3 Burst results for "Stein Leventhal"

"stein leventhal" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

11:06 min | 10 months ago

"stein leventhal" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Brooklyn podcast so much for having major. I'm so happy to be here. I'M GONNA jump right in to hormonal advantage. You know a few weeks ago my girlfriend I were having a conversation and it was before she was about to get her period and she was basically in a state where I won't get into all the words but you can curse on this podcast. And so she was like the gist of it was like this does not feel like an advantage right now. This feels like a big weight and a lot of women have thought that before. Why us we go through all the stuff then the top of that the gender pay gap and this thing and that thing and it just feels like. There's a lot of huge burden. That's there on women but in your subtitle you say hormonal advantage. Tell us what's more. I just love that. You bring right to the beginning of this conversation. The cultural narrative and mythology that we're dealing with right. We have inherited a cultural narrative that says that our periods are hormones are a curse that they're problematic that their mysterious that they're unpredictable that they're problematic and that there's nothing to be done and that you're going to enter the mythology is going to be painful and they're going to have symptoms and there's just nothing you can do. Just bide your time until menopause right. That's that's pretty much you know in the nutshell so to speak the narrative that we have the problem with this is a. It's not based on real science. Be It it. Perpetuates a huge behavioral problem for women which has them basically when you believe that something is supposed to be broken when you see it as broken you then do what you take no action right so puts them in in this situation where they don't think that there's anything to do and then they do nothing which then keeps them having symptoms. It's a vicious cycle. So you know it feeds then. It goes right back and feeds this cultural narrative this mythology. That says it's going to be a burden. It's going to be a big problem and women just feel stock and they feel unhappy and the truth of it is. It's completely false. It doesn't to be this way And and I figured out a way for women to liberate themselves from the mythology from the cultural narrative and also from the actual real symptoms to which you're so excited to share about. I can't wait to get into it. Let's talk origin story. Yeah what got you interested in this topic. And what education were you brought up with? And when did things shift for you? Okay so I mean for me I definitely have had my own run in with a hormonal issue That opened my eyes to the limitations of conventional medicine for chronic. Gyn issue so there. I was you know At Johns Hopkins planning to become an Obgyn and had sort of the apex of symptoms. With what I now at what? I now know to be the polycystic Ovarian Syndrome that no one knew that I had so you know at that time for at least seven years. I went undiagnosed I grew up in Massachusetts. I had access to Harvard trained gynecologists than of course at Hopkins. I had access to Hopkins trained gynecology. I had the best of the best and I went undiagnosed for seven years when I finally was able to get a diagnosis. It was through helping my gynecologist by bringing her a report from a medical journal that I had pulled out of the library at school to that had identified all the symptoms that I was having and I said I have this Kendra is what could you share. What the symptoms were. All I had I was. I was fifty pounds heavier than I am. Now I saw had obesity. I was covered face chest and back and cystic acne. I did not meant straight from the age of twelve to twenty two. I had maybe five bleeds two of which were chemically induced with synthetic progesterone. Which if anybody has done that knows that it is delicious experience and so you know it was and I was anxious depressed. Insomnia cle was a mess. Couldn't really function in my day to day. Life with any sort of regularity predictability. I would never know today going to be a day when I had energy was. I going to be in a good mood It was kind of a really negative scary isolating experience And then all the physical symptoms certainly didn't make anyone feel good about themselves. So you know in one of my insomnia coll- nights at the library. I like any young woman in her. Twenty s we do on a Friday night or Saturday night I was like researching medical journals in obstetrics turtles to figure out what was wrong with me because no one had any answers. Everyone was just saying. I'll just go on the pill and that'll solve these problems and I said but you don't even know what the problem is. They said that's true but we should try this anyway and I just didn't feel like that was good medicine for me to to without a known cause take medication for no accurate reason. I believe in more precision kind of based medicine so I found this journal this obstetrics journal and there was a little tiny article about The Stein Leventhal disorder that described my symptoms to a t and all the bells rang inside of my head and I said Oh my gosh this is what I have so i. I waited in the parking lot of my gynecologist office the next morning. She was literally like walking in with her coffee. And just like what are you doing here and I said well you know what I'm doing here is that I would like us to do to specific tests that we have not yet done that. I think will lead us to the conclusion that I have this disorder and she was intrigued enough and gracious enough without having an appointment to do these tests and was able to confirm my diagnosis that. In fact I did have polycystic ovaries and politico very syndrome. And when I I? I was so excited drew like Oh my goodness after years of confusion and dead ends and no answers to have something on a name for it. It was very validating since identity that I'm just crazy right. I'm not something actually going into something going on and I said excellent and I said so now what you know which is sort of like the new Englander in me like now. What do we do? Let's take action and she said well. Unfortunately there isn't really much that we can do for you. This is incurable. And you know we can. You're going to continue to have problems. The obesity that you have today is going to get worse. It might turn into diabetes You will have problems with fertility you may not be able to have children You will have an increased risk of heart disease and cancer. And I'm twenty at this time getting this prognosis after the diagnosis and asking for what support. My Medical Support Team was going offer me and she said we really just don't have anything we can. Just medicate your symptoms along the way and hope for the best but there's nothing that we can do and it was in that moment which I you know. You don't plan for these things. I wasn't like looking to react to particular way I was. It was all happening real time. But in that moment this very specific loud voice or see you know. I don't know how exactly to describe. It was just like that's not your future. An internal wisdom. Good way to describe it and I just repeated that to her. I said that's not my future. So he goes. I was terrified was very terrifying moment to just have to be facing this and so I just repeated what this voice was saying she said well what are you gonNA do. I said I'm going to go take my very expensively trained mind and figure this out and she said well. I'll be here when you want the prescription for the pill and first of all you chase me down on the Paparazzi me. And then tell me. I'M NOT GONNA listen. It was great you were forging your own journey so what happened from there. So that's I proceeded to really get deeply more into the research around functional nutrition epigenetics chronobiology Chinese medicine and really started piecing together what the endocrine system needs to be brought back online. Because fundamentally what I discovered in my research was that most of these conditions these castaway. Gyn conditions like fibroids like Dimitrius like P. C. O. S. Where there's nothing really that we have from conventional medicine to help women like us. That's why I called him castaway because we're kind of like left to figure it out. Is that this. They're fundamentally caused by systematic disruption. And if you simply start to support the endocrine system the body resolves the symptoms and it just works so efficiently and safely across the board for these different conditions. And that's that's really the origin story of my transformation. It was amazing to watch my body. Just recover fifty pounds coming off without deprivation without intense workout my skin clearing up and my ovulation and my cycle coming back. It came back at twenty two and has not left yet. So you know that's just a beautiful thing. And of course I was able to have a child on my own without any artificial reproductive technology which was really great at advanced. Maternal age on the third. Try which is something that I think is a testament to when you take care of your hormones your hormones take care of you and that led me to create flow living because I wanted to not have a woman feel the way that I did. You know which was sort of confused alone scared overwhelmed and not sure where to start and I promised myself drew that if I could figure out how to get myself back online hormonally that I would create a platform for other women to be able to do the same. And that's how flu living was born. And then of course I wrote the First Book Women Code which has become a bestseller among the period problem set which is really great And then you know I think in my work over the past twenty years working with women I I have become increasingly concerned about what's happened over the past decade right. I've been working in the space for almost twenty years but in the past decade especially. We've had this geometric explosion in the content for wellness for women right online articles media outlets all sorts of things. It's wonderful thing very happy to see that but I started asking myself a question if there is wellness wellness everywhere. Why are women sicker than ever before? Why is it now? That fifty percent of women are struggling with hormonal issues and auto immune issues compared to men. Not even the same ballpark from a percentage point of view in terms of their population. Why is that and I started asking myself this question. Why the first question is well. Why do hormones fall apart right and that led me to write woman code? This next question is what led me to write this book and the answer is really astounded. Me you know. The first is that women in their reproductive years are left out of medical fitness and nutrition research. We just had right before you. I don't know when the PODCASTS ARE GONNA air. I think yours is gonNA come out first because your book is out now. We had Dr Lisa. Mosconi on the PODCAST. Her work and import of her theme. That will eventually get to her interview is that he's doing..

obesity Brooklyn menopause Massachusetts cystic acne Harvard Johns Hopkins Dr Lisa Hopkins progesterone Insomnia Medical Support Team Stein Leventhal flu Dimitrius P. C. O.
Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

08:43 min | 10 months ago

Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

"I'M GONNA jump right in to hormonal advantage. You know a few weeks ago my girlfriend I were having a conversation and it was before she was about to get her period and she was basically in a state where I won't get into all the words but you can curse on this podcast. And so she was like the gist of it was like this does not feel like an advantage right now. This feels like a big weight and a lot of women have thought that before. Why us we go through all the stuff then the top of that the gender pay gap and this thing and that thing and it just feels like. There's a lot of huge burden. That's there on women but in your subtitle you say hormonal advantage. Tell us what's more. I just love that. You bring right to the beginning of this conversation. The cultural narrative and mythology that we're dealing with right. We have inherited a cultural narrative that says that our periods are hormones are a curse that they're problematic that their mysterious that they're unpredictable that they're problematic and that there's nothing to be done and that you're going to enter the mythology is going to be painful and they're going to have symptoms and there's just nothing you can do. Just bide your time until menopause right. That's that's pretty much you know in the nutshell so to speak the narrative that we have the problem with this is a. It's not based on real science. Be It it. Perpetuates a huge behavioral problem for women which has them basically when you believe that something is supposed to be broken when you see it as broken you then do what you take no action right so puts them in in this situation where they don't think that there's anything to do and then they do nothing which then keeps them having symptoms. It's a vicious cycle. So you know it feeds then. It goes right back and feeds this cultural narrative this mythology. That says it's going to be a burden. It's going to be a big problem and women just feel stock and they feel unhappy and the truth of it is. It's completely false. It doesn't to be this way And and I figured out a way for women to liberate themselves from the mythology from the cultural narrative and also from the actual real symptoms to which you're so excited to share about. I can't wait to get into it. Let's talk origin story. Yeah what got you interested in this topic. And what education were you brought up with? And when did things shift for you? Okay so I mean for me I definitely have had my own run in with a hormonal issue That opened my eyes to the limitations of conventional medicine for chronic. Gyn issue so there. I was you know At Johns Hopkins planning to become an Obgyn and had sort of the apex of symptoms. With what I now at what? I now know to be the polycystic Ovarian Syndrome that no one knew that I had so you know at that time for at least seven years. I went undiagnosed I grew up in Massachusetts. I had access to Harvard trained gynecologists than of course at Hopkins. I had access to Hopkins trained gynecology. I had the best of the best and I went undiagnosed for seven years when I finally was able to get a diagnosis. It was through helping my gynecologist by bringing her a report from a medical journal that I had pulled out of the library at school to that had identified all the symptoms that I was having and I said I have this Kendra is what could you share. What the symptoms were. All I had I was. I was fifty pounds heavier than I am. Now I saw had obesity. I was covered face chest and back and cystic acne. I did not meant straight from the age of twelve to twenty two. I had maybe five bleeds two of which were chemically induced with synthetic progesterone. Which if anybody has done that knows that it is delicious experience and so you know it was and I was anxious depressed. Insomnia cle was a mess. Couldn't really function in my day to day. Life with any sort of regularity predictability. I would never know today going to be a day when I had energy was. I going to be in a good mood It was kind of a really negative scary isolating experience And then all the physical symptoms certainly didn't make anyone feel good about themselves. So you know in one of my insomnia coll- nights at the library. I like any young woman in her. Twenty s we do on a Friday night or Saturday night I was like researching medical journals in obstetrics turtles to figure out what was wrong with me because no one had any answers. Everyone was just saying. I'll just go on the pill and that'll solve these problems and I said but you don't even know what the problem is. They said that's true but we should try this anyway and I just didn't feel like that was good medicine for me to to without a known cause take medication for no accurate reason. I believe in more precision kind of based medicine so I found this journal this obstetrics journal and there was a little tiny article about The Stein Leventhal disorder that described my symptoms to a t and all the bells rang inside of my head and I said Oh my gosh this is what I have so i. I waited in the parking lot of my gynecologist office the next morning. She was literally like walking in with her coffee. And just like what are you doing here and I said well you know what I'm doing here is that I would like us to do to specific tests that we have not yet done that. I think will lead us to the conclusion that I have this disorder and she was intrigued enough and gracious enough without having an appointment to do these tests and was able to confirm my diagnosis that. In fact I did have polycystic ovaries and politico very syndrome. And when I I? I was so excited drew like Oh my goodness after years of confusion and dead ends and no answers to have something on a name for it. It was very validating since identity that I'm just crazy right. I'm not something actually going into something going on and I said excellent and I said so now what you know which is sort of like the new Englander in me like now. What do we do? Let's take action and she said well. Unfortunately there isn't really much that we can do for you. This is incurable. And you know we can. You're going to continue to have problems. The obesity that you have today is going to get worse. It might turn into diabetes You will have problems with fertility you may not be able to have children You will have an increased risk of heart disease and cancer. And I'm twenty at this time getting this prognosis after the diagnosis and asking for what support. My Medical Support Team was going offer me and she said we really just don't have anything we can. Just medicate your symptoms along the way and hope for the best but there's nothing that we can do and it was in that moment which I you know. You don't plan for these things. I wasn't like looking to react to particular way I was. It was all happening real time. But in that moment this very specific loud voice or see you know. I don't know how exactly to describe. It was just like that's not your future. An internal wisdom. Good way to describe it and I just repeated that to her. I said that's not my future. So he goes. I was terrified was very terrifying moment to just have to be facing this and so I just repeated what this voice was saying she said well what are you gonNA do. I said I'm going to go take my very expensively trained mind and figure this out and she said well. I'll be here when you want the prescription for the pill and first of all you chase me down on the Paparazzi me. And then tell me. I'M NOT GONNA listen. It was great you were forging your own journey so what happened from there. So that's I proceeded to really get deeply more into the research around functional nutrition epigenetics chronobiology Chinese medicine and really started piecing together what the endocrine system needs to be brought back online. Because fundamentally what I discovered in my research was that most of these conditions these castaway. Gyn conditions like fibroids like Dimitrius like P. C. O. S. Where there's nothing really that we have from conventional medicine to help women like us. That's why I called him castaway because we're kind of like left to figure it out. Is that this. They're fundamentally caused by systematic disruption. And if you simply start to support the endocrine system the body resolves the symptoms and it just works so efficiently and safely across the board for these different conditions. And that's that's really the origin story of my transformation. It was amazing to watch my body. Just recover fifty pounds coming off without deprivation without intense workout my skin clearing up and my ovulation and my cycle coming back. It came back at twenty two and has not left yet.

Obesity Menopause Cystic Acne Massachusetts Harvard Johns Hopkins Hopkins Progesterone Insomnia Stein Leventhal Medical Support Team Dimitrius P. C. O.
"stein leventhal" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"stein leventhal" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Always happy to be here before we dive in. And we talk all about periods and hormones and other questions that we have I would love it. If you can start by telling us a little bit about how you got into this to begin with what happened at Johns Hopkins that change the course of your life twenty years ago. What happened to me? I was at Hopkins fully planning to become an OBGYN, and I had a sort of breakdown with my hormones, and I was seeking medical attention and really had been doing. So since I had been sixteen because there were things that were problematic even in my mid teenage years, but no one offered me any sort of input. They just sort of kind of said, oh, you know, supposed to be irregular for a while. And you know, it'll sort itself out which didn't really feel like a clinical answer. But I had nothing else to base anything on. So but symptoms had kind of reached a critical point, you know, in my early I guess late teens early twenties, and I had gained all this weight really out of nowhere. My skin was just erupting in acne. Different kinds of acne different places on my skin. My chest. My back my periods had completely disappeared. And I was dealing with a lot of you know, mood destabilization, I was really anxious and depressed, and I couldn't sleep at night. And it was really I wasn't able to kind of thrive and function in my day to day life in a way that you you're supposed to be able to expect out of yourself as a young person, you know, the struggle to get out of bed in the morning as a struggle to have energy and do things, and and then I just didn't feel good most of the day. So I went to my gynecologist down in Baltimore. And you know, she really also had no answers for me. So I just said this is ridiculous. There's gotta be some there's got to be something for me. There's gotta be some information some help. And so I was just says I couldn't sleep I would park myself in the library and research medical journals. You know out of desperation may be someone had some little article that would help me and lower. Behold, I found one on the original name for Politik ovarian syndrome, which is Stein Leventhal disorder. And I in just reading this very small little piece of information on it. You know, really check the boxes internally of like. Yep. This is me. And I can't believe that it's been like seven years, and no one's diagnosed me with this. So I thought so interesting that twenty years ago, nobody was talking about Basile last. I just think got such a now a common phrase that people know and people understand it's true. But, you know, back then I think, you know, it was just less. There was less information being circulated at such volume. You know, pre internet. So I took this journal to my doctor. And I said I'm certain that this is what I have you know, what kind of testing can we do. And you know, she was very gracious, and we did some testing, and she confirmed my diagnosis, you know. So she thought that was really clever of me. And I said so now what you know says great we have a diagnosis. Now, we can put a plan together. And she said, I'm really sorry to say, we don't have anything for you. And that was that was not good to hear. She said, we can't fix you with what's wrong with you is unforgettable. And it's just gonna get worse. You're going to gain more weight, you're going to develop you know, of side effects of Andhra Janis Asian with hair loss where you don't want it and hair growth where you don't want it. And they'll be for, you know, you'll probably not be able to get pregnant naturally or even potentially with a RT assisted reproductive tack like IVF, we'll have to put you on medication. You'll have greater risk for. Diabetes high blood pressure cancer. And we'll just have to medicate you, you know. There's moods drugs..

Johns Hopkins Basile Andhra Janis Asian Stein Leventhal Baltimore twenty years seven years