35 Burst results for "Steele"

Pennsylvania DA Appeals Bill Cosby Ruling to U.S. Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 d ago

Pennsylvania DA Appeals Bill Cosby Ruling to U.S. Supreme Court

"Prosecutors prosecutors in in Montgomery Montgomery County County Pennsylvania Pennsylvania petitioned petitioned the the US US Supreme Supreme Court Court to to review review a a state state Supreme Supreme Court Court ruling ruling overturned overturned Bill Bill Cosby Cosby sexual sexual assault assault conviction conviction Montgomery Montgomery County County Pennsylvania Pennsylvania district district attorney attorney Kevin Kevin Steele Steele petitions petitions the the U. U. S. S. Supreme Supreme Court Court challenging challenging a a state state Supreme Supreme Court Court decision decision which which overturned overturned bill bill Cosby's Cosby's conviction conviction based based on on a a two two thousand thousand five five press press release release written written by by a a predecessor predecessor without without any any knowledge knowledge of of his his staff staff or or fellow fellow attorneys attorneys in in his his office office at at release release promised promised a a now now deceased deceased defense defense attorney attorney that that Bill Bill Cosby Cosby would would not not be be prosecuted prosecuted later later Cosby Cosby admitted admitted during during a a civil civil deposition deposition to to giving giving drugs drugs and and alcohol alcohol to to a a number number of of young young women women before before sexual sexual encounters encounters Cosby's Cosby's twenty twenty eighteen eighteen conviction conviction of of drugging drugging and and molesting molesting college college sports sports administrator administrator Andrea Andrea Constand Constand in in two two thousand thousand four four was was overturned overturned by by the the state state Supreme Supreme Court Court he he was was freed freed from from prison prison last last summer summer Steele Steele argues argues the the decision decision would would set set a a dangerous dangerous precedent precedent out out press press releases releases being being treated treated as as immunity immunity agreements agreements despite despite

Supreme Supreme Court Court Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Montgomery County County Us Supreme Supreme Court Court Montgomery Montgomery County C Kevin Kevin Steele Steele U. U. S. S. Supreme Supreme Co Pennsylvania Cosby Bill Bill Cosby Cosby Cosby Montgomery Andrea Andrea Constand Constan United States State State Supreme Supreme Co Steele Steele
"steele" Discussed on The Kicker

The Kicker

04:36 min | Last week

"steele" Discussed on The Kicker

"And that one should have alerted everyone who read it that something was wrong with the dossier because it made claims that were easily debunked by the public record. So in 2017, I was getting really attacked when I said, you know, there are problems with the dossier. And I think people just kind of dug in to defend that because otherwise there was this sense that the rest of the Russian investigation wasn't defensible, which of course it was. I would go ahead. Just jump in there. I would also credit Marcy for doing sort of a form of arithmetic on the dossier that much of the dossier discussion is about how it either hasn't disproven or has been inaccurate. So on and so forth. But Marcy also, I think was pretty aggressive and clear eyed about what had happened actually, but wasn't in the dossier. It's a whole different level of analysis that really I think may even provide a stronger debunking of the dossier. It's not just what's in there that's wrong or unproven or based on some already published report. It's what actually happened in the real world that Christopher Steele didn't pick up on. If I'm not mistaken, mercy. Right. I mean, for example, how is it that the January 6th meeting, the June 6th meeting, sorry, that happened with a client of fusion GPS. How is it that that there was no hint of that? In fact, the translator for those two projects overlapped between the two. At bomb gouter. So how did fusion not learn the Ed baumgart? Their translator was going into Trump Tower and pitching a dirt for sanctions relief. How is it that Christopher Steele's sitting in London didn't get word of this whole miss suit operation or we get word of what papadopoulos was doing papadopoulos is another big omission. But anyway, Kyle, you're asking. I'm just sitting back and listening to this, which is astonishing. I mean, so I think Marcy Eric Marcy just said that if you listen to Matt out, she's still.

Marcy Christopher Steele Ed baumgart papadopoulos Trump Tower London Kyle Marcy Eric Marcy Matt
Author Gregg Jarrett: John Durham Knows Just How Corrupt the FBI Is

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Author Gregg Jarrett: John Durham Knows Just How Corrupt the FBI Is

"He wrote the books on Russian collusion and the witch hunt. Welcome back to America first with Greg Jarrett. I have to return Greg to one more and more question with regards to John Durham and the recent flurry of activities. This is a man who he stayed in the shadows for most of his career. There's only two photographs of them. Whatever you see, you know, an article about Darwin's the same photograph of him scowling coming out of a courtroom. So it's a guy looks to take his job seriously, has a pretty serious reputation, and one of the things he's known for as what was it former Connecticut U.S. attorney is that he puts feds in prison. So he has put corrupt FBI special agents and supervisory special agents in prison for breaking the law. As a result, I just want to what is it Jen Psaki says circle back on why you think the indictments are going to stay at this low level of people lying to the bureau and not actually target the people inside the bureau who were the architects and the implementers of the Russia hoax and the witch hunt? Is that just a gut sense of what you witnessed in the last two years? Well, you know, as much as I sometimes rely on confidential sources and leaked information is any journalist has terms to be commended. I mean, he's remained silent. He doesn't leap, no leaks come out of his investigation. He is a serious guy. He knows how corrupt the FBI is because he's put FBI folks behind bars. You know, I do think he is still looking at people at the FBI and others who lied in the Pfizer court weren't applications to surveillance spy on the Trump campaign. And I still think that's a possibility. You know, it would certainly be proper justice to hold people at the top, like mccabe and Comey and others. I mean, they signed off on these fisa warrants. Again, and again. They swore under penalty of perjury, the information was true. It wasn't true. I'll just give you one example. They vouched for the credibility over and over again of Christopher Steele. Yet, they didn't disclose to the court that they'd fired Christopher Steele as a confidential source for what for lying. So when you say to the goal, he's reliable in these credible, that's a lie. And they kept vouching for the veracity of the dossier when they knew and we now know that they knew that it was all a pack of

Greg Jarrett John Durham FBI Jen Psaki America Darwin Greg Connecticut Christopher Steele Comey Russia Pfizer Mccabe
Gregg Jarrett on Adam Schiff's Disgraceful Legacy

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Gregg Jarrett on Adam Schiff's Disgraceful Legacy

"Greg Gerry, you sent me a piece on Friday entitled Adam Schiff's disgraceful legacy. Right there, we heard him say the following. Anyone who lied to Christopher Steele. Or the FBI should be prosecuted. What about chairman of the intelligence committee of the House of Representatives who lied to America for four years about their having seen the quote incontrovertible evidence of Russian collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow? There are a lot of liars associated with the great Russia hoax and the ensuing witch hunt. Hillary Clinton, Christopher Steele, Igor steel source, I'd add James Comey to the list. But in my book, I wrote in the column, the most remorseless liar of all the flagrant huckster of hysteria over the Russia hoax is none other than Adam Schiff. Which Sean Hannity loves to call shifty shift. I mean, he is the most mendacious of them all. I mean, he is the top of the party not in terms of who lied the most and most often for four years. That's right. You know, he'd walk a mile for a camera shift did hundreds and hundreds of interviews with the stock up media. They didn't know a damn thing because they didn't bother to actually investigate any of the allegations or try to corroborate any of the dossier they simply took it as gospel as if it were scripture from Moses. You know, and so they are winning accessories the media. But they were played for fools. They were winning dupes. And at the hands of people, like Adam Schiff, who kept insisting over and over again, week after week year after year for years that he had in convertible evidence that Trump was a Russian asset who plotted with Putin in the bowels of the Kremlin to steal the 2016 election he said he had concrete evidence, absolute evidence, he'd seen it with his own eyes. We're just on the verge of the big reveal and he promised again and again, he was going to reveal it, but oh, you know, it's classified information right

Christopher Steele Adam Schiff Greg Gerry Intelligence Committee Of The Igor Steel James Comey Russia FBI Hillary Clinton Sean Hannity Moscow America Moses Donald Trump Putin Kremlin
Attorney Kash Patel Reacts to John Durham's Recent Indictments

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Attorney Kash Patel Reacts to John Durham's Recent Indictments

"First cash Patel. Welcome back to Salem radio. Savage, great to be with you guys. I'm so happy that you are continuing to hammer on the truth in Russia. That's why we're here every single day for three hours as well as our newsmax show on Sundays. Cash. I'm going to run by you. The reaction I got just a few days ago from Joe di Genoa, a lot of us have lost hope with John Durham. They say, yeah, yeah, yeah, it's two years later. I get that COVID slowed him down. But talk to Joe, who's a former special counsel himself, former U.S. Washington attorney, U.S. attorney for D.C.. He said these indictments, the level of detail in these indictments, especially the most recent one of danchenko, speak to a very serious individual who's going to get to the bottom of it. You've been there. You uncovered the Russia hoax for the house. What's your reaction to the recent developments on Capitol Hill? Yeah, look I think that John Durham is spot on track. As a former federal prosecutor, too, who brought these types of large scale fraud conspiracy cases, I spent three four 5 years sometimes working up a case in John Durham is working on the biggest scandal in the United States presidential history. And in two years, he's got three indictments. And the other thing about these indictments, he's connected the DNC to the corruption at the FBI to the corruption of their lawyers to now directly corrupting or expose enough nature of Christopher steel in the source. And normally these indictments are about two, three, four, 5 pages long. 40 page indictment. Yeah. Issues on the latest go round because John Durham is speaking to the public. It's the only way he's legally allowed to do so. And he's highlighting to take Sullivan's of the world that Charlie Dolan of the world. All these corrupt actors that fusion GPS and Christopher Steele and mccabe abstract and page. It's all coming to life. So I think he's on the right path. I've said it before on my show cash's corner where I did a deep dive into the derm saga and I think he's only just getting

John Durham Joe Di Genoa Danchenko Russia United States Patel Salem Savage Christopher Steel D.C. Capitol Hill JOE Washington DNC Charlie Dolan FBI Christopher Steele Sullivan Mccabe
'The View' Co-Host Morgan Ortagus Clashes With Adam Schiff Over Discredited Dossier

The Dan Bongino Show

03:15 min | 3 weeks ago

'The View' Co-Host Morgan Ortagus Clashes With Adam Schiff Over Discredited Dossier

"So I guess Adam Schiff thought he was on the view and it was a safe space for him or whatever it is was he being micro aggressive or what But Morgan ortegas was having none of it So she asked him about his constant promotion of the dossier I want you to keep in mind as you're listening to this Keep this clearly in mind That Adam Schiff and I am quoting him directly please go to the Internet and double check me Always Double check everything I tell you Adam Schiff had said repeatedly that there was smoking gun evidence that Trump had colluded with the Russians We now know that whatever Adam's shift said was evidence was in fact nonsense created by the Clinton campaign And notice how he doesn't apologize I want you to notice here he throws out another debunk conspiracy theory that Paul Manafort was dealing with a Russian intelligence agent Constantine kilimnik That's who he's talking about in this cut Constant the kilimnik was in fact a source for the Obama administration too So if Paul Manafort was dealing with some Russian spy then we have a damage assessment to do about the Biden Obama Biden administration which had trusted this guy This is a great clip Did you cut it into two No the whole thing Okay all right play that cut And let's not forget what we learned in that investigation We learned that the Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was giving internal polling data campaign polling data to Russian intelligence while Russian intelligence was helping the Trump to be clear if he was fired halfway through the campaign Well he may have been fired Yeah But the effort to get Russian help continued and even beyond the effort to get Russian help But you made president information yourself for years by promoting this I think that's what Republicans and what people who entrusted you as they Intel committee chair are so confused about your culpability in all of this Well I completely disagree with your premise It's one thing to say allegations should be investigated and they work It's another to say that we should have foreseen an advance that some people were lying to Christopher Steele which is impossible of course to do But let's not use that as a smokescreen to somehow shield Donald Trump's culpability for inviting Russia to help him in the election which they did for trying to course Ukraine into helping him in the next election Which he did into inciting an erection insurrection which he did None of that is undercut None of that serious misconduct is in any way diminished by the fact that people lie to Christopher Steele No I think just your credibility is Did he say Donald Trump was inciting an erection You would like to say that on the radio Yeah I thought I heard that right Adam get your head out of the gutter Get your head out of the gutter you slob Disgusting Adam Schiff it's gross Talk like that on the radio But notice how he continues to parrot fairytales that no one could have possibly known Christopher Steele was lying Really Because the FBI as of January of 2017 when they interviewed Christopher Steele determined that Christopher Steele was in fact

Paul Manafort Adam Schiff Morgan Ortegas Constantine Kilimnik Kilimnik Obama Administration Biden Obama Biden Administrati Christopher Steele Donald Trump Adam Clinton Intel Ukraine Russia FBI
Igor Danchenko, Analyst Who Worked With Christopher Steele on Trump Dossier, Charged in Durham Probe

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Igor Danchenko, Analyst Who Worked With Christopher Steele on Trump Dossier, Charged in Durham Probe

"Well, perhaps the biggest news of the day is the actual arrest, not a subpoena not an indictment, the arrest by John Durham's special counsel of the key individual behind the so called Steele dossier, nobody, none better to analyze it than the legal and political analyst for Fox News. The author of the Russia hoax and witch hunt host of the brief podcast, Greg Jarrett, welcome back to America first. Hey, Sebastian, always creepy in with you. So tell us first, let's start at the beginning. Who is Igor danchenko? Well, he's the fabulist behind the discredited anti Trump CA. And he's indicted in charge with lying to the FBI not once. But 5 times on 5 different occasions way back in the infancy of president Trump's term back in 2017. The FBI knew that the dossier was phony. They knew that Christopher Steele was not credible who composed the dossier. They'd fired him for lying. And yet they used the dossier and then chanko is a pre-tax continue their probe of Donald Trump. And July, the 5 succor to continue the spy and it's really pretty stunning, then Czech who was not some mysterious Russian agent operating in the bowels of the Kremlin is Christopher Steele, the ex British spy led everyone to believe. No, the guys are researcher at a liberal think tank the brookings institution in Washington D.C. that at the time was run by a long time friend and ally as Hillary Clinton G what a coincidence. It was Clinton in her confederates who invented the Russia House, framed her opponent and disseminated the information and then chanko was key to it and it turns out not only when he was interviewed by the FBI did he debunk the whole thing, but in the process he lied about who his real sources were. Now we don't know through the indictment yet who those real sources were. I wouldn't be surprised if they were people closely connected to Hillary

Christopher Steele John Durham Greg Jarrett Igor Danchenko FBI Steele Fox News Russia Sebastian Washington D.C. Donald Trump America Brookings Institution Czech Chanko Hillary Clinton Clinton Hillary
The Origin of Christopher Steele's Lies Comes From Clinton Campaign

Mark Levin

01:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The Origin of Christopher Steele's Lies Comes From Clinton Campaign

"Took years two more years on top of that for the Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz to expose that mister Steele had relied in a Russian source who said he never expected mister Steele to present his info as facts since most of it was hearsay Now derms indictment says that this source this guy danchenko obtained material from a longtime democratic operative who was active in the 2016 Clinton campaign In other words the Clinton campaign passed it off to this Russian guy the Russian guy passed it off to Christopher Steele and then Christopher Steele put it in the dossier and then the FBI used that information to then go after Carter page and other people within the Trump campaign And tell everybody that Trump was a Russian puppet A Russian steward you see That's the Democrats ran on And they knew it the whole time They knew what they lied They lied to everybody about this Hillary Clinton's campaign lied And there were so many people in the government that were more than willing to go along with this You know they were just happy to go along with this They didn't even stop Trump No matter

Mister Steele Christopher Steele Michael Horowitz Danchenko Clinton Justice Department FBI Carter Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:42 min | 3 weeks ago

What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

"What can we expect from this point forward? So is Durham wrapping up his investigation? There's still some skeptics out there, cash. There's still some cynics. Hey look, there'll be a couple process crimes, but don't hold your breath. You're not going to get a Comey. You're not going to get a struck. You're not going to get a page. You're not going to get him a cave. You're not going to get anyone from the senior level of the Clinton campaign. What do you think? Look, I've run these massive conspiracy, massive national security cases, and they take two. I spent two three four years on some cases. John Barnes in his second year. And he's working against literally everyone in government because Merrick Garland's Department of Justice doesn't want to prosecute this. And the Chris ray and the FBI don't want to. So I don't think you issue 40 page indictments for process crimes and tell the world what you're working on if you're just going to stop. That's my opinion. And remember to your audience, an indictment is the only way a prosecutor can tell the world what they're doing because they're not allowed to disclose their evidence. So John Durham has taken the time to methodically issue indictments totaling over a 101 hundred pages now for three people. That's it. And he's identified 15 individuals like the Clinton operative in the matter like Fiona hill like Michael sussman and the like, and I think that's why he's building a larger conspiracy. Now, look, I'm not married to this pipe dream that we're going to get Comey. I wish we could, but I unfortunately just don't think we have the Jews to do it. I do think we have a shot at Andy mccabe and that's probably why the likes of Peter strzok are out in the media now, parading around. Just like Christopher Steele did, parading around his false credibility, now Peter strzok's turn. And that should tell you something that may be something else that's coming down the

Comey Merrick Garland John Barnes Durham Chris Ray John Durham Clinton Department Of Justice Fiona Hill Michael Sussman FBI Peter Strzok Andy Mccabe Christopher Steele
After Igor Danchenko Indictment, Look at the FBI and Democrats' Activity

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 weeks ago

After Igor Danchenko Indictment, Look at the FBI and Democrats' Activity

"And now Durham has obtained an indictment of this guy eager Dan shanko Russian provided the information for the dossier He's charged with lying to the FBI but you know the real story here is the intersection between the Democrats the FBI investigation the phony claims that were made who knew what when and how all this was just a giant lie That's what we know That's what we know Kimberly strasser on The Wall Street Journal points out very very important point Never forget the original claim According to the FBI Democrats and the media mister Trump harbored secret and nefarious ties with Russia We knew that because his mother Jones explained that a 2016 article that became the reigning storyline Christopher Steele was a credible source with a proven record of providing reliable sensitive and important information He had come across troubling evidence of Trump's collusion He brought it to the U.S. law enforcement he brought it to the federales right And then it took a year a year for congressional investigators to reveal that dossier had in fact been commissioned by this opposition research firm known as fusion GPS We all know that right Fusion GPS working for the Democrat party working for Hillary Clinton's campaign And then they all started lying about it They all started lying

FBI Dan Shanko Kimberly Strasser Mister Trump Christopher Steele Durham The Wall Street Journal Russia Jones Donald Trump U.S. Democrat Party Hillary Clinton
If Trump Never Colluded With Russia, Why Did the FBI Waste $16M Investigating?

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

If Trump Never Colluded With Russia, Why Did the FBI Waste $16M Investigating?

"Is why do the FBI just go along with this They use this phony phony steaming pile of garbage to then turn around and get Pfizer's on Americans who were doing nothing wrong It's amazing And then why don't we spend what $60 million investigating the whole thing Trying to bring down a president I mean that's the real coup You want to talk about it and insurrection That's your insurrection right there Trying to use all the power of the federal government's law enforcement department to engage in politics To try to affect the outcome of a political election And that's exactly what took place here And now we're turning around and realizing this gets even worse than we ever could have imagined and the purposes of the government's own collusion Dare I say collusion here with the Clinton campaign Because that's what we're talking about And so it's hard to believe we're discussing this right The Steele dossier But this is what the FBI relied on This is what they relied on to investigate Trump's campaign The steel dossier

Law Enforcement Department FBI Pfizer Federal Government Clinton Government Steele Donald Trump
Diving Deep on John Durham With Kash Patel

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Diving Deep on John Durham With Kash Patel

"Someone that understands the Russian collusion story better than anybody else and his predictions have been coming true and I push back against them very politely when he was on the show. He's a friend of mine cash, Patel, very smart guy American patriot. Cash are you with us? Yeah, Charlie, got you loud and clear and thanks so much for having me back on your show. Really appreciate it. The floor is yours, what have we learned this week with John Durham and these indictments? Well, as your show and your viewers have taken a great interest in John Durham, what he's been doing since we last talked was issue another indictment. And let's just rewind history for a little bit for those who haven't watched the plot against the president, spend 90 minutes of your life and learn about the biggest political scandal and how Devin Nunes and I expose that scandal in the United States history. So first, you have Christopher Steele, or let's back up one more step. You have fusion GPS and the democratic national party and Hillary Clinton campaign pay millions of dollars to obtain fraudulent information through a MI 6 asset Christopher Steele and pump that into the FBI and have the FBI intentionally lie to a fisa court. So you have a democratic political party. You have a foreign operative. You've got tens of millions of dollars, and you have our FBI and DOJ being corrupted. As if that wasn't bad enough, that was proven. Not just by the Nunes memo and the Russia gate investigation we did validated by the inspector general, but also John Durham indicted one of the attorneys who lied to the fist court for the surveillance warrant during the Trump campaign era. And then indicted just a couple of weeks ago, Michael sussman for lying to the FBI. Who's Michael sussman? Oh, he's the head lawyer for the DNC and Hillary campaign who was getting paid millions of dollars to shell. This information about the Russia gate hooks to the FBI and lied about it. And now we have this guy indicted danchenko. His name's not that important, but his position is. And if you recall, Christopher Steele did this terrible interview with George Stephanopoulos recently. We do go to try to resuscitate his credibility. And people were asking, why would he do that now? Because he knew this indictment was coming. And why does it matter? Because we already destroyed Christopher Steele's credibility in his lies. But you asked, where does Christopher Steele get his information from? Danchenko, this guy that was just indicted at lying to the FBI. 5 times over 5 counts in a federal indictment was Christopher Steele's primary source for the information that we knew was rather than to begin

John Durham Christopher Steele FBI Michael Sussman Devin Nunes Democratic National Party Patel Charlie Hillary Clinton Nunes Russia Danchenko DOJ United States DNC Hillary George Stephanopoulos
Who Is Igor Danchenko?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Who Is Igor Danchenko?

"Let's start backwards. Last 48 hours, John Durham, who is appointed by Bill Barr, issued some indictments. One of the indictments that he issued was towards this new figure and you would know about him if you were really into this. But a guy by the name of Igor danchenko. Now Igor danchenko is supposed to be a Russian specialist. Igor danchenko is someone that formerly worked at the brookings institution a Dante is a Russian born U.S. based researcher. He worked at the brookings institution from 2005 to 2010, and he was a former official in Bill Clinton's State Department. And so danchenko's role was not really clear up until the last 48 hours. So the centerpiece of all of this, the centerpiece for the whisper campaign against Trump, the basis for to get Mueller and to spy on Trump was a document. It was a piece of work known as the dossier. The dossier was compiled by none other than former British spy Christopher Steele. But Christopher Steele compiled the dossier in what has always been a focus for those of us that have wanted to get the truth is who were his sources. Well, the main source, the main Russian source was Igor danchenko. Now, this dossier, this document, this summary, fraudulent one and fake one was then fed to the FBI and the press and was later used in fisa surveillance warrants against Trump aide Carter page, and then through surveilling Trump's pages communications, the Clinton Obama regime was able to spy on the Trump campaign.

Igor Danchenko John Durham Bill Barr Christopher Steele Danchenko Brookings Institution Dante Bill Clinton State Department Mueller Donald Trump U.S. Trump Aide Carter FBI Clinton Obama
Russian analyst who worked on Steele dossier charged with lying to FBI

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Russian analyst who worked on Steele dossier charged with lying to FBI

"A Russian analysts who provided information for a dossier used during the trump Russia investigation has been charged with lying to the FBI the case was brought as part of special counsel John dorms investigation into the origins of the F. B. I.'s probe of ties between Donald trump's twenty sixteen presidential campaign and Russia a grand jury indictment issued in federal court in Virginia charges Igor Danchenko with five counts of false statements to the FBI about his sources of information Danchenko functioned as a source for Christopher Steele a former British spy paid by Democrats to examine trump's Russia ties Steele's dossier was used by federal authorities as they sought surveillance warrants targeting a former trump campaign aide however it had no role in launching the investigation led by special counsel Robert Muller Ben Thomas

John Dorms F. B. I. Russia FBI Igor Danchenko Danchenko Christopher Steele Donald Trump Virginia Steele Robert Muller Ben Thomas
FBI Agents Swarm Russian Oligarch's DC Home

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | Last month

FBI Agents Swarm Russian Oligarch's DC Home

"So the guy whose house they swarmed the yesterday in Washington D.C. the FBI this guy Oleg deripaska was connected to Vladimir Putin but he also had business relationships with Christopher Steele who was one of the authors of the dossier used to spy on Donald Trump by the FBI That was the whole collusion dossier You know the pee pee tape He's colluding with Putin You got the whole thing So some people say Dan this great news deripaska means a closed in on stealing a network I'm not sure about that But here before we get to so we have two options here Either they're closing in on steels and network or more likely they're hiding George Soros's role and others in the 2016 election manipulation That's what I think But going back to reason number one here's steals connections some of them this guy Derek Oscar they serve the warrant on his house yesterday In 2015 DOJ officials notably Brussels and some FBI agents met in New York with deripaska to seek the Russian billionaires help on organized crime investigations The meeting was facilitated though not attended by Christopher Steele Chris the first Theo area is here it gets worse In 2012 yields private firm orbis was hired as a subcontractor by a law firm working for you guessed it their apostle Who then headed Russia's largest aluminum company Steals firm was asked to do some research on a business rival By 2015 steals work had left him friendly with one of their apostles lawyers according to John Solomon's sources this is from a 2018 piece And when or the associate Deputy Attorney General longtime acquaintance of steel sought help getting to meet their pasca who obliged but Christopher

Washington D.C. Oleg Deripaska FBI Christopher Steele Derek Oscar Vladimir Putin Donald Trump Deripaska Putin Christopher Steele Chris George Soros DAN DOJ Steals Firm Brussels Orbis New York John Solomon Russia Christopher
Tracking Clinton Campaign Lawyer Michael Sussmann Since the Nunes Report

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Tracking Clinton Campaign Lawyer Michael Sussmann Since the Nunes Report

"So everything I did based on the house Intel drop was chrono chronological order as it was presented And it starts here From the Nunes memo both the DOJ and the FBI petitioned the fisa court to begin to surveil a Trump campaign adviser we later learned was Carter page On October 21st 2016 just two and a half weeks before the election The application had to be certified by the FBI's director or deputy director The attorney general Deputy Attorney General or assistant attorney general to the NSA The initial warrant on Carter page was issued and renewed three times Every 90 days which took you through the rest of the campaign Through the election the president elect period in the early months of the Trump presidency FBI director James Comey signed three of those fisa court warrants Comey sign three deputy FBI director Andrew mccabe signed one Deputy Attorney General's Sally Yates Dana bonetta and rod Rosenstein they signed one Christopher Steele was an FBI source He was initially paid first payment a $160,000 by the DNC and the Clinton campaign to create the dossier via Perkins coy and fusion GPS Okay so this is now the place where sussman fits in Everywhere we have the law firm Perkins coy We now know that was sussman

FBI Carter DOJ James Comey Intel Comey Andrew Mccabe NSA Sally Yates Dana Bonetta Rod Rosenstein Christopher Steele DNC Clinton Sussman Perkins
The Steele Dossier, Explained

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | 2 months ago

The Steele Dossier, Explained

"Have a lot of younger listeners. That quite honestly weren't that involved in politics when this was unfolding so just kind of walk us through that again. The significance the unprecedented nature of this. The chuck schumer like passive aggressive warning. Sign in january of seventeen on rachel maddow show right the donald trump accurately saying that. I'm being spied on people's laughing at him. Walk us through the timeline of all this. I think it'd be helpful as i get to. The topic i really want is your in on. Which is durham. Yeah sure are so. Look these investigations as a former federal prosecutor who did national security cases. You know these things take time. You have to get approvals from down below in the bowels of the justice department through the attorney general if you're gonna go surveilled someone of this magnitude. And that's for your younger viewers a search warrant to search more. If you're looking at if you're looking at a bank robber or suspected murderer you have to go before a federal judge and you gotta say judge. I think this guy committed this crime. We need to go and look at his bank records. It cellphone records is emails. Phone calls because we think he killed somebody or because we think he robbed the bank and if there's probable cause the judge grants it same thing in this instance just different federal court that deals with spy and basically what the hillary clinton campaign did was. They spent tens of millions of dollars to collect false information from this guy. Christopher steele will use to be a british intelligent asset. If you can believe it later turned. Fbi informant. i mean. You can't make this up. I never understood this. Where the heck did this tens of how. How on earth did they spend. Tens of millions of dollars. I've never never understood that. Sure so one of the things that we were able to do on house intel. Even though paul ryan didn't want us to do it was subpoenaed. The bank records for this company called fusion. Gps glenn simpson and they were funneling the money through perkins coup which is the democratic ball. And that's what they do. Their job is to be the representatives for the dnc and the hillary clinton campaign so those guys get paid tens of millions of dollars. Money goes into the law firm. The law firm then cuts checks the fusion. Gps for millions of dollars and they go and higher media representatives christopher steele to start putting false smear campaigns against president trump. So they're working. The intelligence apparatus one lane and the media apparatus in another to take on a presidential a presidential

Chuck Schumer Rachel Maddow Donald Trump Christopher Steele Justice Department Durham Hillary Clinton Glenn Simpson Paul Ryan FBI Intel Perkins DNC President Trump
How Did Hillary Clinton and the DNC Get Away With Spying on Donald Trump?

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 months ago

How Did Hillary Clinton and the DNC Get Away With Spying on Donald Trump?

"How is it that the United States of America you can spy on a presidential campaign because of a lie that you bring to the table How do we allow that in America How is that possible in America All of what I just said use exactly what happened on the Trump Anybody sorry for it now Now I go back to the audio James Comey downplaying the role of the Steele dossier in that fisa application He said I wasn't it was just a bunch of bunch of different facts Back in 2019 December 16th James Comey downplayed the Steele dos that he knew was a lie in 2016 in that fisa application Now why did he downplay it Because he knew that that vice application should have never been granted and the FBI should have never been investigating this James Comey also bragged right about sending some FBI agents He was asked in 2018 after he knew in 2016 That this steel dossier in all this was just nothing but a created lie By the party he supports And when he was asked in 2018 who went around the how did you go around the protocol Why did you go around the protocol going through The White House counsel's office Instead just sent him some FBI agents in The White House For a general Flynn perjury trap Comey smugly said I sent him And everybody laughed This is America today This is what our government is like today

James Comey America Steele FBI Flynn Perjury Comey Smugly White House
John Solomon Knew John Durham Was Building a 'Small Number of Indictments' Back in January

Mark Levin

02:48 min | 2 months ago

John Solomon Knew John Durham Was Building a 'Small Number of Indictments' Back in January

"John Solomon I'm going to play something from you that he had to say And this was back on January the 24th Of January 24th So I want you to put that in perspective of when this was Take a listen John Durham is continuing a criminal investigation We are going to be talking this morning about the Biden agenda Do you expect Durham to come out with indictments even in the face of a new administration and the Biden agenda unfolding Everything that I see in the activity of the investigation and everything I hear from defense lawyers and others that are familiar with what's going on is that he is building a small number of indictments trying to get the evidence to get there There have been some delays and there's fights over evidence in the secret behind closed doors grand jury fights but all the evidence is pointing toward him trying to bring criminal charges probably in the first quarter of this year That's what I'm hearing Of course there's a new sheriff in town when Merrick Garland gets confirmed as attorney general as we expect he will He'll have a say and maybe he'll take the and put the case and set it aside But right now John Durham looks to be building a small number of indictments focused on the top of the FBI That's very important The very top of the leadership in the FBI That's where he's looking Also in these documents that were declassified we learned about Christopher Steele and a confession a year after he was fired Tell me about that So important Christopher Steele finally describes his motive in September 2017 Remember he was fired in November for leaking to the meet in November 16 They bring it back in September He said here are my two motors My first motive was James Comey reopened the Clinton email case I thought that was going to hurt Hillary Clinton's chances I leaked to the news media to create a different storyline in the public And secondly I considered Donald Trump to be my main opponent and I didn't want him to be president because he would help my I think he would hurt the Great Britain U.S. relationship Now remember he's a foreigner He's a British former MI 6 agent This is the clearest evidence that a foreigner intermediate election We started the Russian collusion investigation thinking Donald Trump and Russia were colluding together And we ended it knowing that Hillary Clinton's handpicked MI 6 investigator intervened in our election because he didn't like Donald Trump and he wanted to help Hillary Clinton What a role reversal What a role reversal is right John Salman they're saying this back on January 24th Everything he just said by the way it's become true All of it Now the question now is can the media look the other way long enough Can the media look the other way long enough that you won't hear about this story

John Durham John Solomon Christopher Steele Biden Merrick Garland FBI James Comey Durham Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Clinton Great Britain John Salman U.S. Russia
"steele" Discussed on The Sean Salisbury Show

The Sean Salisbury Show

02:03 min | 3 months ago

"steele" Discussed on The Sean Salisbury Show

"Stamp saying not playing here man. Force your hand and at this time next year if shawn watson's cleared by the nfl no matter all the beg from either side of what the he'll be playing somewhere else and be a starting quarterback if he's if the the legal stuff goes away and it'd be thrown for somebody else i think if you're if you're hoping he's going to be here it's a wing of prayer man and i'm not sure that prayer is going to be answered for you know what's on and what's a bummer. But i just think that it. Can't you tell that the texans have checked out. Yes i mean in my. They're phrasing changed your best for the team today. All there waiting again for what they want. That's it yeah phil steele college football preview the best in the business what he does and a popular popular college football preview one.

shawn watson nfl phil steele football
"steele" Discussed on Mo Egger

Mo Egger

05:10 min | 4 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Mo Egger

"It's a one of the rights of summer. And i've talked to phil steele on this show for the last god eight nine ten years and i i say this every single year because i do it every single year number one. I go on vacation. I get phil steele's annual college football preview and devour it. It is must reading. It's great for a weekend at the pool. If you're getting ready for the college football season and who isn't especially around here it is must reading. And then i get fill on and one of the first things i always ask them about. Is the amount of work in detail. Thoroughness that has to go into putting together this publication. It's the only one to get and there's a lot out there. You could order it. Phil steele dot com. His two thousand twenty one college football preview it is in-depth and as comprehensive as anything. You're going to read previewing the college football season you were just talking off air it so much more fun to have this conversation when we know that we're gonna have a season we know what it's gonna look like there's going to be. Hopefully fewer interruptions hopefully no interruptions. This is an easier conversation to have in the one we had a year ago. Yeah last year. When i was doing the radio show circuit. Everybody was pretty down thinking. We're not plan football and it was almost like well. We'll have phil on anyway even though we don't think we're playing football this year but we'll have mine and this year i mean we. Everybody knows we're playing. The thing was more. Put the magazine out last year. They went and switched all the schedules on me. So we had to put the magazines on the website. People are printing them off. I got pictures of people that have a five hundred page magazine. 'cause they pasted in all the new schedules and you know what i wanna ask you mo this is not just a preseason magazine. Don't use this magazine all the way through the bowl season bradley right all year long. I mean as as somebody who works on uc football broadcasts. It's an invaluable resource and it works all throughout the season. And here's my understanding because this is this is the first year that i've got an exclusively online You can evolve the publication throughout the year. Correct yeah we are going to update all the way up through the start of the season all the changes. So you know like right now was announced wake forces this morning Had lost two starters for the season while we're going to do is on the magazine page on the digital version. We're gonna circle those players and you'll see at a glance that they're not available anymore. We'll also add in any transfers. It happened since we went to the press. Although we went to the press very late we went june fifteenth so we pretty much captured..

phil steele football phil bradley
"steele" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

02:23 min | 4 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

"By people and the fact that there seems to be such a snobbery around the cleaver vanilla. Yeah because it's kind of like okay. It seems like if you're oh. I don't want vanilla ice cream. It's too basic from your whatever. The vanilla stands come through the woodwork. And they're just like. Oh well maybe you just don't get it see my palate is so sophisticated and i can sense the the notes of vanilla bean better than you may be. There's just such an elitism with vanilla. Vanilla has put in no work. Wow okay. I've been biting my tongue for a long time. I saw. I saw the list of what matt steele was saying for his rants. Two out of three of them including this one our personal attacks against me. It is very common knowledge in our home that i am very pro vanilla and pro. French allah whipped cream. We've argued about this several times. I feel like this is now being used as a platform to attack me. And i don't know that that's fair. Yeah i think it's funny. I had the same reaction. I think it's funny. That you've invented this villain of like stand like our bonilla's stands out there. How often malign vanilla as like a boring flavor. And now i feel like i need to assume the role of manila bill. And because i. I will go hard for me. I feel like i recently came into my love of vanilla because it is often people are like it's just boring. We need something else mixed in. We need something but it sounds like you've become an adult and so i'm excited for matt steel to join the party. I will never join this party. I i am on the opposite end of town at a different party. And that is the chocolate party because chocolate maybe as subtle as someone punching you in the face like obviously like it's the opposite of vanilla at least chocolate puts in the work like vanilla does nothing for you sure. No one needs something to compliment it. In order for me to handle it i i would agree that i am often like. I'm never like oh. I would love scoop of vanilla ice cream right now like i. You know it goes with something else. I'm usually like. I enjoy it as as an accompaniment but i do think it deserves credit on. Its own but i remember being a little agree with you. I remember being a child and they would like.

matt steele matt steel bonilla manila
"steele" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:09 min | 5 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Meeting battle and entering into his world. He would express to me the importance of the origin the base of the garment which was fabric. His work was extensively about researching fabrics in their origins. He would explain to me. That irish linen was so because of the water in ireland or it would speak to me about the japanese cottons and how the japanese had bought up all the looms from the united states from the nineteen forties and fifties. Americans drew away for modern technology. They saw an intrinsic value in those looms and took them to japan and started working on those with their cottons. And make little credible wabi sabi kinds of carvings and diving into the origins of material. And and what they what they render with new so them was something that up into that point about big gesture and hadn't really taken the time or hadn't been told much about the tradition of thousands of years or one hundred years that goes.

ireland wabi sabi united states japan
"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"So let's think about these to imagine. Imagine your tiny mouse and that means you're an animal very hazardous environment. You've got predators cats with the eyes and claws are out to get you. You can dive infectious disease. You can even just die of exposure so small and it gets really cold. You can basically freeze to death. So there are a lot of different ways that mice in the wild condi- and that means they tend to have pretty short lifespan in the wild their license probably months maybe a year if they get lucky and so what that means is that mice tend to gear up and reproduce very quickly. They have big litters. They can have babies once a month. Associate obviously much quicker than humans can manage and the reason is that gonna die of something so evil does. is it prioritises reproduction. I've wraps everything else. And if you're an animal that lives in a dangerous environment gives you up to reproduce as quickly as possible even if that comes at the cost of degeneration in later life so you can imagine on a on a very simplified level. Evolution is willing to throw your body together and slapdash way as long as it gets you to reproductive fitness as quickly as you can pump up those kids and then you can basically die as far as relations concerned. Because you've you've served your purpose and what that means is that we have a variety of molecular detritus in our genome which doesn't conspired to kill you in your first twenty thirty forty fifty even sixty years of life but if you do live long enough then effectively irrelevant to the gene pool and so happy to let these mistakes happen. And that's why ultimately we do succumb to cancer. We do succumb to heart. Disease is surprisingly synchronized time our lives. Because that's the point we've got old enough that we've done our reproduction. We pasternack jeans. Just doesn't care about us anymore. Unfortunately and that's why some of those larger animals that are harder to kill. Maybe live longer. You mentioned things like the the whale that lives or the tortoise. That's the cover of your book that that may be it takes them a little bit longer to reproduce so there they get to stick around of. Yeah so i mean. I saw size. Aging is one of the most famous correlations in evolutionary biology. Which is you know the big. The long tend to live. There's probably a little bit of security in that statement because you also need longer to grow to the size of whale that you can't become awale a full-size blue. While in six months however as you say right if you're a while you're in the ocean you haven't gotten any natural predators because you're absolutely enormous then is one really ready clear..

six months once a month first twenty thirty forty fift sixty years one a year
"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

04:43 min | 5 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"We are with andrew steel who is the author of ageless and after obtaining his phd in physics from the university of oxford. He decided that aging was the most important scientific challenge of our time and switched fields to computational biology. Which actually i had to look up. What computational biology is and now that i know it is. I have a deeper understanding of your approach in how you use modeling and statistics to understand Aging but dr steele has worked at the francis crick institute using machine learning to decode our dna and predict heart attacks using patients medical records. And he's now a fulltime science writer and a fantastic science writer so i'm really excited to share his work with you today. I based in london. So welcome dr steele great to have you on and talking today all about aging and actually how to grow old without maybe growing older. Thank you very much. Thanks very instruction. But i think that a good place to start is just with the term aging and maybe what some of some folks initial responses to the term aging be and. I know just in talking with friends and colleagues about aging. I've heard different angles. One is sort of. Oh i wanna know how to anti age more for cosmetic purposes others. Take the approach of we. Just all need to accept that we're all aging and we're all gonna die and we really need to accept in permanence and then others may say things like Anti-aging is for the super wealthy or the silicon valley multi-billionaire that want to just live forever. But you take a different approach to aging and and maybe you can share why you think that aging and working on the science of aging is one of the most important humanitarian things that we can do of our times. I think of just think of aging is inevitable process. Just a side effect of being alive. We grow old. We see packs girl on our farm on the most grow old. It just seems like there's universal process that afflicts all living things but actually when you approach a biologist then you start to see ageing as the cause of this huge amount of human suffering. The reason i call it in the book the greatest humanitarian challenge of our time. Which could sound slightly counterintuitive to say about this inevitable. Process is because is responsible for by far the majority of the death and the suffering in the modern world. So if you think about all the major things that kill us things like cancer. Heart disease dementia. These are all essentially caused by the aging process..

andrew steel london francis crick institute today One one university of oxford dr steele
"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"We have dr andrew steele. Who's going to be talking about the science of aging. And i like to bring folks like this onto the show every once in a while because i was like to skirt. The edges of psychology. I think sometimes we live in a sort of a silo in. it's always interesting to learn about. How different fields are navigating Ideas and concepts that will influence our mental health and our psychology. And i have w. here. I'm curious what your thoughts were after. Listening to the episode with dr steele. You know it really. It was a really interesting episode. I feel like there is a lot of things. I hadn't thought about before and some new ideas related to what's going on with a gene that i had never considered but you know what i really appreciated most about him. I mean he's very smart guy and very reasonable and science-based in his approach. And i have to say diana. I was little bit unsure about it when i was listening to it to be able to introduce the episode..

dr andrew steele dr steele diana
"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

Mental Health Comedy

03:41 min | 7 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

"And all the things that you're going to get because you're already on that path that is like that ed and has a great thing about acknowledged those little things and i have been doing it since you talked about it. I mean i was a guy who still like to stay out to three in the morning. Doing comedy eating slice pizza chasing waitresses. Whatever i did. When i was twenty seven years old and didn't wanna go home and go to bed and now to the point where like ooh. I got that bill. Bryson book awaiting the in bed and my big comfy bed and i could lay there and not think about anything but read this book and laying this incredibly comfy bed and i acknowledge. I strange that i would be thinking about ad as i get into the bed at well. Yeah that's a whole other conversation to each's own sexually to each his own. I'm just saying sure. No roll over and see ed in his underwear three. Am no one does apparent. I will take is helpful philosophies. But i do that. I do that when i sit down at night. And i've made myself a little snack. And i mean this is crazy but this is a giant big beautiful salad to be a vegetarian guy. Giant big beautiful salad. I'm going to watch this show or ballgame or whatever it is and they just. I do take a moment of thanks matter. Alone is the greatest thing you can do for your mental health. Honestly and i know it sounds corny and for people really struggling. Your brain will not want you to do that. It's going to don't look at the good things first of all our arnie and secondly future. You're gonna lose them so don't do that but fightback fight back. You don't have to pay attention and you can do it in the smallest ways if you can't think of something positive then think of something neutral yeah. Going neutral is a big thing especially when you're panicking going. Neutral is a big antidote to that and the neutral is i you know. I love certain things i love. I love music okay. I like a certain song thing about the certain song. I how about right now. I'm wearing pants. That's a celebrate. Look at now. So it's it's all of those it's all of the above now. Unfortunately we have to. We have to stop now. Which is something that all the therapists that i've had light insane but i'm not to lighting it at our time is up. I've only been your age. Well we have to stop now coasters in their offices. John appreciate or did. I get a check from you. That's my other favorite in the middle of account a middle of a sentence so anyway you felt this way about your mom. Did i get a check from you last week. I'm like i. I don't know but it doesn't feel good to Had a guy order pizza once during session with a whole different story. That's my fall. That's not his fault. I.

John last week Bryson twenty seven years old three once each arnie ed secondly first
"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

Mental Health Comedy

04:39 min | 7 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

"And that's an act. You're acting it so act that the other way you can turn your you know. The jennifer always says that comedians have ferrari brain vast brain. That's associated hard to control. And it's it's hard to control but you can change the direction of the brain. He could can be fast in the other direction. Which is what you know. What's the best thought. What's the highest quality. Thought what can we do with this and it can work in either direction but the first thing is what's going on with me right now. That's a good question to ask. What am i feeling edgy. Mention using your. I think you said creativity and whatnot and there was a comic years ago. Michael boats johnson remember him. I didn't And he talked about how if you have some stress before. Show imagine that you've just jumped into a lake. And there's moss on you and then wipe your arms from your shoulders to your risk down and imagine that you're wiping away but it's stress. It's all this want. An and then the trip was and jennifer was talking about this. I think earlier. Take a breath and exhale as you wipe this stuff off. And of course at the time he told me. I'm like a twenty eight year old guys windsurfing. Doing flips under the golden gate bridge and a storm going. You need this crap man and here. I am thirty years later going. Okay jacob ripped wipe the moss off myself and you know talk about the the anxiety and that you have to sort of embrace it to some degree. But not let overpower i visualized that. It's an opponent whether it's on a football field or wherever it might and it just sort of. Take the palms of my hands and chuck it away. Just physically pop. You know as football coach to say this will tell you how old i am right at. He'd say give it to them in the brisket son right under the shoulder pads in the brisket deliver tatum take away their leverage. In the brisket pop. But if i am visualize these little things like visualize you know when. I had a lot of bad stuff. Another friend said come up with some visualization to knock that stuff out of your vision. I am and came idea that i used to snowboard quite a bit and said you know about a snowplow going down the road and all this crap is in the road. It's not snow it's crap and it's this you're the last of your dog. It's your tearing your arm. Whatever it is. Turn your arm up on stage and have this plow. Go down the road and blowing all this stuff off. And you're following it twenty feet behind jogging driving your bike or your car or whatever and the road is now clear visualize and.

twenty feet jennifer jacob thirty years later Michael boats first thing twenty eight year old golden gate bridge johnson years
"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

Mental Health Comedy

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

"The primitive part of your brain is and it just wants you to run run. Get there so as long as you're doing it at your brain thinks okay good. He listened to my brain things running from it. So yeah i felt that because you ever have a dog that's got fleas and it sits in one corner and it gets bit bitten. It runs across the room together side because he thinks whatever is in that corner is causing it name and it frees together out of the room but at least with with the dog. unfortunately the that didn't work but with me it did it. Did absolutely it saved me. It saved me. And i ride bicycle. But you can't ride bicycle at eleven o'clock at night when the panic hits you so so the jogging did really help in. The gyms were close. Which i to hit the heavy bag in the gym. Have a lot of people who use like the gym to help them with their mental health. But this in running. I think saved you. I think it's important. And sometimes the state change to. Like even the you're describing. It was cold and foggy but sometimes just moving getting into a different space can help your brain and breathing that cold air. There are half lonely times right in the middle of on people are still in it like they're still in it right now. You'll you're you're right about that because it was foggy and damp and it was the season and it was otherworldly. I mean you couldn't see a block and you can see the holiday christmas lights in the fog in the distance and there is something and it was silent and there were no cars out no people no cars and i ran down the middle of the street and it was other events a little mortgage dream and it was otherworldly really really help and the other thing That helped and edna. I've talked about this as i have a a lot of friends up here in the mental health and a world and whatnot and i went through a thing..

one corner eleven o'clock at night christmas holiday
"steele" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:21 min | 9 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"The spectator club by sir richard steele. The first of our society is gentlemen of worcestershire of an ancient descent a baronet his name sir. Roger discovery his great grandfather was inventor of that famous country dance which is called after him. All who know that shire are very well acquainted with the parts and merits of roger. He is a gentleman that is very singular in his behavior but his singularities proceed from his good sense and are contradictions to the manners of the world. Only as he thinks the world is in the wrong however this humor creates him no enemies for he does nothing with sourness or obstinacy and his being unconfined two modes and forms makes him but the readier and more capable to please and oblige all who know him when he is in town. He lives in soho square. It is said he keeps himself a bachelor by reason. He was crossed in love by a perverse beautiful widow of the next county to him. Before this disappointment sir. Roger was what you call a fine gentleman had often slept with my lord rochester and sir george ethridge fata dual upon his first coming to town and kicked bully dawson in a public coffeehouse for calling him youngster but being ill used by the above mentioned widow he was very serious for a year and a half and though his temper being naturally jovial he at last got over it. He grew careless of himself and never dressed. Afterwards he continues to wear a coat and doublet of the same cut. That were in fashion. The time of his repulse which in his mary humor's he tells us has been in an app twelve since he. I wore it. It is set. Sir roger grew humble in his desires forgot his cruel beauty in so much that it is reported. He has frequently offended with beggars gypsies. But this is looked upon by his friends rather as matter of rail than truth. He is now in his fifty sixty year. Cheerful gay and hardy keeps good house both in town and country a great lover of mankind but there is such a murtha cast in his behavior that he is rather beloved and esteemed. His tenants grow rich. His servants look satisfied. All the young women profess love to him and the men are glad of his company when he comes into a house. He calls the servants by their names and talks all the way upstairs to visit. I must not omit that sir. Rogers a justice of the corum that he fills the chair at a quarter session with great abilities and three months ago gained universal applause by explaining a passage in the game. Act the gentleman next esteem and authority among us. Another bachelor who is a member of the inner temple a man of great probity wit and understanding but he has chosen his place of residence rather to obey the direction of an old humorous and father than in pursuit of his own inclinations. He was placed there to study the laws of the land and is the most learned of any of the house in those of the stage. Aristotle and lawn genus are much better understood by him. Then littleton or coke. The father sends up every post questions relating to marriage articles leases and tenures in the neighborhood. All which questions he agrees with an attorney to answer and take care.

richard steele Roger george ethridge fifty sixty year Rogers Aristotle a year and a half worcestershire first shire three months ago both two modes rochester doublet twelve soho roger app
"steele" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Introductory note sir. Richard steele sixteen. Seventy two to seventeen twenty. Nine addison's chief collaborator. In the tatler and the spectator was born in dublin of an english father and an irish mother. He made addison's acquaintance at school and they were at oxford together. Steel left the university to enter the army and opened his literary career while still a soldier with christian hero. In seventeen o two. He began to write for the stage. And was of notable influence in redeeming the english drama from the indecency which had marked much of it. Since the restoration like addison he combined politics with literature and in seventeen fifteen was knighted as a reward for his services to the hanoverian party. The chief glory of spectator is of course the club and it was in the essay which follows that steel. I sketched the characters. Composing the spectator himself was addison's creation. And addison also elaborated sir. Roger though steel originated him with ever- may be the respective claims of addison and steele to the credit. For the success of the spectator. It is to steal that the honor belongs of having founded its predecessor the tatler and silver originating the periodical say steel was a warm hearted impulsive man full of sentiment improvident and somewhat weak of will. These qualities are reflected in his writings which are inferior to addison's in grace and finish but are marked by greater spontaneity and invention probably know piece of writing of equal length has added so many portraits to the gallery of our literature as the first sketch of the spectator club. Which is here printed..

Richard steele Roger Nine Steel english sixteen irish first sketch steele seventeen oxford dublin addison Seventy two steel hanoverian seventeen fifteen seventeen o christian two
"steele" Discussed on Hallway Chats

Hallway Chats

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"steele" Discussed on Hallway Chats

"See people make this transition and it didn't always go well. It was difficult. It was something that they really struggled with. Because you had people that were top performers. That had always done really well and then all of a sudden things aren't working very well for them. And i would see that. There was other marketing companies. Who would kind of come in and at vultures and take advantage of these people and charge them outrageous fees to give them very tempted. You know cookie cutter. Solutions didn't actually do anything to help them. Other business and so now. These people felt like well. I've never marketing budget. And still not getting anywhere with this business. And i'm starting to feel really like i just don't know what i'm doing and maybe i'm not as good at this whole running a business. I thought i would be and so that was really what i was driven by when i started. This company was to provide not only great services to help those people to see that. It's not that they're doing something necessarily wrong with their business or they're not great at what they do. They're not necessarily great at communicating their unique value. And so that that became the cornerstone kind of everything that we do. Everything starts with messaging great content. That makes people really wanna learn more. That says i think you can solve my problems. And i need to learn more about that. And we build out from there for websites landing pages email campaigns nor everything that's going to help them generate more leads for their business. It's so thorough. What you've described. I love your approach and and your enthusiasm about getting messaging out there Can you talk a little bit about how your business has grown. And how you have transitioned into working with different types of clients and how they find you. Yeah definitely so. I think i started like everybody does where it was. You know. outsource your marketing department to me. I will figure out a way to do everything and most of it'll be done pretty well. Maybe not all of it but it'll get done And over the years like everyone does i kind of every year. Try to stop and look at. Okay what am i delivering. That's helping my clients grow their business. You know what's really standing out as something. That's actually helping them. And where can i be profitable and efficient with how i'm delivering those things And also where do i feel really confident right when i sit down to write the proposal from feeling really anxious if i'm feeling nervous feeling like maybe my pricing isn't right. Maybe i don't really know enough about this approach to the solution. Those are things that need to take out of my offering so every year. You know it's it's gotten more and more and more narrow as i look at those things and take away different offerings for example. For a long time we did. Seo part of it in house part of it with an agency that we outsource to and every single time that i wrote one of those proposals i felt really anxious. Because i didn't quite feel like that was our best area that we were really strong there and so we took it away and we're able to focus more on things that we do really well and then let the other work. Go to the people that specialize in those things. I feel like i could talk proposals all day long. But that's not really the focus of our show. I wanna ask you one question about taking. Seo out in not necessarily that. It's seo but you're taking out a service and an freelancers growing their own businesses into businesses and small businesses. You know those little services can be the hook that that may be you know you make a couple hundred bucks on a on an thousands of dollars project on on whatever that little service hook is the decision making well if i can get it all at once. Yeah i'll go. I'll go with heather. I'll go with tara go with liam. it's all in one. How did you approach. How do you approach that. Psychologically when you know you're risking those little you're risking sales and and no k. Probably in retrospect in you're gonna do better because you're not gonna stress about seo in your case But but how do you approach that. How does what does that decision process. Look like for you for me. It's one thing that makes it easier. As i do have a great network so over the years you know you meet other people in this space especially in wordpress community. I mean it's it's kind of like no other business community where everyone really does want to help. Each other and there can be really great positive relationships and so anything that i'm not able to do. I can feel pretty comfortable. That i could go to my network and find someone that can help. Fill that gap and we can do a really good job of integrating with and working well together in at the end of the day if that's not the right fit for a client they really want everything under one roof. Then i'm okay with letting that go At a point now where definitely there were hard times to do that but overtime as you grow and build a reputation and it just becomes easier to to get leads into getting customers. It became something that i was just really comfortable with saying. If if if the way i do business isn't a fit for you. Then i'm not a good fit for you and that's fine and i hope you even find someone who is a good fit but i'm not gonna.

"steele" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

09:58 min | 2 years ago

"steele" Discussed on Code Story

"Him and hopefully creating a good opportunity opportunity for him and his family. I think that's where just a ton of satisfaction comes through exciting really fulfilling and now with with as many people uh that are as are involved. Emporium that's the most exciting part to me. I think. Tell me about a mistake that you made and an. How did your team respond Ponto it one? That's that's recent the kind of comes to mind is With one of the newer products that we were building out and Lachey. And it's definitely a hard process to create a new product on top of an existing platform figure out by what type of MVP MVP you're gonNA launch with and how early to launch. How early to get the validation and everything and so with one of our recent products actually Like our team chap product this is helping in our businesses communicate internally with with each other from chat perspective. And there's a huge if you're using this you're most likely you're going to be on your mobile device right. So there's a huge mobile component and I think we did an awesome job laying out the product like figuring out what problem you're solving but after we launched it you might have even still been Beta phase but after we launched in user started using it and we started using internally which I think is important so whenever you can use your tools at your own business it totally pays off and there's some huge benefit there but we started using it and it was pretty obvious that we we had maybe not made the investment into some of the mobile development that we need it. We were just just kind of frank about it. We're like you know what we made a mistake here. This is not up to par with our standard of product and the experience on mobile is not that great and I think the the response from team is kind of cool. We have a room here. Podium it's on the top floor it's right next to our CEO off CEO's office. Yes and IT'S A. It's like a special projects room and we basically organized this team from some of our best engineers and an put together this team and they basically over the next four weeks it was. It was a pretty team winning and just focused on taking this armonk lap around this feature and bring it up to the standard that we required and we shifted priorities. We moved into rat. Move things around there really difficult to to shift on the priority side but it did come back to that principle of like look we need to like stand by standard on our product sides as we have from the beginning and we need to that so important right so we de prioritize things. They were hard they went in and I think just the amount of effort effort they put in to get up to that standard was super impressive and a few weeks later. We came out with something that I think exceeded. Everyone's expectations from that and so the response was almost responsive of kind of facing that. Being Frank about the issue was was incredible to see from the team. But it also pointed to you some things that were embedded into the culture. I think you need to embed in from the beginning which is just a really high standard of quality products because it's is that much higher or it's that much harder later on to keep that high bar so it sounds like it was a blessing in disguise is surfaced. Some things that were good about your team amplified the team culture because everyone had to jump in and respond and then strengthened your product standards as well. Yeah and that's really the beauty of having a An environment where people feel safe to own problems and and say you know not necessarily focused on just blame but say hey. Here's the issue like. How are we GONNA fix it and if people can be safe in in bringing that to the table and and calling it out? I think it positions the team even battered respond in in that way and turn it into some things something positive. What does the future look like for your product for podium and for the team the future the vision is you know we really do believe that podium is modernizing the way business happens locally and we think we can change that at a global scale? We have an office in in Australia. Now we're starting to expand internationally but the opportunity even just the United States with local businesses is massive one of the coolest things when you look at the impact that we've had is even though we work a lot with these forty thousand businesses and those are our customers. We actually actually interact a lot with just your everyday consumer so it actually turns out that one in every four cell phone users in the US ask interacted with the business through odium so it's pretty amazing kind of be the reach the we've had even to just everyone in the in the. US asser one in every four in the US so the vision is to really continue to expand that and figure out how we can really changed and modernize and experience. Yes you have with any type of business that you go to walkway. Who influences you so name name an architect a CTO tech tech person or or anyone really that you look up to and why we were fortunate enough to be able to go through the white combinator program and and through that process? We you had the chance to meet with a lot of founders and one of the really cool experiences we had was meeting with one of the founders of AIRBNB and that's our chief product officer Joe Gambia and we set up a meeting with him. We gotta go to the AIRBNB headquarters which we're kind of in is at the time they're amazing and we go on. We sit down with Joe and have one on one meeting in for thirty minutes and it was really cool just to see airbnb huge massive company but to sit down with with a founder and and see how focused he is on you know making that product better and how in the weeds he was with figuring out user experience and the details around that still even at the scale they were you know multibillion dollar company and so I remember that being pretty had a big impression on us at the getting stages of how we wanted to continue to be that close to the product later on and it was just pretty inspiring from product perspective to the steed at and you kind of put in our minds of look as as big as the company gets as much as you scale at the end of the day building. Something something that people want is still the most important thing and you don't have much of a business if you don't have that and sustained close to the product something we've always liked to do and and continue to do as as we scale. If you could go back to the beginning. What would you do differently or or is there anything that you would consider taking a different approach on? Yeah so one thing. I think you know when we sit here and we have this grand vision of podium. I look back. It took us a while to get there. We were this single products single feature for a long time as we grew the business. And I think it's important as early as you can to think about the bigger vision and what the possibilities are and what what you can grow whenever you have whatever type of privacy having to something bigger and so yeah one of the things maybe maybe a little differently is earlier on. Try to think and really push ourselves to figure out what that vision was and where we are going to grow up to an IT. It turned out like it. It worked out great. Luckily probably helped us ease into it a little bit and help this hits the milestones and scale along the way by having a product that really delivered at the beginning by developing that vision a little earlier and figuring out where we could had miss something. I'm probably go back and focus on a little bit more. Okay last question that you're on a plane. You're sitting next to a young entrepreneur. Who's just getting started? What advice would you give? That person might seem clean cliche. But I can't say enough laugh dream big. I think for us and it's it's an easy tendency to just think. Oh man if if I could just have a little small business that you know that would be that would be great great and be honest the beginning of probably what I thought. I'm just like if we could just even have something that was real and legitimate. It would exceed my expectations but how far we've been able to come with. How little we we knew? At the time. I think anybody has that opportunity. Especially these days with the technology that's out there with the platforms and systems that make it so much easier to oh execute I would just say push yourself to to think big and don't have any doubt that you can't go achieve it because any founder we've met that have been achieved way more than us every one of them has been in that exact same position and it took me a while to learn that along the way talking with more founders and go going through it myself but the sooner you can figure that out the more it's going to help you push yourself to to the limits you need to at the beginning to really achieve the most plus. You can excellent advice. Well Dennis thank you for being on the code story PODCAST. Thank you for telling the creation story of podium. Yeah thanks so much. Thanks for having me in. This concludes another chapter of Coq Story. Code story is a production of touch touchdown. LLC and is hosted and produced by Noel apart and edited by George Macharqa special things to Diana Chapman and Stephanie Kemp Mpg for their promotional support. Be sure to subscribe on itunes Google play breaker or the podcasting APP of your choice. Make sure to check us out at code story dot co- or follow us on facebook instagram twitter or Lincoln.

United States AIRBNB frank Lachey Coq Story Joe Gambia Google Australia facebook Dennis Noel Lincoln George Macharqa
"steele" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"steele" Discussed on Code Story

"Businesses get more of US online and that was what we started off with. We had very simple. Product focused the beginning mm-hmm but it was really valuable at that time. And so that's what. How a pool with our initial growth? So tell me work. The idea came from era gray. When I started the business we had been friends and Byu And we actually dried a lot of different ideas. If you want to the entrepreneurship programs there. We went to some pitch competitions and trying to find a business starter some cool idea that to get going on and so about a year after we graduated together we met back up and started talking at at the time I was helping local businesses with some some of their online reputation monitoring their reviews helping them come with answers for negative reviews. Things like that and Eric's dad tire shop in Canada and his dad had been asking him to help him solve this problem with reviews online and showed him. Some technology was using to run his business at the time. Especially Mike Communication standpoint and just wasn't a lot of good technology and so we started talking talking about that started collaborating and it was pretty obvious. We could build something that that would help these businesses and that initial Solving that initial problem was helping them with with getting more of US online. So that's how the idea formed. Eric called me a few days after we had that initial discussion was like. Hey we need to do this or somebody else will and sitting in my in my kitchen table and I said well come on over. Let's work on it. So he came over. We started sketching it out like the early product sketches on. I Know Book and within within a few weeks we had an MVP to start selling door to door so it was quick from what we had first disgusted to win. We actually were out selling to businesses. What tools did you use to build that original? MVP So we mapped it out. I think for even tried to use light employees charging on lucid and that we were familiar with the Byu you so I think we mapped out like user flows and Y- and user maps on that and then we basically took those as the basis to to some of the engineers. We started working with the beginning to help us build that firs. But in the early days as you're you know you map out the flow. You're outsourcing the engineering what sort of decisions and trade adopt you have to make sorta in the short term one of those was deciding. do it on rails so we built the first version ruby on rails now is kind of a joint decision we had. We've since switch technology stacks now at put him. We were kind of designing all of that. As far as like wh text act us how we wanted it to be mapped out. We're we're kind of technical in that way of Syria now even what we wanted to built on as we were consulting and working with these Genera so I think what helps and sometimes what a disconnect that I see some menteur his hands especially at the beginning is working with engineers and just thinking that you all those decisions can just be made by them right whereas a better approach is if you can be as technically possible and actually put some thought into those early decisions like what you want it to be written in how you want the technology to interact with the customers. Those things actually make a difference. I think long term for sure. So how has the product progress from that initial prototypes. You mentioned it was built rails. You're using outsource engineering. And you're doing some early flows. How has the product progress since that point? You know we. We continue with that process that first year so these were pretty full days. Eric can I were basically selling all day. Implementing these customers six in the morning going near the jam and finishing out death mound. Ten thirty at night. That was kind of the early grind. Brian the business and the platform was pretty simple. Just with that one feature After that phase we had some initial customers on the on the platform. We raise awesome money and hired her first engineer and he was like pivotal to the success in the early days. We hired him. His name's Arthur Wiegel. He was working at adobe at the time yet. A pretty cushy job and we had to basically convince him to come join us so and we were still at the in the apartment office at this time so he leaves adobe he comes to work for us and we show them what we have from a coding perspective. He's a really good engineer. And we just said Hey we want you to take over and run it and so he dives in a bit in a weekend. He's like. Hey guys I basically have to all thing over and it felt help like maybe a step backwards but looking back it was really important. I think it's set like at least some kind of precedents residents and podium in the sense of like even if stuff sometimes takes a little bit of time we're GonNa do it right especially from a technical perspective and that is totally you paid off from us and so the price of all time since then we have a huge engineering team working on the product. Now some of the technologies we've implemented now are like Elixir on the back end working through Phoenix react on the front end things like that. So technology stack has evolved quite a bit as well as just developing developing out the whole feature set of the platform in the feature set of the platform. How do you how do you build your roadmap? How do you determine what's the most important thing to bill next? It's it's tough because a lot of times. It seems like it's more important figure out what not to build. Just because you have so much feedback coming in as you build your customer base right and it's really figuring out of focus on what adds value and getting validation from that and then being able to you to just focus on on those features that really matter and the things that people want and so that's a process we kind of built early on working really closely with the customers to figure out what's the most valuable thing that we could build into the product and having that help shape our road map and then constantly going back and validating validating that value with the customer to make sure that that's like we're on the right path to what we're building and so even today every executive every product manager every engineer. They're required spend one on one time with customers and do extensive research every week to keep that feedback loop really really tight and that just basically basically helps us helps US Scott Garner roadmap and helps us figure out what to do next. Do I understand right that you are a graduate of Mount. Yeah with through the debt mountain. The program didn't really have a ton of development experience before that And it was awesome to go through that program kind of what my skills very cool cool so so tell me about that process. Tell me about going through death mountain. What got you there? And then you know what you came out with arrogant I and we have these dreams to start.

Eric Byu US adobe Scott Garner Mike Communication Mount Arthur Wiegel Syria Phoenix Canada Brian
"steele" Discussed on Liberty Education Interview Series

Liberty Education Interview Series

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"steele" Discussed on Liberty Education Interview Series

"We have with today. Shelby Steele who is a conservative author columnist documentary filmmaker Dr Steele is recipient of the national humanities medal. And a Robert J and Marian ES or senior fellow at Stanford university's Hoover Institution. He's also the author of many books, including the content of our character, white guilt and his most recent work. Shame how America's passan's have polarized our country. In addition, Dr Steele has written extensively for many major publications, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Harper's and has appeared on Nightline, sixty minutes and many Fox News programs. Dr Steele, thanks for joining us today. Thank you for having me one of your articles. You said that the real trouble between the races in America is at the racist or not just racist. But competing power groups, which you explain what you meant by that. Well, yes, given America's history the beginning. Obviously with the with slavery and blacks being brought in from largely from Africa and set up in America as in this this this low this burgeoning society, primarily settled by Europeans white Europeans. And then there's this infusion black slaves, these we're sort of still bound in that sort of binary relationship, white black and and and in. Throughout history. The when the two groups of in the sense involved as power groups in relation to each other blacks had another problem with blacks had very little any power at all during three and a half centuries and slavery whites had enormous power in relation to blacks until slavery ended then they sort of gained power again in the Jim crow era, and since the sixties we've been sort of renegotiating that relationship where do do blacks have the kind of power in relation to whites in American life that they should have if given that we are free society focused on individuals rather than on groups show, you see it more as not so much racial groups as power rooks. That's in terms of we we are racist though. Oh, that's breaking down actually. But the differential empower between white people and black people throughout American history was really problematic created a schism division in our society that we're still very much struggling with. And we've we've come into a new phase of that relationship. But it's still based on. It's it's still based on power and lacks have gained enormous power since the sixties since the civil rights victories of the nineteen sixties. We we won a are in a sense. We finally won our freedom then. And again, we we. At least the radically. We have now power a level of power in American life. That is commensurate with whites though, it's very tenuous. We're we're we're back all sorts of issues remain. Most recently people are talking about reparations again, all sorts of. We're still negotiating that power where that relationship between the two of my my my now, finally equal or or not are are white white still locked into a racist position that gives them an advantage or not. And you know, it depends on who you talk to what what answer you get there. Much of our politics comes out of that that abrasive. In fact, I think really the the American democracy is in many ways defined by its relationship. To this human problem of race. That's what distinguishes us from almost any other country in the world. In that same article, Dr Steele, you pointed out that whenever people make racing important. Issue powers, the primary motive, and it's kind of along the same lines. Can you give us a specific example this and also explain how things like innocence superiority and entitlement all of which written about how they factor into it? Again. We we have this this. It's it's. I wrote a piece recently about this. It begins. I think in in in came to to our attention nationally in the sixties when America for the very first time after blacks, Ben here. Some the very beginning of America, the colonial era finally in the nineteen sixties white America through the government from the president president Johnson on down acknowledged that the United States of America, the freest country in the world the world of the country that have failed articulated freedom through its constitution more eloquently and precisely than any other civilization in the world that America also practice probably the most pernicious, prolong instance

Shelby Steele America Hoover Institution Stanford university senior fellow Africa Jim crow Robert J Marian ES New York Times United States Wall Street Journal Harper president Johnson Ben president sixty minutes