or fifty years. It's time to trade. In in terms of my specific for the year I think equity markets will be higher by year or end having had a real roller coaster ride as we get through all the political trade. Everyone so focused on these things and everyone so so ready to sell the equity markets. I just can't imagine that we don't have some real swoon during the year but once we have clarity on whoever that president is going to be. I think we'll we'll be off to the races. Because equities the place to be in this low interest rate environment. The good companies will have continued to do well and people will finally at least have certainty about where we're headed. That's great great. Picking up on two things. There are number one. You know a good part of our job here. Capital Group has helped you all in the audience Help your clients during this period so expect just to hear a lot from us to give you the perspective. You're going to need to keep them staying the course. And then secondly rob you know we talked about your bond allocation. So let's say the sixty equity in the sixty forty Instead of doing the classic forty. US TWENTY-NINE US think about putting some global Strategies in there can swing it for you. They can swing it for you and have that flexibility is a good time to have flexibility rather than be constrained in this kind of market right. Well that's all the time we have today. And I want to thank you all so much. Raw Margaret Daryl for your insights into the financial markets and economies around the world. We really hope you in the audience found this discussion helpful and we look forward to working with you in twenty twenty and once again. Don't forget to take the credit quiz if you're looking for credit credit for CFP ENCIMA. You can do that now so thanks again. Happy Holidays and enjoy the rest of your day. We're always trying to get better. So if you have any feedback including topics you'd like to see addressed in future episodes shoot us an email to capitol ideas at cap group Dot com for capital ideas. This is Matt Miller reminding you that the most valuable asset is a long term perspective investors should carefully consider investment objectives risks charges and expenses. This and other other important information is contained in the fun prospectuses and summary Perspectives which can be obtained from a financial professional incident read carefully before investing American funds distributors. INC member FINRA. Sandra investing outside the United States involves risks such as currency fluctuations periods of illiquidity and price volatility as more fully described in the perspective. 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Mom Boss | Jessica Saultz Founder of Dino Bars

Mom Brain

33:03 min | 8 months ago

Mom Boss | Jessica Saultz Founder of Dino Bars

"This episode of bombarding is brought to you by Vino haircare where beautiful hair starts at the root, their farm to shower inspired collections are blended to soothe your scalp and nourish your hair from root to tip colloidal vote is the first ingredient in their shampoos and conditioners, and it helps to promote a healthy scalp environment. Each of their eight collections are infused. With unique wholesome farm fresh inspired ingredients to help you clean clarify, strengthen, and reinforce shine and color vibrancy from root to tip every one of those hair care products are safe for color treated hair and are free from parabens, sulfates, and dies find the latest shower vino haircare products at Walmart dot com or on Amazon and visit Avino Dot Com to learn more. This episode of Membrane is brought to you by camp by Walmart. Twenty twenty has brought a lot of challenges for all of us and the summer is no exception with so few activities available to kids parents are going to have to get very creative. That's why we're so excited to tell you about camp. It's a free, choose your own adventure video platform on the Walmart designed to bring the spirit of summer camp to doorsteps everywhere. This is not just another. APP your kids. will watch videos on and sit around like zombies all summer all fifty plus camp by Walmart activities are powered by echoes interactive video technology, which allows campers to make choices that shape their activities to create unique experience each and every time they blake and it's perfect for kids in parents to play together camp by Walmart has every category covered for you and your kids. These amazing interactive activities range from Puzzles, DIY activities to arts and crafts, sports, and more head to the APP store. And download the Walmart apt to play at Camp and give your kids summer adventure. They'll never forget camp can be found in the services top of the Walmart APP or hey guys, I am somebody who thinks a lot about hydration not just because I am a fitness professional and I go for my runs and I do my yoga and I drink a lot of fluids every single day and I wanNa make sure that my fluids are actually hitting my system and making me feel. Hydrated. This is why I am a big believer in electrolytes after I go for a run or have a a pretty intense workout I always want to make sure that my body is hydrated and I'm supplying it with really good electrolyte. So this is why I'm so excited the body armor is sponsoring membrane body armor. Late is not your average sports drink not only is low in calories and low in sugar, but also contains no artificial sweeteners, no artificial flavors and no artificial dyes. Body armor light has potassium packed electrolytes, coconut water vitamins and antioxidants, and is the perfect addition to your fitness routine stop now at target Walmart. Walgreens and on Amazon learn more at drink body armor, Dot com, and on social media search at drink body armor. Hey guys. Welcome back to mom brain today we have another special Mambo series I, me Larrea and I'm Daphne, and today's Mambas is Jessica Salts. She is the founder of Dino Bars Donna bars is a company that I've actually talked about as one of my favorite things a couple of weeks ago it's a functional food company and a small family owned business owned and managed by. Jessica and her husband Ian and what I love is there like kid snack bars and these are bars made from hemp seeds and coconut oil and fruit, and so delicious. If you're apparent that tries all your kids food before they get to taste it, you are going to want to be eating these bars. Now I, mean, my kids, my kids all they want is snacks and I. We I mean they will fight me over whatever meal I prepared for them but there's like an go I'm not hungry anymore after medicine and I have a snack or so I'm excited to learn more about this company that I love and here's our conversation with Jessica. My Name Is Jessica saw I'm a mom of two and I am the CO founder of boss I. Make Heavy kids next with my husband and where can we follow you Can follow us at nine Oba's on instagram. We are awesome facebook. Same dentals. And you can find a website at Steinbach succumb a the name come from. So we wanted to find a name that kids at the young age because the kids kits one plus for video once you. have to find something that they can pronounce. Easy. And one of my friends she was. Declared idea. For friends. Cute. He wasn't is a very cute cute little packets is. Have you find design night? It's one of a thanks you don't have to do everything on your. Mom, it can be wearing try to find people that can have we find an amazing designer. Who had the screed package? How'd you find that person actually that's that's really hard finding the right logo getting the right look and designed to that your brand is clear through through the imagery. Yeah. The Person I. Just looked at a ton of profile. I looked I searched for just design awesome got and I looked at pictures and I found pictures that I thought would repute and kind of went into the direction that we wanted to go with. And I just contacted in Sicko. Allah make a good snack company with my husband. Can you these heavy make a design and? We exchanged numbers. We had a phone call. We figured out how debase ideas. Came out of it, I'm so happy to get to chat with you about your story because it's so cool to me when people take ideas that they have around a need especially in parenting. Yeah and just make it happen like. And I've talked about on this podcast. The fact that dino bars was a favorite thing of mine and you heard it which so happy. You know I can imagine that parts of the process have been challenging and stressful in. You've got little kids at home in all of it, and then people really care about this product. They really enjoy it. It really makes a difference in parents lives I. Hope that you feel that from me because I. Love these. Love, these bars So I'm just excited to hear a little bit more about like for people who don't remember me talking about the dinosaurs or know what they are can you just tell people a little bit about what they are and how you came up with this idea and so yeah, dynamite a hectic snack version for kids sat one year. So yeah to give you an idea how the whole story started I'm originally from Germany born and raised in Germany. And I met my in America about ten years ago we moved to Germany after you got married and we had both the kids in Germany. And two years ago we sat together the board with our knife overnight. So we moved to America. And my oldest son he was to us at the time and when he was visited, he just couldn't handle refined sugars like he was one of the kids who would eat a piece of cake and he would go off crazy or not. He would know how to handle his body. He got so much energy Made me feel so bad. So we made a decision to cut out refined sugars company. It was like no Chagrin, our house or nothing that didn't come from crude or. Refined. So, we moved to America added locating at stores locating for kids snacks, and it just couldn't find anything. I said I going to play into talk to miles what you feed UK kids like what kind of snacks give your kids? At no one could really give me an answer. So enjoy our pediatrician and. Can you please recommend a good snack from me. And she didn't really have an answer for me. So I was like the beginning of it. So that's kind of sad hidden. In Germany I was used to a food snack better than that of a paper. So they had that over the exactly. So I with it like they have to head that's. When I was little I had a snack Outta peop- it's not it's nothing. New Germany. My kids eat at every from Joni knows but snacks. Paper pay-per-view from Germany. So my initial thing was. Just by Jimmy I went to Germany, I would buy sixty, four my kids. So it'd be good for like a month, but she and whenever I had family come over to visit. Tied Up, please bring me a whole box kits next handy them. And then at the same time, my kids got older and older and I started questioning myself actually go back to Laura at this point I was A. Stay at home mom. It's actually go back to work. just keep saying home with kids but at the same time I felt like. Staying home with the kids for years and years s just wasn't what I had planned to do. I didn't like the off. Working for someone as. Having kids and having to a for someone is is not easy. So many. MOMS. Holiday don't know what to do they. They sort depend on the jobs that working at. The kids have to suffer demands have to suffer because they wanna be home with kids but they can. And just the thought of that useful sad and I couldn't. Justify an couldn't handle that. That was the first time where ipod maybe I should start something on my own. You would have asked me five years ago. It said no way. No Way I'm starting accompanied as Noida enduring on of this. I'm. GonNa be working for someone and it's yet. But Yeah Ming changed what gave you that confidence I think it was more active fi actually of having to work for someone. And defeat of having to leave the house really early and having to have my kids in daycare all day long and having to be back late and then having to do all the things that mom says have to do you do laundry get healthy not make dinner property lunch M. N. having a few off having the control over. You know if you have your own business if you work for yourself I can say now. I am taking two hours off India, and then I just go and work at night right? I answer. Yourself. Yeah. Exactly I'm my own time manager right now. which is tricky. Also like I think, a lot of people are discovering now certainly through quarantine, what if you're lucky enough to be able to work from home, how how structuring your life and how being responsible for your own schedule in your own timing and it's actually it presents a whole new slew of challenges especially home with children. So, I'm always amazed amazed to hear about about how that process the how that process works when you have little kids at home in. Obviously it's for you. It's not just during quarantine. It's Europe know this is the business. So. Your background was actually in bioprocess engineering. which feels like a little bit more technical than Food Than Food, bars rusted paper. But but maybe not like I will say the the very limited experience I've had in commercial food production. It is such a detail especially for kids it is so detail oriented it is so safety in process or yet it is so many strict restrictions strict put on you like you're not you're on you're you're not a US native originally how did you even? Navigate the whole behemoth of legislation and like feel like you could break into this really crowded snacks. I, mean you found an amazing white smart white space whereas light I know nothing that I needed existed. You weren't afraid of of the of the mountain you had to climb. I'm sure to get this product launch like what did that? What did that experience feel like So, one big thing has said whenever I, get overwhelmed divisions It's my husband and I would be breaking up in the past because yeah small. If. Big Mountain. In front of you like you ju just gets get you can't do it. You can't make change overnight and you can figure everything out overnight. Saw I got really lucky because my husband just laughs reading through. The. Documents. Legal things he has a passion for. I am glad to Kinda way like I have kids I have very limited amount of time. So there's a number that I can call. That number you know I would just ask people ahead unlike. Two people walk in front of me I can't figure it out. Can you please walk through it with me like the eight hundred number like who would you? Who would you call? This for every for every step, there's always some he can find online. For registering the company off were. The Sea that he had South Carolina do not always people that if you. Dig Deep Enough. So one thing that I thought when I first he the bars I because again like I you know my background's in food I always. Yeah. I'm just I taste my kids food before I, give it to them for everything which is why you know it's it's Their snack bars, I always taste for his. Way Right, it's not surprising to me that like I would say. Ten bars of ever tried to give my children there are not interested in unless it tastes like a candy bar and then I don't feel good about giving that to them and I teased at your bars and I was like, wow, there's this really like lovely kind of like. Fatty texture to the season, the tartness of the fruit just like really pleased me your bathroom and like I wanna eat these things. But but it feels kind of novel recipe. I mean, these are things that I do at home when I make the kids smoothies I always put hemp seeds or flax. Yes. Something that because we don't think about this but like a lot of the vitamins and minerals that your body's absorbing needs fat to carry them inside. That's what we add coconut away they want to his coconut. Roam. Around mom. Are you guys if you follow me, you know that I am obsessed with hair and scalp Venus farm. Sharon. Part Haircut collections include clarifying blends that help remove build up on the scalp where you're hers glamorous always Ns especially very nice right now. Yeah like. Okay. A lot of this has to do with using products that are not damaging and are going to. Give special vitamins and allow for lots of hydration and you guys are always asking me what kinds of products I am using and the bottom line is these products that are without parabens without sulfates definitely no sulfates because it's so drying for your hair. So I'm very very impressed with with Avena may family we are really really big Avena fans over here of was farm to shower inspired hair. Collections include Colloidal Haute, as the very first ingredient in the scalp soothing blend of Venus farm shower inspired haircare collections are safe for color treated hair of farm to shower inspired. Haircut collections are blended to clean, clarify, and reinforce shine and color vibrancy from root to tip find the latest farm to shower Vino haircare products at Walmart dot com or on Amazon and visit Avena Dot Com to learn more. Around, my mom laying off smashing Chubais I'm so excited that of you know haircut is our sponsor for this episode I've been working at an ambassador for Harrison's since. At least over a year I, forget how long it's been but have been using their products for a while and I have to tell you part of why I was so excited to partner with them in the first place was haute being the first ingredient in a lot of their line is a critical because it's part of that the story of soothing part of the story of creating this balanced environment that lets your hair be it's best and provides vital nutrition. I. Also, it's really important to me that the entire line is free. A pair of men's free of sulfates and free of dies may family we are really really big amino fans over here. I find that it is effective, but also humming and very natural experience, high shine and volume when using Venus farm to shower inspired haircare collections their hair care collections are perfect for oily hair in the summer find the latest Pharma shower of haircare products at Walmart, dot com or on Amazon and visit a dot Com to learn more. Bank. Excuse around the while mom off message with social distancing measures in place in summer camps canceled across the country parents are looking for activities to keep their kids entertained while strengthening, academic and creative skills to avoid summer slippage during the kids break from school. That's why Walmart created the camp video platform on their camp by Walmart is a free, choose your own adventure video platform on the Walmart APP designed to bring the spirit of day camp to doorsteps everywhere all fifty plus activities are. Powered by echoes Interactive Video Technology, which allows campers to make choices that shape their activities to create unique experiences each and every time they play families can choose interactive activities across series like Sports, arts, and crafts, and fitness for kids and parents to play together head to the APP store and download the Walmart APP to play at Camp and give your kids the summer adventure. They'll never forget just look at the services tab of the Walmart APP, and that's where you can find camp. Gray. So, how did you cope with the recipe or was this something that you'd seen in Germany and wanted to play with over here or what was how did you make that sort of come together? So I looked at I had my one of many moments ahead send ten of those bras and I looked at autumn credence using. So that kind of gives me that give me the base of it. Biden, I decided to make some changes I in Germany they always used. I didn't like the fact that they were using. So I switched out with coconut oil just as went up to things at Germany. The out of people made out of wheat flour. So. We looked for people that was made with potatoes Sachin Sat, and it is actually very nutritionist to. Yeah. It's really interesting. How much you chancellor potato such that he wouldn't think off. So. I just started making recipes just said it a kitchen mixing together and just tried it out for hours and hours I probably made like. Three hundred defend initially recipes how What did your husband think when you're like you know what? I'M GONNA make children's food bars. Did he have you always Volvo as we have always been very anti nutrition fitness okay. Weevils, we made our fitness licenses in Germany you read like retried basically every diet out there we went from Kito to Katyal. Just to figure out what works best fall body vinyl vegetarian since six months now. Yeah so and I. Get. He'll alario is, vegetarian. -Tarian so but that's amazing I'm sure I'm sure you feel very good. That's deal. Always been very into that. You know just yes, oppression bird now it's. It's amazing. It's. It's really amazing when you guys can do this together he sounds like you guys are very similar pages because working with your spouse is not always is not always easy. It's on how did you? How did I have so many questions number one, I need to understand this edible paper thing. They? Yes, it is. It is genius because you don't want to get your finger sticky when you're eating. Fruit snack or anything that's not it's crazy because the the you know if you grew up eating gushers or like things like that they coat those things in in preservatives that you don't necessarily want to be eating all the time either. But if you don't coat them than your finger, all sticky like you're eating jelly. was. Straight up. Gene is my this is why I was able to get my kids to try them in the first place and then they discovered they loved them which. Yet, for me, I'm the kind of mom who takes Lod and automatic snacks. You know when it gets sticky fingers and touched Estrada or the Kasey. At home they share everything it's pretty sticky. You touch our later. You're like, Oh what's that? I just I don't like the. Daphne was we're we're talking about eating paper before somebody told me as a kid you can eat paper So I used to like whenever I'd have gum which would not be very often because my my parents really complete health freaks. Would like put the entire gum wrapper in my mouth and chew it and I would tell people in today I was like, yeah like Trident and she said before she says, that's not actually a thing so that you told me that because I would be. I know you blue dinosaur referee. Movie. That's why we added a window. You know Sylvia saying that the night of a people. So if you see when you kind of see what looks like a paper okay, that's labor. Strikes I noticed this. Number one with the blueberry ones amazed. I just like how hard it's not like so sweet that's all just. The is a little bit about So how long have you been been in business for? Is it two years? Is Now the via viewed new so we started to hold Dynamo thing. A few months back we have been sitting those sends like. Two months now actually. Okay. Really. Knew we have eating you bad at sank To describe it via getting this amazing feedback, we've been contacted by magazines by stores. Everything happening really fast within our is that hard to keep up with in terms of because we talked to some other of the Mombasa's that we've talked to. They're like, well, the Alvis I couldn't reach the demand because all became a thing. Are you? How are you coping with that? That's kind of where we add right now would I however managing as so for me I also WanNa give at Amman the opportunity to work in violent bet if comfortable science specifically conforms to. Allow, saw I am now looking to find a month one of my friends right now I just asked her if she wants to set work because just kind of create a psych safe monks base. You know where it's okay. If you try to you, say you have to stay home you're GonNa make it work just gonNa be another mom that's GonNa. Cover for you. I was a cover for you. You know saw me tried to just do it. Nick the two of us and we have to. Be Hiring people now and. yeah it is. It gets overwhelming and that's the thing again where you have to take him on serve at a time. Status of night, how which manish just how are we gonna do this and rely on the floor recycling cry? Really. We can do this because you have this passion for we love. We're doing one thing we WANNA make a change you know kinds of. Oh, my goodness. What if what if he can make outside won't make it at the end of someone as cousins Moniz it's bigger if we can make a change people from going to office refined show this next to a heaviest I would if I could. Yeah. I mean you're you're you're nurturing are all of our babies who are eating this and that and that's a that's a really incredible pink zone. Still around my mom way. Guys you all know that a lot of people have know issues with cardio. It's one of the hardest things to make ourselves do and I'm a big believer in learning how to breathe because one of our biggest fears is that we're going to not be able to get enough oxygen and so our lungs start to burn a not actually the physical sensations in the rest of our body rather than the lung thing that starts to get US I. Saw Not just learning how to breathe is really important but also making sure that your body is hydrated when your mouth goes dry and you just feel that deep deep deep thirst. So staying hydrated both before and after your workouts is really important in having a drink that has good electrolytes in it is vital to experiencing this. This is why I was so excited when I heard that body armor light was going to sponsor mom brain. because. It's not your average sports drink not only is low in calories and low in sugar, but also contains no artificial sweeteners, no artificial flavors and no artificial dyes. Body armor light has potassium packed electrolytes, coconut water vitamins, and antioxidants, and it is the perfect addition to your fitness routine head over to target Walmart Walgreens and Amazon to get body armor light learn more at drink body armor dot Com and on social media search drink body armor. From. One of the one of the topics. That comes up a lot on on these episodes is financing trying to mind financing were for different ideas that people have idea what what kind of advice can you give two two people out there who are listening and are saying, Hey, I've got a great idea and I don't know how to finance. CFO something or you can do to just have creativity and see what takes you a few not pointing too fast. You might be to just use the money that you get from the company to put it right back into it. If you don't have to fight on her, we didn't have to do those big big investments right from the beginning. So like. Hey. US Have Hawaii, we put every Sunday. We're making an company. We're putting a right back into it and you're feeding the company with it and Just, take advantage by to see if are people we got lucky because we have people in our family that Nafti idea end was supportive in be noted. If we ten managing on anyone day with step in right. But don't afraid just because of the money. If you have the idea and you have a passion for it, you will be able to convince Pupa to have you with it while it's great that must be very inspiring for your children as well as their little now, right? Yes. So they are now two four. Yeah. But you know what I think watching you know having this story where your your parents went out and created something I think it's an extremely extremely inspiring story for them as they as they grow in mean, you think about it as well like say once Kobe has over and we're back in school. Be like. Yeah. My Mommy makes that bar this in your lunchbox rate. I asked him the other day. I. Was thinking what do you want to be when you love I want to work for myself all the Serbs. When did you? If there's one thing you can point to that you thought was like a big turning point for you that you you booked some major. Distribution at a store or you got like social media campaign like what do you think is the one thing that made I obviously it's a it's a cocktail of many things but what's one thing point to and say this was really important for my business. Difficult because I think every single customer has been pretty important for business. Transformation had amazing support you. I'm not a big instagram person I've never done instagram before. I mean I have my own instagram, but it will use it. So I was really afraid of using instagram as a marketing. But. A registered muscle amazing decided sharing a mop every day every day we got like two three people, Shannon Nestorian between data, and that went on for weeks. And sending pictures who all doesn't thanking me for it and I think. Every customer that's reaching chests on daily basis. It's just giving me the motivation to keep his crowing, make this happen and. Pinpointed to one specific event I. Think it's high of office people. Saying enough this product now one, I, want to support you believe in you while the word of mouth of the mom community is so important and powerful and I love that you clearly are so focused on empowering MOMS to to have a career that they love and also to be able to be the moms they want to be and I know we wish you so much continued success for creating this. Wonderful. Thank you so much. Thank. You know she's so inspiring. She's she's twenty nine. She has this. You know crazy background with with engineering and and she had her two kids and decides that this is she sick of asking her family and friends who are visiting Germany to Lug forty forty individual snack bars over for her kids and goes and makes his company and it feels like. It really does it really does feel like sometimes what you don't know actually makes you much bolder and makes you much less afraid of. Trying the obvious thing or trying the trying the like you know just calling the eight hundred number or call being like someone's going to help me. I'm just going to tell them. I don't know how to do this and they're going to help me figure out how to do it. A were being willing to to. See that it doesn't have to be you who does everything all the time doesn't make you less scrappy. It doesn't make you less. You know less the founder or the creator of awesome product that families are going to enjoy if you realize. I need to be the logo creator like I can outsource this to someone who's going to do a much better job than I am and who's going to support me being able to do that. I do really well, and I think that's such a powerful lesson for. MOMS to here in general I, do think where the backstop for everything. So a lot of the time we do feel like we have to do everything and we sometimes we need to, and sometimes it really benefits us to take you know a little bit of time back into day by offloading something that can be done by someone else to that place. I also really loved I mean I I really love the idea that. You can start simple like this is it's clear that she and her husband believe in the functional power of food and that this is. A A a a snack ranges probably in their mindset right now of like what they think could be valuable for kids to have easy access to. But you know don't be afraid to to have your hero product guess and to have the thing that really proves the value improves. The proves the potential of what can be done with with a very clear and obvious white space that you're looking to fill. Absolutely ask. Ask. For help. Go back to simplicity. Make it happen. So you know I I love these I. Love these stories that were that we're bringing here to membrane because. I feel I feel like there's there's so many out ideas out there in this really gets back to how mom brain why we wanted to bring brain together. Let's put all of our brains together. Let's support each other so that we can figure out this very confusing and difficult, but wonderful journey. So having women like Jessica, come on here and give us their wisdom of their to's and what not to do as well is extremely extremely valuable. So so so thank you so much. Jessica was a really great conversation. Are you guys thank you so much for listening don't forget to rate review subscribe tell your friends. Try Dino Vars, I can't wait to try and Daphne you talked about it recently in the favorite things, and now we just got to talk to her and so I'm just really really excited getting very glad that I know not to eat the outside outside. Has You guys all know that with my pregnancy brain I would be you guys until next time.

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Liftoff 90: My Feet Belong on the Ground

Liftoff

45:07 min | 2 years ago

Liftoff 90: My Feet Belong on the Ground

"Hello and welcome to lift off from your friends every day. Brought to you this week by express VPN and casper lift off with a fortnightly show where you don't have to be a rocket. Scientist to understand the latest news about space and related subjects. My name is Jason Snell him, I'm joined as always by my co host Stephen Hackett. Hello. Hello. Jason. How are you? Pretty good. Pretty good. It feels like the new year is finally like shaken off the rest, or whatever and the government shutdowns and all sorts of stuff and things are happening in space and here in Texas. Not here in Texas things are happening things happening in Florida. Yeah. Things are happening at the edge of the system. It's a busy time. Busy busy time. Like, oh, let's go on. I was thinking just this morning and doing the prep for the show that it's been awhile since we've done like a science explainer episode, but there's so much news. It's like we need things pause for a little while. So we can talk about Neptune or something. Yeah. Yeah. I was thinking about that too. We're gonna have to get back to that. Also, the the Apollo fiftieth a lot of our time. But I'm sure we're going to get back to I actually I've been reading a bunch of science related books lately. And that usually will spawn me wanting to do an explainer episode about. So I read the Steinbach and reading the one of the Feinman biographies now, so. Oh, you know. Maybe we'll learn how to build atomic bomb later. I have Jason Snell book club our import. Yeah. We spoke last time about the SpaceX starship. So this is it's hopper. Putting hopper air quotes hopper. Rocket to work through someone technology used for its next sort of next level vehicles. And we mentioned last time that it's built out of stainless steel, and it's covered in a thin shiny metal as well. And we talked a little bit about maybe why they would use stainless steel and had an interview Popper popular mechanics that link is in the show notes. But basically, it comes down to several things I think we were right about basically, everything we said, but one thing that I hadn't really considered was just the price. And so this is quoting from talking to the magazine saying that carbon fiber is like almost two hundred dollars a kilogram because you have to scrap like thirty five percent of it as you work with it said, it's very difficult to work with which would imagine as steel as like three. Kilogram massively cheaper to work with and to if you have scrap something easier to recycle scrap carbon-fiber, apparently is a nightmare to deal with. So you have the the cost angle. And there's things that we talked about that can be like, wait, it can be easy to work with you don't have to have someone who's like specially trained in dealing with carbon and molds and all that stuff that finding people who can work with steals. More common skill set and something to is that it can handle both the very cold and the very hot temperatures that it will experience it can handle that actually pretty well. So this is like a stay hardened stainless steel that is designed to be a bunch of different applications. And if you think about something like a rocket you have very cold temperatures with the fuel being. Very very cold keeping that keeping that density high you can load more propellant on and then it's very hot. When you have things like engines burning and you have re entry. Reinsurers warm, you know, and then again, if you're, you know, up really high in the atmosphere or out in space, it's cold there too. So sort of interesting that he walked through this. And in this interview, he's asked like willing to how to engineering team sort of take your suggestion on this like, oh, yeah. It took me a while to talk them into this is a sort of an unusual way to do things now. But he he seems like must seem to think that this could be a way Ford for them at least on this vehicle. I don't think that there's basics of saying that this is what's going to be on the real deal. But at least for now at least for this test vehicle. They're gonna use stainless steel. Yeah. I mean, we'll we'll see. It's fascinating the idea of the material science, and I got the sense from that interview with musk that he's very much saying. Like, we thought it would be really cool and clever to use carbon fiber. And then we realized that, you know, in the end something that's more boring is actually way better than I think there's I think there's a tendency among especially these billionaires who trying to reinvent space to think. Well, we're going to cool modern stuff and not this boring tried and true stuff. And then you go through that process, and you end up coming back to this is why strident true I understand now it's a little bit like not to draw too far parallel. But it's a little like saying these space capsules are dumb. We're going to build a space shuttle everybody be like, maybe the capsules aren't so bad. We'll just do modern capsules maybe that was the right approach after all even though it's not it's old and not cool. Maybe it's the right way for reasons, and I feel like. You'll musk is doing a little bit. I imagined he's done that throughout his time at space x to where he's had like pushes his people to be like, why don't we do at a new way? And sometimes they're like, yeah. This is this this is the way to do it. We're going to reuse the rockets it's gonna be awesome and other times like no tried and true is the way to go. So. Sometimes the old ways are best. But what happened Stephen what you left out an important part of that story, which is that that something happened to the little spaceship test guy it fell down. So this is being put together in Texas has a large facility there, and they had some high winds come through. And so I've read a couple of things it seems like at the very least the knows the upper section fell down. I got blown over maybe the whole thing. It's the same some damage, and but it's not a loss must said that he could be repaired they'll take a few weeks, and then it should be kinda back on target via the starship hopper. Got blown over in the wind and the wind the wind you build something for those cold temperatures, and for the temperature of re entry, and then the wind gets you there some Arnie in that suppose, you know, it's a bummer, but. It. It's fixable. But it is funny. So we have some commercial crew news because the government is has started to awaken from its slumber. That is also this is the the preflight checklists. The prefect is heavy on the space. X this time. I feel like they were waiting for the government to reopen. Stuff. Like, you're, you know, you're standing outside and you're waiting, and it's like come on turn the sign over that says we're open so we can get in there. So there's a commercial update they've been talking about this month launching their commercial crew tests, which is not with people. This is the one where they use the crew dragon. So it's the capsule that's rated for people, but they're going to do a test without people in it. And now, so they did the hot fire test where it's, you know, it's basically out there ready to go, and they fire up the engines a little bit just to kinda give it a test that happened five days ago as we as we record this on the twenty fourth of January the government is open for business and SpaceX says that as early as February twenty third they could do this launch. Again, not the flight with the real astronauts. But according to pulling in the show notes to a nice ars Technica story about this that they're still kind of targeting summer. And I think you'll on musk said summer and Eric at ars Technica. Who is wise about these things said so late summer or early fall just build him that that fudge factor? And that's assuming everything goes well with the test, but it looks like we might actually get a flight of the crew dragon which is necessary that that is the beginning of the story of SpaceX doing commercial crew. Absolutely. So this hopefully makes this date. You know, there's another potential government shutdown on the horizon. But hopefully, they can they can get this get this done. They did the hot fire test couple of days ago, like they're they're ready to go. But you gotta have your government partners. They're ready to go as well. So what's the big step said this feels like the gateway into commercial crew and a big way? Like, okay, this vehicle is going to be the one. This is really exciting that a so close if they can they can fly a human rated spacecraft and take it up, and then bring it back that is like, okay, then then they're open for. Business at which point they will send people and that's the next one. So again, we're still looking like twenty nine could be the year where American space launches put astronauts back into space. So that would be good since it's been what twenty eleven was the last Bishop Lamont launch. It's been awhile then has eight years now, it's not not great Nygard at all is not the only space story, and of course, other vehicle the falcon heavy which flew last year as sort of a demo flight. We've talked some about they're getting customers signed on. And it seems like that could be the next month could actually be pretty soon. So no earlier than March seventh. It would be from Florida. Do you actually know if they can launch the falcon heavy from from Vandenberg? I don't know if they're launched facility. There can handle the heavy or not. I don't know. And I think traditionally the ones that are requiring the big heavy loads. Want to don't are either leaving the planet and winch case they want to be from Florida right because it's generally easier rather than being in a polar orbit. But I would imagine a can. But I don't know. I haven't heard any discussion of being launched from anywhere. But but Kennedy at this point, and this is the Arab sat six eight that they're gonna launch again. I imagine that being the second launch of hocken heavy there's a little bit of a discount because you get the sense. This is still considered kind of like early days risky somewhat experimental. They're going to do that mind-blowing thing where they launch the whole thing. And then the two side. Booster's come off and return back and land side by side. And they're once again going to try to land the central core on a ship out in the ocean. That didn't quite make it last time. But they're going to try that again and then on top of that. So the reason this is they were waiting for the government to file papers and get approval for this because there's like an approval process that you have to go through and they also filed for third falcon heavy mission. And the idea there is that they want to do a quick turnaround on the items that they used and as early as April which seems kind of ridiculously ambitious, but it is space x to do a an additional launch which would include some air force cargo as well as a solar sail demonstration from the planetary society, which is kinda cool, but that is going to require for the quick turnaround. It's gonna require them to land the boosters, I think to land that central core. So they can very quickly refurbished all and put it back out there. But they're this is what the trying to do is is demo the ability to launch and Reese. Michael falcon heavy which is great and being able to do it. So soon in the vehicles life. It's a testament to what they've been able to do with the falcon nine, and of course, these these cores are more or less falcon nine center one is beefed up a little bit. But it's it's billing on what they already know. And that's that's great. Like, I hope they have success in this and show that recycle recycling rockets isn't just for like, quote, unquote, little rockets, you can do it with serious heavy lift vehicles as well. And we have we have one last preflight update that is not from SpaceX at all it is. Instead from the outer reaches of the solar system, we do. So the the new horizons project again, we spoke by this data's going to come out slowly over the next while and some of that actually came out over the break, they they had some things out, but they're back now with a a new high res- image, and it's pretty incr-. Credible. So we spoke about this the day the day after the fly by about the the two lobes at ultimate too late. There's like a a light colored region where they connect, and you can see that really clearly in this image. But you can also see that whatever that might material is exist. Elsewhere this thing looks like it sort of piece together, and you can almost sort of sit back, and sort of squint your eyes a little bit and imagined that whatever this white material is sort of the glue holding it together like this is not a solid object. Right. It's believed actually that it's built up by several things. So they got pulled together by their own gravity, and this picture sort of can see that see how. We wouldn't it up there. But it is pretty remarkable image. And I think the clearest that we've seen so far. This was tweeted by John Hopkins, AP L just just a few days ago. Yeah. And it's there will be theoretically, there will be higher higher res- images that that are coming because this is pretty close, but it was not at the closest point of the fly by but so more to come. But getting a lot of detail on this very small object. But that they were also very close to. Yeah. So we finally the peanut or the snowman or whatever it is. It is I I lean more and more toward snowman. As the time goes on. But so, yeah, that's that is our preflight checklist. Prefer nice prefect prefect still get my arms around that one. Well, somebody suggested that we do at draft of ridiculous. Ridiculous acronyms from space. I feel like that's a brilliant idea. And we're going to have to do. That's a very good idea. I support drafts. By the way, this good podcasts. You should do them. You do everybody should do. All right. Let's take tell you about one of our sponsors to this week. This episode is brought to you by express VPN. 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So there is no worry if you don't like it, you can get your money back, and if you ever use public wifi like down at the local, Starbucks, or whatever and you want to keep the bad guys away from your data. You don't wanna? Really send that unencrypted on a password free wifi setup. You wanna use of EP unlike express BBN I've used at super-busy used a couple of buttons. And you're connected. And then everything that you do on your device, I was using on my ipad just launched their app may make one tap. And then I am I am someone else and somewhere else on all my data is in cryptic, very nice to know that especially if I'm working at Starbucks or something like that protect your online activity today. Go to express BBN dot com slash off. And if you don't want your online history in the hands of your internet provider or data resellers express VPN is the answer to express VPN dot com slash liftoff, three months free with a one year package once again, that's Xpress. VPN dot com slash off for three extra months free with a one year package. Thanks to express VPN for sporting lift and all of relax him. So Jason us. Oh this store. You put in here about rotation at Saturn to what's going on here. Yeah. This is a story that would seem easy also seems ridiculously hard. And it's because of a matter of perspective. So who would think that there would be a story in the year twenty nineteen where scientists are figuring out the rotation of a planet in our solar system. Right. Like, we can see Exo planets. We got we got we're flying by Kuyper belt objects. We're looking for planet nine there's all of this stuff going on. And then they're Saturn which kind of featureless ball like the rings are great. But the Saturday it self is kind of featureless ball. It's hard with a gas giant especially to tell like what is the rotation is at the clouds at the equator isn't clouds higher up is at the the core. There's also kind of like the slushy icy part. Like, would you consider that the like how how often that turns around is that it? So there's been great debate about the actual rotate. Nation of Saturn. And the story came out in this past week where scientists have teased out with a view is the most precise and accurate rotation of Saturn ever. And what they did was they measured Ossetians of tiny particles in the rings of Saturn in the innermost ring, the create these spiral wave patterns that form that can be measured and basically the can the period of that. And what they're measuring is what the heavy part in the middle of Saturn is is rotating, and they can see the pattern and they came up with ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds of rotation. So great, congratulations to them. Problem solved. Except except when we'll put a Lincoln in the show notes to this story by Phil Phil plate scifi wire. The note I have down here is have you ever really looked at your hand man like. What is a day? Really? Is it like the the cloud tops or the ice of the core the magnetic field? What is there really a day on a gas giant, man? And it really is a can of worms. It's like what you know. What how you define it? Like, it's not the concept of day, basically is invented by. You know us on our little rocky planet that we live on where the Little Rock spins around. But on a gas giant, even a nice giant like, it's different. It's complicated. It's not it's not the same kind of concept. And once you think about how we define what a day is. It does get really interesting. So it is a can of worms. But this is a very clever result using very careful observations mostly from Cassini, I think of these operations in the innermost ring of Saturn, which gives them a totally different kind of resulted a very very accurate result. That is probably how the. The, you know main mass at the center of Saturn is spinning. Yeah. And he kinda route off like how do you pick the metric redefined this? But it could even be the true that it spends faster or slower at the center. Then does the cloud tops, right? Like, you can't sure like you just stick your finger in somewhere like, oh, it's a day because it's going this fast here. That's not true everywhere. And these planets are so different from our own. It's like you said the definitions we have the language we have described in a rocky planets. That's not universal. These things are different. I was thinking about this. I read this article and then saw tweet. Marking this week marks the thirty third year. Of NASA Voyager passing urine us and a always forget that was the same week of the challenger disaster. The same week you were born. That's true happy thirty third birthday. Thanks. Thank you. But we, you know. You really summed of exactly what I was thinking. We know an increasing amount about Exo planets and about all of these far flung things, but we have our own neighbors in the solar system where with your we've were there once a fiber with Voyager thirty three years ago that has been it it, you know, we talked about this with other guests outer socialism, planetary expiration takes time it takes money, and there's nothing stopping us from going except time and money. And I for one thing that we need to revisit our neighbors out there in the outer solar system urine Neptune ice the ice. Giants are very interesting. They may be more common kind of planets in the galaxy than we really understood at the time and both of them. We just kind of like scooted past with Voyager, and that's it. So I agree with you. I mean, we talked about. Not spending as much time on Venus and all of that. But like our solar system. That's a good example. We have done a lot understandably with Jupiter and Saturn. But I agree with you urine us and Neptune or vote both very interesting. Interesting moons and interesting planets, and there are things we could learn and it does seem shame that. I mean, his great that we did that fly by don't get me wrong that grand tour fly by was great. But the fact that there's been no follow up to those planets. It would be great. If that happened. I don't know if anybody's proposing something like that. But wouldn't it be nice to have some sort of a maybe you build to and you send one to each of them. I don't know. But it'd be nice to get something in orbit to the could do detailed science 'cause we got the fly by, but that's all and and get the kind of science that we get from something like Cassini at at Saturn or all the different, you know, Jupiter probes that we've had over the years to you know, that would that would be nice to have something in system and. Yeah. We thirty three years too long. Yeah. There was actually a joint. Nasa ISA urine Pathfinder mission that had been proposed by group in the United Kingdom that would have used the atlas five basically to to launch a probe to go. Spend time you're in a system and it. Didn't really go anywhere as we know because we would have actually known about this before I some googling define like as anybody actually tried. This is a is a low, I guess it's a low desire on the the larger community to do this. But a urine us orbiter was proposed as part of the Decatur survey. And yet. Nothing has come of it. So I guess there's some talk about a mission in the twenty twenties. But like, it's basically just kind of floating around out there, which is frustrating. It is maybe one day. I'd love to have an episode of the show where we talk about that. But today's not grey day if there's going to be triple digits for sure. Not the next the next six months. We we do need to talk talking about expiration on other planets, we need in with opportunity on Mars JPL had an article this week looking and talking about the basically the time line of what's left to do to try to to wake opportunity up. See fortuity can contact us. You know, as a little recap in June of twenty eighteen there was a planet white dust storm that is believed basically just covered the solar powered Rover like, you know, curiosity is it has a nuclear power plant. So it can survive these dust storms as long as to cold. It'll be okay. But when you're solar-powered you can't deal with a bunch of dust, and there was hope that maybe a windy vent or something could could clear the dust off enough that it could wake up that is actually happened in the past. But seems like maybe that's not going to be. How the story ends. So this interview also in the New York Times about this JPL NASA have doing what they call sweep. And beep, which is a side note is like a great name for a project a sucker for things that rhyme. I guess, but the idea here's basically sinning commands and waiting for it to respond, and that's been going on now for a little while I was gonna continue for seven more weeks looking at the x band radio that may failed, but there's also issues potentially like with the internal clock. But maybe that opportunity is awake, and it may be can even receive this. But they can't it can't send a message backout due to an issue with internal clock or the or the onboard computer could have a fault. So it's it's annot. We may never know. But it seems like we're getting towards the end of an opportunity to to find this thing it I did good, right? Yeah. Because the the winter is coming again where it is. And that is that's not good. No. It's I like the idea that they've tried all normal things. So now, they're getting the wacky ideas of what if the radio's failed with the clock is wrong where listening at the wrong time, and they're trying that, but they're running out of hope, they're they're sending this little messages in a bottle of like if you get this. This is what the time actually is. And this is what you should do just hoping that it'll hear them, but it may just be a goner. And and if so it will have, you know, lasted far more than anybody expected to denigrate job, but trying to to to wake it up. But it may be maybe end, and that would be okay in the end. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it landed fifteen years ago that was heck of a run for something that was supposed to last ninety days. Yeah. Exactly. Right. It's been longer than ninety days for sure. Yeah. Success checks of success. Yeah. So I think we're gonna keep an eye on on this story. But it seems like NASA JPL sort of coming around to the fact that this may be this may be over. There are also a couple of stories I want to talk about some other private space companies. So we talked about SpaceX for a little while. Of course, they're not the only ones virgin galactic, and it's crazy via says unity and its base to and like all the stuff they're doing. They have moved. Into more thorough testing. They have an item space tourism and other things coming up very soon and have laid off some staff to what the company says, it's basically to realign and prepare for commercial operation. So this this article made the rounds a couple of days ago, and it marks like five percent of the overall workforce about forty people or so it's not a big company. I was actually surprised. It's small-size, honestly. But seems like those those staff those positions were maybe more involved in the in the engineering and testing side of things and that winds down and flights with paying customers. I guess start to spin out. There's just weren't needed anymore. Every time a cover this. We talk about this in tech to it's always sad to talk about layoffs. Oh, a sad talk about people losing their jobs, but it is part of a part of this ecosystem of these companies that are doing things very rapidly and trying to implement new things like spaceship to is sort of a crazy deal, and they seem to be making adjustments as they go as they as they near that that future see for themselves. Yeah. We talked about this last time with SpaceX the same thing that they're there. It's kind of a natural. It's actually a sign of maybe maturity in the commercial space outfits that they're doing this. Because. I don't think it's necessarily that they're doing badly, but that they're changing gears and also that there's so much going on that they have to react to what's happening in the rest of the industry, the other one I think is maybe maybe more interesting because what you just said to straddle which is based Seattle member. It was created by Microsoft co founder Paul Allen who passed away last year, they had a program the base that they were like the world's largest airplane. And this plane was designed to serve as a launch pad for rocket. So we've seen this with a couple of NASA missions even talking about virgin galactic second ago. Basically, you fly a rocket into the upper atmosphere where the air is thinner and drive it from the plane and it lights, and you don't have to worry about going through the lower atmosphere and all the fuel fuel makes it heavier. You know, that that sort of cycle to get off the ground. You can lessen it severity. If you launch from the atmosphere. Self but straddle is backing off some of that as well. They've laid off fifty people or so they say, it's an I'm quoting streamlining strategy just just a real fun phrase. I guess, but they were they had a program to develop a new type of rocket engine like a new line of rockets to us with this large airplane. And it seemed like that program has been doubt back a bit. Yeah. I read a story about this that was making use other people's rockets. So they're not giving up on the concept, but they are not going to build their own straddle on rocket to launch on under. They're playing there. They're still going with the plane thing the Chinese other people's rockets. I did read a story that is a little more negative towards straddle on suggesting that their business model in as other competitors come online that are offering launch capabilities that are cheaper. It is making it harder for them to make the case because their whole idea. Was this is cheaper way to launch? Right because you can do it from the upper upper reaches of the atmosphere, but it sounding like other competitors are making that tougher for them. And that that there may be a question about the overall business model, and now that straddle on doesn't have Paul Allen kind of there to give the thumbs up that that it's his family, and it's unclear what they destination for all of his all his companies is going to be that once, you know, I worked at a company like this once the billionaire who is in charge is gone. The people who pick up the pieces are gonna make different decisions than the than the billionaire would. Yeah, I think that's right on. I mean, you look at something like blue origin or SpaceX again with a billionaire leader. There's a very clear vision from that leader, maybe not SpaceX, but there's some sort of vision. But everybody Mars, everyone will be saved. But yeah, I think that's that's always a risk with these companies that you know. You know, you see it in NASA. Right. We've talked about this bunch where administration changes and all of a sudden during demars stuff gets packed away. Putting a closet and we talk about going to the moon again. And would eventually go nowhere because it's just ping pong between goals. Private companies are immune from that to a degree, right? Like, if they work with NASA work with other agencies that could affect our business, but they can have a goal and push towards that goal without the goal changing unless they just decide that it changes. I so blue origin. Jeff bezos. They're building blue origin at two at. I be space tourism stuff, right? That just had a test launch a couple of weeks ago. And every third sentence was about the beautiful windows in the capsule. How's the biggest windows in his capsule, blah blocks? That's what they're doing. They wanna do space towards them first. But bazo sees that as a way to fund and to work out the kinks and a platform where blue origin can become like the AWS of space. If you need to launch something you just go to them, and they do it for you. Right. That's where he wants to be a pretty clear vision and they've been working knocking down milestones. As they go towards that. That vision. But you know, when that person leaves or something happens like you said that that can be called into question. Now start launch has has some good ideas. I think clearly they have engineering and manufacturing skills that are valuable they've this airplane. They've built is just absolutely wild. But maybe they've decided that could shed some of it or like, you said go to go to Jeff basis or whoever it's a, hey, you know, we want to to give you an opportunity to you know, we can work at this other way too. So it's a story to keep an eye on you know, I never really knew where to categorize straddle launch before just because there's there's so different from some of these other companies, but I think it'll be interesting to keep an eye on them and see where these chips fall is this continued to be. A company that they're they're pushing this this air platform or the sort of quietly fade over time. Yeah. Well, y watch it. But this is the competition. Right. They're going to be winners losers. There's a lot of competition for access to space, which is great because there's going to be more access space than ever, and it's going to be cheaper than ever. But some of them aren't gonna make it and the same is going to be true of access space for Taurus. So, you know, what is it going to blue origin or or version are they going to quickly blow through the number of people who are willing to spend six figures on, you know, very brief bid of weightlessness, or is there going to be an ongoing industry or are they going to have to, cultivate, it and move onto the next thing and spend more money. It's all kind of mystery. I think that's why the blue origin business plan seem so smart to me that like right space tourism is not going to be forever. But it's going to be for the one percent. But as many people as could afford it like a very small percentage, but want to do it and they're going to have options. Like, that's not a way, I don't think to build a sustainable company that's gonna last fifty years, but. If you use that to get people in the door, and then you do bazo says he wants to do, and you become basically, a utility to get things and people into space, then you know, you can move from one of the other and survive. So you know, any company that's saying just base towards them always looking for. Okay. But what about past that because that is not a an my mind, at least I could be wrong. But in my mind, not something you could build on for decades. And. Be sustainable, but maybe I'm wrong. But it feels to me like that's not enough to keep a business. It's this large this expensive to run your manufacturing rockets and Motors, and this is all extremely expensive. And I don't know if it's could be funded just through some like rich dudes, go into lower orbit. Maybe. But I think so I get my money Jason as we've no, no, it'd be need to be a lot cheaper. And by that. I mean, it's basically they're never gonna. My belong here on the ground. Yeah. I might need a new car instead like seriously, or or to fix something in my house or to pay for my kids to go through college. It's not I you know, it is just you think about that like space tourism stuff is being kind of parade of people with lots and lots and lots of money, and that's great. But you know, that's going to be a tiny tiny set of people in and we are not them. All right. We're gonna talk a little bit more couple more stories, but won't tell you about our second sponsor this week. This episode of lift-off is brought to you by our friends at casper. Casper is the company focused on sleep. And they're dedicated to making you exceptionally comfortable one night at a time. This this number seems wild to me. But it's true. We spent a third of our life asleep. At least if you're sleeping the recommended time, and you spend three life doing anything else you'd want to make sure it's the best it can possibly be. And that's why you need. Kaspar Caspar mattresses are perfectly designed for humans with engineering to soothe and support your natural geometry. It's got all the right support and all the right places. So what goes into this? What makes a casper mattress, so comfortable with they combine multiple supportive memory foams for quality mattress with just the right sink and bounce. Casper mattresses are designed and developed in the US, and they're breathable design helps to regulate your by temperature throughout the night with over twenty thousand reviews an average rating four point eight stars. Casper is very quickly becoming the internet's favorite mattress. You can be sure of your purchase with Casper's one hundred night risk-free sleep on it trial. They delivered directly to your door. And is any reason you don't love it. Casper has a hassle free return policy. So my wife, and I've had a casper for many years now. And we really love it. So here in the south it gets hot in the summer. Hot and humid and the winter it gets pretty cold. And the casper is comfortable year round. You know, our old matches like in the summer, you kind of sank into it. Too much is not not comfortable. Casper is great year round. You can get fifty dollars towards select mattresses by visiting casper dot com slash liftoff. And using the offer code liftoff at checkout. Terms and conditions apply. That's casper dot com. I slipped off and the offer code liftoff to get fifty dollars towards select mattresses. We think casper for their support of this show and relax him. So we talked about the government shutdown how that affected launches and ongoing missions. But it also affected the day of remembrance. So at the end of January every year that moves around a little bit. But the end of Jane. Ury NASA marks it's a new day of remembrance because you have three missions three disasters. Really at the end of January so January twenty seventh nineteen sixty seven was Apollo one. As you mentioned earlier, January twenty eighth nineteen eighty six seven astronauts, also lives poor challenger, and then February first two thousand three seven more aboard Columbia's at broke apart part during re entry so NASA honors these fun, astronauts in their families. At this event every year, and Brian Stein said a letter last week saying that due to shut down in a lot of employees were furloughed bunch also working without pay. We we heard from a couple of different people giving stories of that. But he wanted the NASA family to be together. So they postponed. There's a date yet. I looked today couldn't find one, but these are normally held at the astronaut memorial foundation space mirror, which is at Kennedy Space Center visitor complex. If you've never seen this action links in the show notes, you should look at pictures of it. It's really a beautiful spot. They also hold events at Arlington National Cemetery. Where some of the astronauts are buried memorials are in place there for challenger in Columbia, and a there's an Apollo one memorial. That's in the works to be at Arlington, as well, which I think is is really awesome. And quite frankly, drastically overdue. So I just bring this up one to Mark this occasion. Because I think it's important to talk about this when it comes around, but these sort of shutdowns, they affect lots of people, lots of different ways. And there are lots of stories about the news. But this is like another example of how it affected this corner of the the federal government. Yeah. And it is a memorial is beautiful. And it is I wish you happy birthday before. Unfortunately, your birthday does coincide with the this. This is the people don't believe it. When I tell them like within a week is the anniversary of all of the NASA fatalities. So I had a I wanted to mention a couple of things I recently read bringing Columbia home by line, Bach and ward will put Lincoln the show notes hard read tough tough read, but a good book about the recovery effort in Texas and Louisiana of the Columbia because of course, the Columbia broke apart on reentry and scattered its debris field over an enormous area. And if you've ever wondered sort of like, how did they find I forget what it's like a third of the of the mass of the shuttle they picked up off the ground in Texas and Louis. Zena and brought back to Florida and the symbol d-. In a in a warehouse, basically. And they recovered the bodies of the astronauts, and so it's it's grim. And yet it's also a really kind of amazing story about how they put together the logistics of this mission and working with the people in Texas and people from NASA and grieving astronauts and the whole thing. And so if you're thinking about this if you're pondering this sort of stuff, that's that's a good read. Like, I said, it's the subject matter. It's very it's difficult, but it is a well-done, and I'll recommend something that I've mentioned on here before which is a TV movie starring William hurt as Richard Feynman called the challenger disaster. Which is about the challenger accident investigation board and what they discovered about the cause of the challenger. And I am happy to report that that TV movie is on Amazon. So it's not for it's not free on Amazon prime video you have to buy it. But it's it's you can just buy just the movie for. I think it's like two or three bucks. And I liked it. It's a good movie, and you know, Feinman is at the center of it. But it's it's an interesting view into the the period of in eighty six at NASA. And so if your mind is is focused on those. I wish I had a good Apollo one thing to recommend feel like I man deals with Apollo one bit the rang Gosling movie that I think is just now out for people to watch at home and from the to the moon, which is that great miniseries produced by Tom Hanks that is I think only available if you can go find the DVD somewhere, and I was really hoping would maybe get remastered and released this year for the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing. But that's doesn't seem to have happened yet. Anyway, they have an Apollo one episode. That's that's good in that set. But that's that's what I could come up with in terms of sort of like for further reading about these the the events. That lost the lives of these seventeen. Astronauts also have in the show notes an episode of lift-off episode nine where we talked about no shuttle. Yeah. A long long time ago, we talked about the shuttle, and we touched on these disasters. And that I think it's important we need to go into them in more detail. Probably, but I think so yeah, there's a lot of material the movies great Breen Columbia home. Is is great as well. So they've got you got some homework. You wanna go? Learn more about these. Yeah. Well, I think that does it. I think that brings us to the end. Yeah. That's episode ninety. It's it's gone. It's gone so fast, but there's a lot again, I'll put out as I point out before and often we were worried that there wouldn't be stuff to talk about on liftoff. So that is not a problem. The if you want to find links and stuff articles things we've talked about head over to the website relay data fem. So I lift off slash ninety while you're there you can get in touch. You can follow linked to the tumbler page where we post links between episodes. Of course, you can find us on Twitter. Jason is j Snell, and you can find me there as I s m. H until our next four Nigerian say goodbye. My body audio.

NASA SpaceX Texas Florida Jason government Stephen Hackett Scientist Jason Snell Casper casper Starbucks Columbia Steinbach Popper Ford Amazon Michael falcon
Star Wars: Jedi Fallen Order Reveal Incoming - What's Good Games (Ep. 100)

What's Good Games

2:15:12 hr | 2 years ago

Star Wars: Jedi Fallen Order Reveal Incoming - What's Good Games (Ep. 100)

"Yeah. What's good everybody? And a welcome to episode. One hundred of the what's good gains podcast, your source for video game, news commentary analysis and funny every Friday, I'm Andrea aid joined by miss Brittany Brom Bacher day to. Woo. Birthday. You're right. It's not a break and Christine is here. Hi to rain on your parade and tell you it's not like only she birthday 'cause this had wearing says birthday girl on it. And I was like, oh, I can wear it. But I can't it's an amazing little premature. It's pissing glitter. Birthdays, very close. Yeah. That's true. Are to your anniversary is on the horizon. We're very excited about it. But today is episode one hundred and we thought it would be fun to celebrate. And so for the third segment today, we're gonna be talking about some of our favorite episodes or favorite moments across all of our one hundred of what's good games. If you've been with us since episode one thank you so much for all of your continued support. If today is your first episode, welcome. We're glad that you are here and part of our community. Of course, you can listen to us on your favorite podcast service, or you can find us a YouTube dot com slash what's good games. Wherever you are watching or listening. We're glad that you are here. We. We have a pretty exciting show lined up for you today. Lots of stuff to talk about I want to say lovely job last week has always Steinbach holding it down. Hey, I'd kind of hoped against hope that I would land on time to catch you for the final segment of the recording. But my flight got delayed coming back from Florida. So I didn't get home until after midnight. So sadly, how long delayed those awhile about three hours. How many rows as did? I have. By drunk it'll go fast. Yeah. It was weird. Because I was so upset about the delay. Because they said it was weather related, and I looked up and it was like cloudy like clouds are not whether they're fine. And then this happens in San Francisco airport all the time. So it was like gosh darn it. I need answers. So I'm going down Google rabbit holes and getting drunk in the bar next. And I discover on this Francisco's FAA site that apparently the runways at SFO airport are too close together for them to be used simultaneously. If there's a low, cloud ceiling and turns out, there's low cloud ceiling all the damn time in San. Yeah. Go because of airport. Yes. Yes. So apparently, the runways need to be at least four thousand feet apart to allow simultaneous takeoff and in touchdowns during low cloud ceiling in the ones that SF O R seven hundred fifty feet apart. All my say one airport. Yeah. So one of those low cloud ceiling they can only land plane single file instead of two at a time. So it obviously makes the wait time at least double if not triple link, and I'm like that is the worst. I wish I would've known this sooner. That's the more, you know, anyway. That was a weird to go down. Sorry about that everybody here for you. Thank you. I appreciate that. And shout out to britney's fantastic hat one more time. It is fantastic. Did I say that enough? It's. Litter Oliver my face by the time. This is done you'll be all over your body baby girl. Yeah. Girl, send you a new after this. Let's go. Yeah. Hey, okay. Can I sign up to be on this list climbed anytime? Charges you I'm down whereas the credit card. Okay. So a couple announcements before we get into the show. Thank you to our sponsors for this week's episode quip and Robin Hood, we'll talk to you more about them later. I want to remind everybody about deer WG. Gee, I know we've mentioned this before. But when we made our patriot changes in March, we decided to open up dear WG to everybody. Whether you are part of our patriot community or not. And we know that we weren't as good about checking it as we previously were and we apologize. And so we want to reinvigorate are right in community. We know a lot of you are sending us emails or leaving comments or tweeting to us, and we love that don't stop doing that. But we thought it might be more efficient if we funnel all of the questions specifically for the show into one place. So what's good games dot com slash dear WG is where you will find the form where you can enter your questions, obviously if you make them person. Two topics that are happening that week will probably more inclined to read them on the show, but we'll take any questions as long as they're not mean. Yeah. Request and mostly safer work. Mostly. Like PG thirteen flirting with our rated. SO reminder for that we set some dates for some upcoming patriots. Streams we have decided that the April patriots. Streams will be on a Saturday, April twenty-seventh times TVD the may patriots dreams. Right ahead of our anniversary will be on Friday may tenth. And then our anniversary stream is going to be Saturday may eleventh. It's gonna be a good one. What's going to happen? Who knows we haven't finished planning it yet? But Markham and your calendars. We'd love you guys to join. It's going to be lots of fun. And of course, as a reminder that anniversary stream will be open available to everybody not just to our patrons. And last year's was a lot of fun. And I expect this year's to be just as much fun. If not more from. And I want to say a big thank you to this month's patriots producers like Davis Alex crops fares attain. Muhammad Muhammad and welcome this week to our patriot community again, Josh basin. Jackie Chan Natalie Mattos, Stephen Gyles, Jillian vendor mogul and Thomas White. Wow. We appreciate you guys. You said Vander Mergel very eloquently. I don't know if that's how you say your name, Jillian, I took a wild stab at it. So if you. It's fine. I was like damn because I mean for for a second thought you're going to give it to me and have me fuck it up. Don't we have? We have the mythic patrons to lead to read at the end of the end of the shows. Don't you worry, but you will have plenty of. And before we get into the news. I just wanna take a moment to recognize missile and the amazing. What's guardians shirt design? If you guys missed my Twitter feed from Pax east. I'm wearing it on the show right now, you can see. It's got our what's good guardians on it. It's got the world titan in the hunter. We are. Now, you can buy this shirt in the whisker games merch door. That's what's what's good games dot com slash store. If you guys want to pick up your own copy of this t shirt, if you're part of the what's good guardians. Or if you just like destiny, then you think it's cool or if you want to support us, so thank you to solid snake. Also four making the shirt for us years a bust. All right aunt, it's time to get into some news. And this week. The news is brought to you by quip one of the most important things we do for our health everyday brushing our teeth yet. Most of us don't do it. Properly. Quip is a better electric toothbrush. Created by dentists end designers quip was designed to make brushing your teeth more simple, affordable and even enjoyable built in two minutes. I'm repulses every thirty seconds to remind you when to switch sides, helping guide a full and even clean up to ninety percent of us. Don't brush for full two minutes or don't clean evenly brush heads, of course, are automatically delivered on that dentist recommended schedule. Every three months for just five bucks and three out of four of us. Use Brussels that our old worn out and ineffective. I get on John's case about this all the time. Like, when's the last time you switch out your toothbrush? But now, it's not a problem because we've got quip I just got my package on the mail, even toothpastes. It's delicious. I mean, not that I eat. But it I was like don't do. Put some toothpaste tastes weird through can leave a weird aftertaste this one better. This isn't bitter. Sweet Micky in your mouth. Yeah. It's it's lovely for brushing. And quip is one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association as thousands of verified five star reviews, we love quit because it's easy to travel with. And of course, it's got those fantastic. Little rubber bristles that make keeping your gums healthy, really super easy. Anyway, that's why they're backed by over twenty thousand dental professionals quip starts at just twenty five bucks. And if you go to get quip dot com. What's good right now? You'll get your first refill pack for free with a quick electric toothbrush. That's your first refill pack for free at Q U, P dot com slash what's good. Time for some news. First up. We've got online ID changes on P S N your questions answered. That's right. Ladies and gentlemen. The time has come. You can finally change your do. How I can't. I forgot. I remember what the story broke. It was big news. And then I've been wondering what happened what's going on with this? And then I feel like out of the blue today. It's here Burda, you're gonna change yours. No. Because my name isn't like asked liquor sixty-nine. My name is brave fast. So it's embarrassing name or anything like that. But the reason I'm hesitating is because of all these not all stipulations one. There's a list of games that have known to have critical errors in some games may or may not work in. Honestly, I just wanna fuss with it. So I will deal with my name because it's not awful and terrible. So I'm good. Yeah. I feel like this is more for people whose names are asked liquor sixty-nine. Yeah. Sure, you're out there. And now, you can be less embarrassed by the name you made when you were young. It's true. They over on the PlayStation blog. They wrote we do want to take this opportunity to clarify one point as a result of the preview program because they did a little beta test run of this. We found an instance where a game did not fully support the feature even though it was originally published after April first two thousand eighteen contrary to what we mentioned in. Our original announcement all PS four games originally published on or after April first twenty eighteen have been developed to support the online ID change feature. However since they have not all been specifically tested with the feature. We cannot guarantee that they will support it more details and information, and we encourage you to refer to the test of list the list of tested games before making a change your online. I d so they have a giant FAQ over at the PlayStation blog. The answer is a bunch of those questions, including the list of games that have critical issues of that list. There was maybe a couple that might be worth. Awesome. I think the important thing to remember is if you change your name and discover that there are problems you can change it back for free and fix all the problems. So it's free to change it the first time, and then it's free to change it back that what you're saying. Who wrecked then I hype hypothetically, I think like, you know. So then if you want to change it again. And if you're like, okay, I'm actually like okay with us. Then I think it cost, but I don't know how much it costed. You guys. See that part. I think we talked about ninety original announcement. But I do not remember what it was sounds, right. Let me go to the blog and check it out. And so critical error is considered. Okay. Because this is what it says the blog if you have a game this category. Would you not recommend change in your online ID? If you wish to continue playing that game without losing its entitlements in chief, that's which you've already brought a release as possible to incur permanent errors or data loss. As a result of using this feature of the games. Like, I just pulled up. Everybody's golf little big planet. Three some MLB. The shows. Those are the ones critical errors. I think there's only like ten games on that list. And then there are other games like blood born and charted four GPA five t Lou and those ones will make it. So your previous online ID will show and not your new one. So it's not like it's going to break your shit. But it's still gonna show Asoka sixty-nine. Got it. Liquor sixty nine. Well, I think that in a for most people this probably won't be game. Breaking literally for them. I think that it. It'll be fine for most games, especially since we're pretty close to moving into the next generation for PlayStation. And I'm sure the their new architecture will take this into account much like Xboxes does. Right. And it is ninety nine for the record. If you want to change it after that. But I think that it's good that they're finally catching up now. I mean, let's be honest. I still think it's you know, why Lee overdue because XBox has had this feature for quite some time. Yeah. But XBox knows how to build like victim for Microsoft, which had a bit more knowledge and how to build something like this where PlayStations was kind of like oh shit. Build a thing. And then it was like, oh, we didn't build it with this. We didn't think about this use case Yoda and build it like that totally. So now, we're hosed and when you're talking about like, maybe the next generation will be better. I mean, this is their online infrastructure. So I don't think that has anything to do with it. And I don't think it's going to change unless they do like they would have to like take it all down and then rebuild it. And I know that they're going to do that. I'm curious to know, how many people are actually going to change their name share. This is a feature that people have said they've wanted for a really long time. But how many people are actually going to go through the process, you know? Ask or sixty nine nine probably. Like a new account it happened during the PS three generation where I I switched accounts. And like, I was like, oh, you know. I don't want this old idea. And then I came to the realization that I can't change my ID. And so I just started a new account. I just lost everything from before. I was like what are goodbye stuff like those entitlements? Didn't mean much to me because I the all of the games that I had for PS two were all on cartridges. So it's not like digital licenses for any of them. And I had very few games on PS three because XBox three sixty was clearly the superior council during that generation. And obviously, I'm always been in the camp that XBox live is a superior online multiplayer platform then position. I'm just really glad that got their shit together for this generation for PS four and that it's functional and it works and the party. Chad is good. But I don't think it's controversial to say that XBox has always been better at this. They just kind of fucked up there you. With Xbox One. Yeah. It took them awhile. But they came around. It's better. It's the best now than it's ever been. But it's still not as friendly as the XBox sixty was so nice, log on you seal, your friends, and you'll let your advertiser you see your little buddies. You're like, oh, hey, who's on the go to something with them? And now it's like just generic dashboard that cross media bar while they the blades to fun. I hated the cross media VAR Fiennes three. It was the word was. Well. Yeah. I mean, I don't play stations. You I in general is great. I wonder if each year where it's just like the good old days where you have it boot up in the sense that you stick your game in and then it just don't have the by bypass all that bullshit, which you know, if you're in the middle of the game, you should offer console. It does that already. No big deal that I say this because my grandma for some reason, I think that PS three cross media by really fucked her up because she has a hard time. Now fucker. This she scenes shit now. No. She always gets confused. She puts in the game. And she's she asked me where's my game? It's so confusing. There's all these other things going on. I just wanna big icon that says play my game. And so I want that to be feature just for my grandma now for any giant players button. Yeah. Just you stick the game auto boots the game. You don't have to worry about signing in you don't worry about seeing. What's the latest and greatest? I mean, I'm sure you probably have to pay premium for that. Because that's all marketing, but I'm just going down to rent a rabbit hole. Here. Don't mind me. It's fine. I was just letting you go with it. I love your grandma stories the best. Thanks is pretty great. She just Brit eleven excited. Oh, I actually like that game. Will it's pretty good. All right. So I put this story into the dock, but I didn't know what you guys wanted to do to talk about it. We probably should assorted up before we started the show profession. We got this. We can roll with it. But there is. A really interesting article in depth article over on Kotok, Ohio. About dragon age. And of course, it's by Jason schreier. He does a lot of great investigative work over talk. You it's called the past and the present of dragon age four and it kind of deep dives into by aware. And I'm guessing he got a lot of this information when he was doing his research for his anthem story that he published and it kind of looks at what's happening with the next dragon age game have either of you ladies had a chance to read this whole article. Did edit even know it existed. I totally miss this. Yeah. I saw it. Okay. So it's just came out like a couple of days ago. So don't worry about about missing it. But essentially just read the first paragraph here from his article it says in December two thousand eighteen developed by Ortiz. The next dragon age game hinting at a mysterious future for the popular fantasy series. Well, it's Tyson, but seems very far away. Why more than four years after dragon age inquisition is dragging for still so early in development, the answer's complicated and reflective of bio turbulence? Over the past decade last week. We published a lengthy investigation into how anthem the new loot shooter from the beloved games did yo- went. So awry, well porting on this story. And then in the days that followed I learned a lot more about the current state of dragon age by hours to ten poll franchises alongside mass effect which was put on ice in two thousand seventeen following the disappointing Mets drama, but has since been warned backup. Yes. I heard more about the first version of dragon age was rebooted in October twenty seventeen and the current version, which is now in development Bio's office in Edmonton Alberta Canada. So. The next paragraph says the story behind this reboot isn't just a story of a game going through multiple iterations as many games, do the drainage for overhaul was a sign of bio worse troubles. And how the company has struggled in recent years to work on multiple projects at the same time. It was indicative of the tension between as financial goals and what buyer fans love about the game's about the studios games. It led to the departure of several key staff, including veteran dragon age, creative director, Mike Laidlaw, and it led to Shays dragon h four who's developers hope to carefully straddle the line between storytelling and the live service that e has pushed so hard over the past few years. So I'm not. No, but actually Britney. So this was funny after I read this article, and it goes into depth about the issues that they had a team and how similar to what I was saying before like people needed to be pulled on a different projects not uncommon Dev teams and the dragon. She was kind of like pulled from one to the other. And then what whatever was able to make some progress. Then that got rebooted because it wasn't whatever. What meeting visions? I forget the exact reasons, but. Then there was now analysis there's a focus, theoretically. And we don't know what that is. There was no details released about it. But more of a live service you type game. And I saw tweet that was actually pretty funny because it was like all dragons fans hearing the live service thing up in arms. But then if it's really like, but you'll get you know, extra dates with your romance person like constantly, and you'll just think you're being being fed this virtual romance at a pace. And I was like fuck asked. I know. Go like, maybe they'll be smartened up bumped microphone with my face. But that's okay. I got so excited. I just ran into it. But. But she said, yes, exactly that would be pretty produce. Well, if it was something like that. But or even yeah, I don't know how exactly it would work. But I'm also not on that team. So it's not for me to decide I think, you know, when we talk about bio aware and everything that's been going on with them. I still stand by that. I think they'll do right by dragon age because inquisition was game of the year. Right. Like, that's a huge. Bar to meet or to beat for the next dragon age game and after striking out with their last two games. I mean, inquisition whatever's coming next for dragon age is certainly like all eyes are on them to make it succeed. Obviously their fans will always stand by them. And I don't know about that. They're hardcore fans I mean at once. Sure. Yeah. I mean, don't forget like silent majority. Yes, vocal minority for sure. Because when we were at packs, we saw plenty of bio or caused play out there. There was a. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And so I think that they have a very robust community. I think people just you know, you expect the most from the things that you love, and I don't wanna go down a rabbit hole anthem. We certainly talked about that game to death. But I thought this was interesting and worth bringing up and if you are interested in what's going on with the dragon age development. Certainly go. Check out Jason's article over on Kentucky, and I felt bad for just I mean, granted it's just feel bad for the teams in general because it's just like you get knocked down once and then you get kicked in the gut again. And it's just like, I know this is interesting. And like I'm not saying he shouldn't have written this on. I'm trying to say I also just feel for the people on the receiving end of this. And or it's just like all right? Can I can I just breathe for a second? And I get a breath. I am clenching right now. You can't see it. We could just. About the pressure of this dragon each game. I mean think about Andromeda while I really enjoyed that game. Obviously hasn't been received the greatest and then with anthem and then this piece with schreier last week in exposing the development held in turmoil in the turbulence and whatnot. If you like dragon age is the precious baby that can help right and put by were back on that. I don't know if that's true. Basically like, hey, we're not we're back because you know, the whole thing right now is by the same or they're not the same or they're being forced to do XYZ, not true. But that's kind of the general consensus of the the vocal majority is I guess what I'm trying to say and having dragon which is such a near and dear French is it's been around for such a long time and has such heavy lore in such people are so investing characters the pressure to put this game out in do. Right. And not screw up. I feel like this is a Navient being dramatic here. Let me know he think kind of like the last straw to. Really this is what I'm holding onto like anthem. I wanna hop in. In, but I'm not super invested into it right now, just because of the bugs, and there's other things going on and with mass effect and drama. I enjoyed it. I know it didn't live up to the hype of the prior mass effect. But with dragons like this is like my baby this is like my most anticipated by title. Right. And so it's in close to home right now. I guess is what I'm saying. I don't even know what I'm trying to think for my thoughts based on what you just said. But yeah. It'll be interesting to see how how it comes out because the setup from inquisition story wise, I think that I was seeing cuisine had things about that. I didn't love game play wise. But overall that story I thought was released strong in the sense that it set up a really great villain, and it set up a really great premise continue off of. So I have to imagine that they are keeping that element. Because if they threw that baby out I'd be like what the fuck are you doing? But I am curious about how the team is probably trying to solve the issue of. Their games are very different from a lot of the portfolio that yea has. And I know that you were saying Britain. That's not a thing. But actually, I mean, I'm sure it is. I'm sure it's massive internal pressure from EA. And it's not someone breathing down your neck at all times by any means. But it's even a subtle pressure can be enough where you're looking at the numbers, and you see how much your business contributes versus the other parts of the business that contribute, and you wonder whether or not EA values you because you aren't pizza before makes them so much fucking money. It's insane. To not be FIBA alone that alone, even if no one from EA for ever said a word to them. I feel like that pressure enough. Look at those other studios. See how much money they're raking in. And and you can look at your own financials and realize that you are the type of game that sells very well initially and then drops off. It's well, I think that there's room though for via wear to to retake the their foothold of where they were at. I think EA has really suffered from a little bit of what frankly, maybe this is too much of an extrapolation air kind of what America in general is suffering from right now, which is capitalism run amok. It's like this idea that there's like no balance between profits and product and saying like, I support the idea of free enterprise and businesses being able to make profits because it's really kind of the bedrock of the American dream. But on one hand, you gotta go. What am I? Sacrificing for the sake of profits alone, you know, like we have to maintain artistic vision alongside profits. Otherwise, what are we even doing this for activision? I mean, yes, no. Because look at look at blizzards doing I think that they've remained committed to their artistic vision. But have also been wildly successful because they have been and and I also point over rockstar go they've been created to their artistic or committed to their artistic vision. But it also has been wildly successful for them. I think it's just all about the type of business and how the churn of profits are going. I think a lot of people don't realize that EA is the biggest publisher in the world, and that those profits in that constant chase for stock price and shareholder dividends is something that has been made a priority over creative, and that's been disappointing for me to see I hope that they can regain their sense of creative inspiration because they're still doing some cool things. I wanna point out that I love that. They featured see of solitude on stage at EA play last year, which is amazing small indie game from my friend, Connie over in Germany, and how that game has such a great message about you know, like battling depression, battling mental illness. And I think that the fact that e as willing to feature a game like that shows that they're not completely this heartless corporate overlords there frequently painted as and I think that there's a balance, and I think they got a ri- from like probably like two thousand fifteen to sixteen clearly until two thousand eighteen but I I like to believe that the battlefront two fiasco kind of shook them loose a little bit and said, hey, like we need to to stop before we lose a lot of our our fan base, and those changes aren't easy to implement overnight. And I think. We're now seeing them go. Okay. The community has responded the communities responded, very negatively, we need to pivot and get back to what made EA the biggest publisher in the world and get back to the games and the gamers and the people who love our games and make the people who make our games. And I think that they're trying to course. Correct them right that ship. It's just gonna take time doesn't mean you don't get to be mad at them doesn't mean you don't get to be upset at what they've done. I just think that trying to expect them to flip a switch and change things instantly is unrealistic XBox, right? Like that you have to take time to right the ship. But to your point about sea of solitude, and I think just a decent job of highlighting really interesting. Indie games. But also the overhead on those significantly lower than is at a studio by wear. And so I think that for me is more of a light concern for how they're doing. Obviously. Like I love by aware. And I I wanna see them grow and flourish. And I imagine that you know, a lot of the original leadership there did as well. And does as well. And so it's just like it's it's just shooting time on you do it. I was I was heartened by Casey's response after Jason's article. And then e as not yays than bio wears official statement, and then Casey's memo Casey's response out of everything from last week was what kind of gave me some hope to be like. Okay. Key was there during the glory years. And now he's back and he's been working. On like, you know, recreating the culture that they used to have and making sure that they've got rid of these unhealthy business practices and somebody's like directing the creative vision in which clearly was lacking between and drama and anthem. And so maybe he can work with Mark Dera and the rest of the team to get dragon age on track to be to be a hit for them. Because I I hope I think we all hope that the next dragon age is going to be as good if not better than question because I loved inquisition. So although I was like I thought the they give you a loose pitch of what dragon age for was originally the cube being a group of vinter spies. I believe and I was like fuck it. Cool. Like like, that's the thing. We're my shit sounds date. I'm sure whatever they end up doing. We'll also be neat. But like can you make this a weird spinoff Leah or at least like trying to a book or something? Yes. Do something with it. Because it just sounded interesting. Then again, here's what I'll say a lot of game concepts can sound interesting in the network. So yeah, I mean, listen, we're all bio or fan girls here. What's good games? There's no secret about that. We've said that time and time again, so take it with a great assault if you want, but hopefully, you're here because you also love us and loved by aware. All right moving on. We keep talking about them forever. And I'm particularly interested to get britney's. Take on this next story Capcom is selling a resident evil to all in game rewards unlock for just five bucks. Euro gamer writes the all in game. We're words unlock as it's called instantly unlocks a raft of extras that can also be unlocked through gameplay. It's available on steam, the PlayStation store and Microsoft storm four that five bucks or four pounds, sterling. If you live in the UK, you get the fourth survivor and the tofu survivor extra modes the unbreakable combat knife, the samurai edge. Handgun with infinite ammo, the Ellie five sub machine gun with infinite ammo, the ATM, four rocket launcher with infinite ammo and the mini gun with infinite ammo as well as the costumes models and concept art is also if you can unlock just by playing resident evil two so what you're paying for here is a time or work savor the main draw has to be the infinite ammo weapons, though, these require a lot of work on lock. Then there are a lot of fun to use. Of course, once upon a time this stuff would be cheat code. But that was once about a time, there's no happy ending to that story, dude. So I can pay five bucks and actually play this game. Yeah. No. I think that's crazy. I was like, oh, the token top money, and then you're like all the shit with infinite ammo, like, wait a fucking minute. Yeah. You can have a mini gun that never runs out of its. Maybe this game is not as scary. If I have a mini gun with infinite ammo, and I on Mr.. Exeter mini gun. I think lock those in game. You have to beat the game and under certain time. Limit with three saves on the hardest difficulty or something cuckoo crazy like that. Which is something a lot of people aren't going to want to do. So. Hey, like, yes. Absolutely. Put it in there. I think it's great. So. Yeah. So of course, I think the initial reaction from a lot of people footballers, but I think when you have deal see like this you pay deals he like this. You look you have to analyze each game. And see what they're doing. And see if it makes sense the Brady Elsie we've gotten from Rosen evil to we've gotten the ghost survivors. That's three episodes each on your first times, like twenty minutes, or so that's like an hour, at least of extra content. Then after that, you'll lock another episode. You have the tofu survivor. You have the fourth survivor unlocks beaten just the game the second scenarios, and you have the free nineteen ninety eight costumes that came out last month. I think it was or month before either way, it's you have this awesome, free content and then for five dollars. You can unlock info. Minute ammo. And there's there's absolutely nothing wrong with this. I think Capcom has given us a lot of fun free deal. See there's a lot of replay ability and resin evil to you. Why not give people the option to pork over five bucks? And this is obviously I think mostly for the weapons like we were just talking about. And or if you wanna play his tofu. Yeah. I sure like I missed the up down down days where you would put in your Chico's and a lock stuff, but you know, not all games had that. And if games didn't have that you had a plunk down the money for a game shocker and action replay. And that's what I had to do when I played Rosen evil for the first time because I was too scared to play these games without cheat codes, and like simul just said perfect example, I can play this now take away that the edge of fear of having to manage my ammo, and and just knowing that you can blast every zombie in the face in knock them dead. And they're not a threat to you at that. Because I stopped playing when I got to the creepy collar the liquor lined people. Yeah. Those. And I was like, you know, I don't know. I don't like this. I don't like this at all the others does. Okay. With that one. I was like, no, I'm sorry. This is a hard out for me. And if I could rocket launcher them in the face, I think I would feel better in. Yeah. And that's that was that in the day. You would trust me. I love the grenade launcher that that Claire has super fun. But Rog along later, that's an upgrade. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Shit up. Yeah. And that's how I played. I got the infinite rocket launcher MO. And I was like I don't know thirteen years old or something after I after scarred me for three years of my life. I came back to it with a game shark, and like let's goes on bitches and blur heads off. Yeah. So I think this is this is the perfect kinda game for this. Because it does take away that little fear factor. So we'll get people like Steiner who probably still won't play this. But at least she knows if you wanted to option maybe the gave me a code for the game very kindly. So maybe I will give them five dollars. So that I can have these guns because the story risen evil. So fascinating the Lord, so rich, and I completely understand. If a game is too scary that legitimately turns people off from one to play it give them this little advantage. They can experience the story. A new no Steiner might turn into a bigger resident evil fan than me when she took. Silence. Helpful. It's just it's a chance to get more fans in into the series. I think and it's a good way for people who you know, I've played the game all the ways you possibly can. But if someone's like, okay, I've done leeann done Claire Claire and then Leon, but I don't wanna have to go through all the hustle of, you know, getting the weapons there goes my hat, but now give them five bucks. Now, you're invincible person. And you can just enjoy it. I am all for this. Rod. Let's go. Her gray. Yeah. Oh, right. We have. Oh, yeah. Go dory. Naggus story is really cool. 'cause it's about Star Wars at everybody likes Star Wars for the most part. Yeah. Yeah. Great. EA posts a cryptic tease for Star Wars Jedi ball and order head of announcement. Jian EA updated its Twitter account last week with the new Star Wars Djeddai the phone order banner. Keep saying the word does not in there. It Star Wars. Djeddai Colin phone order the weird place for an colon. But short. As well as posing cryptic tease for respond Entertainment's upcoming game. The tweet features and animated image depicting appears to be the severed hilt of a weapon perhaps lightsaber or some kind of vibrio Steph. Late on a stone service and grapes with runes. The image is accompanied by a caption don't stand out to you, and your goofy movie this likely refers to the fact that in Star Wars Jedi. The phone order Tampa. I said it again, I keep adding the word that just makes sense to me players will take on the role of agent ipad wandering, the aftermath of episode threes. Order sixty six if you've scrubbed the prequel trilogy from your memory that was pumped teens mandate that all jet. I be wiped out as such we expect the game's protagonist to blend in and hide from any authorities perhaps they'd even want to break their lightsaber to remove any evidence that they're part of the jet. Order over on the main Star Wars Twitter feed. A second tweet offers more details I look at Star Wars jet. Iphone order did it correctly will be showing celebration Saturday at one thirty pm CD t. Tomorrow for everybody listened to the show on Friday. That is tomorrow daylight time eleven thirty AM Pacific time seven thirty PM UK time four thirty eight AM on Sunday. Actually the perfect time. Because so start sober celebration. Is happening right now in Chicago. And that's where it is this year, and the they they announced that there was going to be a panel about this awhile ago. But this is the first time we've gone a little bit of a tease. And of course, we're getting the tease because there was a leak, and so they're like, well, we might as well get the tease out there head of the panel. So I was very fortunate to be there with Vincent Palo from respondent EA play last year when he announced the name of the game. We knew that respond was working on this game. But we didn't have really any details and tally. Vincent, give me. And he details or any barely the name. Yeah. At EA play last year. And so I'm really looking forward to seeing what they're going to announce my guess is we're going to get like a reveal here. Maybe some some single player details, but we're not going to get a game played deep dive until EA play at e-3 Linda history in this paragraph. I didn't understand anything. I I've seen the star war movies Star Wars movies, excuse me. Maybe once each maybe twice each on. I don't understand. If you a jet. I it's bad news bears. In fact, that you're playing it as Djeddai means you don't want to stand out you wanna run away. You wanna hide it's like you're to like put your hood up as if you're an assassin's screen try and blended with crowd. Okay. Yes. Don't stand out. That was my initial thought, you know, even knowing nothing about anything regarding this. Yeah. Blenda, and you wanna stand up of the crowd, even if you've got a shout out loud and. Yeah. I it's really interesting in the sense that I think Jackie brought this up on her Twitter. She's like, I'm mostly just pointing out that this is very much opposite of a lot of games marketing, or it's like, you are the children one you go be the best. You are amazing. And this was like, no, no go hide in the shadows. Because they're gonna come kill you otherwise. So I think it's pretty interesting. I'm curious you have my attention. Yeah. Steinmeier a loose one. I'm not like super duper into it. But I like the movies enough and all them. Yeah. I I love Star Wars. I certainly haven't I wouldn't call myself like the biggest stores nerd either. But I've seen the movies like dozens of times if not like in the high twenties thirties forties of times and love the franchises. I think they're great. I find interesting the most about respond Star Wars game that I really enjoyed what responded with Titanfall to campaign. And so that gives me really Good Hope. They're going to do right by this especially since EA has been having a rough go with the Star Wars license, not only with battlefront two and all the trouble that game phase. But them closing down this rural games and Amy Hennig starrewards project. Think all eyes are on them to kind of get this, right? And to do right by the Star Wars license, the Star Wars name, and I think respond is really poised to do that they launched apex. Legends to great fanfare earlier this year, and so far everyone's been very happy with how that game has run. And they've said this is going to be a single player experience. So it's going to be I think I think it's going to be good. I'm I'm holding out hope that I can be excited for this. 'cause I typically haven't enjoyed Star Wars games in the past. I had a pretty okay experience with the battlefront two campaign, but I would like more, and I have high hopes that response going to deliver. I think the battlefronts who campaign got me like nauseated when spaceflight that was it. I remember that. Yeah. I was like Foget. Oh got. But we will of course, follow up with you guys next week once reveal happens Britney had a story to the Ron because it's so amazing through my anonymous millionaire wants to set up a real life battle royale on a private island. An unnamed person with a significant amount of wealth is planning to set up a real life. One hundred person battle worry on a private island. Hush hush which styles itself. As quote, the world's leading luxury shopping. Marketplace has received a request from an anonymous person who was looking for a game maker who can help organize the three day event. The plant, thankfully, does not require participants to actually kill each other. That'd be a hell of a waiver to sign. No right does like hunger games. Instead players will be with air, soft guns and touch sensitive body armor, the last person standing is set to win one hundred thousand pounds prize. I don't know that is in US money money. The plan is for the anonymous one hundred and fifty thousand maybe the plans for the anonymous millionaire. Island. Okay. A private island. That's in itself, which will be the setting for this real life battery out the competition will run for three days with twelve hours of competition each day during the nighttime players will be able to camp for the night. I'll camping gear and food will be provided this insane. Invent is insane. Invent is only in the conception stage as noted earlier hush-hush is looking for game maker of the large scale event management experience. You can sign the Rena cool battle royale games have become incredibly popular over the last few years ago, and our customers huge fan who wants to make the game of reality in the safest way possible says hush-hush founder Aaron harp in on the request page at the championship is a success this year, it's something he wants to make an annual moving forward, which is very exciting perspective. Game makers can apply the hush website and the project pays fifteen hundred pounds daily with an expectant AM. But yet expected six week duration the contract set out to pay forty five thousand pounds. My god. Crazy, the forty five thousand pound contract for six weeks for this is actually now that I say it is actually not that big of a payday for the amount of work. That's going to all I mean. Yeah, that's just the planners fee. That's one thing. But you're gonna have to hire an army of staff to accomplish us. I think this sounds really cool. I would absolutely watch the shit out of this on twitch. That'd be really fun to watch. So it sounds like for twelve hours a competition each day and then during the night you actually get the camp. I guess you actually have to make sure that people are alive and wolf head and taking just hope it's not like fire festival 2.0 documentary. This already I'm already looking forward to the documentary on Netflix about the still like we thought forty five thousand pounds enough tired entire planet committee. Gone. The last person standing is getting one hundred thousand dollar prize hundred mound. Yes, this one hundred thirty thousand dollars roughly. They can away. Did I do that backwards? Hold on. Bounced oh, no a hundred thousand pounds sterling equals one hundred thirty thousand dollar has eclipse the sterling pound is a thing. That's real. Wait is American. I don't know. I have a hundred thousand pounds sterling equals one hundred thirty thousand United States dollars. No, I'm doing that backwards. Math is hard. You guys. Brenton green. Doubtful. I think Brennan green is way too smart to do something like this. But honestly like with the right sponsors. This could actually be something really huge. I mean, clearly the first thing I think of is why does an epoch do this. They're planning their World Cup for four night. Of course. But everybody would watch real life fortnight battle, Royal you kidding me. That would be amazing look at how successful survivor is in this wouldn't even be as devastating survivor right because they would be provided with food. They wouldn't have to go hunted on their own or anything in providing food and camping gear for one hundred people's not that wild because I'm sure a lot of those people get eliminated in the first day camp and drink. Yeah. But no you ship them off the island once there are eliminated. They're gone. Yesterday at the end in the weeds question about the production of this could you record this and have TV camera people phone them around. Or would I give away the position of the players you, and you would have to film it like cameras? He's ADM's oh have little or have fly cameras that I think you could have camera crews on the ground following people because it's not like those people the people who are competing, but the problem is he was too. It's too much noises. Too much. It would be. Oh, I see what you're saying. Yeah. Have to have a whole bunch of like. And the cameras going. It would have to be hunger games where they have all the hidden cameras everywhere and the drones that. Oh my God. I think this is cool. I don't know if I'd want to participate in this clinch too much. But I would love to watch this go down. Also, Andrea you're thinking about the money backwards. You do it backwards. But just because the number is bigger doesn't mean the dollar stronger means tweaker. Yeah. Dude. Got it backwards. Like instead of the Super Bowl will be watching the battle, Royal? I mean, it'd be interesting. Honestly like, I think with the right amount of publicity. It could get a ton of viewers like the Super Bowl like we don't really, I don't know. He's actually relaxed. All right 'cause Nielsen ratings are kind of booked, but. Like, but like YouTube and twitch ratings like those unique viewers to this is fascinating. I want this to be thing. I hope somebody applies. I want to watch it. All right. Well, that will do it for the news for this week. We're going to take a short break when we come back. We're going to talk about what we've been playing sick with everybody will see minutes. Welcome back. Everybody segment. Two of the what's good games podcasts. And this week. We're going to talk about what we've been playing. In is brought to you by Robin Hood, Robin is an investing out that let you buy and sell stocks ETF's options and cryptos all commission free. 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Sign up at what's good Dodd robinhood dot com. Again, if you wanna get your free stock mine was in group on very exciting. You get you can sign up for yourself at what's good dot, Robin, Hood dot com. All right time to talk about the games of the week that we've been playing and let's start with britney's ensure lists the longest oh, you say my God damn time fucking Porsche. And if you win it or Porsche, Porsche Porsche to rusty. I think it's Porsche. I can't quit this game. Last week. I was telling Steiner how I was like kind of getting like hash takeover a little bit. And then real I started with I think you can do without me. You think you're better than me you want this you? You did. Around bent over like, you're right. I do want this bad. I cannot quickly in this game at all issues, so relaxing, and again, it's comes out these sixteenth of April for ten to switch PS for Xbox One. I'm playing on switch, and it's this is an out yet. It's been on PC for very few months. I think January came out a PC. So yeah, it's just now getting ready to come the consoles and echo. Everything said, it's just a great game to lose yourself in you. There's a lot of things you have to manage at the same time. So it's kind of relaxing sin. There's people to befriend people to bang and just fishing all the things that, you know, seem like this you would want from. So I'm still definitely enjoying having a really good time. Just a little update I heard back from team seventeen and the loading screens. I've talked about how they're kind of knowing will be patched as soon as possible after launch. I don't know what that means. But that's what the update they gave me. And there are still some bugs that will crash my game. If I'm trying to harvest this giant bamboo papaya for this festival. You see ladies? He's and I need to harvest it. I wanna participate. So when everyone to like me, but I can't pick that bitch up. My whole game crashes. So a really, yeah. Yeah. It's a thing. So just like the beak, you know, if you do pick this up on the sixteenth. I absolutely think it's worth it. You know, this is the only game breaking game-breaking. That's not the only bug. That crashes. My game I've come across. And I probably put like sixty plus seventy hours into this thing, so far and just be worried that they are aware of these things and that because I won't be here next week to formally review. It they are they are aware of these things are working on it. And they're very communicative with the patches that they're uploading bring all that kind of stuff. Anyway. Yeah. I can't quit this game. I can't quit. But yes, it's it's a gem is. Love it so much. That's all. Well, I'm glad that you're having fun farming all of the things so armee, and I just got my first cows and sheep. So it's not even farming. I'm building stuff and collecting materials we have stop talking about this game. Okay. So let's talk about something else. How about we talk about? Ace attorney. So it was really cool about as attorney. It was one of the three games featured and our game stop TV segment. Thank you again to everybody who's been sending us photos or gone into games up stores, and you know, taking self ease with the TV we love that. If you guys do that, please keep sending them we love seeing those photos and thank you to game. Stop and TV for partnering with us on that initiative. But ace attorney is now on intendo switch. Yeah. Buchan is. It's exactly it's basically exactly what I was. Hoping for which means it will probably be my go-to travel game from now on until I finish all of it. Because it's just like, it's really simple. But in a good way and simple in terms of formula. So you it's a lot of text to start. So if you're not somebody who likes reading this enough for you. But it's just kind of goes through different case stories new are Phoenix. Right. The defense attorney, and like the first tutorial thing that you go through is pretty funny because you have like nerves and asks you are you. Okay. You need to answer some basic questions to make sure that you can even function as a human being. And I don't know what would happen if you answered them incorrectly because I can't bring myself to do it even for science. But. So yeah, I answered everything correctly. So I was fine. I'm good. I'm like really a good lawyer. But if you're shitty at it. I don't know what the game is going to do to you. Maybe somebody else who doesn't care as much contrite out. But so you're going through and you listen to people's testimonies you have evidence that is brought into the case you look a little evidence. Menu that pops that you can pop up at any time and look through it and kind of be like, oh, this guy said that while whatever this guy is saying is not matching up with the evidence is saying, and you need to be able to figure those things out and then be like objection, and then it's really fun Memed thing that's happening. And I just really like it because it's it's simple, and I can get through it. And I know they're all broken up by individual cases. So it just has like it's nicely contained. I suppose what I'm going for there. And if so good me find yourself ever stressed that you're gonna make the wrong decision or the wrong verdict. I don't know how this game works. I've never played. What like I haven't played enough to ever. Fuck it up yet. Okay. The cross. I'm sure you can I don't know. What happens when you do? I could probably just Google it. But that's true. Is there up as attorney is they're easy save and reload options, if you mess up do, you know, like if I make the wrong if I if I say and. The only saved after the after the things were done. So I actually I don't know if you can save within the case itself, but it seems like once they unlock it's like a pin? You can easily click on again got. So I assume if you fuck up it's like we'll start over and how long do, you know, the cases are that you've been doing? Like, ten minutes. Yeah. They're not. They're not terribly. I literally have no nothing about this game. So I also knew nothing about this game. So let's fair we're learning together. Yes. Yeah. It's nice. I like it. Well, cool. I'm glad that you're having a good time with it how good travel game as a standby. Always a nice thing. I have been playing a little bit of dangerous driving. So I talked about this during our packs panel and our east live show. Part of me, and this is from three fields entertainment, and I only got to play a little bit at packs, and I loved her they played there. And I've gotten to play a quite a bit more. Now that the game is officially out. And I'm still been having a really great time. I do have a few issues with the game. Obviously, this is a very small outing independent studio so three fields entertainment made up of former criterion. And they made this game with seven people believe in seven months so made it very quickly with a very small team. And I think that's important to remember when you play this game. 'cause when you put it up you're going to notice that there's a lot of bells and whistles that are missing. And so I had emailed their their team to ask them some questions about about the game. Because I when I first heard about it, and I talked about at Apax it was all about burnout. Because clearly this is the team that made Bruno in this is an Oma. Really like burn out to an burn out three and I loved the burnout series. Burnout revenge was my favorite as I had discussed at Pax. I'm trying to pull up here's the the question the answers to my questions. And so I ask questions about it. Because the first thing I noticed when I was playing let's talk about the things that I love about the game. I it's got that amazing kind of grip to the road that I love an arcade racer, I can no Jin crash into things, and it's not catastrophic and most importantly, I can hold the gas down the entire time. I never have to break in this game. Which is what I love about arcade racing and I can boost in the right mode. Like heat wave I can boost pretty much the whole road, which is super fun to do. And after about two to three hours of play. I finally kind of got my groove back with drifting fifteen such an important part of this game. I just love take downs. The whole idea of persistent wrecks on the roads and really hearkening back. This is an Omani to arcade racers from the eighties nineties, and I want to be clear about that. This is not a modern, arcade. Racer it's not even as robust as a burnout paradise from from the three sixty generation. There's a lot of like. Like, I said kind of bits and pieces missing from this game that I would like to see them make in the next outing when I have a bigger budget more time and hopefully a bigger development staff, and I'm glad that they've priced it appropriately. I would even say I would like to see this game drop down like a nineteen ninety nine price point from a twenty six ninety nine not that that extra six dollars makes a huge or seven dollars, execute difference. But it kinda does. So some of the things that I hope that they're going to add, obviously, they're adding a six person line racing enraging mode. And that's what they're working on at the moment, which is going to be exciting to see how they implement that. When they update the game. They are definitely going to add more. I always get this wrong of his libraries or liveries. For for cars. We used to say all the time on games up. Tv we would screw it up every single time. We have like a racing game. And it was always like a UK game. I think I'm gonna say liberties. But I have no idea. Oh, there's somebody in the UK listening. Like, oh my gosh. Go screwed it up. But they're definitely add more, color customization options. So they have four types. Of course. We'll technically they have twenty seven cars across six classes. I think is the official thing that I have here. But I asked him, you know, if they plan to add more cars, and they said something that they are contemplating and the most important thing to me that I felt was missing from the game was music because I love racing to a great soundtrack. It was one of my favorite parts of cruising. USA my favorite racing game of all time is just like every track felt unique because it had unique music and it had a unique setting. And so the settings of dangerous driving across American national parks. And so they make for really neat backdrops. But they just seem eerily quiet, and because this isn't a simulation game. It's not like I'm getting some kind of extra jazz out of the sound of a particular car engine or the revving or. The squealing of tires stuff that you would maybe find a grand juries MO or Forza motorsport game. These all seem pretty kind of generic car. Sounds and the reason why it seems so quiet is because they didn't have the money to build music licensing into the game. So instead, they built in a partnership with Spotify premium, but I don't have a Spotify premium account. I have a great do want my logging. Yes, simul identical. A three fields made custom playlists specifically for the game that you can drive to. But I have Google play. I was like why don't you guys wanna do anything with Google or with apple or the other music services? And they said that it's definitely something that they are considering but that they've broken new ground with Spotify in that there's potential for using music and quite clever ways. Alex word one of the studio heads wrote to me and said, this has been something we've been working towards two thousand twelve when we first began to investigate the use of music on what were then the new generation of consoles. So he's obviously talking about pre PS four pre Xbox One. So I do think it's really fascinating that you can link your Spotify premium account and listen to virtually anything from your Spotify playlist while you're racing. I think that's a really cool concept, but Spotify premium was nine ninety nine a month. It's not an insignificant cost since I was like, well, it'd be great if we could get museum of some other kind, but. They said that they're working on other options as well. And then one of the big things that I really thought was interesting about three fields is that you know, each game. They've made has truly been a stepping stone to the next game. When they talk about this in there about me section on their website. And when I reached out to them and ask for more clarification about really what that meant for the future. And if you dangerous driving is maybe an indication that they're going to build a bigger more robust dangerous driving world, something that has a lot more bells and whistles to it. You know, he kind of gave me a kind of gave me this rundown. Saying you know, we made this game called dangerous Gulf. And he said, let's make something new and silly and learn how to do physics and learn unreal engine. And then was lethal VR is said can we use U E and make VR game really quickly for big fans of the original point break movie of nineteen ninety one. So we always wanted to make a game like that opening sequence. And then they made dangerous, which of course, our car crash game. That says can we take physics learning and make a lot of cars crash explode onscreen all at once dangerous to can we bundle. It all up and take it outside and model real actual intersections from around the world and then with dangerous driving. Can we make all of our favorite game modes make new tracks a much bigger game and a really short time. And so now, it's like where do we go from here? We want to be bigger better and more online. Those actually the starting point for burnout three takedown back in two thousand four and he wrote everything is the starting point in dangerous driving just. The beginning. So with that in mind. There's still a lot to be desired from this game. But I'm having a lot of fun plane it, and it really kind of gives scratches that issue for arcade racers that I've been missing. But I do think that there's a lot to be desired in terms of like onscreen animations and loading screen animations, adding soundtrack adding just like a lot of tiny little things you expect to be a game. This clear that this is a very much an Indio mosh to burn outs of your. So would you recommend overall? Yes. I would I would only recommend it till I die hard burn out fans, though, because you know, as I chatted about with Christian Spicer kata deal C, which by the way, if you missed my guest appearance, I went back and said hi to those jen's it was on the episode last week, please to give them a follow or a subscri-. We loved the guy's a deal. See all of us have been on the show before and they are wonderful people. They both were hating on the game. They're like non very good, and blah, blah, blah. And I was like, yeah. But you guys are expecting something of burnout paradise caliber. But this isn't like a sixty dollar AAA game. It's not it's a much much much smaller game. And once I said that Jeff was like, well, you kind of have a point there. Because like nah dog what's the point of me spending twenty six dollars on this game. When I can just pop in burn up paradise into my Xbox One from my three sixty. Disc played on backwards compelled, backwards compatibility. And I was like listen. I'm not saying you're wrong. I'm not saying that that's not something you can do probably have a fun time too. But what I love about this is that reminds me so much of the burn games that I loved from like the PS two generation. And that's what I love about it because it feels retro in a lot of senses. And if that's not what you're looking for. I just wanna be clear about managing your expectations. And I think for once my expectations were in the right place expecting. Up. Yeah. I wasn't expecting much from this game. And so I've been pleasantly surprised the entire time. I've been playing it. And I've been having a lot of fun in the thing. That's exciting. For me. Is that this team who really got pushed aside for need for speed which made me sad which made a lot of other burn out fan. Sad decided, hey, we're going to do it on our own. We're not going to have enough money to put everything in the game that we want to, but we're gonna start small, and we're going to work, and hopefully, you know, each game will build upon the next and we'll get to a place where we can make the burner game. We really wanna make. And so that's something you want to see happen. You wanna support independent gamed of then I would say maybe goes by the game. Yeah. Absolutely go. All right moving on from dangerous driving. Let's talk to Steiner or Britney Brizzi. Maybe you want to talk about Britney. Let's go to Brittany want to talk about. What did you talk about dragons outward because I don't have a lot about dragon's dogma yet. Okay. So I have a switch code for dragon's dogma dark risen and this game comes out April. Twenty third obviously dragging stock came out in twenty twelve and then Ducker is came out twenty thirteen on PC. And then it came to consoles in twenty seventeen I think PS four Xbox One. Yeah. So I think dragon's dogma Ducker is may have come to lash. I don't know the point is that was the expansion. Right. It was like it was like a what you call it like an ultimate edition of it had the deal. See reimagined some things, and I don't know how I've missed this game. I'm only a couple hours into it. But I'm kind of getting this dragon age meet skyro- vibe from it so far so far in terms of like, the vibes. Get is giving me. But I don't know how I miss out on this game. I'm playing it. I am so invested in it Steinberg. Did you play this back in the day? I went to a Capcom preview event where they had this game. And I just remember distinctly because it was so funny to me so part of the thing of the combat of this game was like, you can grapple onto the enemies. Oh, yeah. Climate and shit. And so I had grappled this one thing that could fly, and I was like trying to stab it. I think and it flew it took off with me still on it. And we up. And up and up and up and up, and then it bucks me. And I'm just like. Oh shit. I fall for a good thirty seconds. I was like I didn't even I was like how did you allow programming of Singa fly so high vertically, I don't know where I am. And then I just smashed into the ground. I take a quarter health off and walk away. Like this game amazing. It looks it looks like it's going to be a fun ride like something. I really would have enjoyed back. Then I don't know. Why did it play it back when it came out? Then I don't know. Maybe I was busy with Georgia. So the things happening at that time. I don't know. So yeah, I don't have a lot to say about them only about an hour in and I will be gone next week. And a lot of flying headed me. So I will be playing this on the switch, and when I can back tell you more about it. But the game that has really kind of sucked me and nj sin as well as outward. Now this game is developed by nine studios and published by deep silver, and it came out on March twenty six and I'm going to read the little blurb about it. Because it's kind of hard to describe as game outward delivers immersive RPG experience coupled with survival game play offering deeply rewarding challenge for the most avid gamers as an ordinary adventure. You'll not only have to hide her defend yourself against threatening creatures but also brave the hazardous environmental conditions. Protect yourself against infectious diseases. Make sure you get enough sleep and stay hydrated embark on expeditions across untamed lands. She reached. New cities undertake varied missions. And discover hidden dungeons brawling with formidable enemies. So in this game. I came out. I was a little weary because I was reading about some pretty gnarly bugs that were plaguing it items disappearing in between loading screens people not people loading into walls. Just not good stuff. But nine dot studio seems to have been on it. And for the most part, I'm having a pretty bug free experienced, but let me tell you about the game. So you what I love about this game. First and foremost is that it supports split screen co op and online co up, and I think the reason I'm I'm instantly clicked with this in we're kind of obsessed with it is because reminds me a lot of Acheron called and a lot of people don't get that. They're like what the hell was Ashrawi. Call 'em. Oh that was shut down a couple years ago. Yeah. That's be what you're talking about. Yeah. So no. Because of you Jason and how much you guys loved it. And would always play it. Yeah. Astronauts calls a really really old Emma that was. Created in two thousand right around there. And just recently got shut down a couple years ago because it wasn't making money and Warner Brothers was like, hey, they should it out. We still don't really know the official reason. And I think there's some legal issues going on behind the scenes because it has such a avid avid follower. And it's a cult classic bubble up. But something what I loved about that game. Because by the time, I hopped in a lot of its population had dwindled, and what I got was this huge world with all of this hidden content. Just waiting to be explored it uncovered. And it didn't hold your hand. Didn't you know have little quest markers until you which way to go? You had to use coordinates and almost felt like a single player experienced multiplayer experience, but not an Emo because it didn't you didn't have the typical fetch quests. He didn't have the kill ten burns report. Back to me stuff. Like that. It was legit dungeon. Crawling mazes. All sorts of different innovative, dungeons, temples and everything else. And this game feels a lot like. That and astronauts calls the only game I've played that gave you that feeling. And so it's hard to describe because I can't just say, oh, this is a typical term face PG. You know, you have your protagonist. It's not like that at all. So you're into this world, and there's hardly any hand holding in this game. And there are survival elements. You know, you have to manage your temperature. You might get sick. You might get hungry. You might get thirsty, but on top of that die of dysentery. No. That's a good point. Thank goodness. There is dying in this game. But there's no game over per se. So and the game is constantly saving. So if you run out of health because every time I've run out of health Jason has been able to revive be. So none of us have actually like kick the bucket. Totally yet by understanding is you can lose some items. But you can't reload your save and go back and see what happens, and there's a lot of RPG elements in this game. Obviously, you don't level up. But what use you get better gear? And it's not there's not a ton of loot dropping everywhere. So they literally like, okay. Here's this world. Go in explore. Ou're good luck. You know, there's there's a map, but you don't have a marker on your map. All you have or the landmarks in your compass, and you have to try figure out where you wanna go, and we have a bunch of different decisions we need to make and we have to really work together. Because bold is so scale silver, so scarce that you have to be really careful with what you buy with it. So you don't level up in this game. But what you do to get better gear. Like I said, but you can also buy buff. So you can go to trainer's throughout the city and spend your silver on getting HP increase or stamina increase or maybe get a different skill. You have two handed weapons one handed weapons. You have you can be a major. But the magic is a little tricky how it works, and we haven't gone to that level yet. And it's really fun. You know, we found we completed first mission together. And then when the world opens up to us we were very poor, and we just had like rags on our bodies, and we are getting beat up by these big white birds. That were roaming the plains in this is very so we found gigolos doto. It's like a big white choke abo- to file. Fantasy thing. Okay. Anyway. Yeah. So we've found this fort we ran only simple to cross this for and in there, we found Mejias archers some other dudes. And we knew we were too weak to take them all. So what we would do would go in there. Like, these sneaky, squirrel kill one or two of them Luther shit, high high tail it back to town, sell it. Get better stuff come back and we've been doing that for like one and a half nights now. But it's just so fun to work with someone on this. I don't think this is the kind of game I play by myself. I think it would feel a little lonely, but this is absolutely game. You play with a friend whether it's split screen or online, you can really really lose yourself in. And that's a common. I'm seeing from a lot of people and one that I want to echo that are playing. This is you you just lose yourself in at the time just goes so quickly. And you know, it's just a lot of fun. It's just good solid fun. It looks like a like an XBox three sixty game or a PS three game. It's not the most beautiful game. And like I said it's a little rough in areas. But can like you're sitting Andrea you both the PS two charm and. Dangerous driving has that charm to it. And it really takes me back, and I feel like there aren't a lot of games out there like this. So I'm really really having a good time with it. So I could see this game becoming. I can't obviously say game of the year. You can't say that early anyway, but I can easily see it becoming on my personal coming apart my personal game of the year list. Because what it does is so different in so fun, and so engaging that I'm having a blast with it. Even those kind of flood. That's awesome. Good time. Cool. Hey, good. Tones are good times. All the really matters is having a good time like dressing up your burger in falcon age. Segue. Of. Yes, both timer, and I have been playing falcon age Steiner, you're playing it on PS four, correct. Wreck. I'm playing it without VR soon. I played it with VR. Okay. Good because I. My thoughts on when I started firing it up playing it. I was I think a little confused, but I I was and it took me a liquor hot minute to realize. Oh, right. This game was built for VR. And it's a weird thing to play a game built for VR not in VR. Because I when you're playing it not in VR you're expecting certain things from a game. For instance, when you walk her on the map, I'm like you have to follow very specific route. Obviously that is designed for VR because you don't want to the fucking world, right? Like make sense. But when you're just playing with your control, you're like God, damn it. Why can't I just like pop down to this thing? Like go over there, do whatever because you just wanted to act like a normal PS four video game. And it doesn't act like that. Because again is not built for that. So that has been honestly throwing me off the the bird super cute again. Like kinda mention I think I mean the bird for me is the saving grace of this game. And how a doorbell it is. Because it's just so fucking cute. It's real unlike when it so you. Okay. Let me let me back up. If you're like what the fuck its balcony each. It is as we've mentioned it is both a VR game in a non VR game. And the story is basically you are a girl imprisoned and by this robotic corporation. There's only a robot in here with you. There's no actual people. And there's a little Felker. Let's like outside of your window you feed this Balcon. It's sort of like a like a groundhog day thing where like you'll go through a few cycles of like, it's this day these questions go break rocks. Bought a bought and then one day the, mama. Falcon dies rip are sort of spoilers. But it's like the MB fine. And then. Tailed? Yeah. Yeah. You baby Burg, and you feed baby Burg, and maybe bourbon and you team up to take on the world's not really the world. But basically this evil corporation your prisoner the people who've in prison ju yeah. Yeah. So then you kind of go out into the world. And you're learning how to train your falcon like the baby bird grows up almost immediately. But the game is clever and gives you a hat that you put on the bird that makes it go back to baby bird forever. So I was like that's really smart if they hadn't done that. I would be like what were you doing because? Yes. The grownup Fokin is bad ass looking. But the baby everything is cute. Bird, baby. Like, so you can either like if you have your arm out or whatever in your in the game were NBR. I don't know how Indrek it's tell that works, but you can like snuggle it for a little bit which is really adorable and the like stick, you know, like the internet thing that was going around where dogs would stick their Stoute's in hands. Like, if you just hold held them up like a hole in that would just boop. It's that but with the bird and the bird yet sticks. Stay with your fingers. You put your hands together to make the heart sign, and then the little bird sticks. It's face through the heart. And it's the cutest show you've ever. You can fist-bump with it. Yeah. Like, the relationship building between you and the bird was well done. I think right now I'm struggling bit. With the way the game runs. It doesn't run super smoothly for me. It's not terrible by any means. But again, I think L is just expecting it to be a little a little bit smoother. Like stuttering that tenant. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Little it's a little story. And otherwise like, you kind of you can take down different types of enemies. I think they've done an interesting job with variants in that. So the robots takes out a different way. There's certain robots were you can't send your bird in yet. Because if you because I I was like us going to be hell easy. I'm just going to burden effort everything. But no because there are like turrets and things you need to deactivate. I they'll shoot darts at your bird. And then it will be sad. And then it will come back to you with all these little things sticking out of it. And you feel terrible and science you accidentally did this to your bird. So they'll get bird then the bird the bird got gut yet the Burgh it's got like I'm an asshole for setting my poor baby burden. It's always a baby. And then there's others the one enemy of actually curious to hear you duck about Andrea stand wolves because like I screamed a little bit because it jumped at my face, and I was like I can't imagine that shouldn't be our out be. I'll be horrified. If this thing was like. No, I don't want that shit that I actually haven't gotten into those yet because happened to me is I played the first hour of the game in VR, which is quite frankly, an incredibly long VR session for me. I never usually play VR for that long. Because it just I like I've mentioned before I have a very small face. And so I have to strap it very tightly. So the headset gets uncomfortable. The only other time I spent that much time in VR was with moss because I was just like so enraptured in that game. And so after about forty five to sixty minutes, I was like, okay, I'm gonna take a break and move my safe file over to the other PS four and continue playing at flat for a while. And then you know, what I'm feeling ready? I can go back to VR, but sadly. There was no checkpoint or save system at the point of the game that I was at did not realize this. If you were in an hour, you should pass the checkpoints. That's what that's what I thought. What did you go to you have to go to the water spout? And actually it. Oh, did not realize that. Yeah. So protest, anybody listening. There are these like random wills around those are your safe points. So you have to you have to twice also just so, you know, it has lever us to go up. His auto say not always thing and then down, and then you'll know what saved when the water actually comes in and the bird comes drinks. And then it will save. No, that's bullshit. I love echo, and I love the team and outer loop. I think they're wonderful people. They put my cats in the game prophecy, if you guys find them, but that garbage. Okay. We need an auto save. I was heartbroken when I went to go. Upload my cloud. Save and move it to the other console because we finally have a dedicated PS four just for VR. Some not having to be behind the TV fiddling with the cables all the time. And then I wanted to offload and there was like there's no safe data. And I was like wait a minute with which is played with like an hour and then booted the game back up, but it started me from the beginning. And also worse that is especially this is not a particularly long game. I'm probably like three plus hours in I think it's a five hour game. Yeah. There's not much more for me to do at this point. I mean, I like another at least one more place to take down possibly, maybe when more after that. But overall. Yeah, I think my thoughts on it or are basically summed up as this is clearly a game built for VR. If you're not gonna play in VR, it's going to feel weird to you. Yeah. It on a flat like place TV screen and just be aware of that going into it. If you're like, I don't care, and I just wanna have some cute bird time. Great go for it. And they do have non-combat mo- that they added as well. So don't want to do any of the combat if you just want to hang out with your with your burger. Yeah. If you just wanna like go, find go kind of explore the world and find. Items 'cause there's like little hidden shit around that you can go like there's a boarded up. I think they're just sheds for. But my brain went to that they're out houses for some reason, but they're not outhouses their their sheds, and you just kind of like bat Bank down the door. So in addition to the bird, you have a baton and at first you can just sort of mash. And then you get like an electrical whip thing, which is pretty neat. And now I'm trying to teach this bird how to like drop EMP's and shit. Like it gets gets. There's more complicated stuff add to the birds abilities as long you're trying to take down these folks is corporation ever imprisoned you, but how how do you do that? So you go to area. What do you do you go to an area? So you clear out refineries at least so far. That's what I've been doing. And so I basically scoped the place out. That's what I told me about a new enemy type. They're like because there's like a the resistance members there. To tell you what to do. And so they have turrets which you need to take out first. So you can't have your bird like on my arm when I go in sometimes because I don't want her flying around because I don't know how. How good the I is to stay away from the range of turrets to get wanted to get bopped, Jerry. Yeah. So I have on my arm, and I go around and like. Like, you have to like electric whip the Tura and then stick the thing and hold it. And the. Whippet sticking police. Good girls. I like the sound of that song. Literally what you do. And then once I had I took up the turrets. I then there are like flying drone things you have to handle and take care of those use in your bird after they'll crash the ground you have to go smash them. Then there's like these other types of robots where you have to figure you use the whip. Then you send the bird the bird holds them in a way. And then you can Spanish them. It's like you have to kind of just take out these groups of enemies and be somewhat careful about it. Not. It's not like a mega stealth game. We're not gonna have too much of an issue and. But if they are alerted they'll send like these mechanical spidery robots after you assure annoying Spock, but you can just again, you can just smash them smash everything and you like build you give your falcon little snacks. And you find recipes around the world and I've killed killed killed rabbits, which were the easiest FOX's goat. Because you can cook you can cook cook for your them. And then. Something the sand wolf. And then I think when more other animal, but so yeah, they have different things that chicken, and they all done of them. Look exactly like their real world counterparts because it's kind of strange biomass here. And then you so once cleared the refinery out sorry, I'm sort of jumping all over the place. My brain is not particularly on a linear path today. Once you cleared out that once you clear out those refineries than the resistance takes them over and you can do for them. So I had a garden plot. And you can put in different types of fruits or vegetables in there to grow them. So you can harvest them. So you can make different traits for your bird. There have like still treats and deafening treats and just health treats for one when they do get bopped by those darts because it's inevitable sad. And it is said, and you have to like sit there and pull them out. Sorry. Sorry. Fran taking out the trash with your burger friend. Pretty much. Yeah. And there's like. You have to pay attention in the world. And there are things sometimes hidden up on high like packs where you can get a different loot and stuff like that in them, and you have to go send your bird to bring it back for you. And then with the currency you can buy bunch any choice for your bird. Which is really cute costumes in there. But I also wanna remind people that this is a nineteen ninety nine game. So we talked earlier about studying expectations. This is not like a full triple eight release. It's small as we mentioned probably four to five hours of total playtime. But it does really look great in VR. I was having a good time with it. And what I there was this one moment where I had the headset on where just like leaned all the way back. And just like, look, I watched the bird like flies straight up into the sky. It's I mean, it looks great Clooney's a gain that was built for VR. But that the added a flat version so that they could appeal to more people who wanted to play the game, but that don't own a PS VR headset. So this is a nineteen ninety five game or ninety nine nineteen nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine nine nineteen dollars ninety nine cents. Not like thank teen nine. This moment was like did this game come out that and they're just redo eat it for VR, and I was real confetti holier. I didn't not mean to be confusing. I mean, it's not a full price sixty dollar game. Sorry. My bad. Don't mind rain word spot to it's all good. And we do have to think outer loop games verse for sending us the codes for that as well. So if you like burbs, and you wanna shoot robots and acting that your kid. I got you. When a bird blocks in the fluffy waste. And the round beak in your face. You let it go fly free and live. It's best life. Here you go drop a bomb on someone's bitch. Let's work. I was going to talk about the division to end game. But I probably don't need to go over that. Again. I'm just having a lot of fun with it. I'm like gear score like four ninety six now chasing that five hundred live getting ready for the raids so I'll probably just table. More of my the division to talk until the rate comes out, which is very soon to couple of weeks away, but been having a fantastic time discovering new secrets and hidden areas and attention to detail and world building massive really did themselves this game. I wish against wish that they would just fix the massive amount of bugs for lack of a. Because they're so quite a few. It's not interfering with my overall enjoyment of the game because they are working on that specialist ammo drop issue that they've been having that I treated about but just little things like textures not popping in the sound audio issues that happened during the beta have been persistent for me, they're not constant, but they happen frequently some kind of tissues. Clipping in and out of the world enemies clipping. There's just like a lot of open world bugs that you expect to see an open world game that clearly they're working to fix that. Just haven't been fiction, but it's been a month now since launch or almost bene- month. And so I hope that they get the clean up some of these ongoing bugs because the game is fun. But there's a lot of books. Alright. So that's gonna do it for our hands on segment for this week. When we come back. We are celebrating episode one hundred of what's good games stick with us and come down memory lane. We'll be right back. Welcome back everybody. It's Seguin three of the what's good game podcast, and we are super excited to get to episode one hundred of the show. Now, we don't want to go too far down memory lane. Because we obviously have our two year anniversary on the horizon, and we will be doing a lot of reminiscent that day. But we thought it pertinent to celebrate episode one hundred by talking about some of our favorite moments, some of our favorite episodes or things that have happened in our last one hundred episodes. It's that's a lot of content. That's over two hundred hours of content that we've made a lot. I was just on the ladies drain our break that if you go to our Facebook page Facebook dot com slash what's good games or videos, and you sort by the oldest videos there, it's a frigging trip. Man. I forgot about a lot of these funny things. I was going through remember Alexis Mario's dead theory. Yes. The cabbie theory. And she hated capi. All my gosh. It's so funny so much funny stuff in those old videos and those old lips because what I would do. And I still do this as Oakland out little parts of the show, especially when we're doing something that we think is kind of funny. And then you watch it back, you know, years later like holy crap. I forgot about that. I was just watching a clip when Steiner was talking about if someone pulled up next to me in a really scary van and asked me to play call of duty what I get in the truck with them you remember that same. Kind of. Yeah. I don't remember the. Yeah. That was that was a throwback. I said if somebody like I would play that game of somebody like basically forced me into van and played it to play it, and that's really creepy at all. Yeah. Yeah. I guess boggles eighteenth of twenty seventeen that wasn't does. But before we go down memory lane. We have to give a big shout and thank you to our fantastic MiFID visible mythic membership patrons and above on. This is your time for your monthly shot out. Of course, if you want to be part of our fantastic patriot community and get rewards like secret segments, like an ad free version of the podcast like access to our after hours. Gameplay stream are happy hour, Q and A and more. Go to patriot dot com slash what's good games. You can support everything that we do here on the show. Help us keep the lights on help us get to you for more meet and greets around the country and around the globe. And we will do our best to keep the content rolling. So why don't we read these tastic mythic patrons and above and we can? Get started. Yeah. I remember you read this name last week. Yeah. Leonardo Talavera Beto chill. Bruce Simpson also go next shit. You said how to say isn't missio. Missile missile VA. Guess andrew? Susan just in full she Sean, Kathy. Lucas Kyle and Kelly Dillon. Blink. I guess right. I skipped them. What does it for you? Thank you. We're on L. Burto bruin. No. Because nobody said this. I said Kia bright out. I did. Oh, yeah. The audio cut because I didn't want is. His name running four times. I'll berto Videla Martha Emory, David I Colucci Steph, Lou jerick Hannah Reagan insen, Bill still will Dustin Lewis, Tara Brunel or she gives. John's tune Aaron Jason Michael Scholtz. Patrick Higgins, Timothy Bennett. Jaber travers. Turkey Milan Theus geo Wen's his own the MAC. Joe schlieffer max Cramer Elmo show. Jared Howard Tyler McColl. Edison. Elisa my aura. That's a Ma. Does. Numbly Jay's Bravo, just the cub bloom. Teddy gone, Gregory Haughton. Andrew smith. No, well, nevarez Lucas Sheni rub Leonard. Mark desktop Jilin, Drake. Jacob safari joke. Edison at him. Oh, God kindness. Emily kit, trends Pennington Gabriel. Emily aucoin. Chris Wilson Ariella Fomin will Khalam Wilburn end is Brian are Johnston. Stephanie do pumped Kevin Dunkel Billy should blue Stephanie fitzwilliam Sam Jesse answer Brandon shorts. I just here to my head like the ham horn. I might clean geek, art games. Tommy Larsson poke defied us. So in person. I lost my place in the docu Justine FOSS, the coal, Humphrey, Burke, lary Asia, Paris. Anthony Murphy, Jake, jasmine Ling Elizabeth, Brooke Adrienne Williams. Ryan be pure blue octopus ball, Andrew cotton. Tony. Shape. It's it's shea. Really? I believe so. Yeah. Okay. Sure. P make Brian happen. Joe Wilson Jason sitting gar. Oh shit. I'm sorry to say Sydney's name. Okay. Also our geo coursing Roland Bala. Sorry page. Oh, no robber at abso-. God page porter. The ghost dog four twenty. Patrick, Matthew, go get the Mahia Christer Lindmark. Patrick Landry e Benjamin Chavis Trent's battery though, not those not chill the third. My mama. Theresa inert. Bamble? Thank you so much to our wonderful patrons. Again, you can join our membership program. At patriot dot com slash what's good games. We hope that you guys are loving our community over there. Now, let's get back to some of our favorite moments from w j j. Because you said that about there was somebody's name we read, and then I was like I'm gonna look at this thing. And it's going to be funny. I'm gonna it's gonna come to me. So while we do sure for its money. I know right. Well, we do that. Well comes to me Britney yell. What was one of the things you were worried about what's good games executing back in the early days of us, making episodes of the podcast because we had a lot of technical problems. Yeah. I mean, number my number one worry overall overall, which is that podcast popular anymore. And I was obviously very very wrong. That was like my number one worry about this whole thing. So not only did I think that podcasts weren't very popular. How the hell my going to sit here with my what was the time blue blue yeti or something with my microphone, and I had my webcam. And I knew how to stream, but know, how to do all the technical mumbo jumbo so, yeah, I think for me the one of the biggest worries it's how are we going to five on a podcast because we had met in person. Like one time before we started shooting the show. I mean all got together to talk about it. It was WG Khan, and we all vibe, well, but obviously if I being well in person, you have to know how to chat with each other on a podcast rate. And how's it going to work out? I didn't know you very well. Andrea, I barely knew Alexa, and Steiner was only one that. I really knew like super well. But obviously that all worked out finding the end, you know, but it was just I think that was one of the main. How is this going to work? I hardly know this people can I say bad things in front of them. Can I talk about banging things? Can I say the four letter words all the time? Will they hate me? It works. It's crazy to sometimes remember that you, and I had really only seen each other at conventions or trade shows really sporadically for lack of a better word, and that we became, you know, much closer through what's good games. And it's been like such a fun ride like thinking about all the time that we get to spend together. Because even when Steiner still lived in San Francisco, I didn't get to talk to her every single week or see her every week. And so even though I don't see you guys in person being able to still chat with you for a couple of hours every week has really been good for my heart, and my soul. And I love our time together. Oh, so cute and episode one hundred I think the thing I was calculating was that if you watched all of what's good games episodes from the very beginning till today, you would be watching us for seven consecutive days. That's how much content we've made. Oh boy. A lovely way to spend your time. I mean, it kind of is that's not even like counting streams and things rice. I episodes of rough to get through. I was talking to someone about this at our meet up. I don't remember who it was. I'm sorry about that. But we're chatting how they had just lost the show, and they went back, and they were listening to one of their first shows they ever did. And how it's it makes you cringe, right? When you go back with some of the first content you ever put out there. Because obviously, you know, you grow throughout the years said, you remember our first show, and they said, yeah, I've been listening since episode one is it. Okay. So, you know, man, like those first few episodes I've ever audio cut out or something wonky was going on. I don't even remember how it wasn't even her first few. It was like a well. Yeah. Fun or so because I remember we set up custom e q profiles in the recording software for each of our different voices. And we set a Lexus gate too high. And so I remember. When we recorded it. The audio came out all wonky because she kept clipping in the during the entire recording. Because we set the gait parameters to aggressively and so like the microphone kept cutting her off periodically. And there was nothing. We could do to fix it in post because like there's only so much you can do to fix it. And there was a lot of lessons learned about the equipment for us. And obviously now I feel much more comfortable with the audio equipment because back then unnamed producer was helping me do a lot of behind the scenes stuff. Helping me edit how me do fixes in in post on the video and the editing audio side now I've been running the post production on my own really since like end of summer 2017. It took like two or three months of hand holding for me to get to the place where I was comfortable. But it's it's certainly been a learning experience for me to really. Dived deep back into the actual production of digital media. Whereas I was more on the content side for very very very long time. Yeah. The sausage. What's interesting to me is I'm a weirdo. It's not even interesting. I don't know. Why preface it that way? This is terrible regret. This. On episode one hundred and three now at this point. I will have been on one hundred. Girl, three shows in my time during this one hundred does that's crazy which is weird that that's awesome, though. It's just weird. It's just like, wow. That was a lot of time. It's gone by really fast. But also we haven't missed a single week. So it's we're yeah. D- think about it for almost two years that we've put out an episode every Friday, and that seems crazy to me too. I don't know what was one of the things that we really wanted to commit to when we started. What's good games? I, you know, I talk about this all the time. And I brought it up on a lot of panels that we've been on. And we get people that right into us. All the time that ask for podcasting advice, and I always point to our podcast one a one panel. We did at RT X last year where we really broke down. How we started. What's good games from podcasting perspective, and the best advice I ever got. Of course was from Jeff Kertzman over a giant bomb. The most prolific and arguably the most successful video game podcast out there. And he said like the one piece of advice, I'll give you is never ever ever ever miss a week. And we really took that to heart because he wouldn't stay that. If. It wasn't important. And so we haven't haven't missed a week. There's certainly been challenges along the way to getting episodes up certain weeks of the year, particularly around holidays or big shows like e three for example, that we've done it. And I'm really excited and happy we have. And I think that we've built built a really fantastic community around that consistency. Because we certainly did not remain consistent are streaming. That's for sure. Yeah. And that's part of starting something like this. You you have all the biggest invest ideas in the world. Right. But when it actually comes time to execute who knew how much time post production would take and who knew how long it would take to do all the social media or do whatever the videos all the things we're doing, and we found that we just didn't have a lot of gas tank. You know? Well, like remember when we used to record on Thursday. Oh, yeah. Finally, one WG g con I was like Andrea. How about we start shooting on Wednesday? So you're not dying every Thursday that brutal. I mean, I like the idea of getting more of the news in for the week on by including Thursday with that turnaround with editing meant very late nights for me and Brittany. Prepping all of the post for upload in late nights of us like messaging Starmer about thumbnails and getting meta data and all of that like it was like the best decision ever to move to our regular recording night on Wednesdays because otherwise. Dude being up until two or three AM and then having to get up at like six AM to make sure everything publishes was rough chuckles to Seattle. Don't do that. Yup. Yeah. Don't see. You don't do that to yourself? If you're thinking of starting a podcast don't ever try give yourself some runway for us. It was really had to do with with the length of the show because if we only did like a forty five or sixty minutes show, it wouldn't have been as brutal of postproduction turnaround time, but rendering and exporting the video in particular is really what takes the most time. And I still remember the day that we launched the patriot in that was our first struggle. And none of us thought we were gonna hit it. We thought we had time we thought maybe we would get there over a couple of weeks and once the word got out, but bam like within hours we hit that first goal of adding video to the pod Gazza. And I was like, no, I'm not ready for this. When you're like oh shit. We thought we were going to be able to figure out how to do that later. Was like. Nope. Figure it out. Even try to do. It was a mix of a whole bunch of different shit. Wasn't it Google? Hang outs. We tried Google hangouts muted. So that you and I could see each other. None that we were in Skype. Bor I don't remember exactly what messenger for a long time. Yeah. No before the end of that, we tried like some weird pack job thing with like two things. Open one of the muted. Don't remember why we needed one of them? I think it was because we didn't have enough audio and camera input sources 'cause in order for us to send the audio and video feeds so that we can hear and see to other while record and not just on the recording. We have to have multiple inputs outputs. I think that might have been before we got the icicle. And then I got an additional webcam. And then I got a webcam that wasn't another brio because Logitech very graciously gifted us a bunch of these amazing four k webcams that they sell when we launched the podcast, but we realize is that the software. My computer gets confused when I have two of them plugged into the computer at the same time because they read the same as the same camera in. So we had to send a different camera to the chat messenger. So that you guys can actually see me while we're talking and then to send a different one to OB s the record for the YouTube video, it's it's complicated. Now, we have that. And we still have technical issues almost every week 'cause we use third party software like Skype or messenger or whatever feels like working that week. And I think the annoying part is shit. Like, oh, Andrea you said something while you clipped out at that one moment. So we had no idea that you said anything, and we're sitting here waiting and you're waiting for us. And we're waiting for you. And it's like a little bit of dead air on the podcast. But you know, what? It's okay, we're doing the best. We can. Yeah. So thank you guys for your patients through those technical challenges in the early days. We like to believe that we're pretty consistent now with the way the show looks and sounds, of course, if there's ever issues of Phil free to reach out to us at conduct. What's calm, but we've done some really fantastic episodes. We've had a lot of amazing guests over the years and still more to come. Of course, our last guest, miss Mercer. Roberto have known her for a long time was really great to get her on the show. Our first guest ever miss Mary Kish. Hopefully, we'll get her back on the show some day. And now that she's in a new role over at twitch, and she has moved to Portland, but we got to see her at Pax east, which was super fun and spend some time with her on the adult swim yacht party. I had a good time seeing her, but you know, we've had Joey well from kind of funny on the show. But here a lotta of come by more than one spin great, actually, Scott us. But on the show. I mean, we've had a ton of great Kimmel ists Kim is fantastic. I remember the first time Kim was on. She had those terrible Mike problems or windscreen. I'll remember that. Oh, gosh. Yeah. Someone's audio or video kept cutting. I'm telling you, man, I'm happy the content. We put out looks all smooth and buttery for the most part. But if you could see how that sausage is made. It's fine. It's part of what we do. Yeah. There was one time when you were in Italy Andrea, and I was doing the video editing and something had happened with Alexis microphone. I don't know if it was the clipping issue you were talking about, but I had to it would decent the audio constantly during the video. How about this? And I had to sit up and like clip out parts and then like remove it over. So that the audio wasn't going off every now, and then like, I just had to sit there, and like delete chunks of audio. So that it would actually be in sync with the video and made no sense to me. I still don't understand it. But I got it to work and it worked, and like, I don't think if you watch the video you would ever know. But that was because I sat there and took a bunch of hours editing all of that shit and making sure like scrubbing through that nobody was de sinking at any point. I it was real weird. Because I think I also was getting ready to take off. And before I knew you were also working on it. I also put about an hour and a half into it as well. And then we finally like started talking about it. And then you're like, yeah, I've been doing this. I'm almost done. And I was like, okay. Well, stop to now. Oh, gosh. Yeah. Good old days. Man weird. That was a weird thing. Yeah. Do you wanna talk about some of the community responses? We got because Britney tweeted from our what's good underscore games Twitter account, which if you haven't taken the moment to hit that follow button, we would greatly. Appreciate it. If you're on Twitter at all you have to do is type in what's good games into that? Search bar will pop right up and just hit the follow button. Even if you never interact with us that would really help us out a lot. And so a lot of you did right in and let us know what some of your favorite moments are and also ironically, not ironically that was the wrong, you said that word I asked people during the raffle where I gave away my Vida at the Pax east meet up in order to enter the raffle. You had to tell me what your favorite. What's good games moment was and a lot of you had some really fun responses. And then there was a couple of people that were like who's what's good games? And I was like get out of our party. Not getting this, Vida. Yes. Show sponsored comes from Allen Martinez. And he says episode twenty five at the one hour and fifty seven Mark when Steinberg talks about VR not being for her and doesn't want to ruin her beautiful skin. She said, you know, what it's hard to get your skin this. Nice. I don't wanna ruin it with a twenty minute experience thought even that good. And I was like when he I saw this tweet. And I was like oh my God. I'm such an asshole. That's. What are we to say? I'm cast. But anyways. L maybe nine sort of not I don't know. Just weird. And then we have one from Deborah from Delilah who says the same moment Eliah says hands on the episode with Steiner Britain Alana when they went to the deepest dive on a relevant tangent. What dragon ball characters they would fuck. Deborah also said same thing she said I nearly drove into oncoming traffic because I laughed so hard. We'll do that. That's dangerous happy. You didn't nNcholas Dudin? I particularly love it. When you talk singing. So timer songs I have so many clips that are labeled Steiner songs. Oh my gosh. That's like a lot of them. From holy moly bittner when I got my new nickname, and it stuck and you all love saying it over and over, plus the postcards the meet up the streams and laughing during the weekly podcast, pure joy, all of its Molly. From my dear friend in Andrea's, dear friend, Ignace yo row Haas. Oh, yes. Enough THEO favorite movement. Brit mad at me after I said Pokemon snap. Wasn't a good game. Saying how by pissing off one of them piss off all three after simul said that we were Gucci. I don't have a dog in this race, it spun whatever you seem fine we have from Dan just as drunk episode. And I started thinking about this have we we've never done an actual episode drunk. We've gotten tipsy toward the end. But we've we've done dreams, but not episodes. We save the drunken shenanigans for for for patriots. Because we need to keep that behind paywall for reasons. Not like we're trying to get key. But because we're trying to keep our reputation semi pristine on the public internet. Yes, exactly. That's really more. It's more for us to save face than it is for us trying to be like, greedy and pay while you exactly it's really like we just wanna make sure that you know, if we're having a good time and things a little lose. Maybe you know, we start talking about like trunks. But or something that it doesn't get taken out of context and like picks, quote, the only way to do that to do it for patriot. But we've had plenty of moments most notably the kind of funny crossover did for Exo eighteen where the our friends over at kind of funny brought lots of cocktails and drinks. I mean, we also brought some to to the watch along. And then Greg Stohr like swindling into. Doing a game cast episode after the watch along we did not realize that he wanted to record something else afterwards. And then we're like, we're all drum you were drunk for this. I was like, I don't even know. And also, here's the good part. Was there were way too many of us? So I was like, oh, this is fine. I'll just like sit here quietly and be drunk. I'll just like one liner every now. And then people remember that I'm here. I mean, you excel at that you really bad one. Tyler McCall says my favorite serious moment. Was Andrea Rene started reading the speech would have given if she had won the training game a year ago. Those words that she wrote and the discussion that followed really impacted me. Oh, thank you Tyler. That's really sweet of you. And a big thank you again to Tyler. And Craig for organizing the session, we had we had a ton of fun. But that's very kind of you. It was such a bittersweet moment. Obviously. Like, I wish I would've won. But for me, I thought it was an appropriate time to remind people that you know, what what's could games represents is inclusion and reminding the what brings us together is our communal love of video games, and the culture around it and that wall, there's a lot of negativity that gets out there about video games, and gaming culture. And being a gamer. That's actually not what gaming is all about. And I think being at a show like patsies reminds us that that's what being a gamer in being part of video games is all about is. You know, tens of thousands of people all appreciating and loving gaming and coming together and appreciate an loving each other and being accepting and welcoming to each other. And that was just what I was trying to express. So thank you. I appreciate that Tyler clip that and mail. It off Email it off to everybody in the world. I don't know. It was really good. It's really good speech. Just like a chain letter. Yeah. Train litters back. Oh, yeah. If you for and this people within an hour, crushable, disown you. Yeah. Crush will never speak to you again. Let's do it. We have from Brandon Gant who we've had a history mispronouncing this gentleman's name, and we've got them in person at Pax east, and he said mispronouncing particular name sincere. Sincerely, Partha MU. Bart Gannon Dorf because that was the name I gave in. It's a superior name. Oh, changing with your life. David Jack, nineteen every grunts and noise and pseudo Sudafed. Pseudo of it. But Tom Chelsea says, I love the beds adventures that was a stream. And then a lot of the rest of them. Oh, this is and from Ron she says, congratulations, my favorite moments, hands down have been the pack. Speedups the community is filled with incredible people Darren Clarke says I love the wine tasting. And then Jason says whenever Brit does her Kermit voice. I'll keep doing it for at least one of you. And then all the other ones still Bando man that Silvano moment goddess for. Yup. I mean, it's an oldie, but a goody that was such. I think about that. But sewed very fondly because that was right around holiday twenty seventeen I think because Andrew United just got back from planed farcry beieve. I think and we were talking about member there is the testicle festival, and we were talking about that. It's that a podcast steamer. I think you were we were calling you in from LA, Alexa, Andrew Nye in the studio. And yet, we're all just like drinking. It was just a really good fun time. And then yeah kills spur the seal band of stuff started happening. You started reading your book. Oh my God. Yeah. Because what had happened is. We talked about. An earlier episode. We had talked about like crushes a character crushes. I think maybe it was a secret segment or something, and I was struggling to. Yeah. And then I remembered that I had this like big crush when I was a middle schooler on this character from this book series, the powers that be from Elizabeth Scarborough, and and McCaffrey, and you guys tease relentlessly about it, and Alexa, was the worst about it. And it was funny because I think she was having trouble understanding, she was like, wait. So is the seal is he a man is he like has seal like how does it work? So I said why don't I bring the book on one of the episodes, and I'll read a passage of it. And so I was reading I brought the book picked out a passage to read. And then that's when Alexis started playing careless whisper, and then Brittany brings in the seal noise. Oh, oh, and it took me a second to process it. And I just could I just died. I just like I don't know what took over me just like started. Adding. So it was hard for me because I was the only one on. On. Very hauling in. Yeah. I didn't even hear the seal sounds, so I was just laughing at careless whisper. And then a it was way late when I realize also seal noises happening here. As a little bit behind on that one. So the videos called huseband does our first our current are weirdest. So it's a public video now. And if you go to the nine minute and thirty four second Mark, you can find Andrea start talking about her seal, and I only know this because I can scroll through the video and you see a big picture of seal pop up. So I know you're talking about your boo good, good indicator. I think his name is Shawn. Dr Sean, Sean Kelly. I've never likes to put the focus that name even. Your name. I was looking on these videos, and we had some really good times. They're just thinking about her hip number nine the hippos. And we were like Brennan and plays the assassin's creed hippos chased at her story her Mario like capi and how she thinks Bari was dead. Yeah. Just like, yeah. There's some really she's hilarious. We miss. We miss Alexa, Ray. And I know a lot of you've asked about getting her on a guest, and we're working on it. Hopefully sometime in the future. We're going to be able to get her back on the show in get her get her to give some some hot takes back on what's good games at some point. But simul as the resident longest running host of what's gang gun. Is there a particular moment or episode that you were like that episode rocked? It was super fun or like that episode was wild. Can you believe that crazy news? We had to talk about for the most part. I will say I blackout when I record these shows. Not like not like, I'm drinking drinking water. But it's just one of those things where I say something I forget about it. And I move on with my life. Like, I didn't remember like people have been quote tweeting me today or tween close today. And I'm just like I say that what did I say that like I black out? It's weird. Like, there's some things obviously make an impression. But for like, I would say at least ninety eight percent of the shows. I if you were like, I'll pay you a million dollars. If you tell me what you said, it'd be like. Out of million dollars. I don't know. I don't know. It's it's true. Because I've clip things out and posted it, and then Stanford will tweet back to the what's good games accounts. She's like I said that that's not a few times. I have the memory of that. It's not good. Well, good thing. Britney is very good at clipping stuff. We have lots of actual evidence of what you said. I remember when I started recording with you, you were in the bedroom and the light would change as we were record because you would have natural sunlight come in like, so the first ones we did. I was in my Venice apartment, and then I switched over to my aunt's house. And that was the bedroom where we didn't have blinds on any of the windows. So like there was nothing. We could do it was just like the sun's going down. Now goodbye. Yeah. I remember that an accent that I look at all episodes. I'm like, oh, yes. We're used to record on this a little weird tiny desk and her camera would always fall off. Yeah. Struggles man, you had a hold your microphone. I think for the entirety one episode -til. There was. Yeah. Because something broke I don't remember exactly what. And then there was a lot of tens where I would have the microphone honest deck of books in my lap. Because it just I had nothing. I I was scraping by people what I had to like a bunch of books. That's my that's what my mic stand is. I think what big fancy one you could see see. Far, we've come to my favorite episodes to record. And this is actually something we get to pretty are the magic eight ball, three episodes. Oh my God. Right. Yeah. So fun because we just throughout these outlandish, Chrissy Teagan unveil animal crossing or something like that could be a thing. We can eight ball. You don't here. Right. I know you have to get other magic eight ball because you probably through the other one go. Hello, girl. I got that. You have. They do. Of course, it's a magic ball thing. You throw away she threw pumpkin. Steiner stealing your bike. Garbage lenghty of warning. I gave you several months to rescue that pumpkin. And it was never today. Think it was going to happen because you're like, I'm gonna do it. You never did. I'm like she's bluffing. You. We could have at least had a funeral for it. But that's fine. We still can't if you wanna hold a pumpkin memorial service navy do. Okay. You you think on what you'd like to say as the pumpkins eulogy? I used to eat in the pumpkins honor. Because I'm all about food. I was thinking we could have some that pumpkin pie. Core is just drink that. Oh that sounds delicious. Also, don't forget on the next time. You guys are in town for the anniversary stream two kilo rose was Halley. We didn't drink at a Paxi. So when Marisa was on the show Steiner, she brought her own little mini bottle of tequila rose to her studio because she's like drink on your show. Right. You were drinking, AVI. And so we explained to her what tequila rose was have you had Keila rose. I know I don't know. I did the confused dog head tilt at you. You will you will also love the tequila rose. So it's I'm sure it will. It has the words key Linnet yet to Keelan IRA friends now list, the was the fortnight pond show that you were Andrea was that part of something else that was in a podcast rate. I was before wasn't part of the podcast. And that was before how you're seeing the unblocks video. Yes, when Darren sug, the creative director fortnight came to our studio, I believe it was in August of twenty seventeen when they launched save the world into early access. They came to our studio here, and we did like an hour long stream with Darren where he showed us the game we played around. And as a gift, they left us this fortnight backpack, which I still have and it inside of it. There was a bunch of survival gear. And so I did an undocking video which you can still see on the website on YouTube dot com slash what's games where I take all these things out, and I still have the Maris. The meals ready to eat. Why would you wanna eat those unless you're going camping? Will I thought might be fun to like, try them just to taste them? But I kept everything of the kit inside this survival kit because you know, it's like the apocalypse and save the world or whatever all the husks invaded that the storm or whatever. And there was this poncho, and I took it out. And it was like this little tiny square when I took it out of the bag the backpack. And I was like what is this? And then I like proceeded to unfolded and on folded and unfolded, and then it became like, oh, there's arm holes. And then I like struggled to put it. It for Disneyland. So that you can go on splash mountain. I'm watching it right now. It's called fortnight technical backpack and boxing, and there's a sixteen second clip of Andrea putting on this punch. Oh, it's just the most thing in the entire world is she? Excuse me. Remember, they also put a walkman in there with cassette tape. There was like some kind of secret message. I never knew what actually ended up happening with that. I should follow up with them. And be like what's this? 'cause they're probably like what are you talking about? Go look at the battle royale by right? Yeah. But I still miss that bear that bear was good. Remember, I made there you are not bear. I was I was I was a bear. I was once. I don't remember exactly the wording, but I try clipping that out. But the audio clip out riot that moment, so I couldn't use it. As a clip of this really really funny to you are not bear fires guns that you your life. Oh shit. You're right. I'm not a bear. I haven't logged into save the world on a long time and other they've made a lot of substantial improvements over the last like six to twelve months. There's just so many games to play. It's hard to it's hard to. But I really did like what they were doing with that game. See we believe in four night before four nine became a global phenomenon. Yeah. Look at us trendsetters. Cool before it's cool. But we could literally go on and on and on. And we will definitely be talking about more of our favorite memories during our anniversary stream, which again is Saturday may eleventh, Mark your calendars. Will we doing a multi our event and hopefully having some fun guests pop by for the stream it's going to be a great day. But this has been fun. And again, Brit said if you wanna little trip down memory lane, you had to Facebook dot com slash what's good games and search through our videos. We have some expes book exclusives. That you won't find on any other platform because we did a lot of exclusive videos for Facebook. When we first launched in some deep cuts, some good ones. You guys are interested on over. And check those out and hit the like button because why not help support what we do here. But we love you guys. And we love making content for you. And we will pop a bottle when I see you ladies next month and raise a glass to a hundred more episodes and beyond. So thank you everybody for stopping by this week and for tuning him. Thank you again to quip and Robin Hood for sponsoring this episode, again, if you wanna be part of our fantastic membership program patriot dot com slash what's good games. And we will be back next week Britney will be on vacation Steiner night going to be holding down full. All right. Everybody have a fantastic weekend.

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Doctors and nurses describe dread as COVID-19 cases risk overwhelming hospitals

The Current

21:13 min | 5 months ago

Doctors and nurses describe dread as COVID-19 cases risk overwhelming hospitals

"Hey parents if you're looking for some screen free family fun while you're staying home. Check out the story store podcasts. From cbc kids and cbc podcast new story store. Shorties are released every week. These short original and hilarious stories fit anywhere in your day from breakfast to bedtime. The story store available on smart speakers. or wherever. you get your favorite podcasts. This is a cbc podcast. Fires burning in so many different areas and right now is the time to get those under control a warning candidates chief public health officer. Dr teresa tam. Those fires are cases of covid rising across the country and manitoba on saturday. A new single day record with fifteen deaths alberta and scotch win both reported record high number of cases as well on saturday so did ontario with almost sixteen hundred new cases. That number dropped to just over twelve hundred. Yesterday and severe cases across the country are increasing over the past week there were on average every day more than fourteen hundred people being treated in hospitals. Some areas of canada have seen that they now had to scale back on routine medical procedures because the hospital beds getting four. Much concern about icu. Capacity you have specialized medical resources personnel. And they're getting exhausted as well. Dr darren markland knows exactly what dr tamas is talking about. He's an intensive care. Physician and enough at royal alexandra hospital in edmonton dr good morning. Good morning you're about to head into a shift at the icu this morning. What do you think you'll be walking into well after the weekend. I think we're going to have and very important meetings about what. We're going to resource and staffer unit today and for this week. That's a big sigh as you start to answer that question. Well i think like Most canadians Were all a little tired of this But we also see what's coming and there are cells in the air already. I mean the first one hit because of thanksgiving. And we're waiting for the next one to hit because of halloween and so when you see exponential growth without a plan brings a lot of anxiety in the frontline healthcare workers. So when you say that you're going to need to have meetings around resource allocation tell me. What does that mean. What sort of decisions are you to have to make in the next few hours. So we have had a surge plan set up from the beginning of the pandemic. But it's one of these plans that It looks good on paper but is dependent on staffing and resources and hard decisions and so up until this point we've been running a full icu. But able to turn the patients over so that everyone gets the care they need but within this week next week. We're going to have to expand the icu in start drawing resources away from the laws We've already cut down elective surgeries to bring in more resources and prevent admissions. But we're going to have to do more. We'll have to reduce more surgeries. I take on take on more staff from other units and that process will have to continue as it does You start to get stretched a little thin and as that process exceeds our capacity then you have to make more difficult decisions about things like who actually will benefit the most from care and that's called called triage and that's somewhere we don't want to get to if we don't have to do you feel that that's inevitable. I think there are things that we can do that. We have to do them quick. We have to do them rapidly and we have to initiate the process. Now we still have two weeks of surge even if we initiate things right now And so yeah. There can be some very tough decisions in the next week to two weeks in the intensive care unit serve pressure. Is there on on frontline stuff like yourself. I mean you said that we're all tired and we are certainly but you're right there and you're working long hours right you know at at at the the the the tip of the spirits they say so what kind of pressures they're on people like yourself it's interesting. There's different types of pressure. I remember during the first wave. We just kept waiting for things to hit us and when it didn't post the guilt that you know canadians were so supportive and we never hit that first wave because everyone did the right thing Now with that in our back pockets Everyone's a little more realistic. We're seeing it where we've been doing this for eight and a half months The hospital moves much slower than it used to because of isolation everything is an additional challenge putting on the appropriate. Ppe taking it off ensuring that you don't make a mistake because one mistake will lead to an outbreak which can paralyze your hospital. That is an incredible weight and then add it to our nursing and Medical staff and physicians who are also trying to keep the rest of their life in order with their kid going to school and dealing with intermittent Quarantines and sick family members at this point. We're really seeing morale in the hospital. Start to take a dip for yourself. I mean are you frightened about what you know is going to await you when you when you arrive at work today or tomorrow or later this week you know. Fear doesn't factor into it anymore. I think we just done it long enough. We've had enough experience with we know what's going on It's more a dread about seeing what's coming And not seeing a definitive clear plan to deal with it as of yet. It's kind of like the cassandra complex. We know this was coming forever. We predicted it or epidemiologist. Knew it was going to be an issue. And now it's here and following the predicted curves and yet the measures are half hearted and not effective. You mentioned nurses. I wanna bring darlene jackson into this conversation. She's president of the manitoba. Nurses union that province currently has the highest per capita rates of covert infections in the country darlene. Good morning to you morning. Tell us what's happening in the small city of steinbach. What are you hearing about the situation at the hospital her. This steinbeck is a small town. That's just a small city just about fifty kilometers to winnipeg and It has almost become an epicenter of Cova nineteen in manitoba We're hearing that nurses are Are working crazy overtime hours. Just to keep up. They are going out and triaging patients in their vehicles. in the circular driveway of the hospital just because The emergency department is so jam packed with patients. There's no bad there's nowhere to move them Patients out of emergency and in order to bring another patient in there. They're going to have to rearrange the whole department. So they're going out and triage union vehicles if the patient stable enough they stay in their vehicle at their unstable than they have to come back into the emergency department. Rearrange make a bad put a structure in a hallway to get that patient in and they are working with the same staff. They've always worked with and it just is It's actually a nightmare. In this problem right now. Sarah newfield is an er nurse at that hospital and cbc spoke with her listen to what she described. It has been mentally and emotionally and physically. Absolutely exhausting is pushed us past what we thought we were able to handle and reciting to question. How is this sustainable. Where short-staffed every day. I think everyone is feeling the weight and the pressure darlene jackson. Tell me more but what you're hearing from nurses of what it's like to work in that environment whereas you say there's not enough space in the hospital. You have to treat people in in a parking lot. Well i i will tell you that are exhausted. They're frustrated. We knew that wave two was going to be much bigger than wave one. We absolutely knew that but our government basically sat on their hands for the for the entire summer when we could have been encouraging retired nurses to come back to work stopping up doing everything we can to get ready for wave two and basically nothing was done so we've moved into way to a numbers are growing. We had almost five hundred new cases yesterday. We're up twelve percent Infection rate and nurses are exhausted. You and this province went out and bought equipment. I mean we bought hundred ventilators with the space to put an in. But we don't have anyone to man that equipment and that's the biggest issue. How concerned are nurses about contracting the virus themselves and they're right in this environment in a hospital that is full to bursting presumably vulnerable as well. Well we've had about one hundred nurses infected since it started the second wave. And you're right. They're very vulnerable. I talked to a nursing steinbach. Who tells me that When she goes to work in the er she gets one n ninety five mask and not mask is gonna last year for her twelve hour shifts. So what happens. Is that every time. You don don. On that nasa that you've been exposed to covid patients with the risk of exposure get tired. So if you're taking breaks your dawning and doping at least five times during your ship. So what's happening is nurses are now not taking that mask off to hydrate or have breaks because number one. They're so busy they don't have time for a break but there's also a huge fear they're going to expose themselves just taking up single mask off. How's it possible. I mean that sounds like something from the beginning of the first wave. And then i thought we as a nation had figured out how to get appropriate and adequate supplies of p. We're still seeing many many many facilities in many units that are monitoring and rationing and ninety five. We have an agreement with With our shared health in this province that nurses can do point of care risk-assessment Which means they basically make risks on every patient prior to contact with them and then they are supposed to decide based on that. What p p the the you but what. We're finding when a nurse does do. Pcr a and requested then ninety five in some facilities. They have to fill a questionnaire on why they need that And ninety five or answer multiple questions and justified out which no one has time for. We are crazy busy in this province. No-one has time to be justified. That they why they need in in ninety five for a patient. So we're dealing with those issues on a daily basis. And i'm and we're back with a brand new season of seat at the table. The podcast where we have in depth conversations with notable guests from media sports and pop culture. But this time we're capturing personal stories about the power of the black lives matter movement the urgency of this moment and really what it will take to move forward seat at the table is available now on. Cbc listen on spotify or wherever. You get your podcasts. i'm not. I add host of ideas in this age of click bait and online. Shouting ideas is a meeting ground for people who want to deepen their understanding of the world. Join me as we crack. Open a concept to see how it plays out over place and time and how. It matters today from the rise of authoritarianism to the history of cult movies. No idea is off. Limits ideas is on the cbc. Listen or wherever you find your podcasts. Dr collins has been listening in. She's the president of the canadian medical association. I want to bring her into this conversation. Dr good morning to you morning. It's interesting in hearing from our previous two guests. They both said we knew this was coming. We knew that the second way was going to be worse than the first wave. Why haven't we if we knew this was coming. Why haven't we been prepared. We'll certainly Your previous speakers have given gut wrenching stories about what's going on at the coalface and i think what this speaks to is that There hasn't been a lack of collaboration and coordination Our public health officials from p hack on down have been working hard They have been looking at evidence on a on a daily basis. vote where to go and how to manage this pandemic. But i think we're the breakdown has occurred. Is that that. Information has not necessarily been brought together in a collaborative way with with levels of government. And by that i mean federal provincial municipal rate out to the health authorities in the hospitals where Dr mark and and miss jackson and many other healthcare workers are working. And so there's not been a a coordinated plan to address what we're seeing now and moreover To act now to change the working situations for these Your your previous speakers. Dr collins if you take a look at the situation beyond the er icu's as we heard from. Dr markland are at a crisis. Point right now. What impact with the surgery. Cases have on the larger healthcare system for things like nonessential surgeries for diagnostic procedures. Yeah that's a great question and it's a great concern and and we actually saw that Poster the first wave or earlier this year At the canadian medical association. We just released a study that showed a marked increase in wait times for surgeries for example hip and knee replacements But we didn't look at. What we know intuitively is that the delay in patients presenting to Their healthcare providers Results in in a delay in diagnosis and treatment for some pretty serious medical conditions patients were then and we'll be now reluctant to present for the fear of of contracting kovin and in hospitals. Dr murkland pointed out You just have to move all your resources to caring for the most deal so elective surgeries will will be cut back. diagnostic procedures Emery that are important in in defining a health problem We'll be cutback. Resources have to be channel to caring for the most sick so this is going to have a far reaching effect. We know the backlog from the first wave is high. I suspect that it will be much greater given this second wave or or just. We're calling it we've seen in the last couple of days Growing concern from doctors across this country and experts calling for long strict lockdowns to get covid cases down to zero. Is that the right approach called. so what what. Cma what we're saying is that that we need to listen to the experts in this and and and public health P hack has been the bedrock of the foundation in the management of this pandemic or in providing the best or the most up-to-date recommendations. We know this virus changes. We know the science and the advice around changes so it's to listen to Whatever their best recommendations are and to recognize that there's not a one size fits all what what edmund to needs and what Northern alberta needs maybe are quite different. The atlantic bubble is a whole different situation So it it's what ever that community or that area needs to reduce its its community Presence of cove it and prevent it from getting into the hospital dr markland. What about for your as Dr collins said at the coal face Do we need not these little circuit breaker lockdowns. But something more significant to stamp this thing into the ground i think everybody's negotiating With both the public and the government right now because Our chief medical officer of health job is to try to balance the greater public need with the the medical issues that are going on and not been an issue for a while. The we had a of people put together a letter who Who argued for the circuit breaker Just so that we could at least get our contact tracing contact tracing were flying blind but that would not stop community progression and we would be at another point where resources would be overwhelmed even with a two week blocking If you look at what. They've done in melbourne They did a much more strict. Six week Lockdown and we're able to get to community spread almost enough. So what do you want. What do you want to see from the government. We asked to speak with the albert to health minister who wasn't available for an interview but said that the government is is reluctant to have lockdown. Because that would end the government's words throw people out of work indiscriminately. So what do you want to see from your government. At the very least i need two weeks At best six I need an honest. I need an honest fact based dialogue with the health minister so that we can actually know where we're going. I don't need half-measures darlene. Jackson for you. The minister of health manitoba also not available to speak with us this morning. But what do you want. See from your government. Well we are right now in a circuit breaker two weeks and maybe extended to another four weeks. And i sincerely hoping extended to another four weeks. I know that our ice to user drowning and our contact tracing is so far behind me. And we're never going to get on top transmission if we can't catch up on the contact tracing and those public health nurses are working hours and hours overtime and we can't catch up so i think we need to shutdown dr collins. What about from the federal government. We should also mention. We asked to speak with the federal health minister. Patty hi do. We didn't hear back but what can be done on a national level as calling for. Is that all governments. Come together to come up with the best path forward to protect the health of all canadians. And at this point in time most specifically we need to protect the health and the ability of our frontline healthcare workers to care for these patients and for other patients no matter what's implemented as dr mclaughlin said we've got at least another two weeks of this ahead of us and but but those people working those emergency rooms in those. Icu need to know that. Someone's got their back that they have hope in the last minute will go to you. What is your message to canadians right now. I think we've done this before. I think we could do right thing before. I know we can do the right thing now. i know we need more support for people out there for elderly and people who are marginalized. But if we don't start doing the right thing and being civil and coming together on this we will see deaths and loss of family members like we have never seen before At least in the last several decades it needs to be done now and you optimistic that we will do the right thing you say can but will we do the right thing. That depends on it. Depends on every single person out there. and de-politicize this issue of covert. I think is the first step is good luck this morning. You're about to step into a very busy situation. And i appreciate you taking some time before your shift to talk to us. Thank you my pleasure. Doctor dr collins thank you very much thank you. And darlene jackson. Our best to your members and thank you you. Dr collins is the president of the canadian medical association. Doctor darren markland intensive care physician and in a frolic at the royal alexandra hospital in edmonton just about to begin. His shift in the icu. And darlene jackson president of the manitoba nurses union for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

darlene jackson manitoba Dr collins Dr teresa tam Dr darren markland dr tamas royal alexandra hospital cbc two weeks Nurses union fifty kilometers Sarah newfield twelve percent twelve hour Cbc canadian medical association darlene steinbach edmonton Cova
February 14, 2019: Hour 2

Here & Now

41:52 min | 2 years ago

February 14, 2019: Hour 2

"Support for here. And now comes from legalzoom for those wanting to start a business or secure their family's future from wills and trusts to LLC's and trademarks legalzoom is committed to helping people. Get started legalzoom dot com slash now. From NPR WB. You are I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here. And now and the news today in the business world is that Amazon is pulling the plug on New York City, the online retail giant had promised to build a new headquarters with twenty five thousand new jobs in queens in exchange for billions in tax breaks. But local opposition was too much, Robin Farzad is following this story. He's host public radio's full disclosure. Hi, robin. Hi, jeremy. So Amazon said in a statement today that it was clear local politicians would not work with the company to build the relationships required to get this headquarters off the ground. What happened exactly we'll step back for a second? And think about Jeff Bezos is awful two thousand nineteen to begin with. Here's the wealthiest man in the world in the midst of the most expensive divorce in history. And the National Enquirer trying to blackmail him. So then leftists and New York City community. Organizers are railing against what bettas thought was the gift of a lifetime. So of course, you want to dump someone on Valentine's Day, you say leftists you're talking about politicians on the left in New York City who didn't want this headquarters in queens. Yeah. I mean, Amazon is such a lightning rod. It's a tech mega-player valued at something like eight hundred billion dollars. That's still vying for regional tax breaks and other critics say it's not diverse enough in its hiring the benefits had pays out of the share of taxes. It pays you think about New York's decrepit subway system, so Amazon embezzles are naturally targets for activists like AO, see and Bernie Sanders, and they've been outspoken about this. But people like the democratic governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo was absolutely in favor of this headquarters being put in queens. Of course. I mean, you see swabs of queens are still endure election their old semi industrial applications. Brownfields you can bring a world class company like this. And and suddenly say that we are on par with Seattle is h q two and it would be a huge trophy. If you're running for president or something down the line. But I think he underestimated the vast blowback especially from from people in the progressive now just to remind everybody as if the the whole search for a second headquarters didn't give get enough attention. Amazon had asked all cities across the country to submit their bids and say, we want Amazon to come in with the second headquarters, they ended up picking to New York and just outside of Washington DC. Crystal city Virginia that was big news for those places. Now that they are saying they're not gonna put a second headquarters split in New York City. What happens? Yeah. The company is saying it's going to go ahead and supplement hiring at it's many other hubs to kind of cushion the blow of this. This bombshell announcement today northern Virginia you said crystal city, it's going to be huge beneficiary, and you can be sure that all sorts of runners up everyone from Miami. And smaller cities in the sun belt are calling up Seattle today to try to get in on more of that. But what they're saying is that they're not gonna do another another one it's going to be Washington or just outside of Washington. And then they'll be up Nashville. Right. But if you take the, you know, the notional amount that would have been done in New York over several years. Maybe you can make a case like is let me take five thousand at a time here, maybe you can kind of spread the love and sprinkle the wealth. Is it possible that they're going to see the same kind of opposition locally in Virginia that they saw in New York City, and that they won't end putting second headquarters they're not nearly as much opposition down here. In virginia. There's fear over the infrastructure hit. You know, how a region already infamous for its traffic bottlenecks and shortage of affordable starter homes is going Zorg this gift, but I think most other places are desperate for this kind of thing. They're not in a position like New York to be able to have Google and Yahoo and apple and other places in Wall Street as backups just briefly, Robin, the story driving the markets today is not this Amazon news. It's the fact that retail sales fell one. Point two percent in December biggest drop since September of two thousand nine what's going on there? I mean, it's it's unbelievable to think that you have an economy like this, which is near full employment and the stock market doing well, but we are coming off of a period that saw triple hit of headwinds partial government shutdown the stock market's pullback in December then a stretch of poor weather. So if you're a category like retail, that's desperate for good news. You don't have any sort of margin of safety Farzad, host of public radio's full disclosure. Thank you. My pleasure. Take care. Well in Washington today. Lawmakers are expected to pass a Bill that would give President Trump one point four billion dollars for new fencing along the US Mexico border, but journalists working along the border of finding themselves subject to increase scrutiny by customs agents. Reporter max Rivlin Nadler has the story Arianna Dressler is a photo journalist based in San Diego. She began covering asylum seekers in Tijuana last spring, she crosses the border several times a week and starting in December. Over every time she crossed back into the US. She was pulled into secondary. That's where agents take people aside for further questioning sometimes for hours agents asked her about events taking place in Tijuana and the people working with asylum seekers. That's not my job getting anything and doing their homework for them other journalists stopped at the border have said that agents have shown them photo lineups of individuals asking them to help identify activists and other organizers that the agents described as instigating asylum-seekers this type of behavior is alarming says, Alexandra Eller Beck. She's with the committee to protect your analysts, her organization issued an urgent report last November about increasing incidents of CB P agents searching journalists electronic devices and questioning them about their reporting and their sources they've heard of at least a dozen journalists who have been questioned by CB p while crossing the border the ability for journalists to project. Jewish is the ability for them to protect information. They they gather in the course of the reporting the ability for them to be seen as independent along forcement, not sort of another intelligence arm of the government is so central to what journalism is in addition to journalists volunteers working with asylum seekers and lawyers who advise them on their rights are also becoming increasingly wary of CB p searches one attorney working with asylum seekers in Tijuana told NPR that last month agents went through sensitive legal documents, she was carrying. She asked to remain anonymous as her organization continues to work in Tijuana Maria, shabas, an immigration lawyer based in San Diego, she's concerned about what's going on at the border attorney client privilege is huge. And if they have the right to go through our phones to our, laptops. If I take a case file with me, and they wanna make a copy of everything that's definitely breaking attorney client privilege at the same time that screening. Of journalists and lawyers have ramped up several have been barred from entering the country by Mexican authorities. Because of new alerts placed on their passports. Mexican officials have told them the alerts come from US authorities. Nicole Ramos is a US citizen and a lawyer with the organization alo throw lotto based in Tijuana. She had her expedited border crossing card confiscated by US. Authorities last month and has since stayed in Mexico, and it's not coincidental that these were issued in conjunction with the rollout of MVP MPP is the migrant protection protocols a brand new policy that aims to keep asylum seekers in Mexico as their claim is processed the department of homeland security has stressed that asylum seekers would still have access to lawyers but hasn't specifically spelled out. How CB p declined repeated requests for comment about specific cases where journalists and lawyers have been. Barred from entering Mexico. Meanwhile, congress is growing interested Senator Ron Wyden. Office says the Senator has reached out to sea be p with questions about their scrutiny of reporters and activists at the border for here. And now, I'm max riven Adler in San Diego and a quick check in now on a horrific story the FBI has released sixteen of convicted serial killers. Samuel little drawings of some of the ninety women. He now claims to have murdered little is already serving consecutive life sentences for three murders in the nineteen eighties in Los Angeles. He's been working with investigators and drawing other women. He claims to have killed decades ago, including in Georgia, Josh sharp is with the Atlanta Journal constitution. Josh how's this reverberating there? Well, the response in Atlanta, so far seems to be a bit muted. And that is because at this point. No one knows apparently even Sam little doesn't know who who these women he killed what? Worst gives me and also the killings were in in the early eighties. So quite a very long time ago. So that's why these sketches hopefully can jog someone's memory to someone who who may have died years ago. Well, little claimed seven murders in Georgia have any of those been connected to other murders. Authorities have confirmed that the they believe they've matched two of those one in Dade County Georgia, which is extreme northwest Georgia near the Tennessee border and one in the make an area which is middle Georgia, which is not far from the tiny town where Sam from understand they're working to confirm three in Atlanta and two into Vanna. Correct. Well, so far, we know authorities have matched thirty four of his confessions. Two killings. He claims to have committed. But again, this is doesn't mean that. He definitely did it if he did he would be, you know, perhaps the worst serial killer in America. And now the. Officials are asking for help. And they're saying that in many cases, these pictures, maybe of women whose deaths were overlooked because they might have been prostitutes drug addicts. And would not have been thought that they were murdered. It might have been thought the overdosed. While the authorities say that some of the women that he killed were perhaps involved in drugs or prostitution, all of them don't seem to fit those criteria necessarily. There was an eighteen year old girl named for Dona Smith whose parents said she simply went out for ice cream one day and never returned. This was in July nineteen Ninety-two and her remains were found about a month later in someone's backyard. But. For all this time until Sam Sam little started, making confessions recently, the case was cold officials are hoping someone will identify. Some of these women were posted it here now dot org. Josh sharp with the Atlanta Journal constitution. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much. Republicans in Washington are spending a lot of time these days attacking a plan by congresswoman Alexandria, Akhazia Cortez to raise taxes on the super-rich here. She is explaining the idea to CBS's, sixty minutes. Once you get to the Tipi tops on your ten million dollar as sometimes you see tax rates as high as sixty or seventy percents that seventy percent tax rate came up again last month at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, a conference filled with rich people panelists including the billionaire founder of Dell technologies Michael Dell and MIT economics. Professor Eric Brin Josephson were asked about the seventy percent proposal. Michael Dell do you support this? I just want to say I'm thrilled that there. Well, look, I mean, you know, my wife, and I set up a foundation about twenty years ago, and we would have contributed quite a bit more than the seventy percent tax rate on my income on my annual income, and I feel much more comfortable with our ability as a private foundation to allocate those funds than I do giving them to the government. All right. I'm not supportive of that. Well, and and I don't think it would help the growth of the US economy. That's interesting. And can you say a little bit more about why why you don't think it would name a country where that's worked ever? United States briefly in the eighties. No, no for from about the nineteen thirties through about the nineteen sixties the tax rate averaged about seventy percent at times it was up as high as ninety five percent. And those are actually pretty good years that debate continued and we'll post a video at here now dot org, but we're going to have a debate of our own right now with two communists, who have different points of view. Chris Edwards is director of tax policy. Studies at the Cato Institute a libertarian think tank in Washington, Chris welcome thanks for having me and Marshall Steinbach is also with us research director and fellow at the Roosevelt institute of progressive think tank. Welcome to you Marshall, great to be here. So what about this idea? Obviously there is disagreement about this. But Marshall is Eric brindell sin right there that the US had much higher tax rates and was able to have very good growth yet. He absolutely is. I think that extreme. Was quite revealing about the court issues at play when it comes to progressive tax policy for one thing the billionaire said, well, we can allocate the money better in my private foundation, which I have total control over an I get to decide who benefits and who doesn't from the dispensation of my fortune, or we can give it to the government where democracy and the mechanisms of a communal distribution are at play. So I think the core issue with progressive tax policies would we want making decisions in our economy, billionaires or democracy. Chris what do you think? Well, I think that I would agree with what Michael delta exchange, the you know, that he can't allocate capital better. I think most very high earners in America. They don't have inherited wealth. They're very productive people there entrepreneurs in their venture capitalism. The brain surgeons and other very smart people these people innovate and start companies and the create whole new industries. So I think people like, you know, from Sam Walton all the way through. Steve Jobs, and many others benefit the rest of us enormously. We cannot go back to those high tax rates. We had in the mid twentieth century. Globalization has vastly changed the world economy. So the United States is not the only country that cut its top income tax rate. The average rate across industrial countries fell from sixty eight percent in one thousand nine hundred eighty two just forty three percent today across all of Europe and Canada and Australia. Everyone slashed their top tax rates because capital flows. Started going over borders, and you couldn't contain wealthy people anymore countries realize it's in the Rhone self interest to have moderate tax rates at the top end. And allow wealthy people to do what they do best which is invest in the domestic economy. What about that Marshall the idea that that competitively the US can't keep the rates that high? If if other countries, aren't yeah, I think we have seen indeed lots of countries cut tax rates on the top. And that's exactly why inequality has gone up so much. So we have experienced cutting tax rates the big question in the economy right now is why or corporate profits so high while corporate investment is so low despite the fact that we just had a gigantic corporate tax cut the economic prediction behind enacting a policy like that is that it's supposed to induce. The so-called productive people in the economy to invest and expand and the rest of us benefit thereby. And we know it didn't work this time. It hasn't worked anytime for the last forty years, and that's had disastrous consequences for everybody else. Okay. This conversation could go on forever. But I do want to get to another part of this. Which is what Alex Andrea Qazi Cortez's trying to tackle here, which is income inequality in this country. And we know that according to the national bureau of economic research, the top point one percent of people own almost as much wealth as the bottom ninety percent of people. Chris what about that? How do you tackle income inequality? Without putting more tax on the rich. What one thing I would say about that is that I it's true. There is a lot of income inequality, but the US is very dynamic. So the IRS put their data every year on the four hundred richest people in the country with the highest incomes, and they track these people over time three quarters of the people in in the IRS top four hundred every year change. So it's the US economy is very dynamic. This is not inherited wealth. We're talking about it's dynamic because of all the entrepreneurship because of all the new industries being created the second thing, I would say is there is income inequality created by government. So for example, crony capitalism on the federal government spends twenty five billion a year on farm subsidies. Those farm subsidies, go to wealthy landowners. I would eliminate policies like that that benefit the wealthy. And then at the bottom end the government does stuff that raises costs on low income folks, it raises the cost of gasoline with ethanol mandates raises the cost of clothing and shoes with import tariffs. So I would I would try to get government out of the way when it itself is exacerbating, inequality Marshall. I think the fundamental debate that we're having here is a question about whether there exists a moral hierarchy of wealth. I think there's a tradition within the field of economics and in general public debate. That the reason why good wealthy people are wealthy is because the government did not intervene. Instead it allowed their brilliant ideas to take flight and incurred the income and wealth that they merited in the free market. I mean, it makes sense in kind of economic theory. But it just so happens that theory has nothing to do with reality. I just want to ask each of you to tell me what you think is we heard that number seventy percent in Alexandria, causing Cortez's plan for the tax rate on people over ten million dollars. What do you think Marshall first of all that the top tax rate should be on on those people? Yeah. Seventies. Not nearly high enough men ten million is much too high of a threshold for it to kick in. So which I think I well as Brin Yeltsin said in that in that debate we used to have a tax. Rate of ninety one percent in this country on the top incomes. I think that kicked in at a threshold that would nowadays be in the neighborhood of, you know, mid six figures type of income and that was when this country's economy grew the fastest. And I think we now know that the economy did much better back when the top marginal tax rate was ninety one percent. Okay. And Chris what are your thoughts on what the top rate should be on the wealthiest Americans? Well, it should be it should be much lower should be as low as we can get it. It's not reality. We're not going to go back up to seventy percent tax rate. What would happen? If we tried to raise a rate that high is he getting massive tax avoidance innovation. Also, even if you if you tried to do that the federal government hardly raise any money. I mean, European governments are bigger than the US government. But how do they finance it? The only way you can finances. It is it by having a mass tax on the middle class in Europe. It is called a value added tax. It's twenty percent on average on everything people by a clothing, food, and automobiles etc. Or all taxed. At that twenty percent in Europe. So if folks like Alexandria ks Ortez and Elizabeth Warren one at bigger government. Ultimately, it's going to be a mass tax on the middle class the funds that okay? So we've heard what each of you have to say, I wonder though, when each of you hear that and hear what the other side says. You almost couldn't be further apart from each other. And I guess that tells us a little bit about this country right now, there are a lot of people who would agree with each one of you know, I I think that's right there is there is a large sort of partisan an ideological division in the country. And I don't know what to do with it. I think we do have to look at the experience of other countries that we have to adopt the best practices we see abroad. And from my point of view is pretty clear that the best practice around the world. These days is to go to lower flatter tax systems, if the government wants to raise more money, and I'm not in favor of that. But the you know, they would have to go to some broad sales tax or value added tax. You're not gonna get any more money at of hiking taxes on high income folks, nor would you want to because I do think that would damage the economy entrepreneurs would leave United States, there'd be less investment. And that would hurt everybody and not just high income folks Marshall, I actually think it's not correct that. At progressive tax policy is a polarizing issue. I think it actually offers way bringing this country together. Some new polling data released from data for progress shows that Alexandria, Causey Cortez's proposal and Elizabeth Warren proposal, actually, get the vast majority of support and even a plurality of support among Republicans. So I think there is a lot of political polarization in this country. If we want to end it the best way to do that would be to enact a confiscatory progressive tax regime. Okay. We'll leave it there. Chris Edwards who is director of tax policy. Studies at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington and Marshall Steinbach who is a research director and fellow at the Roosevelt institute. That's progressive thing. Take thanks to both of you for joining us. Thank you very much. Thanks for having me. Here. And now is supported by legalzoom who want you to know that if you wanna make twenty nineteen year you finally start a business or secure your family's future. Legalzoom can help with their network of independent attorneys. Licensed in all fifty states legalzoom can help you navigate your legal needs from wills and trusts to LLC's trademarks contract, reviews and more. And the best part is legalzoom is not a law firm. So they don't charge by the hour. More at legalzoom dot com slash now. Colorado governor Jared police's congratulating Denver teachers for ending a three day strike saying. The Denver's kids are the biggest winners in a tentative deal that was reached overnight the teacher's union and the Denver school district agreed to pay raises of up to eleven percent next year with Bilton cost of living increases some teachers return to their jobs today. The strike in Denver was part of a wave of teacher activism that began last year when teachers in Arizona, Oklahoma and West Virginia walked off their jobs. Joining us now is Jenny Brian Deane education reporter for Colorado public radio Jenny you're up all night covering this agreement in Denver is it fair to say both sides compromised. Yes, it is fair to sable sides compromise, though, I do think the district moved quite a bit considerably towards the Union's proposal. But yes, the they compromised in the sense that the union really wanted much higher base salary. Denver has one of the lowest competitive. Wages. I should say in the nation. And they got that on the other hand the district was very intense upon maintaining incentives for a set of schools that are very high poverty in have really struggled academically. They believe those incentives allow teachers help teachers stay there help retain teachers the union disagrees with that philosophy. But in the end, they agreed to keep those incentives will teacher said that the current merit compensation system which was once hailed as a national model and embraced by the teacher's union has been broken for years. Explain that why did they think that? Yeah. There were about ten to twelve incentives to start. I mean, everything from being in a high poverty school being in a herd to fill position like math. But what happened is eventually those incentives changed over time. And I'll give you an example. Let's say a neighbor you're getting you're in a title one school and you're getting. Title one incentive that means a high poverty incentive. But then your neighborhood gentrify is. And they're slightly more affluent students there, you would lose that incentive. Other other examples like that teachers found that those incentives were fluctuating, they were unreliable and unpredictable. I talked to about forty teachers one day and not one of them could tell me how much money they were making. So it was very confusing and broken in the district even agreed that that was the case and that helped in the negotiations. We'll is the underlying issue here in Denver that this is a city that is growing very fast that it is getting more expensive. And that the teacher contract is just hasn't kept up with what's happening on the ground in Denver. That's exactly right. It was almost the perfect storm accomplishments of issues housing prices here have just absolutely skyrocketed and were also in a state that is pretty much near the bottom. And it's it we're in a little bit of an unusual situation. Colorado's the only state where the legislature cannot raise taxes and every time a ballot measure to raise money for public education has gone before voters. It's. Turned down. So currently Denver has lost. Or I should say. The state has withheld nearly three quarters of a billion dollars from Denver public schools. It's a very complicated issue. But that's feeding into all of the chronic underfunding that you see in many cities. But yes, you're right. The housing prices certainly added to this the strike, but is Jenny Brian dean education reporter with Colorado public radio. Thanks so much Jenny. Thank you. And you're listening to here now. On Valentine's Day, many of us reach for poetry. Maybe it's Mary Oliver who he lost this year. What a loss. Maybe it's roomy or maybe it Sarah k an award-winning poet and contributed to poetry are ex a column where readers writing with emotional conundrums and three resident poets sort of write a prescription for the perfect poem to carry them through. It's published every week by the Paris review will link you it here now dot org as we convene a special radio edition of poetry are ex with pharmacist. I mean, poet, Sarah. K hi, Sarah. Hi, you know, most I'm reading through and most of the things that you respond to our problems. But we are going to ask you for, you know, the the love that maybe isn't as problematic, but what is the goal here. It's not to fix the problem. Right. No. I have a phrase that I say a lot which is I don't think poetry will save us. And yet and yet, and I think it's the and yet part we hope but in the meantime, if it doesn't save us. It's all it offers bomb living with the problem in a more loving way. Let's start. Here's a letter from someone very much in love, but with complicated feelings, they write dear poets. That's how they addressed the column I'm in love and away of never experienced before. I've always kept a safe distance from my relationships. But now I feel vulnerable for the first time, and they go on to say is there a poem out there for this feeling because I'm emotionally dependent on him. And it makes me anxious and a little scared would you say well for this particular person, I said, I'm delighted to share with you a poem by one of my favorite poets Natalie Diaz, and the poem is called when the beloved asks what would you do if you Boca up, and I was shark. That's the name of the palm. And there's this one section in particular that I love in which she says, I wouldn't fight not kick flailed not carry on like one driven mad by the black neoprene, wet suit of death. Not like sad mouth despair. I'd albacore nor blubbery Pinna peds were slug my ferocious streamlined lovers. Titanium white knows that bulls eye of cartilage. No, I wouldn't prolong it. Instead, I'd place my head onto that dark altar of jaws prostrated pilgrim at Melville's glittering gates climb into that mysterious window starred with teeth the one lit room in the charnel house. I know the words go for it. Yeah. Go for it. You know, this is not you know, roses are red violets are blue not not even close. No, what about somebody feeling alone? Here's another letter writer. Dear poets, I'm feeling quite lonely this week. I'm wondering if you knew of a poem that both acknowledged that sadness, but isn't consumed by it. I'm feeling very swallowed up in my loneliness, and I need a nice poetry life preserver. So for this person a lot of people right in about loneliness. But I really liked that this person specifically requested a poem that acknowledges sadness without being consumed by it. And so I recommend it. A poem by Jose Olivarez from his new book said is an illegal and the poem is called not love is a season. And the poem starts. Not love is a season. I drank fire a dozen blankets. Couldn't keep me from shivering winter is an unavoidable fact, unless you're from Kelley, and I don't trust people who don't know the freeze of loneliness the dead branches abandoned by the bird's still chasing summer. My is all telling me, I'll meet someone else. Like, I want to meet someone else my wound deep, but mine already time working to ease. My grip on my hurt. I know misery thaws. Not love is a season it'll pass. Yeah. I think that you know, there's a lot of different metaphors you could use for heartbreak, you know, a whole you're trying to climb out of a hole is difficult to escape and can seem impossible. But a season must arrive and Jose says winter is an unavoidable fact, and it also must pass that is what seasons do. And so if your loneliness is here, it also means it will not be here forever. And it's okay to acknowledge it and even maybe to relish in in a little bit. But but I'm hoping that this person allows room for fine with online, and again, these are people with predicaments on this day. And I sometimes think they outnumber those who just kind of glide through it. So let's keep going with somebody who wants to rekindle an old fling didn't work. She writes after long separation I spontaneously invited an ex fleeing to join me on a trip. It didn't go. Well, he was disinterested. He was born. Bush skipping ahead in her letter. She says it was more like babysitting. A sullen teen I had some long lingering feelings and hopes about us as a pair over it. Now, I'm not heartbroken, but I still feel like a morning the end of a long fantasy. Now, do you have a poem for this? Yeah. So everyone signs their letter with a pen name anonymously. And so this person signed their letter. Sincerely, wrong, girl. And I really wanted her to know that I didn't think she was the wrong girl. It was that. She's the right girl, but with the wrong guy, and I said actually more specifically, you're the right girl who has fallen for the age old trick of falling for the fantasy guy. But winding up with the actual guy who as it turns out, you might not actually like that much all in caps. Yeah. And so there's this poem by Mariel recognizer called waiting for us, and the whole poem is amazing. But the beginning of the poem is he said he would be back and we drink wine together. He said that everything would be better than before. He said we were on the edge of a new relation. He said he loved me that going into me he said he was going into the world and the sky he said all the buckles were very firm. He said, the wax was the best wax acres. Yeah. And I I love this. Poem because first of all it suggests that women have been falling for the myth of men in lieu of the real man in front of us since well mythical times, and it's easy to get swept up in the stories. We tell ourselves about people, especially when they're far away and the end of the poem goes, I remember the girls laughing. I remember they said he only wanted to get away from me. I remember my mother saying inventors poets a trashy lot. I remember she told me those who try out inventions are worse. I remember. She added women who loves such are the worst of all I have been waiting all day or perhaps longer. I would have liked to try those wings myself. It would have been better than this. And we remember echoes the son of data Louis, the mythological figures data Lewis made wings out of wax and feathers for himself in his son. And he told his son don't fly too close to the sun. But it Chris did. Of course the wings melted. And I have loved that. He said, the wax was the best heck's. But no he flew too close to the sun. So Sarah Kay. Let's not leave with that image of, you know, wings, melting and acres plummeting from the sky and disappointing yet, another young woman. Can you have some poems for us that are just straight ahead? You know, we're in love and at least for this day problem free. Yeah. I have a poem called here. And now that goes here. Now, I have only these hands this mouth the skin as wide as a shoreline this beehive between my ears, this buzz buzz. You are the best thing I never planned. This is the widest I can stretch my arms without dropping things. This is the first time. I don't care if I drop things this is what dropping things feels like this is what happens when the flowers wake up one morning and decide to smell human it. Confuses us makes us reach backwards into places. That are sharp feel around for things. We've dropped I have forgotten. What I was looking for. It doesn't seem important. You brought me flowers you made the bed. This is the widest. I can stretch my arms. This is all I have right now. Here. Well listeners if you steal it for this evening. Please credit Sarah, k surrogacy, the award-winning poet and contributor to poetry are ex the column in which readers right in with their emotional problem and resident poets prescribe a poem link up at here now dot org. If you want to do it, but meantime, Sarah Kay. Thank you so much. Thank you. Again. Poetry Rx published weekly by the award winning literary quarterly the Paris review. Check it out well at here now dot org listened to another of Sarah as love poems. Love letter from the toothbrush to the bicycle tire. You're welcome. It is great. And let us know your Valentine's Day poem picks help someone else out. Sometime between now and April. First Russia will disconnect itself from the global internet for a few hours, the country said it plans to sign off as part of an exercise to gauge how well it could withstand a cyber attack that originates outside Russia. Critics also say it's another step toward creating a surveillance state. Ben Brock Johnson covers tech for here now. Hi, ben. Hi, jeremy. So what does this mean that they would disconnect Russia from the internet? Okay. So the bad news is I'm not a network systems administrator, Jeremy, and I'm not sur timbers Lee who invented the internet. So I don't know the technical parts of this. I couldn't do it for you. If you wanted me to. But basically the way this works is a lot of the information we access as we go about our day isn't a direct line that exists inside our own country. Right. We might access information that's for the user actually in Germany or in Canada or somewhere and Russia's the same way when he user goes to get information online that information may. Cannot be stored in Russia. So the idea here is to make sure that it is all stored in Russia or that their systems are hard enough for accessing the internet that users can access information online, should there be a disruption like this. And why do they say that they're doing this? So this is part of a law that has been drafted. They're called the digital economy national program and Russia says that this is about making sure an effort to isolate the country by cutting it off from the internet won't actually cut it off from the internet it essentially a defense against some kind of potential outside attack. But there are two reasons for this happening, Jeremy as you might, you know, assume it is about internal control as much as it is protection from an external attack protection from external attack. But Russia has been as we know the one that often launches the cyber attack. But they're worried here that the roles would reverse and they would be attacked. Yeah. And you know, I guess in fairness one could say, you know. You know sanctions and other efforts of influence on the global stage often involves the internet. So you could imagine this scenario playing out. I think these types of situations often see state actors fighting fire with fire, you might remember this called militias computer, worm Stuxnet, which almost a decade ago. Now crippled nuclear facilities in Iran. It's believed that that was a cyber weapon developed at least in part by the US. So it there is kind of a back and forth that happens here. And it also makes you think though that Russia could be getting closer to the China model. And if you go to China right now, and you try to open up Google, you try to open up Facebook. You can't do it. They've got control over the internet. There is that part of this to that Russia is able to say we're the ones in control of whether the internet is on or off and what you can look at. And what you can't. I think that's definitely right? And that's what we're seeing here effectively is Russia trying to trying to recreate that in inside Russia. So I actually reached out to a journalist and author working in Moscow. His name is Andre sold the dove, and he wrote a book called the red web. And he says is this is definitely a concern. He gave this recent example. So the Republic of Ingushetia, which is part of the Russian federation last October thousands of people were actually protesting there. They were protesting a border deal between Russia and Chechnya and mobile internet in this area. Which was a tool for protesters was cut at the request of secret services reportedly. So yes, this is surely about Russia trying to develop systems of control over communication inside the country. Does the US have the ability to do something like this to shut the internet down for a period of time? So this is a good question while we are developing more aggressive tools of attack all the time. I think and I, you know, think have been for some time along with tools of hardening our own systems just against other. Kinds of disruptions boasted both in terms of the non-consumer internet's of power plants and other infrastructure that could be vulnerable. Figuring out ways of cutting off those really mission critical parts of our infrastructure from internet disruptions that might happen. I think the US continues to be a place where the ideal is to not create these kinds of digital borders. Right. The worldwide web as we know it is supposed to be worldwide in every everybody is supposed to be connected to each other. And I think US tech companies as well as the the US government, depending on you know, certain circumstances that you're talking about isn't really trying to figure out a way to like flip a switch and disconnect the US from the internet elsewhere in the world. Well, that's kind of nice to hear we can hope we know for sure that has been Brock Johnson who covers tech for here. Now. Ben, thank you. Thank you. What we're tracking the torrential rain. That's falling across much of California today, you can blame it on. The atmospheric river that's funneling moisture from the tropics near Hawaii across the Pacific, flooding, mudslides and debris flows or hitting northern California. Hard early this morning. A woman was rescued from her house after a mudslide ripped the home off its foundation in sausalito southern Marin fire captain Doug Peterson described the rescue on the local NBC affiliate. Surprisingly, we could see we could see a hand through some of the debris. So we knew where she was she was screaming for help. So we were fortunate in that we could find a right away Peres that burned in recent wildfires are particularly vulnerable to flooding. We're going to be keeping a close eye on this story, Robin. I was just in southern California recently, these houses are not built for this kind of rain. They were all leaking saw her hand. Yeah. Good that they got her here. Now is a productive NPR in WB or an association with the BBC World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here now.

US Chris Edwards Russia Marshall Steinbach Jeremy Hobson Washington Sarah Kay New York City Alex Andrea Qazi Cortez Washington Amazon federal government Virginia Europe queens Sam Sam Seattle Josh sharp
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Psychology of Entrepreneurship

40:42 min | 10 months ago

32. Rebroadcast: Volume 01: More of Philip McKernans Wisdom and How Its Even More Meaningful Now

"Nefarious, man like the brain works fucked up. The mind is one of the most deceiving manipulative pieces of equipment flesh. Human bodies on hers, I never have trusted my brain. Leaves. You are the decision maker. Hi It's not runs. Lee I'm Kelly. One of the produces behind the psychology of entrepreneurship and for any new listeners. This is a series where we go inside the minds of entrepreneurs, artists and athletes to see. What is the psychology behind the decisions? Today! We're GONNA. Be something a bit different. We're going to be revisiting volume one of this series where runs. We had a conversation with the amazing Philip maccagnan. A lot has happened since this volume came out, and parts of the conversation have been brought up through other volumes tobacco what our guests have been saying, so we thought would be interesting to rebroadcast this volume and pull in pots from other volumes to see how everything ties in together. kind of like inception, but applaud cosmology. I think. I can't remember the point. In anyway, let's jump right into the minds of these entrepreneurs and see how thought cuttings behind the decisions connect. saw. My name is Rawnsley, and for as long as I can remember. I've wanted to take my audience on Jenny Way. They challenged the accepted beliefs or so-called fruits. And since I was battling a whole bunch of questions in my mind I decided to talk with people who had versions of answers that might or would perhaps challenge my own belief systems, these stories starting with Philip McCain. Philip. Like this really interesting. I've never met someone like Philip MacKinnon, and he's a Hilo of sorts I've watched him. Get to people trauma. It's fascinating. I'm met Philip that an event last year and we had dinner together and I decided to go. My name is Philip mckernan on the founder of one last talk. A coach and I deliver and run retreats all over the world for entrepreneurs and leaders who are seeking clarity about their present. So for the at this dinner right and in my first interaction through conversation. Actually he asked me a few questions that got me really emotional. And I cried at this dinner table. With for the people at the same table. That I'd met for the first, Time. So I went and got his book. It's the only book could that's on my bedside table and has been like for months and months. It's called one loss talk and it's about this movement. It happens all over the world where people delivered their won loss talk. If you had to give one loss on the planet, what would it be and what would you say and I remember? One of the proudest moments from as an individual was being able to finish a one halt live event? Put the speakers on stage Steinbach and look at the speakers in front of one hundred fifty people and say thank you for allowing me to stand on your stage. And I said Ladies and Gentlemen Your speakers. They got the applause stunning Vatian, and then we shut the event down to get a better idea of impact that one last Hawk has his David Cohen in volume fourteen, talking about his experience, yeah one last talk. I went to the one in boulder had no idea what to expect. Still just said he got gotta come to this thing. And someday you'll be onstage doing this. Somehow introverted I don't know if I'll ever do that. But Just. Just crying like you know never spent the entire day dispaced weekly crying right so emotional and you know that'll turn a lot of people off from the event, but basically people are standing up saying the one last thing they would ever say to the world right even though they're not. You know it's not the last thing they're pretending that it would be. And what would they want to convey to the world? And the stories are just so incredibly powerful, right people that have gotten out of long term jail sentence. Talking about you know when the thing happened that put them in jail. And how they feel about it today, their journey God just such an emotional thing. And it's a construct that I. Love the first time I saw it. which is just a mental model of you know this is the last time you'll be able to say something wrong. What USA it's meaningful and I immediately thought of the startups that I work with. And I started weekend which we run a thousand times a year and one hundred twenty countries and has said. There's one hundred thousand would be entrepreneurs going to these things like what if we inspire them and said what if this is your one last startup? Here's what's really interesting for me Philip. Just like me doesn't really like the limelight or the credit and. That loss statement was one such example. Then he said this. That kinda explained that feeling had just a little bit more so as much as I think. The one last talk is delivery and giving a lot to the world I also think I've received tremendous amount most which I haven't stopped to really contemplate a feel like a father who watches his son. Do something that you. You hope he will do something and you know he can do someday and you know he could. He has, or she has the ability and then. Then you finally see it when you're least expecting. And when you see a personal wakened to themselves, I think one of the most extraordinary opportunities in the world, and one of the scariest things is actually to meet and to walk down the street and bump into yourself, and when you see somebody, connect with their truth and their story, and to realize they have value far, and above the N. contemplate any aspect. They saw a value beyond all of that. It's just magical is pure magic. This kind of reminds me of Melissa Embassy and he's awakening from volume twenty one was in a hospital, feeling the most unwell of ever felt, but the most alone I have ever felt in my entire life like an I literally. Is this. Is this what we're here for to Safa and at this time I was. Twenty four years old and a few weeks before this that I ended up in hospital I just started. This thing called Yoga. And I was like what is this Yoga Business? It feels so good so I just started it so I've met these new friends at Yoga. And they sent me a care package to the hospital, and in that care package was like crystals and. Angel cards and teas and herbal tinctures and a book that changed my life. That book was Louise As you can heal your life and I remember reading this book. And I would turn to my mom, and I said to her. Why didn't you tell me that we create our own life? And I did go through a blame stage toward my parents, and I have moved through that and I'm so grateful and I just love and adore them now, and that was the awakening for me. I read this book and I literally like that. Decided to change my entire life. There was this voice inside me. That said if you get healthy and happy again, you'll live a life beyond your wildest dreams and I didn't know what that voice was i. now know it's your intuition, but like. I didn't know what intuition was back then. He challenges everything about the stuff you already believing and challenges all our Patna. Challenges all my patterns for sure. Challenges everything that I thought was correct. I've said to be I. Dare you to be happy. I fucking dare you to run the risk to take a chance on yourself to do something that you've always wanted to do. And Room the risk of being happy, because so many of us WanNa play safe because we think. Our mind deceives us into thinking that. If you're in control, and if you play safe, you will be safe. There is no greater lied that we tell ourselves. Because safety is driven by insecurity and insecurity is driven by a need to control in control is a fucking illusion it does not exist has not exist, and yet we live in a world so many. Many people are trying to control themselves other people the outcome and there's this obsessive meeting to know. And I always say that this needing to know prevents you from ever truly knowing James Whitaker had an interesting perspective on this in volume twenty four, when we talked about how it can be hard for entrepreneurs to enjoy the climb to the top of the. The mountain how that manifests in the short term is extreme frustration for anything like that. If anything I feel, is on absently perfect like if I have a sip of coffee in its spills, if I if anything happens like if I'm doing something when I'm cooking, and it's not perfect and I'm Gordon Ramsay, these this is as you said especially where you don't. Don't have a measurable benchmark of what is success. When you're hunting for perfection, I think can make it even worse. Why do we sit these unobtainable standards of perfection in a way that we can't measure it, and sometimes even having that measuring component can be bad because we feel a bad self sense, self esteemed bad self worth as we're doing these things. For me, growing up I was trained to think that every moment that I was not doing stuff. That is not being productive. I just felt like it was always more more more. So I kind of wanted to get his perspective on what it was like to be an entrepreneur in today's Day and age. Because I just felt guilty every time what was doing something and that was just not sustainable. Then formation was the key Ron's later happiness success peace of mind, etc, we would never ever ever be happier than now because we've never had such information, nor have we ever in the history of mankind. Accessibility to information through laptops. IPADS iphones whatever it happens to be. But what's happening is we're consuming the speed of light so I? Read a book last week and read another book this week another about next week and I go. What stood out what book arlette per class with change my life great. How are just changed my life? Maybe here that how? And I'm not saying there's new information of books you've written books I've written books I'm going to write more books, but if we just read tree books, put them on our bookshelf and kept going back to those books and implementing the things that were organically intuitively aligned to who we are, but a lot of us are consuming books because we're. It's driven by scarcity. If I don't read the latest greatest book, I'm GonNa miss out and. What's happening? Is that can get this right? And then I'll stop is that we're consuming information. The information does not have the time to turn into knowledge because we're too busy reading the next book consuming the next podcast. It, Ever goes down into wisdom. An almost never land in a place called awareness. Did you know that six percent of employees would give up five thousand dollars a year in salary to be happier at work. For me, I think what tends to happen. IS WE AS BUSINESS? Owners as creatives get asked for the recipe for success straight off the BAT. And what I would love to tell us that I have all the onces but five really don't know what is possible for you and for me if I have and we have a little bit more faith and trust in voice. What have we stayed in that unknown part for a little bit longer? I. Know that every time stating that unknown, the creative part of me made my creative side, even more creative. I get asked about most pain-free way at podcast ones business almost as though a podcast will fix it all. I know the steps we've performed the steps we've gotten. The results are repeatable, but of the ingredients going in on considered than the best recipes quite useless Sunday. We usually feel the issue is one thing when it is actually something entirely different. Ninety nine point nine percent of clients that come to me for clarity about X.. It's nothing to fucking do with X.. It's always do with why x is the by product or something deep. The question the people are asking you speculating said don't know. How can I be that? How can I be a? Beacon. How can I get the sandwich? How can I get the luck? My one of my best friends in Ireland Jeff said you're the guy I've ever met. The, luckiest guy, I've ever Nash just put you in a car. Who Win the race do this. You put you in a shop with no clothes some Angie jackets and It's so interesting that we're asking the wrong questions we'll so many of us are seeking for truth in the wrong places, and we're not asking the right questions because we're afraid to. So, what are the right questions? You Graham does his opinion on what the right questions up back in volume nineteen I'm just ask questions because I I tried to feel what is happening like well. Let's see where we're at. What is the foundation is a foundation. Is The foundation strong as a week, can we? Can we strengthen the foundations or value? There I'm trying to find out where the value is. Right. Where's the value is building on? The foundation makes no sense of the foundation is not strong. But strengthen, the foundation can be very valuable if it's not strong. If something we can agree on so I. Just have a sincere seeking for truth in everything so like the separate. The bullshit I'm did this a lot. Sometimes my conversations because it's it's almost like I'm trying to pull away the bullshit, so we can get to some fundamental stuff, so if luck has got nothing to do with it, and if I'm asking the wrong questions, why brain, coming up with these questions in the first place and Why is my brain looking for those answers in the wrong places, the brain is designed to protect us. I tell you right now. I don't get this left right. Brain Front Lobe, the court, the court to don't know one IO's about that stuff, and I find that if I get drawn into the detailed complexity. It's not who I am. All I can tell you is. The mind is one of the most deceiving manipulative pieces of equipment flesh, human bodies on earth I never have trusted my brain and unfortunately i. I do my brain way too much and brought me down all sorts of pets. It creates paranoia second guessing everything else and his powerful I. Don't get me wrong. Not Arguing his power and somebody was some people say we use three percents when people say, we use ten percent of her brain God. Love us. We ever figure out a way to use fifty percent of our brain. We will become mechanically machine like which is already happening in the world. That is who we are becoming. We're becoming machine like. Official estimates show that fifty percent of the adult population will experience depression at some point in their lifetime before Kiddie pumped in with that depressing stat about depression I remember having conversations on my first podcast about connection and connecting food. There's a study done by Monash University here in Australia that says that there's zero occurrences of adolescent depression if the family eats together at least once a week. The power of connection is one that we on not paying attention to the disconnection is making machine like. I've been asked about getting my business very often from other entrepreneurial friends. And to be honest, I live on the dichotomy of whether skill on my business, but like scaling the world faces big challenges. I suppose like global warming. And the catastrophe that the world. Challenge the world is facing. Today is not global. Warming is not mass population that might lead to starvation. It is not. Donald? Trump is not those things. It's the fact that we are becoming so disconnected, and we're forgetting had to feel, and society doesn't reward us with emotion rewards US based on intellect, and what is perceived as to be successful, and a lot of us are focusing on obsessing about living in the now. I don't WanNa fucking live in the now with my now ship. In volume, twenty eight Mark Golson gives a further explanation about being disconnected or in his words. Said I wrote this blog Kawai people kill themselves. It's not depression. And what I said is that there's hundreds of millions of people who are depressed. Don't kill themselves the menu. Do not many but some. Those hundreds of millions of people lose their jobs. Lose their marriage, and they don't kill themselves. Not all those things can contribute to it. One thing that nearly all suicidal people feel which is what I spoke about in the article is they feel despair, and if you break the word despair into D., S. P. A. I, R., A. Feel unpaid with reasons slip. They feel hope less without a future help. Less power less use less worth less meaning less, and when they all combine. They feel pointless in a pair with death. To take the pain away. I know interested in living in the now of now. Shit or the rest of us are Ford focused. My work and what I believe is if you want to understand who you are at the core, intellectually and emotionally, there's only one place to go into your past. That is the place that holds every key to who you are and who you're going to be whether you like it or not. You, but in Australia being busy seen as a badge of being successful. Is defined that if I'm busy, I have no idea what's going on, and I'm running around like headless chicken. I found that every time I was busy that if I just took a break. I came back and everything was almost better. Nothing had changed, but I think the perspective almost made it, Beto. So how to consolidate that? I feel like I should be taking a break, but every time I do. I feel guilty. The balance inside my head. Trust me mental sometimes. So Philip. You know what I've just realized. That I've kept myself busy going from one project to the next. Thoughts? And anyone who's super-busy. Anyone is filling their lives. Every inch of the lies is running from something. All of them ask you to do is to consider stopping and turning about. Because you will not, you will not be able to rush. It would eventually catch up with you, and it will manifest itself physically mentally emotionally, and it will come out. And data selfish particular when you choose to have bring children into this world when you choose to be a leader, I believe that we have a moral obligation to work on the ship that we're afraid to work, because whether we like it or not were wondering up where packaging we're putting. A Beautiful Red Boehner were passing into next generation, this theme of leaving the world a better place and you found. It has been a common theme throughout the conversations that we've had with the guests. Guests on the series in volume fourteen David Cohen had this to say about what drives him. Now I believe you get a short period of time in that's it and so do something good with your time here but it's back to human relationships right if if you can leave the world a little bit better than you found it on that sort of all, you can ask of anyone right. You know when when people say. Why did you create techstars when it usually say is? You know because I believe that entrepreneurs make the place I believe that innovations make the world a better place, and in volume to Dr Sherri. Willing gave this advice to listen is when talking about burnout among entrepreneurs as entrepreneurs. as we as we grow and mature are finding wise that are about more than I've got this thing to work out. Or have this drive in pain inside of May but are about things that bring us joy. That make the world better, I mean. These hundred of lofty, and I feel like I could roll my eyes at my own self, but when we think about it at the end of our lives, we're going to take stock of like. How did we spend our time and the questions that we're going to ask is what what did I do. That was important. How did I make my? My life better. How did it make other people's lives better? How did I experience joy? How did I? How many beautiful sunsets did I see? How many heart problems that I saw that made me satisfied and made me proud of myself I think maybe the question that we don't ask like houses going to play on the deathbed. That's that's the question, ask. What are we going to regret? What are we going to be sad that we missed? When our time is up. So for a lot of reasons, we feel like we are alone. I've heard Jason Gain on. Say this on his podcast. About how most people feel alone even when they are in a marriage. Why do we feel alone in those positions? Even though we have people around us, like as an example, I have team, I have a great partner. What why is it that? Why is it that initially I would feel like this? Whole thing was my own journey and. Was My. Just my cross today so to speak. Let me. Be Very honest. There are still times that I feel alone. But pops happen less and less often these days because I think I'm starting to like myself just a little bit more than I used to. We don't like ourselves so many of us don't like ourselves says we're afraid of how humanity judges, but humanity will never judges way judge ourselves, so we spent so much time and energy looking good on the outside, pretending happy on facebook every single day, and very few of us are willing to actually look at the Great Bali that will ever meet ever that meets us in the fucking mirror every single morning over lives, and if we can, if we can deal with that womb thing which just st without one. Bully everything else look after stuff because I believe to my core that we give ourselves what we feel we deserve and when you wake up in the morning, you've got the greatest vision board on Earth and you look at that you stare at that and you tell yourself you deserve. You use mantras to try and bullshit your brain that you're going to achieve this leaving aside the challenge, not most people create goals. And and wanted chief things that are not belong to themselves. That's a whole conversation, but leaving that aside. You tell yourself you want something money. A yard or relationship love sex whatever it happens to be, but every step you take out of that bed into. The universe into the world. You're seeking to validate how you feel about yourself. So what ends up happening is sabotage starts to appear. So you want the money you want to success, but you make decisions that look. Almost polar opposite what you want, and then you go on. Canadian. How can you make that mistake? You stupid idiot and think about the energetic nature, and how you speak about yourself and you. The disdain that humanity house says is. The saddest thing I on the motion all because I've experienced that myself. I was the cruelest person on earth to myself, and I see it every single day, and it's fucking tragedy and yet so many of us are so deeply lonely, which is a pandemic in the world, and we're only because we're waiting for. Mr Rydin Mr Mrs Rice and yet we don't have any really many many of us don't ever real quality relationship with ourselves. Which I think is sad, said. So in the actual interview when Phillips said the line about an fucking idiot. How can you make that mistake? You Stupid? Idiot I got really emotional because I could hear myself talk to myself exactly that way what I failed I beat myself up badly. Because I just couldn't handle the failure. I would just keep going from one thing to the other, even if I achieve something. I was just not happy. Claim, the mantle. Don't use that terminology that built the business. I've got the family on the happy. And will they don't ask is typically the not curious about. Hey, I'm just wondering what this. They're not curious about that. They're too busy judging the shit themselves which builds on the previous point that I made. Is that the going? What's wrong with me? Business timing. Dollars I've got my car I've got the wife of the husband of the kids. Everything should be awesome, but it's not. And we don't have a place in society for that. Because, we're going to conferences where we feel that, we have to keep. Know we have to keep up a strong upper lip and we have to play about. I think we've very basic level. We've put way too. Much of our density has been tied into. What we do as opposed to who we are and I feel that. As long as we continue to move through this earth, adoring God's putting Gurus on pedestals, entrepreneurs on pedestals at people. Who Do you think about the heroes that we have I mean so many entrepreneurs Wannabe Steve Jobs. Good look. I've no interest on earth of being Steve Jobs. And I go what you WANNA be job with look what he did exactly what he did so socially, and personally his life was a complete mess. He very destructive relationships, and he wasn't very nice to people. Okay, then you say okay, but on a business level mckernan look what he built agree designed. He designed. The Eiffel arguably was going to in history. We look back at certain data points in history we look back and say that was the tool that disconnected us more than anything else in the history of humanity yet you want to be the next Steve jobs good luck with that. And, then I often said by the way just one quick, no question. Why why do you want to be Steve Jobs? What would it be like to be fucking you? When we come back from the break? SIP tells us about the biggest billy you'll ever meet. The, Main objective of this project is to bring together entrepreneurs and creatives who says similar values, so they can find the courage to put out their authentic voice for the people to hear which allows for them to make that impact on the world. Every great movement started with a memorable speech. Access to full length interviews psychology of entrepreneurship dot com and click the button. Research from two thousand and eleven suggests that approximately seventy percent of people will experience at least one episode of Imposter Syndrome in their lives or read this on a facebook post recently society that makes you conform to all sorts of structures, standing out and being yourself is a rebellious act. There has never been a better time for you to be yourself. I did a test one day. I took a book of Your Book here my hand I took a book and erupt. Play paper, and no one can say it. And I said here's a book I put in the middle of the room to twenty very smart entrepreneurs in this world and I said now just before anyone grabs the book in the book. It's GONNA teach you how to make money and build a business, but it's written by a guy who, in my personal opinion and the opinion of many. Of Integrity in other words, he's done stuff to get to the top notch. Really an alignment and one could say socially out of alignment and out of integrity to get there. WHO WANTS TO BOOK? One Guy put his hand abs absolutely and I said so, what about all the negativity associated? Yeah, but if I can one nugget out of us, that's win for me and I get the logic, but I find that when you take that one nugget, you're taking the energy of the negative nuggets. So when someone wants to be Steve, jobs did you live with Steve Jobs? Do you know what no, no, you go down? The no wonder we're mean the way I am in my personal life I. Just want his business success and acumen. You can't have one without the other. It just Nash, work. We'll have to say when I started my entrepreneurial journey. I think it just like that and in a way. I used to idolize that in people for the character because I wanted to be true to my values and I actually. I really wanted to stand by those values when those values are being challenged, but then I realized how important it was for me to challenge what my values were and what? I believed in the first place. Because for the longest time, I believe different things about myself. Because that was just what was repeated most often while I was growing up. Or maybe that was just what I remembered from all the stuff being said while I was growing up. What did I truly believe in? And how do I be open to be challenged so that I could refine my argument? As to what I believed in all, change my stance. Easy to say difficult to do. Because of all this disconnection primarily through a phone finding the most connected devices ever. I get carried away with what social media shows me about what other people are up to? This makes me not use my most useful muscle of all my intuition. But we've heard everyone tell us to trust our gut. Or intuition. This is status love Petrov born September seventh nineteen. Nine and pasta on the nineteenth of May, twenty seventeen. WanNa know how he single handedly saved the world from nuclear war. Dunlop Petrov is the Russian. Who is now an older man, and is now being creditors for preventing a World War and yet? If this ever goes published this particular piece of this interview, most people would never know who he is. He was sitting. The most sophisticated piece of technology on earth that was designed as an early detection unit for missiles warheads, coming primarily from the United States? This was I believe the early eighties when tensions between Russian America were pretty high. Don't quote me on that, but I think it was dirty. And some are the morning. The lights go off. There's a nuke. It's on its way to Russian. Followed in four or five minutes by at least three or four other nukes, and they're heading for Russia. His re-met in his job description his instructions his orders. Crystal Clear Wayne he detects. He makes one phone call to whatever general. Validates of the machines correct and then they choose whether they're going to retaliate before the massage actually wipe the match. And he didn't make the phone call. He never picked up the phone. He backtracked. He looked at everything looked at the system. The system was operating perfectly. and. There was no way he could tell. It was misreading something. And he went against all of his own all of the rules. His he was meant to do. and. In the end of the day, he just said when someone said in a very famous you said. Why didn't you just call up? You just said I had a feeling in my. Feeling in my gut. Say that. While I seem surprised at this when I think about my journey is entrepreneur even just as a person I. Remember how my got so important at every step of the way. I feel entrepreneurship is a lot to do with trusting your gut and being uncomfortable with a lot of things. And yet entrepreneurship is one of the most painful challenge and things on earth, and if you become an entrepreneur, and you don't make near first time rounders. Then what happens is you send to realize the failure and think actually it's me I'm just not an entrepreneur. Every single person. This earth is an entrepreneur. IF THEY WANNA BE, everybody starts to show how many jobs can be taken out the economy over the next twenty thirty years? It's frightening, so then you're going to have to be an entrepreneur future and think actually it's me I'm just not an entrepreneur. Failing at something can be hard on us up. Steam his what David Meltzer had to say in volume five about the idea of becoming an overnight success, the biggest piece of advice I give. Give to entrepreneurs is the first thing you should do every day is figure out how you stay in business tomorrow. Because if you stay in business long enough, you're going to be more and more successful things evolve. There's no revolution in business. There are no overnight successes there isn't you go I sit with the top entrepreneurs in the world. They none of us are overnight successes, and most of us have what other people believe failed more than anyone. It's like worse than baseball. Imposter Syndrome was first studied by psychologists stop. Poulain rose client in nineteen, seventy eight, and was originally labeled as impostor phenomenon. My whole issue on interviewing these amazing people whether they will jet fighter, pilots, athletes, or singers or entrepreneurs. Was Finding out why. We believe that we're not good enough. Why we sell ourselves short on the things that we've done. And, while I interviewed all these people, my main focus was. And still is to create an audio documentary on Imposter Syndrome. From a perspective of exploring it from all different angles, so I almost always asked these experts this one question. What really imposter, syndrome! I think Posture Syndrome is driven by the fact that we're doing stuff that we should be doing. We're doing stuff that is out of alignment and we are an impostor. Posing on ourselves, we're we're cheating on ourselves. We're doing work that we're not meant to do. No one will ever find as far legal there, so I'm I'm just just picking this up. I'm not trying to expose what you said. Just trying to be cautious with the terminology of when someone finds out who they are. It's almost like an awakening. You're I know you're not suggesting that one morning way companies all a hundred percent, but I think that's the challenges that we feel. Like so many centimeters podcast, reason they. How did you become authentic and I said you're making an assumption I am and they were choking thrown off and they go. You mean you're not. I said I'm more authentic than they used to be. But I'm not even close to where I could be, and we assume every day that we don't have the awareness that we do. That were not as authentic. They're not even as close as the essence of who we are showing up every day than we can be concerned about just saying that win. Someone finds out who they are when I would like to consider when they begin to understand who they are because what I see is we want to go from the riverbank on this side to the river on the other side, which is the greatest expression of who we are and everything around us, emulates from the essence of who we are, and now that our our newfound truth that is a leap too far is not possible intellectual. Yes, emotionally! No, what? What I'm suggesting is begin to uncover who you are, and take the first stepping stone to the second steppingstone third stepping stone, and who knows you may arrive in that bank day. You may not I can tell you one thing you'd be however closer. I do not have imposter syndrome my life right now, I do not feel like an impostor. I feel like I. AM showing up as a line as I've never said this before by the way I'm sitting here and go back to the Congress. Add last thing on earth I was could be or should be doing is what I'm doing now. I'm relating that to when I was fourteen years old, sitting in a classroom, dyslexic and feeling like a piece of Shit and hating was hating the essence of was I spent the next twenty years or so trying to be anything, but felt mckernan. And I'M GONNA spend the rest of my life, being nothing other than Philip mckernan, whatever the felt that even means I. still don't fully know and showing on apologetic everywhere and not talking about using f bombs and hitting the bullshit button, and just being rude and tackling people. That's easy. That's not authenticity. And the more myself with my wife with my children, and with my clients, the more success getting. The more peace of mind him getting I. Do not have Imposter Syndrome in my life right now. When I heard Philip say I think imposter syndrome has driven by the fact that we're doing stuff that we shouldn't be doing. It made me really really uncomfortable. Everything in me made me ask myself the question. Am I doing what I should be doing? That made me go down a rabbit hole of why in an age of disconnection they pasta inside us is alive. and well sir. We heard you enjoyed this volume of psychology of entrepreneurship. Next week we'll be revisiting volume to where runs. Talks deducted Sherry walling about the psychology behind imposter syndrome, and Ben Out, so my name is Dr Sherri Walling, and I am a clinical psychologist, but I work in the world of entrepreneur, mental health, great science also has an element of art, because his great thinking and great thinking is creative. It's different way problems all made. It's hard for me to take seriously anybody who's like Oh. Yeah, my come I. Feel Very nonchalant about my company or like very objective. Probably don't I mean you could be exceptional, but probably ask. If you enjoy this kind of volume listener and we'll keep them coming, but until then we'll see next week. Watch. I interviewed Philip because of all his work with international teams. He has worked with the Canadian Olympic team the Pentagon. and has shared the stage would speak such such as the Delilah Lama and Richard Branson, he is an inspirational speaker, writer and filmmaker. Philip is the founder of the one loss talk, movement, or the of dead men walking switch on paper, poor in life and one loss talk. He has built an orphanage in Peru and traveled to eighty countries. This was like one of the most insightful conversations I've had a bought from challenging in confronting mile believes in many ways. It made me think about stuff that I was. Not doing that I should have. Been Wait for you to listen to the second interview. Because I then spent two days with. Philip interviewed him again off those two days. And it was a very different conversation I'm pretty sure. I cried as well. You'll see a trend. Well the next episodes in this series. We're explore basically what it's like to be in the mind of performers is creative entrepreneurs athletes. Why certain people like jet fighter pilots for example don't have imposter syndrome when they're up in the air, because in that scenario, it's like a question of life or death. This is the most production special thanks to every guest expert that has appeared on the show voice of editing and sound design by Katie, bony men guess retain content by Gould and Corn Castles. Project managed by Kenny Benjamin, produced and hosted by me. For more episodes in wed listen, Goto must amplify dot com slash. Her? Hey Hey, it's Kelly from us. Amplify I'm the sound engineer for this volume of psychology of entrepreneurship. I'm part of the team that made this production come alive I work a part of a global team with studios based in West End Brisbane Austrailia. If you're like a plug, cost in checklist, emailed me at Keighley. Amplify Agency DOT MEDIA THAT'S K I L I at amplify agency DOT media. We specialize in finding your voice and making sure it's Hud by the right people. If you're considering whether a podcast is a good idea for your business, check out our other show on. Should I saw PODCAST DOT com?

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