20 Episode results for "Stay Lauder"

Julie Greenwald, chairman & COO, Atlantic Records: You have to outwork everybody else.

Skimm'd from The Couch

37:43 min | 1 year ago

Julie Greenwald, chairman & COO, Atlantic Records: You have to outwork everybody else.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay Lauder. The nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first. Let's get into the episode. For those people that really want career in one to get to the very top. You have to work everybody else. That's it and I'm not saying it's GonNa be the longest hours. It might be at work with the best ideas. I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lived check from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch. Hey, everyone, the show might look and sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the scam is working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today joined by a powerhouse of the music industry, Julie Greenwald she is the CEO and chairman of Atlantic records during her time in the business. She's helped. Advance the careers of Bruno Mars. Kelly Clarkson at Sharon. Just to name a few chewy were really excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. They you for having me so truly. We're GONNA. Jump in, ask you to skim your resume for us. I went to two lane university go graduated in nineteen ninety wine, and then I did a program called teach for America where I taught in the calliope projects, and then I started working at Rush Management With Lear Coin Your Cohen's assistant from ninety two to ninety. Re Unwind Ninety. Three moved over to detmer hurts and became the promotions coordinator, and then from ninety three to ninety nine worked my way up industrial records, and then ninety nine took over island records and became the head of marketing for island addict. Jam. Then I'm not quite sure when I became president with now it's not to get causey with my dates, but I do know in two thousand four I. I came over to Atlantic records online I've been at Atlantic records since two thousand four Julie with something that is not on your kind of official bio that we should know about you I. Don't think I officially. put down. That I am a mom with two kids by that is probably my most favorite part of my life is that I am a twenty year old and a sixteen year old. That's great I want to kind of just start with the elephant in the room that we're all dealing with which is how to run companies amid stay global pandemic, the music industry is interesting, because in some ways you know, it seems like you have a lot of talented people who are at home, and a moment of reflection in some sorts and I'm sure they'll be a lot of good hopefully music to come out with it. But how are you thinking about this time? So for the artists that have been able to continue to give us, music is been business as usual in terms of. Thinking of Creative Marketing and promotional. For these artists rollout there songs, obviously facing different challenges, which is. Creation of music video photo shoots. We've sent artist green screens. We've sent them ring lights, and so been really just trying to keep everybody focused on the fact that the world is listening to music right now to help through such a terrible time, and so many artists are giving great music to continue out there. They're a bunch of artists that still need to get into a studio. Need a collaboration and those artists. Were just trying to be really good partners and friends to down and tell them that you know. Hey, it's okay. Take this time, maybe just right in a notebook and try to just be you know thoughtful, and in good partners to our artists that are staring at the fact that they may not be able to tour. You know for the. Future and so we're just trying to make sure that they see the light to buy you know. Streaming has really offered us a way to share their art and music and doing these live streams social. That, they can stay connected to their hands. I think we've been incredibly lucky. In terms of all the businesses that are really been affected were continuing to. Market and promote during this time. And as a leader, how have you been trying to set your team up remotely and keep them focused at a time when there's so much uncertainty? So, I personally jumped writing at first and I do weekly email. It's very personal. Email to my whole company every Sunday night to talk about okay. We're about to start in next week. Know Week two week three and I share my stories and I let them know that. Now I'm in a house with two crazy kids and husband and a dog just diagnosed. Diagnosed with cancer and Chemo and and so you know I let them know that I to going through you know challenging situations, and then also set up a time for every department where I call it either morning tea, or after key, where every assistant coordinator manager director on up gets an opportunity to see me on the screen and talk to me in. In us. We questions so I can kind of let them know what we're talking about. Upstairs and keep sharing the fact that we don't know when we're GONNA. Come back when it's okay because we're working. How can I help you and in really like? Let them see that they can. Individually email may call me facetime with me and I'm right there in the. The canoe with them. I feel like I've actually gotten more facetime award. Talk Time with every person on the staff in. It's great because you know. Sometimes, it's the meetings where assistance in coordinators don't really WANNA speak, and now I think I've given them all voice. If you'll really comfortable to talk with me and asked me style for share ideas, maybe they. Feel comfortable being in the big room because they feel so intimate. I think people have gotten so much more vulnerable and more creative, and we're open with me, and so I actually personally feel like I'm GonNa. Come out of this a better reader because I've got so much more individual time with the staff and I think the staff from what I'm feeling back from their emails and their conversations. They're feeling like they're building a closer bond, not only with me, but their peers and other workers from other departments that they don't normally engage with, because everybody is so You know talking regularly every day with each other. I. WanNa. Go back in time. When did you think you'RE GONNA? Be when you were growing up. Very clear path, so I was always going to law school. I was always going to become a lawyer. My parents involved in politics in always were involved in many clamper beats, and so when I went to college, or read about being a lobbyist, and then I was like God is definitely for me I signed up to be Senator, John Bruce in turn of Louisiana I date again true drives and volunteered soup kitchens. That's why when I read about teach for America. I was like Oh my God I don't have to go to the Peace Corps I don't have to leave the country. I could do good in the United States and I turned. Turned Management I work at a to a law school admissions office guided rate with Dean of admission is I was like okay? He's gonNA write a letter of REC. Law School and I was like I'm GonNa? Do teach for America. Get this amazing hands on experience on because I felt like on God I could be either children's rights, advocate or women's rights advocate. I want to go to DC politics. I'M GONNA. Do teach for America. I'm the go to law school. I knew exactly when I was going to do when I took a summer job. Lee Are after teach for America I was I to with me into his office every day the. Study Guide so I'm. GonNa I'M GONNA? Pass you because who is leader? Okay, so you're calling was one of the founders of Def jam records in one of the most important people in hip hop music in terms of your driving Def jam records in driving hip hop into mainstream music in. He's gone on to become the chairman warna music real. And then he went to become the chairman of Youtube Music Right now, and so he's A. A major player in the music business, and so when I took a job as his assistant, it was just a summer job so I could be in your city in steady for the L. Sats Weiner. Mind boyfriend I never really thought. I was going to stay music business. You know I needed to help pay the bills and he saw every day. I had this. Book on my shelf in. What are you doing and I was like I'm going to Moscow when that's. When he yelled at me and he was like everybody is a lawyer miserable. You don't want to be a lawyer. You stay in music business and that's when he said you know you should go to. My other company learn another side of the business is I was on the management side with him. To the records I am assuming growing up. Did you have any connection to the music industry? Not to the industry I did I did like music, but you know I just like music in the car and music. You know on the radio in uneven. Know about the business you know I. didn't know anything about. It didn't even think it was an opportunity for me or I. Honestly never thought it was a creative type of person I was A. We's a great speaker. I knew I was going to be a lawyer. That's what I thought. I was built for. How did you discover that you had to create a side? was a you the discovered a first or leader? So I was sitting in promotion meetings in I would be like. Hey, why don't we do this this this? Would this artist and why don't we come up with this kind of concert? I? Remember with onyx on its was the rap band. We're trying to break in early nineties in and they had a song called Slam. And at that time we were getting a lot of heat from the government about our lyrics being too aggressive in videos, being too aggressive, and that's when they were first introducing the we needed to stick. Our product is a parental advisory. On it and so I, did a whole continent equalled slam censorship where brought run DMC Onyx Redmond to perform in DC to say you can't censor their music just because you're offended what they're saying, but this is why. This is the stories that they're telling you. Rap Music was under attack you know. In the early nineties. People were stared at it, and so I kept coming up with all these different ideas and Leo was like a moving from promotions to marketing. You have great ideas and then when they handed me the art department in Video Department. That's kind of exploded in terms of. Brainstorming ideas and it really opened up in me was whole other side, but I was like. Wow, this is amazing, dishonest interesting back. In early day we were small company and you had to wear many hats. Just you guys when you started your company. I'm sure you were designing mats and figuring out your logo and all the kind of good talking. When you're a small company, you gotta do seventeen different jobs, and you know sometimes all of a sudden these things inside of you that you did not have become you know your passion and you're like. Wow, I'm ended it when I hear you. You talk about being at two lane and you're like. Yeah, so you know. The Dean of admissions for the law. School was gonNA. Write me a recommendation and then I'm an intern. Who has this kind of casual interest in music? But we are takes notice of me. You say it so casually, but there had to be something that makes it so that these people are drawn to you or they see something in you. Is it a sense of fearlessness? Is it that you kind of knew what you wanted and you went after it? What do you think got you that foot in the door? So, I I can tell you from a very early age I've always been confident. I always known. I wanted things I wanted to get good grades. I knew I wanted to go to good college. So I set myself on a path to be involved in a lot of organizations I. always knew that Lake I needed to work. To move myself forward. I saw how hard my parents worked I saw that they were involved. In many things I had the greatest role bottle of life. My Mom was my dad's partner in the built a giant business, and she was also involved in many philanthropies, not just with money, but personal time, and she seemed to make dinner like five nights a week, and she was the greatest cook in the warmest person I three sisters, and yet we all thought she loved us the most. You know when you have a role model like that, I set my sights to be like her. To be you know a major contributor back to society, not just have a job, but also do some good in the world you know. I always just wanted to do the best job for people. No matter if I was an intern or just a part time job, you know I always gave it two hundred percent, and I knew my own work ethic was going to be the thing that propelled me forward. You Know I. Think the confidence that you're talking about is obviously propelled you forward, and we talk a lot about faking it till you make it on the show and we'd certainly done that ourselves I'm curious. Is there something that you professionally have not been confident about? So I think. The beginning when I first got into hip hop music because I don't claim to be a hip hop Aficionado I just love the music and I fell in love with the culture and the art and artists. I think. I've always known what I. Don't know I've never been afraid to ask for help and I've never been afraid to hire people that actually are Jenner than me and are more informed. Better educated whether it's been technologies. Social media understanding their culture hip hop were alternative music so even when I don't know something I'm confident, I don't know it and that like. Let me surround myself with really good people do know it. I mean there's a lot of things I don't necessarily good I, but I know it I know I'm not on it so I bring in those people that really help me get better and to learn from it when you started off in the music business, you've been open about paying your dues as I think most people. People do when they get into the industry I think that there's been a lot of conversation about what paying your dues should look like and you know when we interview people, especially young people starting out, there's definitely at times you can recognize the person that just hungry and they'll do whatever and then there are the people that are hungry, but they want to know what the job path out of that entry level position looks like. How do you as now the boss bank about people starting off, and what that path around paying their dues should look like. So I definitely employees a lot of young people right out of college, and we have a giant intern program where we really try to make sure keeping an eye on superstar interns that could then become our assistance to work their way up I don't fault anybody with A. And I actually appreciate people, especially young women that come in and sit with me. An WanNa know what is their path forward, and is there a real clear half-forward here? You know so many people know my story, but in a very small company so I had I think an easier time to move very fast of the ladder, and when you're in a very large company, it may not be fast, and it could feel daunting in the one thing I. WanNa do is make sure people know that you can row here and that it might be a slower pace, but there's real opportunity to grow, and it's my job to make sure that the young people feel like I'm. I'm going to provide them with a path forward, so it doesn't bother me when people have edition as long as they come in in their super respectful to their immediate bosses, and their co workers in the all understand that you know everybody isn't going to be the Alpha, but it doesn't mean those people are in great and contributing to the company to I, just want a very healthy respectful workplace, but as you guys know you're going to be people that leapfrog people that have been there much longer at your company because they're giving it to million times more in, they have way better ideas and they're you know burning those hours as a really showing you that. They WANNA come. Take you out of your chair, and like the one thing you don't want to do is you don't want to stifle that. We want people to feel like they can really thrive because they could be the ones that are going to add some extra thing to your company and make your company that much more better invaluable. We are all in a period of working from home for the foreseeable future. Thanks to covid nineteen. And if you're like us, it means that the workday just kind of goes on and on and on because there's no sense of routine, and we're already home, and there's a lot of screen time and screen back back is not good for anyone. We recognize how lucky we are. Stay at home, but we're trying to focus on a little self care so fortunately. We found a great way to put that. into practice, and that's with anr Estee Lauder is advanced night repair serum? Use it before your moisturizer. E fast penetrating serum helps can maximize its natural ability to repair by night and protect by day like a superhero, but for your skin when over five hundred women tried it eighty percent noticed more rested healthier, looking skin in four weeks their skin felt more hydrated and had a radiant glow had to estee lauder dot Com to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R.. DOT, com start tonight with estee lauder advanced night repair serum. I WanNa talk about bringing people along division. You made the switch to run at records you help define def jam, and then you move to a legacy label top rebuild in a conic brand. How do you bring people along with you without scaring them? Oh! I definitely scared them. I'll never forget the first when I came over in two thousand four. I left the number. One label in the country island def jam was on fire. Jay De AMAC's Commie ludicrous job will shanty killers fall out boy, some forty one who is staying I mean we wrong fire again. Confidence is not something I lack. I came in in said to everybody. First of all I had a be hundreds of hundreds of people, and I had a fire, hundreds of people, and so I was scary person because they knew I was deciding if you're gonNA, stay go, and so you know. As I was meeting people. I was really trying to understand. Are you a bow becoming a new culture and a new company or you going to be gripping, and are you going to be a problem for me? But, how do you create a culture? Fear Paralyzes People. And instead motivates them. Because what I did was I got rid of a Lotta People's I had hundreds and hundreds of people to choose from and I interviewed a bazillion people and I said Hey, 'cause I had electron Atlantic in my said. Hey I'm not trying to come over here and be all the lecturing, nor the old Atlantic and by the way I'm more trying even the island gesture I'm. The company left on coming here to create a new company with. With a new culture or you down, and if you were down for this new mission, because honestly, it's going to be hard. I tunes had yet really taken off now. Stir was thriving. He was scared for their jobs and I was like listen. I will lead you to safety, but I need I need to know that you are not going to be gripping and that you're gonna be down to do things new different way and that. That are going to be a company where it's all about development signing artists in however long it's GonNa take. It's GonNa take an on patient for greatness, but I need you guys to be patient. Understand the hard work. It is to start over in really come along with me and based on the interview. You know if you were down felt it kept you and on five felt like they were like looking at me like Oh, you young! Young thirty four year old. You never know what you're talking about. Then I said you know I'm GonNa, let you go and when we started you know I. Let people know like listen. I am a vision for this place. I want to hear people's ideas. I had an openness in meetings. Like Hey I. Don't know everything. Give me your marketing ideas, but I was also very vocal that I thought the idea was not a good idea. Said? No, and that's what leadership is is having envisioned driving it and. Being open to people helping you with the ideas the creative, but when things don't feel right or smell right, you also have to. Just you have to assert yourself and not be afraid to say no. We're not going down that path. This is how we're going to do it and I outworked. Everybody you know. It's like I was in their morning noon and night showing everybody what my commitment was. was to the artists, and then I was taking this very seriously, so no one could be like. Oh, she's an armchair quarterback. I was in it and they saw me meetings that I really wanted creative thoughts. I wanted to create a company I just didn't want to do it the way because the old way was getting put out in his new time called digital music I to this new. New thing and that's why honestly Atlantic records was the first companies across the digital divide. We were making more music more money from apple than we were physical next, because people came along with me and we're not afraid to embrace this new thing called Apple, and then when streaming happened, my company was first company to actually make more money from streaming the digital, because one time we embrace streaming. Streaming we were like. How do you market to it? Hardy macaroni rounded an huggy. You market on the platform. I've always been interested in the know what's out there. And how can we better because our John? Lewis and Clark eight for our artists to go back and educate the artists and show them it was this promise land over here, and this is how we're gonNA. Get you to safety. When you talk about that period where you're starting off building in, and it's going to be a New Vision, and you also have the chance to build a different culture. You said you didn't have a personal life for a long time, and you talked about wishing that you had taken a longer return ity leave. How do you think back on what you've built in the culture today, and now having the opportunity to be both the boss and the mentor? What is your advice to people in that position? Who are trying to find what works for them? While I I definitely in way, more sensitive to young parents who are just having children or starting their families in I'm really encouraging them to make sure that they don't miss out on so many of life's wonderful moments that I missed out on. You know I look back and that's the only part that I. Regret like that, you know. I chose so many times to stay at the office and not go to a soccer game or go. Gee, a volleyball bulky because I didn't reschedule meeting. On end so I definitely Wayne more sensitive to folks to say. Hey, you have a cell phone. You have a laptop. Go home. Go be with your kids on. Then he can finish your work at night. Because obviously we need people to not fall behind, and you know our artists count on us to deliver endure we need to do they don't WanNa hear that we left the office at five o'clock because they were different hours than us. I let people know that it's hard i. Let especially the women. Man It's really hard to juggle. It all end that there's no such thing as. Stop striving for balance. Just do the best job you can give yourself a break every so often. Stop beating yourself up, but you know for those people that really want a career in WanNa get to the very top. You have to at work everybody else. That's it and I'm not saying it's GONNA. Be the longest amount of hours. It might be out work with the best ideas it might be having. The relationships move talent that working harder exactly. You gotTA outhustled. People because that's who gets the ring at the end of the day or the people that are putting points on the board in showing their. Valuable, you know that's why it's really important. If you want my chair, come for it. You gotta come for it because there's one thing I learned is no one gives you anything. You got to really create your own path while. You're not only in the music industry. You're also in the talent industry. And you have to manage a of different personalities artists. One of ours capacitors had a question. I actually was thinking about so thank you Catherine F for asking Miss. But how do you give honest feedback to people in artists who are typically stereotypically surrounded by men or women? So I always felt really good about my role, because I was never on the artist payroll, and so you know I always felt like they knew I was coming from a different place and I just. You know felt like they knew always where they stand with me when I would court then to sign them I always say never gonNA mean more honest and direct person with me, but it's always gonNA come from a place of love and wanting to just see you have a career in the future. If you establish that day wine from the first moment you have to deal with bomb where you see video, where piece of art or a song and you say. You know what like I liked the song? I, don't it? I think the video is just okay can you could have done better if he don't bullshit them from day? One than they understand the relationship with you know, this is the thing if you remember, you have the opportunity to really get in with an artist from before they were famous to athlete were famous. And, so you said you know the tone of what your relationship is going to be. And so when you very honest and direct relationship with them from day one inch eaten when they turn out to sell hundreds of millions of albums, they still no I'm that exact same person. I haven't changed for me. I'm GONNA business where there's no right answer. Right music is so subjective in so there's always the it's just my opinion. And I'm giving you my opinion with love, respect and as much knowledge and information that I have about the situation, but it's my opinion, and at the end of the day. The artist needs to make your decision of what they wanNA. Do we always know where they stood with me? You are one of the top players in a traditionally male dominated industry. What's your advice for? Specifically women who are trying to negotiate and I asked this because when I met you, we were at dinner, and it was all talking about negotiation, and you were just so blunt and confident, and it was really refreshing. It definitely gave me some confidence to think about negotiating in it it in a different way. When you're negotiating. You have to know what your values and look the if you think you're worth. A million dollars a year, but you have been done anything to deserve a million dollars in here. Little crazy. You also have to know where you are in the career path to and what you're delivering and how valuable you are, you have to understand the marketplace. You have to do your homework. You have to be informed. You know we have a business where at least in the music business in where community you can reach out to you, but you also have their peers in your friends that. That you know it's an uncomfortable conversation and I don't think people necessarily warranted share. You know what rates are, but there is some homework and diligence that you gotta kind of do. If you're moving up the ladder, just so you have an understanding of what the marketplace is going to bear, but if you're a superstar, and you're not asking for it than you're missing out on. You don't have to look at it like you're being obnoxious or you're being. You know wrong in the matter you just. Have to say you know what this is. My worth and I'M GONNA. Go for it, but you know in so many situations. You got to be willing to put your neck out on the Y. You ought to be able to say you know. Hey, if you're not going to take care of me, somebody else well, or maybe this isn't the right industry for me. I'm going to go into a different business. That will you know respect? My creativity were this or by, but you also have the know kind of what the on environmentalists I just was having a conversation the other day with somebody about their contract and you know timing is everything. In was like twenty million people are unemployed right now, and we're about to face the worst recession after and my job is to keep his many people employed, and keep all my people employed, and so you know in my handing out giant raises right now no I'm trying to make sure everybody got gigs and so you just have to understand what the environment is to and be thoughtful about it because like I, said if we're going into recession, and you're standing there, asking for Brazilian. You by Galvin Gig just period. You've got to be smart. You do your work, but you also have to know what your self worth is, too, but if you don't put points on the board, don't ask for. A move to our lightning round. Julie New Green ask you. Questions. You have to respond as quickly as possible. Yes morning, person or night owl medium. Just a normal person. Yeah! No, it's crazy. Because Bill Corentin has turned me into a night owl I wasn't morning. Person in the Korn teens turned me into a night. Adults I'm obsessed with supremos now. Are you watching it from the beginning or have? Yes, okay by kids. Can you skim your nighttime routine for us? I make dinner I walked the dog I either depending on the night of the week. Play monopoly. Were we watch the Sopranos until finally on exhausted in the morning and go to sleep. Is there an artist that you've passed on that? You were like. So we had post Malone and we ended up not doing the deal. I every time I see him than heroes. Music I WANNA kill myself. We we had. We just didn't end up making the deal. One of our skin Basseterre Kyla wants to know what is the most bizarre request. You've seen an artist writer. I remember. I did have an artist. Everything in the room had to be white. White eminem white flour is white candles. They on this whole white by everything had to be his beautiful white environment. What is the best concert you've ever been to? All My. Dance I am too I. Am too many I give you. Some of the target is three tops on. The hard knock life, rough rider, red man, but the man. I, giant hip hop concert got was insane in everybody was exploding in. We were just breaking down the barriers. That hip hop is not gonNA. Be Giant or Music that's wine seeing. Ed Sheeran Sleigh four nights at Madison Square Garden. When we started off him in Qatar at the Mercury Lounge eighteen months before that to all of a sudden, we ended the cycle with like four sold out nights at Madison. Square Garden so much work in love on. It was emotional amazing. Might for me, and then and then probably Bruno Mars first concert at bowery ballroom when you just saw that this guy is going to be a worldwide global superstar and It became so clear from this one little show. I was like forget I knew it. I knew how big he was. GonNa be. Unbelievable. Last question. What's your shameless plug? My shameless plug you mean for like one of my artists now can be anything. Right now in the job. interesting time right now because the coronavirus where I just want everybody to be kinds of charter, women especially can make this world a better place right now I think we. are inside organizations in companies. I think we're super thoughtful and I think we can make the world a better right now. Because the world is so scary, we need to make this a better place, and we need to be so much more compassionate anomaly inside organizations, but what we do at home and outside communities eight Hugo match. Core was nice seeing you. Everyone. We're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty, we WANNA take a moment to spotlights, a new female founded companies. We've heard from many incredible skimmers who are leading small businesses, and we will be introducing them to you each week on skimp on the couch. See the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or friends. I'm Dr. Sarah Feldman. I'm a board certified behavior, analyst and Co owner at the Helm Aba and the hell. Maybe a focuses on decreasing problem behavior and increasing communication and improving quality life for children and families affected by autism. We do that I providing in home in center, based therapy and supporting local school districts throughout North Texas. This year we are celebrating our year in business. We started as a small team of two people with three hundred dollars in. In our pockets, since then we've grown to a team of over fifty therapists, and we serve seventy five families for us. When covid nineteen hit, we had literally just gotten the keys to our third clinic, and so at that time we had to shift really from this growth mindset of Henry. Continue to grow and serve more kids more families to how do we create some safety and security for the team that we already have? We really were dedicated. Dedicated to trying to figure out how to get our staff to stay as employed as possible. We were a lucky few that we were able to be considered an essential business, because we provide medically necessary therapy for the families that we serve. We didn't have time to make it perfect. We just switched to tell a hell for as many kids as we could and to provide that supports, and then we switched back to in home, which was our route. Route it kind of felt like you were taking ten steps back, but we were also able to continue to employ as many people as possible. We feel really proud because every family. That's wanted services in every employee. That's one into actually come to work has had a job throughout the whole time for is what can help most is if people take it seriously. We have a lot of kiddos that don't know how to socially distance. They don't know. All the rules and regulations about keeping space or keeping their hands out of their faces in the more that we all take this seriously, this is uncharted territory for everyone, and we have grace for one. Another were all doing the best we can, so we can stay kind of stay home, and you can also follow us on instagram and facebook to learn more about autism and how to support families affected by accident. Thanks for hanging out with US join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day. Sign about the SKIM DOT com. That's the S.. K. I M. dot com to m's a little something extra.

America United States Bruno Mars chairman intern TA WanNa stay Lauder John Bruce Kelly Clarkson Danielle Weisberg Estee Lauder coordinator Julie Greenwald Lake I Peace Corps
Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, co-founder and CEO of Promise: "When you feel like you're fighting for justice, it empowers you in a different way because it's not just for you. And I think that makes you very powerful."

Skimm'd from The Couch

37:07 min | 10 months ago

Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, co-founder and CEO of Promise: "When you feel like you're fighting for justice, it empowers you in a different way because it's not just for you. And I think that makes you very powerful."

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay Lauder. The nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first, let's get into the episode. I think that when you feel like you're fighting for Justice in empowers you with a different way because it's not just for you. It's for other people I think that makes you very powerful. I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg. Couch, this podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? Hey everyone. It's carly. The show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to Kobe nineteen today favorite LS Lampkin joins me on skin from the couch. She's the CO founder and CEO of promise a financial. Services Technology Company tackling criminal justice reform before founding promise failure ran revenue and operations for the healthcare tech startup honor and has built her career around creating change and improving lives favorite I'm very excited to get into this conversation welcome to. Skimmed from the couch. Thank you so much for having me. I'm happy to be here. So I have so many questions for you and just to level set I was reading an article a few months ago in your mentioned in and I just became obsessed with you and your story. So I kind of cold reached out to you through mutual mutual connection and just really excited to see this happen. So I'll start with the question I like to ask everyone, which is please scam your resume for us. I think I've spent most of my life trying to figure out how to understand social change on behalf of working people. People of Color and so almost all of my work is really through that Lens I worked in the Labor Movement for thirteen years I ended up running a Labor Federation in Policy Research Organization that basically tried to understand how to use the power of the Labor Movement for social good things like health kids end living wages, and then from there I ran an organization called green for. All. Green. For All was focused on how did you use environmental policy to also create good jobs? Because, often people have to make a choice between really good employment that sometimes police instead of it's one or the other. It's not often both especially for low income communities on from there I worked with musician Prince and worked for him are GONNA come back to that you can't disturb. reprints for a couple of years became interested in how technology had a negative influence on content especially like devaluing content and it was mostly a negative force I thought for a lot of artists in I've seen that theme in the Labor, Movement as people who weren't of the firm became marginalized in economy. So I wanted to go learn how technology could work and so I. Went to work at honor started running operations ended up running revenue operations. I recently joined the board in the company, and then really understood that technology was fundamentally about scale and wanted to understand how did you purposely create a company that was using technology for good and so co founded a company with a friend that worked with for about twelve years and we started promise. Great you know obviously it's a very professional biography and fancy linked in what is something that we couldn't find either of those things that we should know about you. It's so funny 'cause I don't think of myself at all as fancy. So I appreciate. ME. Impressive. I appreciate it. I, think something people probably is I answer the phones at every place I work because I felt like I learned so much and so I am probably the person that you're most likely to get on a phone call early in the morning or late at night because I learned through doing and so i. really like answering the phone like that. That's the I have ever had somebody say that that's great. I like it. So what I've always struck by in talking to so many women on this show is how much each of us are shaped by how we grew up and how that ended up informing our career choice and so I'm curious before we dive into why you ended up doing what you do, how do you think your childhood lead you to that? My mom was a waitress when I was growing up and so I think there's very vivid moment in my life where I realize she wasn't bringing food to me, but she was bring it to other people and so it made me realize I think, and also the importance of and I was clear that a lot of are likely had was dependent on how other people out untreated are. So I think as I grew up I was very clear that we were poor and I was clear that people treated my mom differently than other people and so with anything I spent most of my life trying to do is to build dignity for children. So it's like it felt different I was lucky I I cannot gifted programs for ninety percent the kids who are wealthy they. All knew each other together had private tutors and I knew that I was different under the experience for my mom was different. It's I just think it felt bad and so the Lens I think for me has always been like how to kids not have that same experience they dignity respected kids shouldn't have to feel that way and so for me, it's really the the. Of knowing that we will pour in other people. I. Remember my mom was a single mom and so it was just very very different and I just I don't want other kids to feel that way. As you emerged as the leader in these two movements, I'm curious were the the strategies that you learned early on on how to advocate for change, and then actually get that change to be created. Think that I grew up in privy I grew up around a lot of trauma and violence and I think what it did is there's a lot of science about how kids who experience trauma have managed crisis and I think the first thing is that having to manage crisis as a young person able to manage crisis as adult, and so when I went into the world things that might normally throw someone for Luke. Did it feel chaotic to me like Oh someone canceled? Who cares like that's? Also I think the reality of having to get up and keep my friends I joke where rowers like when something happens like we gotta keep rolling, it doesn't occur to us to stop. Buddhist. Didn't have as options. So I think what made me effective is I didn't stop because it. Didn't occur to you could, and then I think I also had managed chaos. So the things that. Other people did vocab up to me. And I think that when you feel like you're fighting for Justice in empowers you in a different way because it's not just for you. It's for other people and I think that makes you very powerful. When I think about what you've done where you've worked like. So much of it is tied into, can the emotional impact stat you create that you can create and I'm curious when you actually extract like your core competencies that have traveled with you from job to job? What are the core skill set that that has allowed you to sort of do one thing after the other to eventually actually become CEO. I think that fundamentally I am best when I feel like, I, am helping bench justice because it makes me boulder that I might be naturally it makes me stronger and then I, have an incredible skill I don't care if other people like me I started to care a couple of years ago but. Then unless I loved you, I didn't really care what you thought about me and that makes you much bolder because if you think that you're doing what's right and if your moral compass whole to a certain expectation than what someone else thinks of you doesn't matter. So I didn't care if other people like me, which means that I didn't stress about how people fell. I think women sometimes, we are always given that ability to not be worried because I didn't care, and especially as a black woman gave me a credible power because I wasn't impacted break by the fact that people didn't like me or the people that's not how I should behave or baseball or whatever I think that probably was what made me really able to make? Good decisions and to be able to lead is I felt rooted when I was in labor movement in the people we represented. So it mattered to me is the janitors that I thought were single bombs can two jobs living in garages like did they think I was doing a good job if they thought I did didn't care of city council people or mayors governors. Or presidents and I think being rooted in people and being clear about who work on behalf gives you incredible power to the standard like if in are working criminal justice if the people we serve the people we seek to measure in by improvements in their lives. If they feel like our work is good than than, we have accomplished what we set out to accomplish. What made you a few years ago start to care if people like to after I worked for Prince people sometime said mean things about me and I think the hard part about working in music was never worked for like a celebrity or money or things like that. So I didn't understand the things that came with it. And I wasn't very good like saying this is what's happening in the world and this is not even like masters. He was like you should go to a story being tell like how this happened and it I just had a baby raising kids like it just wasn't by stick and so I think when people said untrue, me things about me and my skillset wasn't advocating for myself or even telling a story are creating a narrative. It was hurtful. I also think just because after he died and it was like when you're in a position that is vulnerable and painful it put me I think in a different place and so it was just it was hard. What I learned is that One thing. He told me which was always helpful as like you have to make a decision about whether you wanNA play in Madison. Square? Garden whether play in your backyard like if you play music in your backyard, no one gives you they. Everyone's for you like if you make the decision to play in Madison Square Garden, you're going to get people. And so I just realize in terms of scale of change I wanted to play at Madison Square. Garden? Because I wanted to impact lives change, which means I kinda had to get used to the idea that people would be and and that was going to happen but as long as I think my compass lists at. Very clear. As do I think I've always acting with integrity. Do I think I've done the right thing that is how to measure myself Danielle and I talk a lot about you know how do you balance being a manager or leader with sometimes you don't make the popular decision by you. See it in a way that like this is why it's the right thing to do you know I often like hear myself telling people on my team you don't have to try to have them be your friend like it's okay. If they don't like like you right in this moment, as long as it's the right decision and as long as you're operating obviously with a strong moral code. Did you find that as you? Built your at promise at that was. Something you had to navigate. I think it was I. think the challenge is like someone who's now in their forties is when I was in my twenties like the models we had do men who like yelled at people and the version of leadership was like a power individual and it was strong and assertive, and I think I certainly made a lot of management mistakes. It's only as I started to get older like even understood, there was a different model for leadership rank. There is a model for leadership than it is like you don't have to prove you have power right way to do that is not the way. It is to call people up and so I definitely find myself having also gets like really hard to be a woman in that. The way that your measure is really hard as the CEO, because we felt like we have to prove ourselves that were reduced a really good job but we also realized like, I, watched the number of women who I think have been attacked for their leadership styles and it's like along must desert. It's like cool right like Steve. Jobs as it. It's cool right like it's their passion and their commitment and they don't. Even in two thousand and twenty, we've created a model for what female leadership looks like. that. Strong at promising I've learned I think I've made mistakes I've done good things but I think the thing I'm trying to figure out more and more as what's the leadership style that works for made for our company because it is one that I think is very feminine end in is rooted being a woman of color and so what does that look like how does that operate in? How do I not care about the standards? So I think that's been really important, but I think I'm still learning and I think I'm very clannish sometimes it's like this is our team, but I think the reality is. Someone told me once I'm talking about Oh I feel bad about this management decision in a friend of mine CEO said the you have to decide if you want to be the head of HR or you want to be the CEO because if you want to be the head of HR, you can have all those feelings to make those decisions but like if you're the CEO, you make decisions on the interests of the company. And so I was like I wanna be this. Check yourself all the time right because it's like in society rewards you for like as A. Head of HR, right. So it's like when you do act as a CEO at seem as. It seems very different. So I constantly remind myself that there's not enough of us some leadership partners because we have been trying to be Decio we'd been trained in the world expects us to be the head of HR we're going to dig into promise but I I would be remiss. If. I didn't ask you how to somebody become Prince's manager. I don't even know right that's the real any of my jobs if. You, become it because I had a friend band. Jones. Who's now C. N. he prince was a donor to Greenfield. And while I was having US pregnant and I had some time on my hands because I was like I don't WanNa be working working but I want to figure out to do a project so dan was. like anyone can get your masters back. It's fe draw and I met with Prince and I didn't think he liked me and then he was like you remind me of the mother of a woman that he spent a lot of time with and I didn't know enough about his history. So I was like, okay. Called me like an older woman I don't know. And so we met and then we worked on getting his Masters back with an incredible attorney newborn detroiter. Then we got his master's back and then I was like, okay. Now I'm going back to work and I had my baby and he was like you shall never leave my side basically and so it was an incredible experience learned a lot. I learned a lot about also. The ability to say I don't know something. I think a lot of the achievements all through his brilliance in his mastery, but we were able to do because I didn't sued staff Harris. Master's work. Okay. Great. I was like well, if he owns half of them, then he can stop it from being sold everywhere. So let's let's Overcomplicating right? Oh. Okay. Got It. We can if we If fifty percent plus a little bit power we have a controlling interest. So people thought we were crazy and he was crazy because we took his music platforms like there's all stuff that we're doing. It was just like he had control. So he could act in that control and short term losses long-term game. So it was incredible. It was really through van and even I left month for his passing in went to work he continued to be a strong. And good friend. And so I, always just have incredible appreciation almost. Promise. Promise is really like the manifestation of my hopes and dreams, and by that, it's trying to figure out how do scale impact and the tool is technology, but it's really a company devoted to understanding how can you use government for good and how can technology skill some of those solutions? So first project was to work on a criminal justice specifically, how did you scale bail reform? It was interesting because we did a lot of good work could continue to work part of what we realized is the incentives have to be aligned and selling to people whose incentives incarcerate people does. It work, you have to sell people who have an incentive to get people out, and so we started with a criminal justice product and began think about how the incentives are aligned. We actually ended up on payments ended up working continue to work in criminal justice, but also announced we payments and the ideas because incentives are lying government. Once you pay your money, you don't WanNa go get in trouble and face the consequences. So we do everything from child support criminal justice. So when you say late I mean truly like I'm GonNa take your advice and ask all your dumb confidence. Not So. If you're like, if you're hiring somebody interviewing recruiting somebody to work promise what how do you describe what it is like they actually will be doing so I we say promises a cost effective, more humane alternatives to incarceration. So how does that work? So with two different products one, which is financial services product, the other criminal justice. So the I if you're working on the criminal justice product, you're working basically as a personal assistant to people who are either under some form of community provisions. So it might be I get charged with a crime. I, can't afford bail I get out early and eighty central reminders federal court dates we connect you to resources or whole incentive is to keep someone out of the system. So we provide all of that and an APP, and it's all the support you can think about like how do you get an appointment and then we give information back to the government. So for example, say we noticed in the bay area people who have morning appointments and live more than an hour away are always late for court so why don't we change if you love more than our hour away in the afternoon because otherwise setting people up for failure we noticed that the court requires people to do education appointments, but it's a total fail ridiculous. We noticed the longer you're on probation the more likely you are sale. So let's shorten the time people armed probation. So the way to think about it is you're spending time providing sport someone who's been Charged with a crime, not necessarily convicted, and then we're providing information back to the government about how to better support that person Still. Before you even tallest the financial services aspect, I WANNA pods here because whether it's been on this show and we talked to other leaders or aspiring entrepreneurs will come to us for advice when it's something social impact space usually the first question is do for profit or not profit. So WanNa hear like how you made that decision I think the other thing I wanna hear is with a criminal justice reform that is A. Big. Media category entire elections have been based off of debates around and like that. That's a big thing I think one of the hardest things for an entrepreneur who wants to take on something so big it's like how to focus view describe promises like your hopes and dreams I know that you've got more up your sleeve. How did you decide where to focus? So let's start with the nonprofit versus a for profit, and then I'd love to understand the focus. Then non profit vs for profit was what did I think the greatest tool was to effect change? And I felt like if we did nonprofit, we could bill effective programs like small effective program but we wouldn't scale in I wanted to understand how to track the most capital, how to attract the best talent and so for me because I just spent time intact I knew I could do that best by being for profit. It was important that we got investors who fundamentally. Vision. So for example, the company when there is a client want work with no, we're not going to work with you and I needed investors that understood those decisions. We're GONNA make but I thought I, hadn't seen any type of scale outside of the technology that affect done it for. So cost effective. So for me, it was the best strategy. The thing I learned music is also that the people are more likely to come to a concert that's enjoyable and talk about social change like it's much easier say prince wants to meet with you. That is to say the committee to talk about the Committee for Social Response The basic thing is when you make an experience more enjoyable people are attracted to it when you make it easier for people to use, they are more likely to use it and so for me a for profit was that because if I did a nonprofit I, knew that I would spend a Lotta time fund raising much more time than a witness for profit and I knew that. I might not attract the same assets and resources that for me were a balanced, the skills I had, and so there was just no question I knew that the team I would hire their values were strong enough but I didn't need something to stop us for being doing bad right. The team I think those values would be strong said, that's important. So I run a nonprofit before in. Part of it was hard is it felt we had to do so much make decisions sometimes about where resources were. That has at least I can do it in an environment that's not as resource constrained. And I didn't think there was more freedom in a nonprofit. I thought actually felt more freedom in the for profit world. We also were fighting forces like if you look at the technology that's been done on behalf police, which is horrific innovation is happening in these spaces only on being thing we're experiencing is like on behalf of police, and so we wanted to make sure there was innovation happening on behalf folks in the system on behalf of people, women people with call arc, and so we knew what that like what we had to counter. When you looked at how technology was being used in. So so for a for profit made the most sets, tax me that how you decided where to put your focus. Yeah, and we'll save that for profit part was finding the right investors. We couldn't have taken certain investors for our focus as small as it sounds. It was mostly like where I grew up in the people that we knew and what we wanted to impact at the time is starting wasn't quite as exciting as it is in this moment so like when we were talking about. The fact that the two thirds of people in jails have not been convicted of the crime they were arrested for is unacceptable. And the fact that we are criminalising poverty is just unacceptable and so the thing we wanted to do is because I thought government was the best tool for change and if you could change government, it had more repercussions or whatever I could do as an individual and so if I was like, how do I impact that that strategy that has what's the place that's most broken that we could have the most impact. And so for us that was criminal justice both because he touched my personal life, my family and I was clear how broken system was and I was clearing the difference between having money and not having money, and so I just thought if there's any way to balance the system like I felt like I had obligation to do it because I'd been privileged like my life had shifted for most of my family didn't show. Like where do where do our folks the most amount of resources? Doc. It's hard to believe it but the scam is already eight years old and we're going into the fall which means strategy planning time and around this time of year were always asking ourselves the question, how can we do better? How can we still make sure to stay on top of our game? bring new things to life and stay true to our vision. And we think it's really important to make sure that you are always reaching out for new tools new advice, different ways to be innovative. So part of why we love Estee Lauder is because they for loss of the that you can always be improving in looking to do better, and that's why we are so excited that their new advanced night repair serum is back in better it is infused with antioxidants and highly Roddick. So they're number one ceremony guys seriously just got a lot better. We love the serum because it helps repair the look of key signs of aging fast and eight years in we have some key signs of aging over here at instantly makes her skin look radiant and it's all pumped with hydrogen. You can use it and morning, and at night we just really can't say enough good things about it. It really makes your skin feel firmer. So hadn't to store or GO TO ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. E. E. L. A. U. D. E. R. dot com start tonight with estee lauder new advanced night repair serum. Talk about the financial services aspect of what you're doing because this is so innovative. Yeah. The the financial services was mostly I. Didn't realize people went to jail for parking tickets. What I was interested in is why people are getting in trouble for these weren't there payment plans and other things we went we were in the Oakland and we will look to the city of Oakland payment plan for parking tickets and you had to have fifty percent of. The money upfront you had to I think five hundred dollars you had to come into the office you had to have copies of your taxes. You had to have the license of every person in your house in there was an interest rate and so a fee, and so this is a system that is not made for someone's to succeed actually need to criminalise would. And If that's parking tickets, and now we looked at things like child support but I'm trying to put we saw what happens is if the Non Custodial Parent Who the person is, patients were the custodial parent gets public benefits. The non custodial has to pay that back. So let's say that food stamps. Yeah. So that let's say your mom, you get food stands I'm Dad I'm paying child support but also paying the govern- back for the food stamps you received. Wow. Okay and most people are in relationships with people in similar economic situation and so the idea that now paying you but I'm going to. Try to pay back the politics benefits received. It's like the system was creating poverty for folks that had criminal consequences. For example, if you get behind in your child's for you lose your driver's license. If you lose your driver's license that is most likely to not show for court suspended driver's license because you need to go to work a for kids around. So the way we got into financial services is really the recognition. The consequences were so significant. Systems were meant to penalize people that we had to build systems that were more updated. So for example, why do you have to prove your poor if you WANNA put yourself on a payment plan? Why, why prove your port does it and so what we did is we started in Oakland parking tickets and the payment rate went up much higher because what we said if you aren't gonNA payment plan, just sign up go online and if you WANNA pay, it should be cash at Ben Moshe whatever way you could pay and last if you want to change your payment date, you'll have to call me for two hours to talk to someone like the incentives should be we want you to succeed. Ended up in financial services specifically with the government is because we wanted to do an intervention consequences. What do you think our listeners would be most surprised by learning about the criminal justice system? How many people are incarcerated who haven't been convicted of a crime and maybe the the thing that's most shocking is like what happened so let's say, let's say someone we know it's rusted they sit in jail they don't have the mind get out there most likely to take Cleo, it take a plea deal because they just WanNa get out even within guilty. Or not incomplete it'll just out because he can't afford a lawyer and most things we don't go to trial pleat out. Then the problem is they're under community supervision, which means if they get in trouble than the consequences are they go straight to prison usually so an could trouble could be you miss an appointment with your officer it could be you don't pay. A bill on time, it could be your at the wrong place at the wrong time, and so the thing is in the thing that was shocking to me as give to process. So we remain with selling they called a cost savings measure, which is if you're on probation, you don't have a right to a trial it can send you away for an. Offense. So I think the thing that was surprising to me I. Think we'll be highs in the most people as the system is designed to incarcerate people it's not designed to have us be safer as a country it's designed to incarcerate and it's incentivize right? It's the way your budget's work is you get paid per person per day so the incentives are off. I want to talk about what it was like to raise money for promise. Ami. Talk a lot about fundraising on the show especially venture capital under saying. Most of us are aware around this does has checks for women raving in in Silicon Valley, and in the Tech Industry and in particular women of color being able to raise successful rounds and more than one round like you the stats, those numbers become exceptions rather than the norm. What was your experience like raising money for this? was relatively easy how well one I think Iran revenue, which is anytime. You've run finances I think people think you know how to make money so I think they invest in a very different way. Iran revenue, the company that was fast growing, and I ran it from beginning till I left. So I had grown. Business Rate. So I think having that credibility I think what's important I raised from people. I. Knew Mostly Like I knew most folks which wasn't even. Recent people who share my values so we raise very quickly. The most helping was I also didn't know anything. So I'd only been in one tech company I didn't know anything. I didn't go to Stanford I didn't have any credentials. So the people they raised twenty million seed. So I thought that's what you do. Raise twenty million, your seed I understood evaluation they raised. and. So when I went and started fundraising someone to me, you should raise your company at fifteen million dollars valuation or like a six million dollar by mission and I they were being offensive because the only model I had seen was the model bidden. So I, knew that valuation was I. Think Part of it is I didn't have enough experience to know any differently and by then I was already mom I wasn't reading. Articles. I wasn't talking to other people so I went into the environment is of that's how people were supposed to respond to us. I, think sometimes people respond the way that you expect to. It's unusual I think a lot of our investors they were pretty diverse. So it was like everyone from first round Jay z to the Cape Wars. Wait I'm sorry. What was the second? He said Jay z knows of. Briefing on. Bester I walked into it i. felt like it was a mission into that also made it much easier in found investors who understood that we are trying to understand capital not be extractives. I, think we ain't steaks and I were like Oh with these people out of those people are devil. So it just worked I. Think we we understood the market and we understood how to make money, and so I think my co comics criminal defense lawyer. So I think understanding the market and then understanding how to make money and we hire a team which people because I've been at fast thousands of folks people knew I could then attract talent I was very but he'd. Skill that we were able to attract. We raise twelve as a seed. We did four in the ninety days later raised another seven. First of all just congratulations that's. All you throw these numbers out like you're talking about millions of dollars. It's an amazing thing to help change his sticks both in what you're doing, and also for the the the venture world. So congratulations. It's a lonely world being a woman of color being a black woman. So lovely world I actually, it was GONNA be next question, which is in a normal circumstance in normal climate, what you are doing and trying to solve for every day God is absolutely exhausting emotionally draining to be a CEO is lonely exhausting and draining. To be a black woman I can only empathize in the world that we're living in right now is A. We're in a really ugly moment right now in the news stories that we're seeing and just seeing such anger and violence happening in this country, and my question to you is, how are you taking care of yourself? How do you take care of yourself so that you are the leader that you are for your team and for yourself. When I really appreciated that the one thing I'll say about this moment as I feel it. What's good is what's becoming public is been what experiences and so the Nice thing is when we talk about. The criminal justice being corrupt people thought we were crazy are very left. We'd be like it broke it. It's not designed to not work that. No longer feels like I have to convince people that it doesn't work for black and Brown people and others. and. So hard actually though making it feels like the reality in which we're experiencing is public now right it's like you don't have to have that debate anymore people get it's broken so that part doesn't feel demoralizing and also the amazing people that are rising up and doing incredible work is just mixed my heart happy for taking care of myself. One is I was doing really poorly, which is not exercising anymore which I think is really important and It's just hard like I. Feel like you should start everything but I'm sure you're depressed the human. So like how do we act? With my own team like if you can't make it today, you just take a day off like this stuff is hard like we have to realize that we are living through a hard time in whatever you do take care of softening important. We just like made care packages for crew or sending them fun stuff and their families because we're all work is in your home I think for myself when I started doing coaching just been very helpful like you're getting a coach or. Coach. And the thing he said to me, that is really helpful. OJ Don't think women do is he said you have to think about yourself as a Formula One car and you have to take care of himself in the way of Formula One car does because other people are depending on you and I, think I think of my treat myself like I'm a Toyota. and. It's like. The kids every big. Own You're right like I'm inner goal in I'm high performance and I'm not treating myself like high-performance and so now what I've done is to think about it as an algorithm, which is what are the steps like if I were thinking about a successful Adrian So for me, it's like sleep. It's exercise. It's time alone because now I'm surrounded by humans humans, but it's hard has to be a practice because I don't. Think it comes naturally think being homeless so much harder. Yeah. Are you ready for lightning round sorry Oh. Yes I'm so excited. Okay. Are you a morning person or night owl morning best work from home productivity to Mornings when everyone is asleep so because we have a lot of kids, the best time for me is six seven am because it's quiet and I can focus okay. Wait I've another tip which is to not stress out when you have complete chaos because like with my kids my kids are moving along the way or like some asking me a question nine this like roll with it does he stressed have to that's right they're coming in. That's actually increase my productivity not worrying about controlling what else how has your nighttime routine evolved over the last few months? Oh, the TV out of my bedroom and I just go to sleep with. You know it's funny. I put the TV in my bedroom. Way because it keeps you up and it gets your mind. Makes me I watched my fall asleep too funny shows. It's great. I mean I know that's really bad things to do but I really like moved like a TV. Okay. There's twenty five franchises of before the ninety days out of the ninety days during the ninety day. They can keep. Now, there's a show watching the people why? Well I was GonNa say what is the last show you binge watch but I think I know the answer? No I. What is the last show I'm really into p Bali right now, which is on stars. Have what is the worst professional mistake you've made? Not Listening to myself like I. Think there time I knew something wasn't right for me and I stayed too long fun fact about Prince. he was the most pro woman human I've ever met. He didn't WanNa work with men. Last time you negotiated for yourself. this morning with my daughter to leave me alone. Pedra, this is amazing. Thank you so much and congratulations on everything. Thank you for having me. Thanks for hanging out with US join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and if you can't wait until, then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skin dot com. That's the S K I m dot com m's for a little something extra.

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Misty Copeland, principal dancer, American Ballet Theatre: I want to diversify [ballet]. I want people to see and know that a Black girl can be a ballerina in a mainstream White company.

Skimm'd from The Couch

37:17 min | 9 months ago

Misty Copeland, principal dancer, American Ballet Theatre: I want to diversify [ballet]. I want people to see and know that a Black girl can be a ballerina in a mainstream White company.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay Lauder. The nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first, let's get into the episode. I wanted to bring ballet to more people that was the bottom line and I want to diversify it. I want people to see a know. that a black girl can be about arena and a mainstream white company. I'm Carl Sagan I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk at all out than where it began on a couch? Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. Bun heads comes out this September mystique. Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited. To, be talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm really excited to. So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. So naturally made sense that I. Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. I started bollywood thirteen years old. It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, the local community center across the street from public. School in San Pedro California, it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. By the time, I was seventeen about four years of training. I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. In in two thousand, fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. Ballet, theater now, in their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do estee lauder in Saco in. Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. Swift. I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. I just got the book and it's fantastic. So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, it's Kim H. Q.. What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. Google. Recipe Ah. So this is proof of this. I'm I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. The entire thing I am very surprised you. I would. Never Clumsy. How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. Yes. Next Children's book. I WanNa talk about your childhood. This career podcast, we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, and that informs how we can go out into the world top. Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life That's pretty much in my memory. All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, and there was just a lot of hiding things. I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. I not experienced. You know just no stability a lot of abuse There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. So stepping into the world of ballet, it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, and it was the opposite of what my world was in. So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. So there was no a lack of understanding in that area. Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds. With anyone in your family and athlete announcer kind of. So my father, my father was a basketball player like in college and my mother was a professional cheerleader for the Kansas City chiefs football team. So she grew up, you know nothing serious but she took ballet tap jazz but I didn't really. I. Wasn't exposed to it at all my siblings all were athletes track tennis basketball golf all of it. I think I was the only one that just felt no connection in had no interest in doing anything no sports I just kind of existed in wanted to hide. You started ballet much leader than most ballerinas end up starting, and so you were at twelve or thirteen, and you get told as you just as you said earlier, your property within the first hour. Did. You believe that did you when you're doing it where you like? Yeah I often good like this. This is easy. I don't think I really even understood what that word meant. I don't think I really understood it until I was a professional that transition for children and being told their prodigies in end excelling and then transitioning into professional life can be really confusing and difficult I think that was when I realized the magnitude of that word but it was never about being good at anything like that's just not how I grew up without experience. I think because I wasn't a part of the sports world. Competitiveness to me dance was the first place I felt like, I was in this bobble where I could be myself for the first time. So I never looked at it as something that I needed to be great at and it just happened really organically and it was the first time that I I wanted to learn I. wanted to soak up everything that was being offered to me and it helped me in every way of my learning you know there's different I don't have children yet but what I've been told is there is different methodologies if you will around had instill confidence in some parents believe in. Telling your kid like you're the smartest you're the greatest and summer league. You don't say that or they're going to be the worst and I'm curious being told that you are prodigy at a young age. Obviously, you accelerated very quickly like within the ballet track to get to the professional track share with us just kind of your confidence level. How would you describe your confidence in? How has that shaped itself over the temperature career? The confidence that I naturally and organically gained definitely didn't come from someone like worshiping the telling me. I was the greatest anything I feel like I pulled away from that type of language what allow me to be confident was peoples belief in me and to have trust from people which I didn't have that growing up I didn't trust a lot of the adult figures in my life I didn't trust any outside relationships other than my siblings that I had in. So that's what gave me confidence to feel like this is something I want to do and I want to succeed at it and I have a support system around me that believe in me and I think that's you know whether I'm mentoring young people or I'm being mentored by amazing amazing people in my life it's allowing them to have the freedom to choose but supporting whatever their dreams are and giving them advice your own experiences in not forcing anything on them. So, much of your life has been accompanied by the different phrases. One of the only the only the first there's obviously such tremendous power in that, but also a lot of pressure. And as you stated, you left your house and you're very well aware you were a black girl going into a very wide sport or wait industry that's also very very infamously known for having a lot of pressure on body image and bodied type, and I wanNA understand sort of what that was like for you to to experience that at a really really young age and how you were able to. Become self protective says it I if I grew up in a very small ballet school. So there was not that big bellies schools don't have love and support but you know it's working on different standards and the goal when you're in a professional ballet school is to create students that will be funneled into a professional situation or atmosphere and a lot of kids that grow up in smaller schools. Again, it's not every one of them, but have a different kind of feeling and atmosphere in why the people are there, and so I feel like I. I had a very backwards experienced than most black dancers. From, a young age I was being protected by my ballet teacher who saw my potential and knew what I could be also knew how real it was that I was a black girl but she never talked to me about it. She never said you know she never pointed it out that I was the only one. She never told me you know the things that were being said, you know there were parents that were pulling out of the board of. Directors and not supporting the school because I was getting to do leading roles or taking their kids out, and there was just a lot of adult things that were happening around. That were kept from me that allowed me the freedom to believe in myself into just to focus on May training. But what was so interesting was that from a young age and not just from my small school, my ballet teacher but these these were things being said to me by. Leading Ballet Schools San Francisco Ballet, the Joffrey Ballet American ballet. Theatre me being told you have the perfect body for dance. Your proportions are perfect. You're everything and so that was how I grew up thinking like that my skin color nothing to do with anything it was like Oh, my God I'm actually good for something and then when I became a professional at all shifted and I no longer I was then being told you don't have the right body for ballet in in my mind it was just so confusing where it was like, how can these things shift I'm still in the same body? How can they shift so drastically and I think that was when I? Really just stepped back in and tried to decipher what all of that language meant and it's so closely connected race and body image, and that it's a passable way for the dance community to tell black and Brown people that they they can't do what they don't belong because it's a visual art form it's about your aesthetic and so dancer. So easily turned away because that's something that they can say in it's okay but I think that it allowed me to be able to express that and give confidence to so many people that just thought this I wasn't born with white skin and a white body so I can't do it but really exposing with that language means. It's hard to believe it, but the game is already. Old and we're going into the fall which means strategy planning time, and around this time of year were always asking ourselves the question, how can we do better? How can we still make sure to stay on top of our game? Bring new things to life and stay true to our vision. And we think it's really important to make sure that you are always reaching out for new tools new advice different ways to be innovative. 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You've talked a lot about your really protected by mentors and supporters as you came up, I'm curious who those people are and I'm also curious how do you see yourself now as a mentor and Supporter for the next generations knowing the things that you're protected from and knowing what is still being fought against? I feel like I I hold. Little. Pieces of all of the incredible people that have come through my life and on this journey with me my mother I I think not realizing or knowing she was being a mentor to me but the way I watched her never give up was something that is instilled. It's instilled in me to this day that there's no giving up. There's no other way of existing. It's like you have a goal in you're going to accomplish it Susan Fales. Hill, with someone that early on really made a huge impact on me, she does it all. She's a writer. She writes books. She was a writer on a different world in the cosby show back in the day, and she's a black woman and often was the only black woman in the room She was on the Board of Directors of American Ballet Theatre in. That's how we met and she was encouraged to be a presence in my life because. I think being the only black woman in the company they didn't really they wanted me to succeed or the artistic director Kevin McKenzie. Didn't he didn't really know how to nurture me in a way I needed. So her coming into my life completely changed my outlook on just how to approach situations from coming from someone who is a successful black women though she wasn't a ballet dancer I still could take her experiences and advice and apply them to how to exist in a white fields which I mean most people do. Of Color. Raven, Wilkinson was someone who impacted my life incredibly, she was the first really the first black woman to dance in a major company in. America. In the nineteen fifties shit up becoming a close friend of mine. She passed I think about a year and a half ago now. But seeing someone who literally had lived in walked in my shoes, you know fifty years prior it was shocking and disappointing. But at the same time, it was like if she can get through the racism and the death threats than like I can persevere and continue this. Legacy that was cut short in she was never given opportunities like me as well as prince you know my husband like two men two powerful men that have been a huge impact on my life just being black men who were strong and successful and knew how to support a strong woman in their life. But artistically, prince champion me a way that I've never experienced up until that point to have someone have complete trust in. You was an incredible thing that I felt like just unleashed the artist in me by having him support in have. Trust in what I would deliver did you seek out mentors or did they find you? I think it was a combination of things. I definitely sought out Raven Wilkinson but I felt like because of the mentors that came into my life I had an understanding of how to do that. But I think that you have to be open to receiving for them to even come into your life and that's something that I constantly saying to young people that I speak. With that, they can be right there in front of your face. But if you're not ready to accept the the guidance, then it'll just pass you by and so I, think a big part of it was realizing that I needed help and I needed the advice I needed more of a structure Amana support system, and then once that happened, it just feels like a flood of amazing people like especially black women that that entered my life I think one of the. Hardest things about actually having mentors is. How do you decipher the different types of advice look you don't have to take everything follow exactly what they say, but actually had to be able to really internalize it and figure out what is right for you and your situation. Obviously. The mentors that you're talking about some are you know really big names and some are names that are more resonant in the dancing community and some just you connected with for lots of different reasons. How did you start to realize how to find kind of your own gut of what to follow versus what to sort of what to follow, what they were saying versus how to kind of carve your own path? I that that's such a great point and it's really hard for a lot of young people especially to to not get lost and other people's words I think that maybe I had more of an understanding of it because in the ballet culture in in the ballet world, it's really kind of woven in to the fabric of dance that mentorship it's not something that's really sad or. Implied but are ballet are coaches are teachers artistic directors are staff. Their job is to pass down their experiences and knowledge like a lot either as dance notation, there are films but everything is firsthand and I think that there is something about that that my body reacted to what I knew was right for it before my mind could and I think that's how I learned to trust my instincts. So if I was being Told physically to do certain things that I knew weren't organic or right for me. It allowed me to respectfully sift through what I took in and I think that I then was able to apply that to the words people were saying to me and words are so powerful and can like take over the way you see yourself and the way you move in space and what you see for your future and I've also. Had, incredible people that have said things to me that stuck with me and I remember Susan Jaffe was a principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre and she was a coach mind for a couple of years she just and I remember being in a place where you know I was starting to do leading roles and being the only black woman and being the first to do this, and this I got a lot of focus. On me when it came to critics and reviews I remember her saying don't let other people's words define you like it can completely overtake you in. It's really simple to just say I don't believe that or doesn't work for me. It's that simple in its shuts it off I WanNa talk about the caliber of your chosen original profession anyone in any job stressful days I've had stressful days where like my neck hurts I'm like. Your your physical physicality of your stressful days is very different and you had injuries and you push your body to to its limits. When you think back in the days that you pushed yourself, how do you look back on that? It's all about you know pacing yourself and it's hard for a lot of young athletes and young people to appreciate the balance of downtime. Especially when you're when you're young and you just want to get to that next point and you want to succeed and you WANNA reach your goal but taking care of your mental and emotional health and taking care of your body is equally as important as the physical work that you put in and I think that's been to this day. It's still a battle. You know to not feel like your following back or your your maybe other people you know. Your peers are putting in extra work on those days that you guys aren't in the studio and that you're going to be left behind. But in the end, you can't control how much rest your body needs and I think that's been a big part of it but physically, it's extremely grueling valet and and sports are young man's game and there's no way around that other than taking. Care of your body fueling at putting the what what you put into it is going to be make your body respond in certain ways, and again, how much rest and how you take care of it. I mean you look at Tom Brady, you get so many athletes that their life is committed to the care they put into their body and the result comes out in their work. Are Moment. When you look back, they are like, that was my physical breaking point. Yes. Yeah I mean there have been moments where you know as athletes and as artists are mental toughness. no-one like nothing else. It's unbelievable. The way you can convince yourself to believe that you can get through something even though your body is physically giving up but then there are moments where your body truly is at its breaking point and your mental toughness can't even push you through definitely the toughest injury for me which was almost career ending was in two thousand, twelve I think two, thousand eleven, two, thousand, twelve when I. Had stress fractures to my Tibia. It was that realization that I no longer have control over pushing through and giving into the fact that if I wanted to continue to do this like I need to step back and get help. But there was a reason for me pushing through. You know it wasn't just because I was I I needed to be on stage, which, of course you need to be. On stage but the importance of the opportunities I was getting in that time as a soloist and as a black artists I was being given principal roles I was being given the firebird for the first time and I knew that if I didn't do that performance, I probably wouldn't get another opportunity like that. Again as I was twenty nine years old, which is very late, be given your first. Principal role and I knew that the black community was coming out to support me because it was them. I was the my represented. So many things that the valley culture in the Metropolitan Opera House had never seen before. So I felt like I need to at least kept you one show of this. At least they're the people that were in the audience that day would see a future possibilities for themselves. How do you handle stress? How do people know in your stress? Kosh. How do people know I'm pretty good at hiding it. I'm pretty good. I think that it's about. Communicating. I think that I probably shut down and don't share as much when I'm really stressed because I think in the back of my mind, it's like if I don't give it life, give the stress life it's not there and it's the opposite. It just grows even more and more when you don't give it attention and acknowledged that it's there but it's not just just solely talking because that's so difficult for people to do when they're in stressful situations and when they're going through something. But I find ways of getting to that place of. Communications. So whether it's through food, I mean I feel like cooking and food those types of things bring out a relaxed way of communicating in me. So if my husband's there in the kitchen and I've got a glass of when I'm happy and I'm being artistic making food, these things naturally come up and he doesn't have to pull it out of me. So I think it's just about finding your best and most comfortable way of communicating. But if you there's no way to get to the root of your stress unless you talk about it. I'm very curious. You know it's very well known that like in any sport as you said, it's a young man very women's Sport and like there's a ceiling in in terms of like how long somebody can really go for and what I've always been fascinated by your story is how you are able to create the business around the brand of misty Copeland that that's not a that's not an easy thing to do, and you can have all the great managers agents and Fancy Hollywood people to help you. But like you are driving I assume and. When did you realize that there was more for you that you had a bigger purpose? I think that thought realization of a bigger purpose wasn't directly connected to everything I'm doing now I think that my manager Gil, the Squire who still unites like A. While she has an assistant. So it's like a three woman you know operation, but it's never been. You know I think what people would assume when they see my success that I brought this you're saying this big team of people around me and you know it was one black woman who believed in me and she knew nothing about ballet but she saw what I was doing and what my voice could do for. So many generations the positivity behind my story and what I learned in the tools that I've gained from being a part of this incredible art form. So I think that what she held onto in garnered was. The authenticity of what I wanted out of all of this and that there was never a specific goal it wasn't like I have to get sports apparel endorsement dealer I have to get a jewelry it none of that. It started out with US sitting down at like a coffee shop and her saying, what do you want to say what you want from your career in and it was I wanted to bring ballet to more people that was the bottom line and I want to diversify it. I want people to see a know. that a black girl can be a ballerina and a mainstream white company and that was the root of where everything's stemmed from and you know I put in the work you know it was work I wanted to do in that were of value to me, and then all the amazing opportunity to just came naturally. But I think it was really about having a strong understanding of what it was I wanted to say in that's never wavered in changed I still have the same mission. What was your first moment? That whether it was like the big check that you got from Randy worked with or the big billboard where you're like, oh my gosh like. I'm doing meth. Yeah you know I feel like I don't really pay attention to a lot of those things 'cause they just happened so fast and my sole focus is my career. So even though I was doing all of these other things on my like one day off. But all of my attention and focus I'm doing those things because it's going to bring more attention to what I do and bring. More people into the theater. So I think the first time that it all hit, me was the first under armor campaign. I what I want to see a you know it wasn't even so much that the commercial I thought was amazing and it turned out great. But then I just go back in my world and do what I have to do every day but it was like going out. Whether it's speaking engagements or book tours that I realize the impact of it and that it was reaching. So many more people than I ever imagined I. Think the craziest thing was like grown men that would show up at my book signings engines say that like it was because of the under armor commercials, they had more respect for like ballerinas and they saw the athleticism they saw. The focus. They saw the similarities in other athletes in that was why I wanted to work with under armour and that's why that commercial was. So impactful in some portent as your Dan your nathlie number of projects from the books you've written in this new just coming out now to the brands you work with how are you evaluating what projects to take on at this point? I'm I've gotten really good at saying no because of my manager if I can't put my whole heart into a project than it just doesn't make sense for me to be a part of in southern I ended up running myself into the ground because I'm going to put everything into everything that I do but it's really about what aligns with me and I've never done and never will do something just because of the amount of money that I may get paid but the relationships that I'm building mean everything to me the reach and alignment. Of Messaging means everything. That's why I do what I. Do and I also want to set an example in a standard that it shouldn't just be misty getting these opportunities. It should be valet dancers getting endorsement deals and I just want people to have the respect especially in America but to have respect for ballet dancers into no, the investments that we put into this and that we work harder I, believe full heartedly than any professional athletes and we don't get a lot of reward but respect as a reward I think is most important to us. May last question before we go into our scary lightning round to you think of yourself as a businesswoman I do now I think I used to fly kind of shy away from that word but you know it's been it's been many years now and I definitely think I, have an understanding of what's right for me and just having true care the things that I do and knowing how to do. Them. But it's something that I'm constantly growing into, and because I have an amazing team of people that have set an example of what it is to be a businesswoman my manager gilded particular. That's I think why I have so much respect in maybe shy away from it because I'm like it takes a lifetime to work into having that type of title but yes, I would say I am. I think you are. Alright Mickey, this is probably the hardest thing you've ever done as an athlete. We're doing lightning round you have to go very fast. Morning person or night owl. Both. How can you be both I don't know how has your nighttime routine evolved over the last few months? I don't do as much I just like I rush my teeth I, go to bed. It's much more simple. Last TV show you binge watched twenty S. Creek dinner to me. I do a really good like salmon salad with spinach. It's really simple. Just salmon on the stove top go get crispy skin and stick it in some spinach and make dressing and go. All your cooking at home. No one's around. Music comes on like what's on your dancing to? Some saffy emotional Mariah Carey Song. I asked our audience on Instagram what I should ask you. Center stage or save the last dance. CENTERSTAGE centerstage. Cancer if you are able to perform with any dancer dead or alive, who would it be? Arthur Mitchell. How many points you have you got through? Oh God I can't even count I I go through ten a week ten a week. A. Week. I Gosh how many hours a are you still practicing ballet? Oh still to this day. I. Mean not very many I'm recovering from an injury. So most of my days were spent in physical therapy but an hour and a half is committed to that, and then I try and squeeze in like forty five minutes of ballet class when I can when the last Jedi negotiated for yourself. it's a daily thing shameless plug. Shameless plug. Heads. A. Bun heads my amazing children's both on. So excited about with an amazing artists say tour Fiat, G Bay that brought the whole thing select yes. Misty. Thank you so much virtually everything you do have done such a fan and you're wonderful to talk to you. Thank you. Thank you so much for having. Thanks for hanging out with US join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about Skim Dot com that's the S. k. i., M. M., Dot com to m's for a little something extra.

American Ballet Theatre principal Kansas City Missouri Ballet Schools San Francisco B basketball US Misty Copeland America Saco Raven Wilkinson California stay Lauder New York City Carl Sagan Girls Club Google San Pedro California writer Prince
Eva Chen, director of fashion partnerships, Instagram: I think it's really important if you have a door open [to you], keep it propped open."

Skimm'd from The Couch

37:00 min | 9 months ago

Eva Chen, director of fashion partnerships, Instagram: I think it's really important if you have a door open [to you], keep it propped open."

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay Lauder. The nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first, let's get into the episode. Doc I think it's really important. If you have door open, keep it propped open keeping the door open is really important. And also not just like saving outreach for when you need something that I do think there were networking gross i. feel I think it sounds kind of like sleazy right. But if you think about reframing, it s like maintaining contacts and or kind of maintaining relationships. Yes. That's the way to think about it. I'm Carl Sagan. I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome to skin from the couch. PODCAST is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch? Hey everyone. It's carly. This show might sound a bit different today because the skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Eva Chen joins me on skin from the couch. She is the director of fashion partnerships at Instagram, and before that she was the editor in Chief of Lucky magazine she is also known for her bestselling children's. Books, and for her loyal following on Instagram I am one of those loyal followers either I am so excited to get into this conversation. Welcome to skip from the couch. Thank you. Thanks for having me very excited to be here in my PJ's with you. I put makeup on trio carly. So honestly your PJ is more fashionable than anything. I own so you're good. To start with the question I like to start with every show skim your resume for us. At. The top of mind resume obviously would be my name and address should not be revealing podcast but I grew up in New York City and I was premed Johns Hopkins University, which is like you know where you go to be premed or any near neither of which I am I intern at Harper's bazaar the summer between junior and senior year and I think that's what kind of really set that light bulb off over my head that I wanted to work at magazines and I wanted to work in particular fashion magazines and Then worked at Elle magazine for three years and I worked at Teen Vogue for seven I was freelance for a bit ditzy consulting, and then I was editor in chief of Lucky for about a year and a half fifteen issues is how I think of it. Then I been at instagram since then for five years do fashion partnerships are you supposed to put like hobbies are skills? There is no right way to do this and I love how you doing it. So yeah what are your hobbies and skills if I were literally? Screaming my resume, my resume reflected. When I just said, I would not get hired. Super. In all over the place, my current hobby is composting and learning about gardening, and I feel like that would be a conversation starter at an interview and my skills are I. Don't know I'm still figuring out. This is a good resume. You'd make around two would I Definitely obviously for anyone that knows of you. Feels like they probably know everything about you because of your presence on instagram. That can't go go about you that people would be surprised to now. Feeling. What people don't know like I. Feel as a mom a working mother especially during cove Ed. The spring was a very dark time for me. It was really hard balancing home school in three hours a day. So I guess what you wouldn't know from. The constant like I think a lot of women feel a lot of people feel this is like Oh my God. I'm trying to figure it out and I'm trying to hold it all together. I think that's always a challenge neighbor I detroit to show that on Instagram I will say like in my stories I try to show the good the bad the anxiety stress and the highlights Douglas. That's people wouldn't know about me or they wouldn't know that secretly and quite introverted and my idea of a perfect night is not going out to like the coolest restaurant or living that sex in the city dream fashion life my ideal night really laying in bed reading a book and like maybe either drinking ginger. Or maybe if I'm feeling wild and crazy like a gossiper say. I'm very much a homebody. I don't know that people would assume that right off the bat you know I will say I I completely relate to that. But second of all, what I find fascinating about us, we do the show as we had so many amazing women that are high profile and and they all described themselves introverts and I just think that's so fascinating and do you want to come back to that but first thing I wanna ask you as you mentioned that? You are on the Pre Med track. You had a plan beginning premed, very linear path. You know how many years this will take to get to this level? How did you realize that that was not going to be your path and how did you get your foot in the door into something? Totally different. Pre Med it was just always a given for me because I'm a first generation American. My parents came here from Taiwan China in the seventy S and I think the dream for a lot of first-generation Americans at their parents. The parents dream for their children is often something very stable. So you see a lot of Americans kind of gravitated towards these quote unquote stable career pads medicine or law like whereas very linear, and there is a undercurrent. Of Stability, and for me, I never really questioned it. I always did have an interest in biology and geology and general house searches kind of followed that path got Johns Hopkins. Obviously, it's a great school to be Med ad but really looked at the clues of my life or my career. You know I did always love reading fashion magazines and more importantly like I always loved to read I, always had my nose in a book super shy growing up. Super Awkward a lot of people in addition to Sangare introvert or is was a really awkward when I was a teenager I have never seats have been four don't prove. We're not GONNA show it supremely awkward and so books during much in writing were very much my solace and so I was premed at Hopkins and I was like honestly. It was okay. I like studied a lot to get okay grades ace them by any means, but I never had that like deep calling to it. So I remember the summer between my junior and senior year I was like i WanNa do something. It's totally different before I start setting the cats and Doing that whole track and so I applied to about twenty internships and my strategy was really poor one literally applied to companies that I had heard. YOU-YOU'LL. MTV that would be fun is quite near applied to like we more s and obliged to Random House publishing applied to conde? NAST did not get. A response not that you had your pretty women, move it like big this. Big Mistake. Huge. Not Like I ended I ended up there was like really happy there. So it all came full circle. So I got an internship at her bizarre I applied through a standard like hr and don't even know if it was on a website that data center in my a paper cover letter I didn't have connections. My parents didn't have a network because. They were immigrants and very much scrappy and not like. I. Know There's a kind of stereotypical magazines. All got the job there as. You know sister who interned at Stella McCartney with them. Now, I literally applied with like a piece of paper and when it ended up at her bizarre I was split between two departments it was kind of a dream I was in the features department you know interning for the book Senator and then the department, and so the director at the time was Christine and Shea and the senior editor at the time was woman in Emily Doherty, and so that's how I ended up at Harper's. Bazaar, and in terms of that hit I remember just knowing everything clicked for me that day and so I was very lucky at a relatively young age to and found this internship that I so loved in found like what would become a career for me until I was really lucky respect I know it takes some people longer. But for me things all kind of clicked that fateful summer and I went back from Harper's bazaar went back to Hopkins in while actually I didn't I like. I think that summer I was like, why am I going back to Hopkins in studying pre-med and I actually ended up studying abroad my senior year in kind of having that study abroad original Gaza I studied at Oxford in England which was like this is right around the time that the Harry Potter Movies Coming Out and being filmed and they went. If you go ever go to Oxford it is so beautiful. It is so dreamy you really do feel like you're outwards in they. Filmed a lot of the Harry Potter movies there, and it was just like everything that you imagined like magical i. it just don't magical and I loved studying there when I got back from Oxford in had one credit left at Hopkins but confined a job. This was two, thousand one it was the first kind of dot com boom and a lot of magazines or kind of where folding. So couldn't find a job in magazines. So worked at a law firm, I did not you offer. Yeah I I. Don't I haven't. I don't remember the last time I. Sent Data resume. But like when I did I if I do I, probably wouldn't put this my resume because it's so random but I worked at a law firm called Crevasse we more for about nine months I was like, okay while I don't WanNa be premed. So for like one momentary slice of time parents super happy isn't that I was going to go to law school and so I was a paralegal or legal standing as they call it a crevasse at this big. Huge law firm super well respected. In the Corporate Emanate Department working for an amazing women partner and it was a really good learning experience learned that I did not want. And I do feel like there's No such thing as experience and I definitely think my pre law days like I did a lot of redacting a lot of filing a lot of paperwork which frankly as an assistant. I did a lot of as well and magazines, and then the way I. got my job may put back into the magazine world is really I kept in touch with every single person and a woman named Joanna may chee worked in the fashion department at her bizarre and she was starting a job in the fashion department in credits at Lucky G. kind of emails. All her former colleagues and said like, Hey, does anyone have a former assistant intern? I need one and Emily Dougherty had put her in touch with me and not telling started freelancing machi. That was the world's longest answer I'm sorry. No, it's opened I have a lot of questions and so I know you said you stayed in touch with the people that you had turned for. How do you stay in touch whether it's her internship or early job, and then you leave one of the questions that we get asked all the time we talk to people coming up in their careers like let have anything to say like I don't have an update sometimes feels very awkward. It's like how do you actually stay in touch? That's a great question. I mean I now always actually done informational interviews like I get to know people and Mike I never hear from them ever again or only hear from them like four years at which forgotten who they are and so I, think it's really important. If you have door open, keep it propped open. You don't have to be like I have a life update I. Just did excellent Z.. It's okay just to send an email and I this is what I did I remember this vividly I remember coming back the winter after her internship in coming back to her perces are around the holidays sending an email that's high like would love to drop by and say, Hi and might bring you guys Mike Holiday treats and literally came with a bag of. Cookies just to say, Hi to the editor is high to emily and all that other people working there and just dropping in saying hello and it doesn't have to be this huge formal thing. I'm not saying like you know diem or texture former bosses now that email is so casual your cash for morality known email down with some happy holidays or just like, hey, no major updates. Here. But just check at the end still thinking about my time at Harper's bazaar and how formative it was. Thank you again for being such a good mentor teaching me about X. Y. and Z. Keep a casual and you know what don't be offended if you're a former boss doesn't right back air busy you saw firsthand how busy they were but keeping that door open is really important. And also, not just like saving outreach for when you need something. That's kind of gross. You know like every is that one friend who only tax or deums 'cause you they need something and it's been a while. You literally only reach out to me to do something for you. That's what you don't want. I have always been like someone who likes keeping in touch with people that's always been in my DNA and I am just like like it maybe it's easier. For me but if it's not like a muscle exercising like exercise that you have to do it I do think there were networking is gross feel. I think it sounds kind of like sleazy right. But like if you think about it kind of refrain, it s like meeting contacts or kind of maintaining relationships. I guess that's the way to think about it I. think that's Great Advice. Yeah. I think that is a gross term there's not really a better term but. It's not optional if you need a job which most of us to how you're gonNA, continue to grow in your career is based off of how you have doors open to you how you get those stores open. But I think about the fashion industry is actually very similar to the media, which is where Danielle and I came up in it's not known for paying a lot. It's known for you pay your dues. That's the the pay the pay is usually used. That way you talked about the dot com kind of moment in two thousand one we came up in two, thousand eight and the economy was also not having a good good moment and so many of these industries, all of those linear pass at least we thought were there, which is like you know you make nothing and then you do X Y Z and then there's some sort of success at the end of this road kind I just disappeared like collapsed underneath everyone. What I'm really interested in, you were able to create a very entrepreneurial fashion journey. There's no one else who has done what you have done when somebody comes to you for an informational interview or any advice like do you advise them to go into fashion today? I do get questions about how to. Replicate Mike Career I want to do what you're doing. The job that you are doing, it's hard because like everyone's path is different and the way I did it does not exist anymore I think about the staircase is not to use another shot like a lot about Harry Potter interview already so far sorry allergies I am a Harry Potter nerd. So basically I think about those like moving shifting staircases at hogwarts where it's like you're climbing up the stairs and then suddenly everything's rearranged and that's how. You need to think about careers and just like in general the way I went up the staircase is going to be different. The way someone else goes up the staircase. The landscape is constantly shifting I worked at Teen Vogue for seven years I worked at L. for three years. I think there's much higher turnover now where people tend to jump every year or two now, not even like I think that the new generation of employees are. Different they're like wired differently. This is like a post. It is just a much more entrepreneurial and people are starting up their own thing. They'll say like, oh, like, why do I need to work for establishment like kind of brand when I establish my own and I think it's great. Advice to be, you'll want to work in the fashion industry number one, do your homework even though things are different. Now the media landscape fashion landscape designer landscape there's always a sense of. Going back in kind of seeing what other people done in how they've done it. So it's really important to know context number two. There are some fundamental things that are still foundation of business like I said like keeping in touch with people in maintaining connections and maintaining friendships, mentor ships. That's really important. Sounds Weird. But like good manners that sounds the world fashioned swear. Matt. Hundred Years Old. But you know like saying, thank you expressing appreciation if someone like helps you or opens the door for you. Thank them and yeah, I. Guess I would say like reach out to people. You just never know we have someone on our team at Instagram who I met. She cold. Emailed me. I met her for an informational interview on was just so impressed by her that she's part of the team now and I don't WanNa. Say that standard, bow she had great experience great resume and obviously like deep knowledge of like instagram and the Road Map of what we could achieve. So you do have to take that chance as well. It's hard to believe it but this game is already eight years old and we're going into the fall which means strategy planning time, and around this time of year were always asking ourselves the question, how can we do better? How can we still make sure to stay on top of our game bring new things to life and stay true to our vision and. We think it's really important to make sure that you are always reaching out for new tools new advice at different ways to be innovative. So part of why we love Estee Lauder is because Bachera philosophy that you can always be improving always looking to do better, and that's why we are so excited that their new advanced night repair serum is back better. It is infused with antioxidants and highly roddick acid. So they're number one serum. You guys seriously just got better. We love the serum because it helps repair the. Look of key signs of aging fast and eight years in we have some key signs of aging over here of at instantly makes her skin look radiant and it's all pumped with hydration. You can use it and morning, and at night we just really can't say enough good things about it really makes your skin feel firmer. So hadn't to store or GO TO ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more that's E. S. T. E. L. A. U. D. E. R.. Dot Com start tonight with estee lauder new advanced night repair. Serum. You ended up becoming editor in chief of lucky and that's actually like how I started becoming a fan girl of yours I'm curious. You. Had such a high profile job at that moment, and as you said, fifteen issues you did. And then you took some time off. What was that moment like for you? So I joined lucky to be editor and chief Fashion Magazine, I? Don't WanNA. Say It was a dream come true. Is I never even dare to dream that that was something that I could do that I could be an editor in chief but I loved it I learned so much I was Anna Torres I hire editorial director Nast, and I was really excited to create a magazine into one that reflected instagram influencers that reflected high low dressing these new kind of nascent brands that were being created. On instagram it was kind of like I, guess like about less than a year in Conde nast wanted to create a shopping startup out of lucky which very totally logical idea made a lot of sense unlucky went through a merger, the company in California that was to be totally honest bumpy it's expected to be bumpy I. Don't really have any like ill will or read about it, but it was really complex and it was around that time I was pregnant with the founder that was pregnant ran. It was hard because I was traveling to la every two weeks at the time to go work with the team out in La, that's where the buyers were based at the ECOMMERCE business was based and it just wasn't really sustainable and it was hard because we had to make a lot of cuts difficult decisions at lucky. Just six something didn't feel right it wasn't like sitting while with me sounds really new age but like the vibe was off, I was very happy. And so I had to make the decision to kind of step back. I remember like having my daughter in December of two thousand fourteen remember my daughter in December and then like literally coming back things were so crazy January like literally three weeks later and just thinking like I can't do this. You went back three weeks later. Yeah. I had to because there's a lot happening. Were consolidating a lot of departments in team that he just didn't feel like. Felt like I had to come back I got no pressure from conde or from startup come back absolutely non like they were very accommodating but I felt like I I do it was the right thing to do at the time and so after four months started just kind of winding down and I took decided to take that step back from lucky and take mat leave three hunslet later. So when ran was probably four months old and I think a lot of people think that I went straight from lucky to Instagram, which I didn't like I wasn't approached about instrument position. Until after I left lucky and I took some time off and I remember even when I was approached about position. Instagram, I mean, I was fully I did not I was like I don't know I kind of want to just spend time at home I just like one to take a break for a bit and remember the person who approached mediums Charles I. met him thinking like maintaining relationships I met him at South by South last like three or four years before this Emerald we got tacos in Austin, which is like what you do obviously was in town from San Francisco or. Menlo Park Silicon Valley was Mathau like I heard you left lucky like tacos nosy. And I remember him saying like we have this job like you'd be perfect for it and I remember saying, can I do it part times religious just like want to take time off and marinated on it for a few weeks? My husband Tom was like. Agreed. You want to take time off. He should. He's like the most supportive of her, but he was like does kind of sound like the perfect job for you if it's something that you want to do and so that's kind of how I ended up at instagram. What is your job and Instagram? That is a great question like a source of a lot of confusion for people. My parents included I was GONNA say what? What do your parents think you might? Think I think they think job as lead related link do instagram stories in post the stories I wished out my job. So I oversee fashion and shopping partnerships at instagram audit started out as the position was really working with people in the fashion industry model designers, stylists, brands, influencers, publications, fashion publications in really educating them on Instagram and Mike all the different surfaces instagram weather a stories now gee, now reels and just really. Helping educate them at scale about how to use instagram and basically also taking feedback back from those public figures and sharing it with what's called the product teams. Now, you know five years in I feel like people know how to use instagram like I feel like there are fashion personalities, influencers who use instruments such innovative, smart, amazing ways. So the fashion industry's pretty advanced now and Instagram I would say the last year two years I've been working on helping the team introduced tools for Instagram to help the next generation of entrepreneurs. So when shopping on instagram instruments been around ten years now and everyone is like I love shopping instagram shopping I bitings, instagram all the time in like how do we? Make that easier how do we make small brands like I'm thinking about their skincare line of goals that I love but how do we make it easier to discover a Ramlet Goldie? UTICA new by how much of your day is spent with product tech teams verse like Bash influencers fashion brands it started out when I started five years ago I would say like I spent eighty percent of my time working with external people whether a model whether it's designer and twenty percent of my time with product. Now, I would say it's ninety percent internal working with product teams and then ten percent external maybe less than ten percent. You've been able to truly carve your own story every step of the way and What is it about you? Do you think was like why you got promoted fashion and why you are able to make a trip at the time seemed like a really out of left field transition to attack company, and now you're sending ninety percent of your time with people who have a product attack background that you didn't grow up heavy. What do you think it is about you that's been able to thrive in these kind of changing environments. I think generally I think this is part of like an immigrant mentality is that I'm very much kind of like I can figure it out I don't know but I can figure it out. So a lot of the time. People will ask questions or it'll ask me to do something almost always unlike I don't know but I can figure it out and I and I see that my family very much is that way like I said, they came here in the seventy s without really anything or anyone and they figured it out and were able to give me and my. Brother. So many opportunities and very inspired by that and all the first generation Americans the immigrant stories that I hear people who are scrappy I. Guess I have very little qualms and had no problems rolling up my sleeves and kind of getting into things like I will chip in however is needed and maybe that's it I don't know like I also kind. Of, come at King's I think with kind of like I don't know can we try it this way or like let's do something different and I think when I think about most of the work I, do what the Children's books like my publisher whose Legend Children's book world she really is name is gene firewall and so a lot of the. Time when I was working with her, she was like we don't really do we've never done it this way and I'm like. Well, let's try IT I. Don't go you know I think it's also like an openness to try and things in a different way and failing is okay like if you look back at my career really like I'm a failed premed. I'm failed lawyer. I interned Gr for like three weeks. So I think. Also. kind of learning from all those lessons in knowing that no experiences wasted. You know what are you knock at? I am not good at prioritization I. Think I get distracted very easily I pretty sure and ninety, two percent sure of add or. adhd never diagnosed. I know that like everyone in my family has it. I think about this in the context of like obviously with two young kids in school and people talk about like different ways people learn differently and I look at my daughter she's very similar to me. She's quite like flighty and easily distracted but I also think like maybe it's why I am able to no. Six. Children's books at this plane and like working on adult book and maybe it's that like Ability to kind of spend a Lotta plates spinning up in the air at once in a in a pre cova world. If anyone who follows your nose, you like you're you're on a plane quite often I feel like you are signing a book every second of the day. I remember when we were doing our but for the scam, we were talking to people just like in the in the book everyone looked to you is just as a model of how did you book tour had a sell bucks had engaged audience everyone gave you like the highest compliment which is just like no one hustles like ebay having say, no, how do you balance that drive? We will figure it out your fulltime job your time obviously, and you also now are incredibly successful author. Do you learn how to stay now? I have really hard him saying now I really do when it comes to like the children's books someone will allow me and. We're doing a charity auction of Juno like would you x z like almost always say yes and make us and one of those people leads. If. You're weird and ads saying no especially if there are kids involved right now my publisher like sent me sorry you're hearing a plastic bags switch because. Me like thousands of these clay. You guys can't see days thousands like Roxie book, plates Oh, my guy. So it's like she's like they're like you're negation. and. It's like I I have a crate of these. At every day I would try to sign five hundred to six hundred of them and. By hand is like a gnarled stump. Really love it and I think that's the secret. It's. Easier to say, yes when it's something, you love the sounds weird because you know it's children's books but like my whole life I've wanted to raise children looks like literally what I wanted to do since I was like seven or eight years since I was a grant age, it's really like. What I love to do, and I've learned a lot in the process in it makes me super happy and so it is easier to say, yes and it's harder to say no when something really enjoy. So last question before we go into our lightning round, what is it like to be an introvert and have so much of your life expose on Social Media I think social media. The good thing about around and social media in general is that it's like winds forcing you to do it right but things I share I, genuinely enjoy sharing with the other thing that I'm really into really into fountain pen. See if there's nothing you can say that I'm like, yeah I already know that because I follow you like I know about Tom and the GRANOLA and now about added in about. All I got that might enjoy sharing, but it's like if there's ever something like my dad had pretty major back surgery a few weeks ago a few months ago. I didn't share that because respect for his privacy and also like it was really tough. Are you do you always feel on though like you turn off? I do there is not a big disconnect I would say I, mean I remember walking down the street in New York once. Someone deemed me after I was in a room I, remember the stakes in a really bad mood because I just gotten some like. Going through like school admissions stuff and like for my daughter, who's five which is ridiculous I remember like I got like negative feedback that was like really almost bordering on link need about my child, which is incredibly hurtful of course and might. super cast. And I remember I was in a really bad moods I probably scowling. which is what people are allowed to be in bad moods. Yes. Know Mommy Mom eastern work like renaissance here she's a celebrity. Iran, how are you? It's so nice to meet you. There she yeah. But like I remember someone dmv. So someone me and they're like you put on this really happy face on instagram and I just WanNa tell you. Following you asylum street in you obviously were. Angry or an angry fake person and it was like super annoying everyone to have good days. Bad Days I am generally at a glass not just half vulgar's. But like I'm pretty positive even keeled person but you know the things would social media like you choose what you WANNA put on and I I do feel like. I get just as excited about the new Gucci rerelease of Jackie Bag I get just as excited about that as I do about a fountain pen as I do about composting I'm generally enthusiastic person. And I think the reason why Amazing Mike Lucky meet a lot of sense for me is because it's Sharon lucky was all about sharing. Cool new fines I really like sharing things. I guide you shared all of this. Ask you're now going to move into the lightning round morning person or night apple. Night Owl, how has your nighttime routine evolved over the last few months I stay up until crazy late hours watching K pop bands, dance practices. 'cause I need that time to kind of like unwind from the trauma of I honestly think zoom calls or one of the worst things to happen not not this one I love this. But generally I feel like zooms or so hard because I, think they take a lot more energy like psychic energy is it like you have to intensely focus and work harder to convey signals that you're listening and invested and much more tiring what is your favorite quick dinner to make? Your quick dinner to make. is a piece of fish I'm this is GonNa be alive as my husband makes it. Will. Like bake some salmon and then we'll just like stir fries Greens and that's it or my favorite dinner to make his takeout, etc. It's great. So I asked on Instagram to our followers what they wanted me to ask you to speaking Tom, what and Granola what is your favorite type of Granola? Okay. So he makes one that is tyranny sue that is so good and I wanted to make it and sell it. It involves like you know cheer MEC- The desert several layers to make several different batches of Granola and that kind of creed set layered effect says Labor intensive, but he also makes a blueberry lemon one. That's really good. I'm a secret ingredient is love. Worst professional mistake you've made. Probably a lot. I. Don't have to ask my coworkers but like definitely mad cried worker for I. Don't know if that's like the worst mistake but like I don't know if it's a mistake, I cry a lot like my coworkers used to make crying like teeny at work and get really embarrassed that I'm cry I don't know actually mistake and I just do it last time you negotiated for yourself I honestly now that I'm in this home decor space of like nesting buying furniture negotiating constantly for better deals. and. So I'm constantly trying to get a better deal on a table last cowshed, Selfish Ryan, best instagram filter that I should use. Okay. So there are so many different instagram filters now because it's open access and so any kind of creator can kind of submit Phillip what's your go to? Go, I don't falter. Are you stop? I super. Rarely use filters almost never you have really good skin so I'm happy for you. That's Great All about lightening though Eva, thank you so much. CONGRATS on. And Good luck with a cottage. Thank you. Bye. Thanks for hanging out with US join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch, and if you can't wait until, then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skin dot com. That's. S. K. I. M. M. dot com Xu m's for a little something extra.

Instagram editor in Chief Harper Tom Johns Hopkins Eva Chen Teen Vogue Danielle Weisberg Harry Potter Carl Sagan intern stay Lauder director editor Mike I NAST New York City Johns Hopkins University Lucky magazine carly
Ratana Stephens, CEO of Natures Path: When it comes to business and people, I'm a lioness.

Skimm'd from The Couch

23:57 min | 1 year ago

Ratana Stephens, CEO of Natures Path: When it comes to business and people, I'm a lioness.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. Yes as a wife. I'm living in kind. But when it comes to business and people I'm relentless I'm Carly's aching. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. Hi everyone this show might sound a bit different today. Because worst coming from three different couches. The skin is working from home for the time being because of Kobe. Nineteen today Ratna. Stevens joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the CO founder and CEO of Nature's path which she founded with her husband in nineteen eighty. Five since then. Nature's path has grown to become North America's largest independent organic breakfast and Snack Food Company. Nature's path is also a leader in sustainability and has been recognized as one of Canada's greenest employers Ratna. Welcome to skin from the couch thank you. We're so thrilled to have you here. So we're going to ask you what we ask everybody which is to skim your resume walk us through it. I was a lecturer in Girls College. I taught English psychology and it came to Canada nineteen. Sixty-nine I bought and started restaurant very interesting. I wanted to have something of my own apart from my husband. What kind of restaurant was it is for Vegetarian? Restaurant called Mother Nature Sin. It was in the back of the store that my husband and I started back in nineteen seventy one call. Lyceum natural foods is the predecessor wholefoods smaller but the same concept in one thousand nine hundred eighty five aeronautic started nature spat at the backup -Tarian restaurant that I was running in nineteen ninety. I joined him as a working partner. Before that Mr Moore so you look after nature spat will look after woodland's restaurant because the kids for a young and as a mother you will see tug of war going on in your heart and your mind and that was there with me and I said you know. I'm very comfortable earning restaurant. I'll give you more money and give you more advise but let's look after the kids and restaurant but it didn't last for long time. It only lasted about ear and half in Nineteen ninety-two. I joined him since then. Beeping together in running an enterprise. We're going to dig into that. Enterprise has become but I WANNA to have you walk us through. What was your childhood really like? How did you grow up? I was child off AJ partition. I was an infant. When India was divided into countries than three Pakistan and Hindustan or India? My parents fled Pakistan and drive in India. Which is mostly a Hindu state Pakistan. Became more soy it. Muslim state. It was very hard on them. And somehow settle and my father being an entrepreneur his targeted business again. He left everything in Pakistan except the clothes on their back and my granddaughter tied about few ounces of gold around her waist so he became a successful entrepreneur. Let it didn't last for long. Because the unity of the family was broken. The brothers could not tolerate each other and so the business has gone. The childhood was wonderful. Early Childhood there are so many people working in my father's factory and they are treated very. Well they are respected. But the time came that we didn't have much. That was my early. Youth Scholarships and bursaries. Or they're from me and I took full advantage of. I've wanted to finish my degree. I wanted to college my grandmother. Who adopted me? She was my support Ben. Some male members of the family objected my going to university getting a degree. She was like a tigress. She said defer alone. She is going to be what she wants to we. Did you have other family members who had gotten their degrees? My grandmother could not even read a rite inc. Thumbprint was her signature and she did their best but she could not read. Write or guide me in any way so that was early. Childhood are the Youth. You've been called that heart and soul of. Nature's Pat when you hear that. What does that mean when you think about how you era what is the heart and soul on when you go through difficulties then you see other people going through difficulty you have empathy. You feel for them because you yourself have gone through so my grandmother's very empathetic. And since I was brought up by her he was always there when people needed her in happiness and in sorrow I learned a lot from her and I to. What was the decision like to move to Canada in life? Then you surrender snowed decision. I've fell in love. I love my husband still after fifty years. That's a big feet congrats. A lot of people can't say that right now in close quarters. Oh yes we do. Have Disagreements on misunderstand me we definitely do but after you know discussing after getting a little bit annoyed become to conclusion that what we are talking maybe a different ways different aspects but became to the same conclusion rb agree based dom in the pros and cons and sit tolerance. You have to tolerate an accept. The percents find view. An that's what we have done and I'm grateful that has lasted that long and I think he's going to last longer one of the things that we were reading about with you. Is that as you sort of? Found Yourself as an entrepreneur. You also were trying to raise a young family and young children and WanNa talk a little bit about how you achieved any semblance of balance and I use the word balance kind of in quotes because I think we talk a lot about on the show that that's kind of a myth when people talk about work life balance but walk us through what those early days were like You know running a restaurant and having a young family you know. Tv Ago. When I was giving influential woman of in Business Award Kuenssberg there. My husband was there and of course. I thanked them and what I said. Your mother was always there. Bundy needed her but she was not there when you wanted her when they needed me when I felt it's very important for them to have me near them emotionally intellectually Charles there. If our daughters. She is a lyric soprano. Most of the time I took her to the lessons I take out some little time to take her to school. If they're teachers wanted talk to me to something I was Elvis there. So it's very hard when you're in business and when you have a beautiful young family is hard but you make sure in the time of needs dear family comes first when you and your husband eventually decided to continue following this entrepreneurial side of both of you and built nature's path. Did you talk about like this is how we're going to divide and conquer? This is what you're good at this good at talk to us a little bit about how that works. Aaron is in a leader. He is very good in marketing. And I felt I connect with people more so than he does because US artists is entrepreneur is in a waiter as more soul in marketing. So what I did. After livestream was sold I took securities course just to find out how this finances work on how you also cheap. And he supported me for three months. I Wa ause an investment banker or you call it stockbroker and after that. I told my manager. I said I'm sorry I can't work. He said why you could have meant you know how they talk about. Meeting held off a great broker. I said you know you're right but my family and my marriage is very important. Yes I learned finances. I love people and I learned how to work with people were producing so operation also came under my wings finance out so came. Hr only thing that we shared together. What sales who did you guys go to for advice when I think back on the health space you know thinking about the seventies even the nineties it's just boomed in the past few decades there? I'm assuming wasn't the same type of information or resources or networks when you guys were starting out were there people. That were mentors. When you couldn't figure something out. Who did you go to? You know my husband used say breadth nigh uncommon common sense. I didn't understand that before Moore I could find. With whom Sir was willing to give me advice. I would listen. Use my common sense and go forward. Why do you think he called it? Uncommon Common Sense. I know because probably he felt that I I have common sense which he has not found another. I WANNA stop at this first second and talk about it because what you're talking about is something that Dan Yan. I can relate to a lot which is very much when we talk about our own story and talk about going up and asking like very simple questions. And if you don't understand something you figure it out you ask the people who can help you figure it out. I think there's a lot of reasons why people don't necessarily do that but would away you talked about your story. It's almost so simple. So I'm laughing at how your husband phrased it because I think it's such a spot on description for those that are listening. That are thinking about being an entrepreneur themselves. What is your advice about? How to tap into the uncommon common sense? You know one thing. I also forgot to tell you that I read books. I love biographies whether business biography. Whether biography of well known politicians are well known saints. Demean the inspire. You you feel that what they have gone through and how they have come out of it. Are these lessons for you and for me for everybody because no life is obvious straight whether in politics weather and business weather in any spheres you know in Hinduism and Judaism Islam Christianity. We see the inspiring. Bahir read the inspiring stories. Some of them. Most of them are wonderful. So yes I think. I give uncommon common sense. I give credit to the family the society and to the woman who brought me up. You've said that nature's path is not for sale and you want it to remain a family business. And you've said that despite previous offers how did you begin to bring your children into the business and teach them from the very beginning? We felt it should be legacy company. I remember to multinational major companies. Enterprise approached us the same day as a matter of fact the CEO of one of the company came out to Vancouver. Do US and we're standing near the elevator or pw. Aaron and I looked at each other. This is what we want. I said this is what you want. He said No. I don't want this either what we are going do. After now few million dollars you'll get out of it to distribute among our kids and spoil them. Give them a purpose. We are all in a period of working from home for the foreseeable future. Thanks to cove in nineteen and if you're like us it means that the workday just kind of goes on and on and on because there's no sense of routine and we're already home and there's a lot of screen time and screen time back to back is not good for anyone. We recognize how lucky we are to stay at home. But we're trying to focus on a little self care so fortunately we found a great way to put that are in our into practice and that's with anr. Estee Lauder advanced night repair serum use it before your moisturizer. The fast penetrating serum helps can maximize its natural ability to repair by night and protect by day. Like a superhero but for your skin. When over five hundred women tried it. Eighty percent notice more rested healthier looking skin in four weeks. Their skin felt more hydrated and had a radiant glow head to ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. DOT COM. Start Tonight with estee. Lauder Advanced Night Repair Serum. You grew up no money. He opportunity to even say out loud that you could make millions of dollars if you went down this path and to have a conversation like well. Here's the negatives of that did you guys look at each other and just like how is this happening and I just trying to put myself in your shoes. I'm thinking about ourselves as founders. What was that moment? You can say altruistic moment it was a moment been you have gone to belt poverty when you go through all this you feel. Yes money's important. We have to look after ourselves. Several family. How a decent place to live have children educated. That's what we're doing. But I've heard of seen many wealthy families who have sold their business distributed the money to the family while the children quite a few other children have not done much with that. The money has beeen spend finished. So what is the purpose for purposes very important so speaking about your children and purpose? Your daughter is spearheading. The sustainability initiatives at nature's path and you've committed to being carbon neutral by twenty twenty for companies who want to work towards more sustainable practices. What advice do you have on how they actually start? They start with the product restarted. Bizarre Ganic foods by using organic ingredients. I must say that we have. Vf saved her plans. Hundreds of millions of pounds of chemical fertilizer chemicals that could have gone in the water system and then the land behalf saved planet. Sustainability means total sustainability. It includes social responsibility and environmental sustainability sustainability. To me also look after people give them a purpose help them learn our guide them what is best for the planet and for the society that we live in. Make sure they're well paid. Make sure they're looked after make. Sure they're part of the family. Yes there's a Stevens family but nature's path is a family to mate as Sierra has been right behind you who just locked in high we. We love when family members drop in. It's our favourite part of podcasts. Would you like to say hello to them? Cue Me ask him a question. Please do okay. We've had a great time speaking to your wife and she answered this question but we want to know. What is it really like working with your spouse? Oh it's intense. It's loving is Definitely a tell us at times. What is the most annoying habits that you each have in the workplace probably Interrupting Each Other? We have different views. She's much more pragmatic. And I have a practical streak though and I think. She has an ideal idealistic streak. It's more predominant with me. I think than than her and her practical side is much more prominent than mine. In somehow we balance each other out and love this. It's been fifty one years of balancing. That is incredible. Congratulations sometimes she has a ferocious temper. Sometimes and that did not come up in this interview. And sometimes it gets scorched astrologically. She's the lion she's a lioness and I'm the goat so that says a lot you know. She's a wonderful Woman she's kind forgiving wise. I don't think he's always one hundred percent correct and we I think probably ninety percent that's may be the key to fifty years. Yeah I'm probably not as correct as often as she is but anyway we have learned to Live with each other's idiosyncrasies and I think we really work well together. Thank you so much for joining us. That's a pleasure you take care. Yeah that was great. We'll retina. We gotTA talk. What is this temper? Okay if I'm telling. Please listen to me and that somebody is not listening especially my husband and he will do what have been suggested not to do. Well how does how does your temper manifest? Are you a yeller or do you just like storm off ice storm off a yelled is see heating says it. Wifi should be always loving and kind. Yes as a wife. I'm loving and kind but when it comes to business and people I'm Elena's I love that that is a great quote the we're GonNa move onto our last segment. It's the lightning round work from home edition so we will ask you a few berry short questions and just answer. Whatever comes to mind. Are you a morning person or a night owl morning? Can you skim here nighttime? Routine after dinner final touches on my email going email coming and tied to calm my mind down tried to meditate good asleep. What's the last show that you binge-watch homeland? Oh it's so good. I'm watching to this season. Yes seventy I love the acting. I know I agree since we are. All working from home are most most of us are. What's replace Your Morning Commute Meditation? Email talking to a mother. She's ninety one years old talking to the kids one is in Chicago Illinois. Other one is and the one who are in Vancouver both of them. I call them later. On what is your favorite. Nature's path products you know everyday differs. We went today today. Is Love Crunchy Granola tomorrow? It might be fun conflicts. Granola that sounds good to Brad. Thank you so much for coming on. We loved having Aaron as well. Thank you and thank you for what you're doing. You're going to inspiring and you are inspiring the young entrepreneurs you know Brad. Thank you so much. We hold out my adviser all staling healthy and sane right now and you guys to all of you. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news information you need to start your day sign about. Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. M. Dot Com. She ends for a little something extra.

US Estee Lauder Aaron Canada Pakistan Stevens Mr Moore India CEO Vancouver North America Danielle Weisberg Brad Carly lecturer Girls College WanNa Snack Food Company CO founder
Full Episode: Thursday, February 21, 2019

Nightline

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Full Episode: Thursday, February 21, 2019

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash Nightline. That's indeed dot com slash Nightline. Good evening. Thank you for joining us today. Jesse smell let was back on the set of empire. But it's his offstage performance. That's really in the spotlight. He was arrested in a rain for a felony charge with what police say is a hate crime hoax. Here's ABC's Eva pilgrim. Dependent small at further detail that he wanted able to attack him but not hurt him too, badly, scratches and bruising at you saw his face was most likely self-inflicted attack lasted forty five seconds. We have evidence that we have the check that he used to pay them today, Chicago authorities laying out what they say is the twisted tale of Jesse smell let the stunt was orchestrated by Sma let because he was dissatisfied with his salary. It's been a saga. That's lasted for three weeks rope around my neck. They put a rope around the accused attackers caught on tape. Buying red hats and ski masks now testifying against him before grand jury today. One more twist entertainer jussie smollet arrested and charged your brother's story world's Millette attempted to gain attention by sending a false letter that relied on ratio, homophobic, and political language when that didn't work it's Millette pay thirty five hundred dollars. To stage this attack authorities now saying that reported hate crime was all a hoax. How do you not believe that it's the truth? I think the question on everyone's minds is will Jesse small at be prosecuted. Will he go to jail while this is not a violent crime? This is a significant crime. If this is true that Jesse put together this hoax. Then I think what we're looking at is something much much deeper psychologically emotionally that may be going on in a courtroom today. Smollet listened to prosecutors lay out their case jussie smollet appearing at his bond hearing a serious look on his face throughout turning to his lawyers whispering things sometimes nodding in agreement. His family standing in support of him just two rows behind him. The let out on a one hundred thousand dollar bond. Chopper footage capturing him heading back to the empire studio. Why would anyone especially an African American man? Use the symbolism of a noose to make false accusations. It was the morning of January twenty nine at two o'clock in the morning Jesse smollet reported that he was the victim of a hate crime. Sma let claimed he was walking home from a subway restaurant when he said to men physically attacked him hurling, racist and homophobic, slurs smell let describing that moment to ABC news. So I was crossing the intersection I heard empire. I don't answer to him pyre. I kept walking. And then I heard empire. So I turned around, and I said it used to say to me and turn around and I see. The attacker masked, and he said this maga- country punches me right in the face. So a Pisces. And then we started tussling, then it just stopped and. They ran off. I noticed the rope around my neck, and I started screaming Chicago police immediately begin investigating anytime. A hate crime is reported in the city of Chicago, it gets the same attention. But his entire story was about to come under fire from the very beginning. We had some some some questions about it. During that timeframe, we we interviewed over a hundred individuals in a canvas of the area. We located approximately thirty five of our Chicago police pod cameras. We additionally found over twenty private sector cameras through those cameras. They identified two persons of interest brothers tracking them through cab and rideshare records for a week. We track them to going to O'Hare airport and jumping on a flight to Nigeria. We were able to locate and identify these two individuals. Personal interest when they entered into the country at customs, we took them into custody. Police say that the brothers attorney made a compelling offer. She said that something smelled fishy. She did not think that they were the offenders as were reported. It was at that time that this investigation started to spin in completely new direction. Police say they learned that smell. Let's alleged attack was actually days in the making defendant small then stated that he wanted to stage an attack were able with appear to better him. Defendant. Small also suggested that Abel's older brother Ola assist him with the attack. Prosecutors also claim he enlisted the brothers help having had business dealings in the past. Able was a source of designer drugs for defendants Malek allegedly I smell at made arrangements to meet one of the brothers at the empire studios to discuss that threatening letter he had received small let. Indicate indicates able his displeasure of the empire studios handling of the racist. And homophobic letter he received three days prior return address it and big rid caps. Maga-? Did I make that up to? Yes, prosecutors said he did make it up. They said cameras captured the trio planning the attack defendant small at also included that he wanted let's to place a rope around his neck for gasoline on him and yelled, this is mega country, the stage attack lasted forty five seconds. There was a change in the plan in that bleach was going to be used instead of gasoline. A key part of his plan that light pole camera on the top of it. He thought would catch the whole thing. The only problem it was pointed in a different direction during the good Morning America interview, small state, it feels like. If I had said. It was a Muslim. Or mexican? Or someone black? I feel like the doubters would have supported me a lot much more. These statements by small let further misled the police and the public to believe his attackers were white today. His legal team pushed back on the charges today. We witnessed in organized law enforcement spectacle that has no place in the American legal system. Mr. smollet is a young man of impeccable character and integrity who fiercely and solemnly maintains his innocence and feels betrayed by a system that apparently was to skip due process and proceed directly to sentencing smell at once touted himself as an activist for communities targeted by hate. I just want young people young members of the LGBTQ community young glac children to know, how strong they are to know the power that they hold in their little pinky for Jesse smollet. As an African American gay man who purport it to be a social activists during black history month to actually use symbols of a noose yelling, this is mega country. It's almost as if he was using the very divisiveness that we see in this country and exploiting it to his advantage. Police reports calls real harm concern is that hate crimes would now publicly be met with a level of skepticism. An F B I report showed a seventeen percent rise in the number of hate crimes reported across the country. It is also clear that the instances of false reportings are very low somewhere between two percent and eight percent what this alleged hoax may do is it may emboldened people. To commit more of these crimes. Well, if in fact, he did make up this story that it is an elaborate hoax. I don't see a bad person. What I do see is someone who is in a lot of psychological pain for psychologist. Jeff Gardir who has never examined smell at moments. Like this speaks volumes to such a disservice. When you lie about things like this. It was fascinating where he talked about. You know, if you make something up like this, you do a disservice to other people who've been victims. Yes, that is absolutely true. But is that also the unconscious talking and sort of revealing what may have been going on with him in his mind. I will never be the man that this did not happen to. I am forever. Changed? Millette now facing an uphill battle to salvage his reputation. Fox the studio that produces empire saying that they're evaluating the situation, and we are considering our options as for the city of Chicago. They say he only has one option. Absolute Justice would be an apology to the city that he's smeared, and I just wish that the families of gun violence in this city got this much attention because that's who really deserves the amount of attention that we giving to this particular incident for Nightline, I'm even pilgrim in Chicago. Even we'll have the latest on GMA tomorrow next influenced on how a twenty seven year old turned her beauty routine into a big moneymaker. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash Nightline. That's indeed dot com slash Nightline. From workouts to make up to Tori's. There's a new way of entrepreneurs putting feeds in cashing in on the business of influencing ABC's real Meena Puga on how they win from everyday people to social media stocks. Selena Gomez promoting coach handbags to her one hundred and forty six million Instagram followers. Kim Kardashian has pushed everything from perfume too vitamins, and even luxury brand Fendi little Kylie Jenner is in on the action to seen here. Hawking her makeup Palley on YouTube by made this the perfect palette. And now even your next door. Neighbor could be cashing in on the big business of being an influencing Twenty-seven-year-old. Montreal Marito don't meet more similar beauty and lifestyle. Social media influencers paid by companies like Maybelline, so many great from them. And stay Lauder to promote their products on. First media can't believe this me. I can't believe this to be in stores. She has more than five million Instagram followers and over fifteen million subscribers on her three YouTube channels, a native of Venezuela. She launched her first YouTube channel nine years ago on a win. I was in college in Venezuela. And I decided I want to post my first YouTube video what were you studying biology. Okay. I know it's very weird. But I always loved makeup and biology. There weren't a lot of people that like to make up that I could meet and school. So it was like, you know, what I'm gonna go make video posted online and find people that like the same things that I like a little screen. So I flip it, and I just sit and talk we visited mar yell at her home in Los Angeles that doubles as her studio, what do you roughly get paid proposed? And what is the most you've gotten paid for something? I wouldn't be able to give you in second number but ballpark. I have a college degree. My husband has a college degree. He hasn't gone, and we chose to do this. So you can make a good living from it. Maryelle and her husband Gordo, I moved to the US. So he could attend grad school, but he went to business school. I was home alone. So it was like I'm going to start in English wide. I talked to somebody felt like all talk to the camera the YouTube videos were kind of like an outlet for you to practice your English. Yeah. I was like I have no friends. So I'm just gonna find some online. Did it work out? I think it has just a few million. There are so many 'specially young women trying to be influencers. What makes your account unique? I asked we saw that all the time. Why do you follow me? I'm just being silly. I don't feel like there's anything special about me why. And I mess up and I show them that. It's not. I'm not perfect. I'm not like, oh, do you know? Yeah. But sometimes I feel like that's why people follow me because I'm I'm meet I'm real today. It seems like everyone is in a battle for the most clicks because a big social media following can mean big money, the very first hurdle to becoming an influence, or is hitting ten thousand followers, but you're certified influence, or if you will at around one hundred thousand it's currently six, and I will seventeen year old mega vlogger, Emma Chamberlain was a typical teen from the bay area when she took YouTube by storm just two years ago right now, we are driving around the DMV posting videos like this one four my shirt contest. She's now signed with a major Hollywood agency, and partnering with teen fashion chain Hollister, everyone, I am jasmine Brown. Jasmine Brown began working with. Major brands like WalMart and lady footlocker after being noticed for her fashion and beauty videos and sandy Vall launched into online stardom with her unique nail polish designs now working with Sephora and Mattel really big YouTubers and Instagram stars. They have agents just like Hollywood, they have managers. They have publicist because the best people are making tens of millions of dollars a year. And it's not just fashion and beauty industry. Influencers who are cashing in take Dr Mike Barshevsky who promotes his healthy and Germ-free lifestyle on his Instagram page and teacher Kayla. Del sur promotes the latest educational technology on her top dog teaching social media pages. When you follow it influence her. You're not just following for the content that she posts you'll following her for her opinion, these are ten favorite products. Well, these are also your ten favorite products. There's also a dark side of online influencing take the large number of fake accounts that some influencers have following them. It's a shortcut that. Plenty of people are tempted to take and so they're tempted to do it. But it's always a bad idea. A recent report reveals companies paid out seven hundred and forty four million dollars to Instagram influencers last year loan, but one hundred two million of that money meant to reach legitimate followers, was actually spent on fake accounts. The whole point of being an influence, or is that you have influence with everyone following you is not a real person. You don't have any influence. You've just have a bunch of followers and buyers of social media. He wear being fitness influencers. My fulltime job fans of social media, fitness. Guru brittany. Don, accused her of charging hundreds of dollars for her sixty day, fitness and nutrition plans, some say without delivering on her promise. And we never got anything back other than just grow you're doing so great. But I'm like, how am I doing great? So not losing weight Britney, Don. Posting an apology on her YouTube channel mistake. And that's what this. Who's gonna do to address it to say that? I am sorry. The Mario says the key to success is staying true to herself and working hard. I always wanted to do something where I could have freedom and be creative. So in the way, this is perfect for what I wanted to do. I mean, you're getting paid to be yourself. Dream job. I it truly is for Nightline. I'm Ravina Puga in Los Angeles. That's Peter Tork mayor in the bay JR. Playing the piano daydream believer with his monkey span may delay. Baby. Joan cedar torque die today, he was seventy seven cues a jokester bass guitar keyboard player rising to fame in the nineteen sixties with the Baynes chart-topping, Vince TV show. Snake? Back in the day. I was thank you for watching nine line are full episodes are streaming on Hulu, thanks for the company. What we told you the youngest female self made billionaire whose company was supposed to change the world. She had made this word. She would have been the next job. It's a story of incredible deception being on multimillion dollar fraud. Listen now to the dropout in number one podcast on apple podcasts. Are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash Nightline. That's indeed dot com slash Nightline.

YouTube jussie smollet Chicago Jesse Instagram ABC Millette Los Angeles Venezuela Hollywood ABC news Eva pilgrim Millette Peter Tork Morning America Selena Gomez Lauder attorney Kim Kardashian
Jan Moran  Heartwarming Womens Fiction

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

41:33 min | 6 months ago

Jan Moran Heartwarming Womens Fiction

"Welcome to the joys of binge reading the show for anyone who ever got to the end of the great book and wanted to read the knicks installment we interview successful series authors and recommend the beast and mystery suspense historical and romance series. So you'll never be without a book you can't put down. You'll find this episode. Show notes a free e book and lots more information at the joys of binge reading dot com and now is jan moran is a usa today based over with a slew of twentieth century standalone historical as well as several women's contemporary fiction series to acquitted. Hi i'm your host jeannie wheeler and today's binge reading episode. Jan talks about how she moved from being a successful beauty care entrepreneur to full time novelist and why she loves to ride strong independent characters. Who are striving to build lives that make up fronts. We rely to have john's christmas story. See brace christmas from her seabreeze in series as one of the feature books in our twelve days of christmas giveaway. This is our way of saying. Thank you to you our listeners and readers for your support and encouragement and a taffy for all of us. We're giving away four christmas holiday raids to continue prayed to historical from four featured authors in our holiday reading dome. That's four books given to four lucky listeners. Over four weeks into now on the joys have been reading website or on our binge reading facebook page the offer close december nineteen. So don't miss out links to the giveaway and to john's books in the show notes for this episode on the joys of reading dot com. But now he is jan. Hi there dan so have you with us. Welcome to the sharm. Hello jenny loved the year with thank you. Now let's just get the geography. say it. I'm in oakland new zealand affect your in california. We are in california is. I'm in southern california at los angeles and san diego and over to palm springs. So that's my that's my area. Look you're a usa today. Be selling off with multiple series as well as stand up historical fiction and nonfiction to you quit it you really what other people would say is the complete off the package but they always loved to now to get started on. That right oregon. This you know. I think it began as terminal. I was always an avid reader. And i began to ride as a young girl too fast. Forward a few years. I studied at the university of california in los angeles their writers program and went for my as well but after that shortly after i really began my pursuit of his career. And although i did a few of the things in the interim well and some authors while they might start young. I really am glad that my books came out a little bit later. Because i was able to to bring in such a wealth of experience that i've had so that's given me stories that i can mind minium and now you latest historical fiction. You've done the standalone historical as well as the series that the latest star ical that you publishing at the moment is the chocolate chocolate chocolate here. Here's and it's a jew timelines story between postwar. Us and especially with the mindlessly twisty emotional plod really does keep you on the edge of your seat. A newly widowed war bride discovers that the man that she married just almost immediately after the war wayne neighbor thinks either she suddenly discover. She knows very little about him when he dies suddenly now. Don't give away any points. But it's a great platform to lord to story from or will thank you. It was such a a delightful novel to ride and of course research as well as you can imagine that particular one i wrote for my editor in germany. Oldman people ask will do write a german. No i don't but it's translated by historical are translated into quite a few languages but the a tier was one that i've been dying to ride for a long long time and i saw that as really the third in my what i call my sensory collection from the perfumer that of triumph to the winemakers to chocolate tier. And all of these are based on your of nature. You wind chop perfume. These all emanate from our earth. And i just. I love writing about agriculture and beloved sherie goods that we think of these as that we bring forward and so this particular one starts under the aguirre deli sign in san francisco the the brilliant sign. Which was there during the the fifties when this when this begins and then from there a mall the beautiful shores of amalfi just lovely lovely area the italy and then of course antic readers on mountain track in peru loved researching it and i had the opportunity to me ten learn from venezuelan chocolatier. Who's living in san diego co founder of chew well witches atlas on chocolate. That's actually gone very very wind here in the states. And then of course. French bell rona bow rona invited me in to meet with a trio of peruvian ca cal farmers so i was able to do some marvelous marvelous firsthand research there and several others so it was just a wonderful experience and there is a family secret at the heart of that as there is in so many of my books i love that bit of mystery. History family secrets. I love to write about saga to get the immigrants story about what we what what a character might have left behind in the old country and back. Then you know it's easier before we had facebook following his around the world. It was easier to to go to another country into recreate yourself. Well whatever you left behind. Does that have a bearing on the future. And as you'll see in many of my books. The answer's yes indeed. Yeah that's great. I was going to call me and tell them the family secret. We all love family secrets. Actually we just find them irresistible and practically every family has them no maybe to a greater or lesser degrade. A number of your books are sit in the fifties and sixties. And you say that you particularly loved that era. What's the attraction view of that time period. you know. I think that my mother and my grandmother. I remember their stories of those periods of time. When other she was married in the forties. My father was a pilot based in newfoundland and used to ferry planes from north america to england via greenland and so i really have a fascination with that period so many my books. Fifty zero flashback to the twenties of forties simpler time in many ways but also because of the lack of communication. You know and it was often easy to lose track people. I think that's often very good plot. Twist as well but it was a time when women were were really. On the emergence there was a seismic cultural shift going on while the men were away at war. You know the women were were working. They were holding down the forward they were and then afterwards either through circumstance or choice you know. Many of them continued in the workforce and laid the groundwork for where we are today. So i write about women who were very very determined who creative but to are and who are resilient and they're forging their own so that's what you'll fund in a common thread throughout all my votes. Yeah yeah you've got a new historical coming out next month. I think which sounds. just fantastic. Hip burns nicklaus. It's cold and it's based around the state of the classic nineteen fifty three hepburn movie roman holiday. That's that's a classic film. How did you research that run. What attracted you georgia as a as a story idea. Oh well it was. One of my favorite movies has been for many years. And i grew up in texas and i and the which school in boston and moved to los angeles and my husband. At the time i've been husband was his family was from los angeles and had been very immersed in the film industry so they counted a lot of people as friends the marx brothers frank sinatra like name dropping. But but this was just you know they were their neighbors and friends and you know club members and so and they were you know they were hard working entertainers at that time. And so i got to know in here. A lot of the stories. And they knew william wyler the director of the film and the reload of stories about audrey hepburn who was just one of the most charming kind souls and of course she had been through so much during during the war and she was a ballet dancer which i was also brought up dancing. My mother was in the houston. Ballet studied under the great cutoff. Ski from belarus who also trained gene kelly. So they're all these connecting threads and you used to have these plans to stein ballet performances where she would raise money for the resistance and people. they couldn't clap. And the you know. They're very silent. And and i thought about you know the kind of person the kind of young girl who would do that. She was barely a teenager time and then as she went on through live her humanitarian. Were all of it. I i just. I've always thought of her. Such a ray of sunshine and so to write about her was such a joy but the story isn't about her. It's about another actress. Ruby raines who is from texas and my first texas heroin so she was very very close to my heart and the story begins on the set of roman holiday on a scorching summer in nineteen fifty two in rome That was the first film. American film filmed entirely in rome in italy and so it was quite the happening in rome. You can imagine. And then in the present day. I bring it back to an older ruby and her great niece of grozny's and i take them from los angeles palm springs to lake como lago di which is just one of my most favorite places on earth beautiful beautiful area so that story was although it was conceived prior to the pending a great deal of the writing took place at that time and i i think i call these my pandemic books some of these and i really wanted to make these extra heart and that's kind of befitted. I can't wait to sherve fans gorgeous. You've asleep. grieved lit one of your christmas books. Seabreeze christmas from the febreeze in series be included in a trump dice for christmas giveaway Delighted about that. Heavy britain christmas stories before. No this is actually my first one and so there. I was by the pool in los angeles sipping my hot chocolate and listening to christmas music. And then i'd take a break and take a dip in the pool such fun. It reminded me of you know. There's an old story about white business. That was the song which was written by the pool in makita california or arizona depending which story maybe both but i i just love it and i've had so much positive responsible readers on and i'm already planning one for next year as well. I think christmas stories really touch on hearts our memories. You know how we wish life would be old. So there's so. Many cherished memories of people have associated with the holidays and suspiciously so the sierra isn't a feeling of wanting to somehow grab back some of that warm secure feeling that we used to have before the pandemic struck. Yes and we will have again. I'm sure yeah. Yeah so tell us a bit about now you'll series to see series for example how to what was the genesis for that well. I was walking on the beach in southern california by one beach. I like in particular moonlight beach. Which is very much a family sort of beach. And north san diego county inside nita's and i a walked on the beach and his dream trying to plot and dream of stories as i often do and i thought well. Why don't i just set one right here right in my own backyard and in this one i also aged up my hair ones so in my historical 's my hair ones are often in their mid to late twenties early thirties but i always have very strong secondary characters so the in the winemaker for example the is just as much of a heroin as the daughter is the story revolves around but in this one i wanted to age her so she forty five. She's newly widowed. She's every woman. As i say she's every woman she's has a little bit of a muffin top around the middle and she doesn't really care as long as she's healthy and strong. Should you know. She accepts her aging and she has two daughters one in college. Bit spoiled another one just out of college and so these are things that you know. So many of my friends have dealt with. I've dealt with and the sandwich generation you know between are grown children and our parents and in the story should begins very worried about her mother but her mother is a very vibrant seventy something and her parents and and so i love this one i bring in the whole family and she has a sister a very a very artsy sister. She's a horticulturist ivy's art teacher so these women it's really about them recreating their lives in midlife and those choices sometimes there once we make other times they're forced upon us and so i wanted to follow to women who are recreating their lives and the backdrop is this historic house and it was designed by the first licensed. Female architect in california julia. Morgan who also important work up and down the coast of california but the house is just as much a character in these stories because the former owner was an art collector and from europe. And so what sets these beach stories apart from others. I think in that readers have gravitated toward is that there's a lot of history and mystery in the two. they're not mysteries but there is there some discoveries. Let's say they go. Yeah that's what. I really enjoyed bringing by historical background into these stories. So did does that has actually exist. No no it doesn't nor does summer beach. Unfortunately i had people googling. I really want to visit summer. Beach is it and it's it was really a mashup between la hoya in sanita laguna beach but there are a lot of older homes that are built along the california coast that drew inspiration. I've actually i haven't finished the first. But it's a very intriguing beginning. I always loved beginning sway. Somebody's husband dies and discovered that the done a whole lot of things. They had no idea about she. Actually inherits that has from husband's estate out even realizing that he board it doesn't say yes drained their retirement canal. Unfortunately this is a a story that has happened before. so yeah. that's right every woman's nightmare. Probably celebs. i'm sure it's going to. I haven't i don't know quite how it turns out it because i'm not finished at Scott a great beginning. Well i is Very resourceful in very resilient and nothing. Nothing holds her down so and just like the heroine self you at the series which i became quite addicted with undug confess to you that i listen to them through the night on audio on more than one occasion the loved california series which they rather more tape pray and young women and more racy probably in terms of the lives that they leave because content precision a group of entrepreneurial woman who are all looking for both business and love kind of parallel stamps in industries. Like curve. yemin skin-care basham so this plenty of chances are really sebescen. See savings than than and say shops. Have you been have you been asked for any more of as quite addictive ball. Yes yes i have and as with seabreeze. The summer beach series. That started off as a trilogy and then readers wanted more. So i was. I was thrilled to should go at the acceptance and to be able to go back into that world and ride again so from three to five now. The coral cottage is also set in several beach and i have merged the characters so one of the women in coral cottage is. Ib bay's best friend from seabreeze in so there is still some interaction. Very much like debbie. Mccumber does in her world is so. I really enjoyed that. And so the love california series that stands at six books right now and i may add another special to that again if i hear from readers that they're enjoying it then. It's something that. I'll go back to. But guess i have. I really enjoyed writing that series as well that that series follows very much my own experiences moving to los angeles as a young woman. You know looking for ambition and and looking for a new life and and many of my friends in in los angeles are in the creative feels. As i was myself. I have a background in beauty industry. And i created a couple of touchscreen technologies that i eventually sold a sephora but that took me around the world i started. The company created along with a team of software. Developers created this. It's called the fragrance. I q and skin. I q and i ended up selling that to sephora. But before i sold the company i had in sephora stores in europe and the us in the duty free stores and hong kong and the middle east and stall over so that was my life for a while and it was a lot of fun. A lot of hard work in these glamour's industries and look like so much fun on the outside but really on the inside. It's a lot of word is so i as i was flying. You know transatlantic transpacific flights. I can only watch so many movies. And i had a hard time sleeping on the plane bedtime so i would pull out my notebook and start writing. And that's where many of these stories grew from so one thing about the left california series. Two is each book now. It's those are stand. Boats unlike the seabreeze seabreeze the summer beach. Which is a longer running series. These are stand alone us starting with flawless and each one of those. I take the readers on a journey so it might be paris or spain sydney monaco. You'll get front row seats. At new york's fashion week or or the formula one races monte-carlo run. And so i just i just love that. You know it's fun. It's all the fun things that we want to do in life but at the heart of each one of these stories is a woman's journey and in each one of those stories. Her dream is dashed. Say too much but you know life doesn't always turn out the way we plan but it's what we do. After that that i think is the interesting story. So each one of these women go on a journey and come out the other end really with the life. It may not be the like. They wanted in the beginning. But it's the life that they embrace. It's the life that they were meant to have. So i i do believe in a bit of qismat as well. And that's at the heart of middle of those stories. Craig fundamentally it's interesting. How often kids mccown's up in the make sure. Yeah yeah this is a wonderful communist skype glamour on the mood to. I think it's it's nice like it's it's a reflection back to the sort of jacqueline susan. All those types of stories as nut but refrained for the twenty first century. Yes while i grew up reading. Oh you know. A lot of jackie collins and danielle steele. I think our airplane reads j conran. Yes yes yes. It was great fun. But i think some that really touched my heart. Barbara taylor bradford a woman of substance remains one of my all time favorite books in heroin. Imahara to you know is determined and will stop at nothing. So so what was the books that you first published weeded. You begin with your publishing janey. Oh yes that was. It came out. I as sent of triumph and although the original name was the perfumer and i've just recently gone back to that. I'll explain that in a minute but the this particular book was born. Well as i mentioned. I spent quite a few years in the beauty business. And so my research i i wrote a book called fabulous fragrances. Years ago back in the nineties and that book paved the way for this technology that i created for the beauty industry and so in the course of that. I was researching all of these old brands. That are still with us today. Many of them. Chanel stay lauder a rubinstein. How did they get their start with these. Were these were big brands of the time. These were stopped by women and they restarted at a time. When when there weren't many women in the industry and there was one really fascinated to with the world war two period and what happened to the tour industry in paris at the time most of them closed their doors and we all know now that chanel closed her at talamante moved into the ritz and their books about that and she does make a cameo appearance in in the perfumer but i was fascinated by a particular woman german sunday and she was a perfumer. Now remember to at the time in the forties. It was a man's world in perfumery and was very rare for women should be perfumers and but she was and she created perfumes for a couture year a rebecca p gay and he was head of the forget the name of it but head of the professional society at that time during world war two and he stayed in business and was trying to keep jobs in paris during the war. He you know all the seamstresses lace and all of the of the bead work all of those people employed and at the meeting and nazis were trying to move the consumer industry to berlin which is still a fashion center but but they succeeded in in keeping many of people in paris anyway. I was fascinated by all. This sale as perfumes are still around today. Franca and van de franca from nineteen. Forty eight bandy. From forty four from the height of the war and so. I was really inspired by this. And i said my heroine has got to be a french perfumer and it's got to be during world war two and i had some personal knowledge of what things that people had gone through during the war. My family and so. I thought this this is the book. This is one that i. I felt that that was the book. Even though had written a couple of others. I felt that that was the one that would have a chance. And it did A senior editor at saint martin's press acquired it and that it went on to be published in many languages as well and that was truly a book of my heart that was probably fifteen years in the making and after that they acquired another book the winemakers and that one of course set in california and napa valley during the nineteen fifties so another very strong female protagonist and those those books were absolute joys to. It's great so you started out. In the standalone historical so name graduated to the series. A little later. Yes yes i do. pity move onto talking a little bit about your wide a career rather than focusing just on the books themselves is one thing that you feel. You've done more than any other that you see as the secret of your success in your longevity as arriva the main thing is that i just i never stops persevered and even as an adult the having manuscripts that i would send out and pitch just over and over again but each time i did. I learned something from it and you know Sent a triumph. The perfumer was fifteen years in the making but at the beginning of that time it was nowhere near publication so each time i submitted i learned something about the craft and i continued going to writers conferences and just getting to know other. Riders ended. It truly is crafted took. It took a long time for me to to reach publication. But i too. I wasn't ready in my own life and we each following a different path. So i'm very pleased with. I wouldn't change a thing so you'll republishing. That book show is set. Yes he wanted. The early part of this year. I noticed that it had fallen out of paperback and cover publication and so my contracts. And when i this is just a note to riders. That when i went into those contracts i have very very good agent and there was a clause put in there that i would the rights would revert to me if sales of the of the print versions fell below a certain level. And so i exercised that. And i brought those back. Because by then i felt very confident in the reader base that i had developed and i knew that there was still a market for it. People were reaching out to me all the time asking you if where they could find it in print and so i said well you know. I think i can manage that. And so i brought those back. And they've sold more just this fall than than they had. The last couple of years with saint martin's breads. And you know i left saint martin's i had an excellent excellent editor there. But you know we can. We can do more now. So i'm i'm really a hybrid author. I still have a publisher in germany. Random house goldman. But i keep those domestic rights and i may go to publishers so and then happily the winemakers as been optioned for a television series. Now oh yeah. I mean net period. Now i mean particularly paris in the second world. War does lots of people doing stories based around that sitting the efficient industry during the and the and they're all great to read. So i think that actually the time is probably even riper for that but now than it was when you first handled right very true in fact when i first began pitching that book it was before the huge popularity in recent years of woodward to saugus. Yeah and i remember one of the first agents. I approach said that's just a dead period in history when reads world war two sagas. There's no market for it and of you know trends changed as a writer. It's important to be on top of those trends but also to write. You know the books that you feel like you're meant ride professional rider. Yes we do. Pay attention with them. Yeah yeah turning to janice vida. This is the joys of binge reading we like to cater to people who enjoy genre fiction and introduced the them to new office that they might not have heard of. I mentioned you have in the past. Peter binge reader even if you don't have much time to bench wade now but so. Who do you like to read. Who have you liked to meet in the past. And can you recommend some favorites. Oh yes you know as a child. I didn't realize i was well. It's an avid reader. But i was truly a series reader. I remember there was paul Series called the happy about an american family. And i just i. I had a an indulgent grandmother. And i think. I must have spent twenty or thirty of these books. They just went on and on. And i just loved being in that world and so yes. I was an early early series and binge reader today out you know. I've mentioned barbosa. Bradford on love her series ellen hildebrand for beach for women's beach fiction. I read her winter series in the paradise series. Those are excellent other readers. I admire allison pataki. Who has written a couple books not exactly serious but they are in in a way the accidental empress and and see cpoe about cece and then now well search for historical. Joe paul. lauren will lake kate. Quinn of course. Fiona davis writes very stylish. Nineteen fifties books. A lot of them said into your fifties and sixties berry interesting and then there's some other independent authors very very top-selling pamela. Kelly rachel hannah k. Corral women's fiction series and. I really enjoy those books and i enjoyed working with them to their friends and so we have a great deal of fun together. It's fantastic fianna. Dives actually being on the show greg. Yeah look circling around because we asked telling to run out of time to give at the stage. If you do anatole again. Is there anything you changed. And if it is what would obey. Oh you know looking back over live as anyone. I've had a lot of challenges. But honestly i don't think i would change of thing because every challenge i've learned something i've learned and grown and i wouldn't be the woman i am today. Had i not had those challenges. So i could say oh. I wish i published earlier in life. I wish i had as many books out. Is you know. Pick someone danielle steele. But you know we all have our own journey. And as long as i am reaching readers. And i'm hearing from. I'm loved to hear readers. I get the sweetest stories. And and from people who said that their books of have helped them during particularly difficult times. And especially this year more than ever you know. I think that. I have a facebook readers group and i have a newsletter that goes out and and i share bits and pieces of my personal life or recipes my basil recipe. I had a fabulous crop. This season. basil tomatoes tomatoes. I just i love to to interact with readers. And i feel like this is our world are thing we've created. And what does your next twelve months. Your flight were you badly impacted by the pandemic engine and how you place for the next twelve months and terms of the projects you've got. Oh yes well you know. Knock wood i. We've been my family's been healthy and those friends and extended family members who have who have gone through. Covid have come out fine So you know. I'm i'm so thankful i am sheltering in place quite a bit so i'm not getting out much but then i was always a fan of home delivery groceries and so i have been staying at home. I happened riding an awful lot so this has been a very very productive year. coming up. hepburn's necklace. Were just on the eve of that now. Very excited to share that and then i have the coral cafe coming out in the summer beach world and seabreeze wedding not telling us getting married but or if they are but we'll see what happens and i have some other plans for another historical and possibly another series but all of that still in development at this point and another christmas book for sure great. That's wonderful tell me do you do you. White through a series of the go onto the exterior do job them around a bit Good question typically. I will write start to finish however with the summer beach series. I started that one at the seabreeze breeze. In and then i jumped over to coral cottage. And now i've jumped back so it's all in the same world but typically when i write whether it's a series or a book i'll start and just go start to finish and that's how i write my novel side. I don't bother with editing. I'll turn around. And i'll get that at the end but the most important thing to me is get the story down now. I do love to research so sometimes. It's a little hard to get started to know when to stop researching and windstar story. But once i do. I mentioned that you love to have interaction with you. Readers and we will love the is linked to the places that the readers can find you in the shy nights for the eighth side but just quickly recap where can people find out if they announce district to say to gun. I'm jan moran dot com. And then i am on facebook as the jim moran author or jan marin books and then i have a facebook group as well that you can just tap on the door and i'll let you in. I have a newsletter. That goes out monthly just once a month. Generally and you've i'm by everyone in. You'll find me a little bit too on twitter or instagram. I keep up a bit there. I'll check in to. Yeah i just. I love to to hear from people and i. I invite everyone over for a cup of tea or a cocktail and we'll watch the sunset together now and the good story. It's great i nine to stone. The seabreeze book referred to watching the sunset. Go down the green flash now. I thought that was wonderful. Because i used to live on a whiskered speech a new zealander we used to sit on the beach and watch for the green flash. Yes yes i think. That's universally and so having pleaded that. Makoto book and you know the the name comes from a friend from from new zealand. Oh yes yes. She was known for her seabreeze cocktails. Which is ruby red grapefruit. Cranberry juice and up. She used to throw these cocktail parties at sunset and serve seabreezes. And you know we've laughed about that. We've been friends for for decades now and so we've laughed about that alarm and is and so when i was thinking about the name for the book it just naturally came to me that this would be the seabreeze and i have a recipe in. The back of the book is a tried and tested many times. Sounds like something we should try for christmas. Wonderful talking jan. Thank you so much. Thank you jenny. Been such a pleasure. And i can't wait for your next book that suite of your labor of laboratories. Thanks for listening to the joys of venture reading podcast you can find all the details and links this episode at dub dub dub dot the joys of binge reading dot com. We'd love to comments and suggestions for who you'd like us to interview nixed and if you enjoyed the show take a moment to subscribe on. I tunes or a similar provider. So you won't miss out on future guests. Thanks for joining us and happy reading the joys of bench reading. Podcast is put together with fantastic technical help from dan. Cotton and abe raffles. Dan is an experience sound and video engineer. Whose radiant available to help you with your ex project. C- cannot at d. c. audio services at g. out dot com that steve daniel cpa charlie audio services at g. dot com or check casher nights. He's fast he takes pride and getting it right and he's great to work with a voice. I was done by and now the gm of sound screen has twenty years of experience on both sides of the camera slash microphone as a cameraman director and also as a voice artist and tv presenter. I think you'd a grey that. His voice is both lighthearted warm. He is super easy to work with. No matter what the job you'll find him at a b. ch point and shoot dot card dot indeed as i say the full details in the shine arts on the website. That's it for now. Thanks for listening. Hopefully see you next week

california los angeles summer beach jan moran jeannie wheeler sherie rona bow rona rome Ruby raines los angeles palm springs lake como lago di texas southern california north san diego county paris san diego facebook sanita laguna beach italy usa
Inside Liya Kebede's Social Mission | Inside Fashion

The Business of Fashion Podcast

41:54 min | 2 years ago

Inside Liya Kebede's Social Mission | Inside Fashion

"This episode of insight fashion is brought to you by nets. We'd which empowers fashion companies to deliver a strong Omni channel, customer experience while streamlining back into operations, visit WWW, dot net, sweet dot com. Slash b. o. f. to learn more. I stay water. How did that feel was a big deal in the sense because I was the first block face that they are actually had in their in their brand campaign. There was a historical, it was historical moment. Yeah, you go from being just a model to being a role model? Yes. Yeah. So how does running a company like lamb lamb differ from your conventional fashion startup. I reason for existing is the social impact. The idea of empowering people giving jobs to people so that they can empower themselves and become independent, and then it's sustainable for me was something that clicked. I always knew that I'm going to what I did. There would be an aspect of me that would give back. Hi, this is Imran Ahmed, founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the latest episode of inside fashion on the podcast. This week, I have the pleasure of sitting down with a supermodel. The name Leah cabaret has been known to the fashion industry for many years, but her journey into the fashion world is much less known this week. I sit down to learn about how she started out in Ethiopia, moved to Paris, and then Chicago and finally landed in New York where she has resided up until this day. Leo was one of the first block models to storm the catwalks, and it was really interesting to sit down with her to learn her point of view on how the catwalks are changing, embracing more people of color. She was also the first block face of Estee Lauder, and has been doing some incredibly important work with the World Health Organization and to top it all off his launched her own brand out of THEO Pia called Leme lamb. So join me in welcoming, Leah, Quebec inside fashion. Competit- nice to meet you. Nice to see you. We're in this like slightly echoey room. So hopefully the sound is okay at New York. Fasching. MC is happening all around us that is true or at spring place, but this conversation has nothing to do with fashion make, which is kind of nice. It gives me a little break and I really excited to talk to you because been reading about your company online that you've started several years ago. Now in all the world work you've been doing as a role model, not just as a fashion model, but before we get into those topics, I just wanted to learn a little bit about, you know how you first landed in this crazy world called fashion. How long ago was that now that you started in this business? Well, it's been the real, like I want to say pref- yoga, you know, it's been like twenty years. Twenty years. Yeah. And just kind of what's every model has the discovery story? What's yours? I don't particularly have a discovery story actually, but I started modeling when I was in Ethiopia in high school because you wanted to. Yeah, pretty much. Yes, because I want to, and it was just the coolest thing to do at school, and there was these fashion shows organized by seniors and we all wanted to be in them and and I was very. I was very skinny going up. And so somehow we all thought, oh, this is par, you know what? I whatever. And and so I was kind of excited about it. And I started modeling in the NATO p and it was really fun, and I really enjoy doing it there because it's basically fashion at that time you need help him. And there was like these two designers and they did maybe one fashion show per year in the Hilton hotel, show fashion show plus dinner. Schumer audience? Yes. Direct to consumer very head of the very head of the times. Yeah. So basically what Tom Ford. You know when you first came back and did that dinner. And of course, this basically what we did which was kind of funny for me to actually do that Tom for show and reminded me of those days except we own hair make up and we bought our own shoes and all this kind of stuff. And it was the same girls and it was really, I think for me growing up moment I was I was quite young then I was like, sixteen, but models were different age. I was the youngest, I think, but then there was like, you know, twenty something thirty something and muddling together. So with really women bonding around some, you know, glamorous thing that really bonded us together was really have really nice memories of that. And so in my mind, I kind of thought, oh, this is what fashion is and obviously realized quickly that it wasn't and that it was actually a proper business and a real. It's a real thing, you know, and I went to, I wanted to go to Paris to try because I was finishing high school. I went to the French lycee. You feel pinata. So for by coins by. Chance. My mom wanted me to do that. And so when I was done with high school at the time NATO pill, all young people wanted to come to America because the promised land, the promised land. So it's funny to be here to now. Yeah, and having those question. But yeah, America was the land of opportunity for everybody, you know. And so and I knew that if I, I state and if you pet, my, I wouldn't have a lot of opportunity to even go to the universities what they're offering, what kind of things you can do was was was not. He was not great, and so I really wanted to go, but my parents can really afford to send me to call in pay tuition all this kind of thing. So I wanted to sort of try in my mind. Always thought locale, just try model. Maybe I can make a little money and then eventually pay for school, and that's sort of how it started. It started. It started in Paris, start in Paris. I went to Paris and had my. First exposure to real fashion, which was very harsh violent, not to remember. This was ninety nine or ninety. Tom Ford is big town. Yes, but I was I had no clue. I know. I know I I was just really like landing place just off the boat, you know? So no, I, I found an agency, not any. It was not easy, and I was going around castings which I didn't even know what so I was. It was my first time doing all of it. Then going to castings where you, I remember I used to go to castings and the there'd be girls three times around the block. All all beautiful. All like I knew and you're like, this is this is not gonna work. This is crazy. It makes no sense. You know. And we had many thousands of cast things and you just go on and you hear known. It's very hard, you know, and and I thought this is crazy. I don't know if this is. I'm going to be able to do this so parish, not great, and it was kind of a flop. And then I, when I came to America to still try and like. Get some kind of footing. So I went to Chicago and got elite models and Chicago, Chicago, because my brother was living in Chicago at the time. And so it was just like, okay at founded it was there. Yeah. So I could stay with him and be with him and everything. And. And I try marketing and it was had spent. I live two and a half years, and Chicago was we were off. The weather was awful, and and it was tough because I was doing like random catalogs here there, and I would have to take the greyhound bus to Wisconsin to do an ad for Kohl's or something. And you're like in the middle. I mean, I'm like from Ethiopia. It's like, this is. It was a little out there and it was hard, you know, at the time as well. I mean it wasn't easy to just, you know, to be a black model either. So what was it like we should talk about? I mean, in Wisconsin and she, you know, black model, catalog work? Yeah. I mean Cadillacs had like, you know, the Tolkien I dunno, they always had, I guess. One by girl. I don't see. I think they did that back then from time to time. So I don't know. Was there were there other leather black models that you looked up to that were successful? Like Naomi Campbell? Yes, but that was when I was THEO based. It'd be like I had, I had a poster of AMI in my bedroom, really? Yeah. Okay. So she was the she smart I had, yeah, I think it was a gap ad or something. There was like cool, black and white picture of her that I had. And I was like, oh, you know. But I mean, but I didn't know what that really meant. To be honest with you now that I think about it, it was just like this. It's like looking at a star and, oh, you know. Oh, sign you her. I knew about Iman, I guess, but that was that was pretty much it to when did. When did you get your big break? How did that happen? I came to New York and and. I got into a tiny agency. Actually, I went to twelve agencies and they all rejected me. And then the last one, which was a tiny legend. See this French lady actually took me in and said, okay, fine. We're going to do this and I thought this nightmare. But she said, no. So I could actually change my entire and forget fashion. And so I was in that latency and I did one fashioned week where I did a show for somehow ended up doing a rough launch thing, which is kind of crazy. I was like, oh, my God is amazing. And James Scully, our friend, James, a friend, James at the time, saw me on that show. I don't know how and put called me in. He was a bizarre by then. Until I wanna meet this gogo and I went to meet him and he's like, oh my God. You're going to be amazing. Have to meet Tom Florida. You have to go to Milan and I'm like, no, no, no, no, there's not going to work and I'm like, are you confirming for the shows like, no, no, no. He's just going to go. You're going to meet him. And if he likes you say he doesn't like you come back like, yeah, no, that's awful who Tom Ford was yes by then I knew who Tom Ford was, but it's like I was like, I don't think I'm ready to like, go all the way to Milan and and like you have to go, you have to, you have to go. And he was really, he was amazing actually, and I went to Alon not knowing if I was going to stay or come back after meeting, Tom, you know, kind of a funny situation and. And I, and I met Tom with Korean. And it was actually was one of the somebody's in. I think meetings I in a way like distant me's or what was then God without me. It's like, I can't even like it was incredible. He was unbelievable. I don't know how to explain. He was just like, so. He's such a genius, you know, and you saw and he breathed it and he lived it and and he was really handsome too. And so she and and really like involved with the call, he come in and fits you himself and and very, very curious about, and it was he was his. It was like, you go into the room and it's like, it's quiet. It's there's like a, there was a thing. You know, there was a real. Why he picked you like why you you passed? What was it about you that he, especially if there were so few block models at the Toyota that were, what was it about you? Did he tell you? I think he said something. Like. I think I don't. I think he said something like there was some sort of expensive look to MIR. Tom Ford now, right? You look expenses, things like that. I think it was because I was walking. I had to try some things on from when I went, and he was like, yeah, okay. I like her and I stayed, and it was everything changed. Not so easily, but that was the beginning. It was the first show like any walked in. It was it was it was Gucci, and it was anything. What did you wear with? Amazing and it was that season with the scarves with the big glasses and and it was really the biggest show obviously, had ever done the most glamorous and at the time really Tom was was the leader. He was at the height of it wasn't. He was at the height of everything, whatever he said, what went, you know? And it was kind of incredible to be around him to work with. See the people running war king and the amount of dedication. They took everything they made. It was really winning, inspiring an incredible. And you know he was he was telling us what sexy was to in, right? But he did it in such an incredible way. Yeah, amazing. So fast forward you your career. Obviously it takes off at one point. You know, you're you're on the models dot com. Like number one on that list get doing on these shows. Then you become the face of Estee Lauder, which is obviously in the modeling industry when you the face of beauty brand, that's like that when the when it really starts to pay. Right. How did that feel? I stay water. I settled it was was was quite a big deal at the time when it happened. First of all, for a model to get a beauty contest is as a really big deal. It's sort of like it gives you a central reston -bility, you know, that's that's wonderful. And then at the same time was a big deal in the sense because I was the first block face that they are actually had in their in their company in them brand campaign. So it was a historical was historical moment. Yeah, it was a really store. KOMO and it came with responsibility and you go from being just a model to being a role model? Yes, yeah, yeah. What was that? Like? I think it's it's, you know, it's, it's, it's strange feeling because you realize that even to at that point today, you're still doing the for, you're still doing something for the first time and you're the first one to do something still, and that's kind of disturbing you know. And I, and the new obviously feel, you know, the responsibility of representing, you know everyone and. It's it's it's a bag of mixed. Prince, two. Did they ever say why they'd never picked a block model before? No, they do not. I think that I, I don't know. No, I think I don't know if they made products for black skin, not sure, right. All of that's changed now, especially right now, if you look at what's happening in the landscape of models and the rising models, the names that are appearing everywhere I do a Cajun on. Okay. I and lots of other amazing, beautiful black women. Is kind must be interesting for you to watch this happening. Go from being one of a very few faces too. You know, if you can, if you look at the magazine covers now, there's a, there's a wider conversation happening around inclusivity in fashion as a big part of that. It's funny because yesterday actually I was at the Tory Burch, oh, and a German journalist came over to me, said Okinawa. Do a quick interview him, I guess. Sure. And he goes. So I just want to ask you a question. How do you feel about all this blog girls on the cover subtly? And I was like. I didn't know we were. We had to answer that question. You know, like really we have to actually answer the question now. Why there's goes on the cover. I don't want, Blake. It's so crazy. I think maybe some people are saying. And I think it's an interesting question and says, like. Is it people perceiving it or treating it like some kind of trend? Or is this a reflection of a more systemic shift? Right. I mean, again, going back to a conversation, I like to think of it as it's a stomach shift because it's not just in fashion. It's really everywhere. It's there's a movement going on. There's a lot of things happening and it's it's it's turning around and I think it's a wonderful. It's a wonderful balance that were that were not balanced yet, but still, you know that that that's happening. And in terms of, you know, I was saying in terms of also the models the, there's a sense of acceptance in inclusivity of the individual person as they are as opposed to you have to look a certain way to fit even if you're don't look, if you're black and you're an enduring, you're showing you're the only black person doing a fashion show you. You still have to fit into looking like. Everyone. You know, it's kind of a strain that was sort of what was one of the youth. The reasons that some fashion designers and casting directors would use just like it doesn't fit the vision. Remember that's kind of a very euphemistic way of saying, well, you know, black people or black skin doesn't or black hair or whatever it might be isn't part of the vision. I mean, yes, and we heard a lot also black girls on covers, don't tell right. That was a big one. Clearly that's not the case, I guess. I guess since both, I don't know vogue and all of them had to Larry's I mean, would I think it's a really positive shift. So if you were, if you were talking to some of these young women who are storming the runways now and kind of at the early stage of their career -ly, what does it take to be a successful model? I know it's changed a lot. Yes, it's changed a lot. It's hard to right now. I wouldn't know how to answer that question because I think that the the requirements have changed. You know, I think that for me, what I saw in my time is is really, you have to work really hard. You have to learn a lot to have to. I was saying, you know, one day it's a model you learn on the job. You hopefully have amazing people who you work with that train you. So who trained you. I got a lot of training from seven myself, and I'm not the only one. I think a lot of girls who've any shot with him all feel the same way. He was incredible. He was an incredible teacher in front of the camera. You know what to do, how your body is what you body should be saying doing. But to the, you know, he's the kind of person who would come and arrange your finger, you know, in a shot and then you'll understand why it makes sense that your finger does that as opposed to something else. And so you know a lot and that's helped. That's helped a lot as opposed to, you know, being in front of me being on set and someone just saying, okay, go and Notre action. No, it's very hard because as in a way that we the models are the outsiders on every shoot. What are the ones that you what's happening? We can't see what's happening and we're the ones we change. You know, most of them were contained so that's the same people. And you're the one who's the girl is always the one that changes. So you're kind of always the outsider, so it's an uncomfortable space, you know. And so it's. All those things you have to learn. Yeah, I'm sure there's a lot of luck. Yeah, I have to say you don't know why, why her and whatnot. Why? You know it's just I, it's hard. That's a, it's a difficult one to answer. So at some point over the course of this stratospheric success and multiple covers of vogue, and I stay Lauder contract and knoround though previously, essay Lauder. Now, Lauria right beauty contracts. You started doing other things that have basically nothing to do modeling. It's something that I think many people with a platform now doing which is taking up causes or becoming activists or whatever it might be. But back back when you started taking on some of these causes, for example, the World Health Organization, you know, that was kind of unusual. What, what drew you to these kinds of endeavors in the first place? So you were a mom and you have had a busy career. So why did you feel compelled to take the time to do other things. I think it's sort of. A lot of it has to do with me going up and really growing up, you know, seeing poverty all around and understanding. You know the difference life that people live and and and the different access and opportunities that people get depending on where you're born and at the at the same time. Also it's anyth- European. I mean, it's a cultural thing to helping is really part of the culture. I saw my mom, you know, taking people all the time and feeding people and always kind of thing. There's there's the sense of giving us part of a gratefulness in to all the things that you are lucky enough to have that. I think. I always. Knew that Indian even growing up in Ethiopia, that no matter what I did, there would be an aspect of me that would give back, you know. And I didn't really know though, in which way in which capacity, what platform, which cause and all those things. And when the time I had had my son already and I had my son in New York, I was pregnant and delivered in New York City hospital and had the most incredible care. No, and all my checkups and all the sonograms and an I was given a little note with, you know what the gender was, and I decided not to open until the last day and all these amazing things. I felt really safe and my doctor was incredible. I saw all the time. I mean, it was an incredible process. I mean, giving birth is an incredible moment in women's life and. When the WHO came and wanted me to be involved in trying to raise awareness around the death of mothers during pregnancy and childbirth moments in most diff, developing countries like Ethiopia, which growing up from me, it was a real. It was a real thing. Women die in childbirth was very common and I real sort of every time you heard, oh, so we're going to deliver. Everybody was like, okay, people were worried always, and it was common to me that and but I, I think we I wasn't educated enough in most of us to know why there's no dying. We thought it was just on my God. This is killing. Yeah, yes. It's one of the risks. But then I realized when I came here and I work with a ritual, I learned that actually women were dying because they have no access to basic healthcare basic, not basic medical care, basic, you know, not a doctor, not a clinic, NADA place to deliver your your. A child. If you if you hemorrhage, if your babies too big, you can't Kendra surgery. If you have an infection, it's all in all these things that are completely treatable or preventable anywhere that's in the western world. She want to call it in a in a place like Africa in the poorest nations, those things kill you. And so also a basic education around. Active health and attornal house? Yes. So what give us an example of the kind of basic knowledge that women in these countries don't have about healthcare? I mean, I don't think that they know that there's dangers when you're pregnant that there's dangerous from day one, right? There's a risk always and the best way to prevent that risk is by being ahead of it and the way you were head of it is by going to in those cases, maybe a health care attendant or skill care attendance or a health worker and staying on top and her staying on top of you check your pregnancy seeing if things. Okay. Are you a twist? Would you be one whom I have an infection or is your baby going to be too big if your body's too narrow, or are you gonna have blood pressure? All those things can be prevented. If you know, had an event most Lewin in those in third world countries, they go to the doctor if there is doctor to go to, if there is a hospital that can reach when they're delivering their child. In a hut probably with no water? No, not just starts with the delivery it there is. No, there is. There is no, yes, exactly. There is none of the prenatal that whole nine months is there's nothing. They just arrived at other livery and even delivery snow a delivery. It's when you deliver goes wrong, right? That's when you go all my God. What do we do? Let's go to the hospital by then it's too late. So most of them end up either dying on the way or dying when they get the or their child dies when it gets too late. So even the even the the, the, the idea for them about going to a hospital has a negative connotation because they're always go to late. And so the result is always negative, right? So that education has to change and, and women have to, you know, be educated to know they have to the work that you're doing its basics cle- now. So we worked a lot with. The idea of helping train midwives, warm advice, more skill attendants, giving ex- so women have more access to to the right people at the right time so that they can get educated, they can do their parental checkups and when they are ready for delivery, they have skilled midwives as opposed to, for example, the neighborhood midwife who has delivered children, but hasn't really been educated. I don't want to bring that down, but the risks are really high, you know, and and so we're trying to change that and and help have more and more midwives out there in the world. We work with that. We'd amazing condition called 'em ref, and they've sent the school they want to. They want to train thousands and thousands of midwives, and just sort of put them out into the world. And they say that one midwife can help five hundred women a year. That's a lot. You know. So just by helping one midwife be trained, you're helping hundreds of women in their delivers on their babies and generations and stuff like that. So the idea of investing in women in that way is really is a is a is a good investment. Amazing. And on one of the trips to Ethiopia and your discovered another opportunity to give back to your home country and this led to the creation of this business Leme, lem, which I think means bloom to blue. Miss this and if European, I'm happy Harvick. And when we when I lived with my Ethiopian roommate in Boston, he always kept better better in the fridge and better. And he a better. Try to understand the reds, the red red, the red powder powder, and he put it on everything. So he told me about, I'm Hari this food. Yeah, yeah. But back to the topic at hand, you went, you went home and you decided to get involved with artisans as well. Yes, yes. I think you know, again, it's this that sort of came about because working in fundraising and financial and you quickly realize how difficult it is to sustain from entrepot to sustain a, how do you make eight sustainable? You know, it's a very difficult thing. And so the idea of. Actually empowering people giving jobs to people so that they can empower themselves and become independent, and then it's sustainable for me was something that clicked when I saw that. And I thought this is the way this is a really good way to give back that sustainable that can carry on forever. And you make a religion about acidy building skill, building skill, building capacity, building, it's employment, earning money themselves. It's a profitable business model that is, has all the social impacts that you want, you know. So how does your so you know, lots of I meet with lots of people who launch fashion companies, fashion businesses, it's part of my regular gig, but how does running accompanying like a lamb lamb? Do you think differ from your conventional fashion startup. I mean, because it's a social impact business. The the first, the first reason for existing is the social impact. And then it's about also really preserving the autumn artisans and the work that they do. And and because what was happening was all these incredibly gifted artisans did not have jobs. There were just living in poverty, and the art of of of weaving was dying, which me as a nation kind always been closed by these people, and then suddenly westernization and all these kind of different things come up and people are just wearing t-shirts and jeans and and not wearing the clothes anymore. So all these people were in poverty looking for jobs and not really having a place for for what they were doing. So the idea of transforming that giving them a platform where they can exercise their beautiful hunt, you know craft and they're beautiful talent. And at the same time we're making an imp-. Packed on their lives. You know, their wages have increased five times. As we started, we've imp- weren't playing two hundred fifty craftsman, which is incredible, and it's amazing, and and when you meet them when you go and you see the impact that you're having, not because you made a government but own around it. And it's not just because also even the way we make the garment for them. You know, we're kind of it's a, it's a, it's a marriage because we take what they do. We give them an some sort of influence and direction of way of looking at things differently than they did before. So then the whole thing comes together and they're so proud and they're so happy and they love that. They've evolved also in the way they look at, you know how they look at on how they look a products and thinking that there's a woman in New York City walking around wearing what I made by by hand because they're sitting there, weaving it by hand, you know. So it's kind of incredible. So how did you watch? I mean, what did you launch with and what was your first? It was kids. Okay. I started with kids because I thought it'd be really lovely for mothers to. By handmade beautifully, made clothes for the children and their weaving cotton or what? Yes. So it's it's, it's it's cotton that you we've by by hand an on them. And at first we only had white cotton because we used whatever's available only locally and the now evolved if so, we get calms import cotton and they're reading it and we try wall and weaving which Kashmir it's kind of amazing. So we've you're building a home news? Yeah, when building? Yeah, we're building and it's been. It's been an incredible, incredible ride. So tell me about the scale of operation today. You said you have two hundred and fifty artisans, but like where do you sell the product? You know we. So, I mean, we sort of design everything here and everything is made there, and then we sell everywhere. We sell pretty much online obviously. But then we're at net a porter at Barney's. We're shop of where in Europe as well and in Paris and London, we shot an all the all the all the good stores where where do you see going from here? This business? What's your master plan? I want this to be. A global lifestyle, sustainable luxury brand made an Africa. You know, I feel we're, I feel like I want us to be the bad, you know, sort of like really celebrating the work in the artisanry of African. Talents all across the continent and bringing that forward and having that being celebrated and and and do something. You know, I feel like. We're doing something new and I want us to really grow and really become an example for. This luxuriance African Brent. It's a real contradiction in terms in terms of the way, many people think about Africa, right? Luxury and Africa aren't often words people would put taking over, and a lot of people are now talking about Africa manufacturing that session, not just in fashion, but across the continent, as labor becomes more and more expensive in Asia as people think about proximity to Europe. There's a lot a lot of opportunity to create things, not just fashion, but also fashion in Africa, where do you see that as a something about it? If that's hard, it's a mixed feeling about. Yeah. So tell me why I. I mean, because on one hand, of course, I want that to happen because I think it will be a way of really creating industries in really employing a lot of people and hopefully changing. The lives of many, many, many people at the same time. It's hard because we have really seen places where that has happened, where the people Rini flourished. So it's a because you don't just want. I don't just want Africa to be seen as a place where you're just manufacturing low cost things. That's not my golfer for the. For the continent. I want it to be a place where you can actually manufacture incredibly incredibly high end fashion things. You know, not just no cost. So that's. Maybe both will exist. Ideally, that's what I, you know, I want is more and more of people like me come in also and really. Help the continent flourish and not just be a low cost manufacturing place. Yeah. I recently met with a an activist who. She's on the cover of our new print issues coming up, and her name is Koponen actor and she said she was a garment worker in Bangladesh. It's starting at the age of twelve. And so she and I spent a lot of time talking about kind of this mixed feelings that you have. Because on the one hand, it creates so much economic opportunity and for people who haven't spent time in some of these developing countries and really understand the level of poverty around like having a job. This is a big deal. I think, what what's really missing in the way that western companies work in these low cost countries is really thinking about the people who make the clothes and the the wages and the conditions and the treatment that they got. Right. So I don't necessarily see it as a bad thing to create low cost things in Africa, but it must be done in a way that's respectful of the people. And I think that's a mistake that's been. That's happened in Cambodia and in Vietnam bungalow fashion, you know, I guess that's a risk enough for guys, well, it's a rescue, that's a risk, and that's I hope we don't fall into that, but I totally agree with you. I understand the meaning of getting a job from people and but there's a risk and it would be nice if we avoid the same things that has happened somewhere. We learn from it and make a better situation as opposed to just go in for the low cost, you know, and encourage other people who want to actually promote also high end things and the artisans work, and you know kind of thing so that they can both both flourish. So if someone's listening to this conversation, they want to hear and we have listeners all over the world. Some are in the fashion industry others aren't, but if they want to get involved or understand better, the African opportunity for manufacturing, beautiful things, what should they do? Where should they start here? We'll be. I'd give out your Email address to hundreds of thousands of, you know, I mean, I think you know, I think. I mean, I mean, they, I mean, it's. The information is out there. So it's not really that difficult, but we, you know, we work a lot in Ethiopia with with artisans and the and our weavers, but we've really expanded also our work to include other different countries. Like I told you, we work in Kenya. We do a lot of cut them. So in Kenya, we explored working with people in Rwanda, and we work in different in different places Africa's huge and really big. And so I'm trying to understand the what each country can give is quite is quite a process. But I think that at the same time, there's so much talk around Africa being the new place where there's a lot of return for your investment. It's it's been like everywhere. Now everybody's talking about if European being one, big one of them. Also there's so many industries that are just, you know, r Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Ghana. Yeah. So there's there's a lot of interest anyway towards Africa, so it's it's kind of a, it's kind of a good moment and you know, and they're and they're also moving their moving in. They're also doing lots of different things. There's like fashion weeks everywhere. Now over there as well. And designers are coming out of, you know, from different places as well. And so it'd be nice if there was like a a sort of a CFDA type of thing that can put all those things together and help and support and really create a real industry there, which I think I don't see why we wouldn't deserting to form. I think, you know, I think like what I see and when I'm interacting with people from the fashion industry in Africa, you really get a sense of momentum. There's a momentum. Yes. It'll be really interesting to watch both on the manufacturing side and also on the consumption side how the dynamics and begin to shift as more people enter the workforce. And become educated and get jobs and participate in the global economy, but also participant in the fashion economy. Well, thank you very much. Yeah, that was that was really interesting the tour of your career, but also. A tour of the day African opportunity and. You know if anyone wants to learn more about limb limb should go, no website go on the website. Is it Len limb dot com? Says this. Have a look, beautiful handmade clothes made an atheist and Kenya and other places. And you know my families also from east Africa. So I understand exactly what that craftsmanship. There's really amazing. Sometimes it just needs to sign and guidance and it can. They can create incredible things. So checkout Leme, lamb dot com. And thank you for chatting with me. I am run Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion tune in for another episode inside fashion. Soon, we'll take you on a tour somewhere else. Very special. Very sing. Thank you. Thank you. Bye. If you're interested in the business of fashion, you may also want to know about our daily digest newsletter each morning, hundreds of thousands of people around the world wake up to this newsletter, which is your free essential daily briefing on everything going on in the fashion world everywhere. So if you'd like to sign up for this newsletter, please visit business a fashion dot com. Slash newsletter.

Ethiopia Africa founder and CEO Tom Ford Paris Chicago New York Estee Lauder Tom World Health Organization Imran Ahmed NATO Leah cabaret New York City Hilton hotel Kenya Wisconsin WWW Leo Schumer
Adriana Cisneros, CEO of Cisneros: "I think when you have a crisis... it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what matters to the core of [a] business and rethink it.

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:03 min | 1 year ago

Adriana Cisneros, CEO of Cisneros: "I think when you have a crisis... it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what matters to the core of [a] business and rethink it.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I think when you have a crisis like the one we're having right now. It is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what really matters to the core of that business and we think I'm carly's aged. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. This show might sound a bit different today. Because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is working from home for the time being because of covert nineteen today Adriana Cisneros joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the CEO OF CISNEROS. A Global Enterprise focused on media digital advertising real estate and social leadership. Adriana is the third generation at the helm of her family's company she's also the president of whom does Jones is narrows her family's nonprofit organization dedicated to improving education in Latin America Adriana. Were very excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm thrilled to be here. So we are going to jump in like we do all episodes. GotTa give me your estimate for us. So I grew up in Venezuela. That's where I was born and went to school in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I moved to New York. I went to Columbia Undergrad and then I went to Nyu where I studied journalism. I was in the investigative reporting program there which was really cool. I had a few jobs in the middle mostly around journalism including one at ABC. And then I went back to school. I went to Harvard where I did the program for leadership development and a bunch of other finance courses and then I started working for the family business soon after that I began as head of strategy and then as I was tapped to become. Ceo of the Family Group. My started making a move towards Miami and I've been in Miami now for about seven years. Seo What is something that is not on your link. Dan or former professional bio that we should know about you. Let's see I would say that? Probably what I spend the most time on that. No one really knows is on endurance. Sports what is that mean? I? I'm happiest with the backpack in the outdoors. I love climbing very big mountains. I also like crossing countries on a bicycle a road bike and I tend to do very long rides on the weekends. What is a very long ride? One hundred miles on south and we take between four and six hours depends on sort of the the route definitely sporty but it has to be doors so give me a pair of skins and. I'm the happiest person on a mountain. That's amazing so your grandfather started your family business in the nineteen twenty s which has grown to a multibillion dollar operation. I want to start off with something that may seem basic but what is. Ceo mean when the company is that big. What is your job? Look like on a day to day so I think we're a little bit different for most family businesses. That are around. In most cases family businesses that survive beyond the third generation tend to only be in one industry and just focus on that one thing from the time of my grandfather when he started our business. He always thought more of his core team as a team that was leading a a holding company and every ten or fifteen years he would do a deep dive into a different sector industry or geography that he thought was interesting and that very much was something that my father continued with N. It's very much the spirit of what we do today. So what? We're focused on right now or in. This decade has really has nothing to do with what we were doing. Maybe fifteen or twenty years ago but I think they saw me an opportunity to bring a very young and fresh perspective into what we should be doing next and just for audience. How old were you in your tap to FIA? The conversation started very quietly only between our former CEO and my father when I was twenty seven and it was a conversation that took place over the course of three years in which. I really didn't think I was ready for the job or I wanted it but I was willing to listen and to figure out what I needed to do to train to be able to make that decision so that was a a three year process and that's when I went back to school and kind of honed in on a few skills that I that I had to develop further so back to your original question. What does being? Ceo Look like for me. Today I would say that the first two years it was really about deconstructing and rebuilding and in the previous few years it's been more about leadership and execution. We're going to dive into what it is like to take the reins in business that your father grandfather released at the legacy for but for our listeners. Who might not be familiar with the depths of just? How huge narrow says. Can you just skim? What the company is so? The company was started by my grandfather. In Venezuela in the mid twenty s he was probably one of the more advanced in radical thinkers of the era and of the American content. I would say he was a big dreamer And he was very good at executing his dreams. He came from a middle class family. His father died when he was very young. His widowed mother moved to Trinidad to live with her sister and put him in an English boarding school and when he was seventeen he went back to Venezuela to join a cousin and the reason. I like to tell that part of the story is because he was one of the few people that spoke English so they had this idea. The first buses had just arrived in the country and they had this idea of turning the trucks into buses for people and developed a whole network of public transportation. So fast forward you know. He ended up buying about thirty trucks that he turned into buses and he had just enough money to buy himself in his cousin. Two tickets on a boat to go to New York to the world's fair and when they were there they tasted pepsi-cola for the first time and he really thought that Pepsi was disgusting but truly revolutionary and convinced Pepsi to give him the rights to bring the product to Latin America. So that was sort of the beginning of his desire to bring. American goods into the region that he thought would resonate the next adventure that he had was he started a TV network. Which at the time was only six private TV network in the world So you know a true visionary and then unfortunately he had a stroke when he was quite young and my father ended up taking the family business when he was only twenty five and he continued on this path he ended up being the one that brought apple computers to Latin America. He launched direct TV in Latin America which was true of the revolutionary. He was obsessed with this idea that they were products. Available to bring connectivity to the region so you know that sort of the the legacy I grew up with these very forward thinking guys who were not afraid of thinking big sell. We're going to dive into a legacy you started to create. I WanNa talk about you a twenty-seven now I say this because it Daniel and I were actually a year year and a half and Danielle's case younger than you when we started the scam so I say this is like fellow youthful. Ceo Cancel but we also have no Kissy to live up to and the skiff was not established in anything bigger than our couch. I want to understand kind of your mental and emotional state twenty-seven you were the youngest of your siblings and you weren't expected to necessarily take over the family business. How did that conversation begin? And where were you emotionally and realizing what a legacy you would have to uphold and expanded to the future you know? I am the third one or the last one and I think for much of my upbringing. I was kind of a I. Don't WanNa say this in a mean way but the forgotten one. I had very loving parents. They were great but they really weren't focusing on on on what I was GONNA do. I had an idea I wanted to be a journalist and I always saw myself working around news. One way or the other might big plan was to set up a news agency to cover Latin America responsibly after I graduated from Nyu J. School. But that's around the time that my father had this idea of asking me to start working at the company. We came up with title which was head of strategy which is a position that we had never had it our company so no one actually knew what I was doing and it felt very nonthreatening against. They gave me access to all the meetings and spend. I would say probably two years going to all the meetings that I thought were interesting or on the contrary that I thought were not interesting at all. Have you watched succession? Yeah that's not the case of. How did it like a very peaceful and Organiz family so I wrote a paper of sort of the state of the business and the marks? I thought we were missing and I think we should be going. And that's what ended up getting me into trouble. The paper was very well received but unfortunately they told me that. If I wrote that paper I was the one that was going to have to execute on it and dots. What kind of formalized this whole conversation around me becoming? Ceo when that conversation started. Did you have a minute of terror or were you excited because there are so many things to be excited about but at the end of the day that's enormous responsibility? You know at the beginning. I really didn't want to have a conversation in. I really didn't want the job because I didn't think I was ready or that. I could do it but I've learned in time that when very smart people suggest things over and over again sometimes even if you don't see it you have to go for it because they're obviously seeing things from from an angle. That's different from yours and that's kind of what happened here. I had both are a CEO at the time. Who was brilliant. Who had worked for us for over thirty years and my father who had sort of the legacy in the memory insisting that this was a good idea that I was the person for the job so at one point I said fine even though I think it's a terrible idea I'm willing to consider it. And we were very structured into what considering it meant. We kind of identify what were the key areas that I needed to learn more about in terms of the job and in also in terms of education and ultimately those were the things that got me to feel more comfortable until the day came on like your three of this secret conversation where I said. Okay I got it. I think I can do this. How'd your siblings react to it They were thrilled. You know I think for both of them. They're very proud of of the fact that we have been around for almost a hundred years. That's very rare accomplishment for most family businesses most of them dwindle between the second and third generation. So I think they were. They were very excited about me coming aboard and potentially being committed to the job these for the next twenty years one of the things I read that you and your dad meet it deal with each other that you would always have to pick up his phone call. Yup so I'm living with my parents right now and go bed. I will say down. They're both very close to our families. Don't always say this softly so parents don't hear I don't always pick up their calls so walk us through kind of the dynamic between you and your dad at how you're able to preserve an important personal relationship contained. Amac with obviously one where I assume has. Guidance and experience has been instrumental. That rule still stands. I do always pick up the phone when he calls. It doesn't always mean that I'm going to talk to him. I can say you know. I'm in the middle of doing a podcast. And he understands you know. I've been lucky. I think that my father and I have a wonderful relationship first and foremost. He's my super friend. We connect in a way that is very special. We get each other. I love that description. He's the first person I call when I have a really crazy idea. And he's the first person that understands the crazy idea. So first and foremost I would describe him as a friend secondly I would describe him as my father and thirdly described him as a mentor. And what's really cool about being able to do that? In three categories is that we're pretty disciplined about keeping things separate. We can have very heated debate over family issue or a business issue and we don't let one thing influence the other if we're not in agreement about something of working on If he comes around for dinner and were sitting around with their kids. That energy doesn't translate into the dinner table and I think that's really important because I don't believe in contaminating your professional impersonal spaces with each other so we couldn't agree more yet when you started. You had ideas about restructuring. How did you actually take those ideas begin to put them into place being a brand new? Ceo so I took over after a very difficult period for our for our business group in nineteen ninety eight. When he'll travis the now defunct dictator in Venezuela who took over the country. We made a decision to leave both as a family and as a business and we moved their headquarters to Miami the following five or six years after that were really difficult. Chavez had declared my father enemy of the state US owning the biggest TV network in the country was really the reason why they didn't like us. Because we believe obviously in pre enterprise in free speech and those were two words that that didn't resonate well with the government so we left as a business we spend the next six seven years on survival mode. We were trying to figure out how to deal with a huge crisis in Venezuela where we still maintain our businesses the constant pressure from the government. It was a very difficult time. And the number one priority for all of our senior leadership was to figure out how to survive that crisis. So when I took over what I saw was that a company that for the first ninety years or eighty five years of its history had been innovating decade after decade had press pause on that because they were very busy in simply surviving. There were in triage mode. And there was a little bit of Post traumatic stress. I would say so. The first thing that I saw was that as a media company who had always been on the vanguard we were always the first ones to do things radically different way ahead of time. We kinda missed out on the past ten years in the past ten years meant the digital revolution. So obviously you know being of the digital age. The first thing that I did was to really think what we needed to do with the whole digital strategy for our company and two things came from there was a bit retroactive. Which was how do we used the digital platforms? How do we integrate them into our existing media capabilities? So that gave birth to a lot of things that now seem super commonplace which was to develop digital properties related to analog properties that you would see on television. The second part that I think was more interesting was that we saw at the time. The only video platform out there was youtube and we had a lot of content that we were producing being posted on Youtube. Not by US or by our network here in the United States which was univision by by third parties and it was generating hundreds of thousands of us and there was no one. Monetize that so. We're like there's a huge missed opportunity. Here obviously no has set up an agency focused on Hispanic audiences that was the insight that gave birth into us. Creating what is now the largest digital advertising network that America called Cisneros Interactive through which we represent facebook instagram. What's up that's one of The new verticals that now defined as business group. I love that story in a lot of questions about how you adapt forward thinking into an organ around a core group of leaders. But I think you know. Obviously we're talking to you. In the middle of all of us across the world. Quarantining and a lot of companies are making very painful decisions around restructuring around doubling down on a core part of their business and I'm curious for those listening who are thinking about how to preserve their own business or might be an employee at a business. It's also making tough decisions. How do you think about restructuring? And what would you say to them? The moment that something feels like it's extra or a little fluffy is the moment that you really have to put that in a list of things you should get rid of in. That could be anything from teams to initiatives to physical places. And that's a general rule and I think when you have crisis like the one we're having right now. Those issues surface much quicker and in a way it is kind of a unique opportunity to really think about what really matters to the core of that business and we think that decisions are really hard We've seen a lot of industries having to make very radical changes. You know like the hotel industry here in Miami when the Saudi. We're going to be shut down for three months. They've furloughed percent of their employees. Fortunately we're not in that industry. What's been interesting for us. This time around. Is that with our AD network. We HAVE OVER THIRTY OFFICES IN LATIN AMERICA IN EIGHTEEN. Different countries and the virus is affecting each country differently with different intensity in different timeframes as well so we don't really have a blanket strategy of what we're doing in terms of the virus we really do have to take it case by case so. That's a huge jigsaw puzzle. And we're spending a few hours on that every day. So part of this new work from home reality is a lot a lot of video calls so many back to back all day long. They one of the low points of my life recently was when somebody told me to try a filter on the video and I informed them that I already was filtered and since I no longer wear. Makeup only wear sweatpants. It's really up to my skin to pull through so lucky for us. We discovered something that keeps our skin looking healthier and more arrested. It's estee lauder advanced night repair. It keeps US looking and feeling virtual camera ready lightweight and oil free serum your pillow cases will thank you. It fights the look of key signs of aging so you can wake up to more rested healthier looking skin when over. Five hundred women tried it. Eighty percent notice more arrested healthier looking skin in four weeks their skin felt more hydrated and had a radiant glow head to ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. DOT COM STARTS TONIGHT WITH ESTEE. Lauder advanced night repair serum in time of change. I'm thinking you know obviously time Colbrad did. It's so many moving parts but also thinking about what you just spoke through when you were coming on the restructuring that you did. How did you gain and keep the trust of your team? Yeah so you know one advice that I could give any. Aspiring CEO is when restructuring is going to be part of your job. Do it sooner rather than later because when it sooner you actually see things much more clearer and you're not attached to the past do not attached to legacy. You're not attached to the way things were done when I knew I was going to be taking over a CEO but we still haven't made it public. We had three or four off sites that I would host at home where we would brainstorm with. Our you know our leaders of each of each divisions in terms of how we saw the future but I realized that what was going to be really cool was instead of having the media people discuss media and so forth. We actually just mixed everybody. We have mixed groups with different expertise trying to see what the future looks like and that help us really reorganize the company and and see what was the fact that we needed to trim what I learned in the process. Is that bringing people together. That come from different backgrounds and industries to problem solve a really good idea more perspectives. That you have are the better. The best ideas came from people that had nothing to do with what we were trying to solve for. And then what I also learned. Is that letting go of people is really hard. And it's really hard especially if they've never done anything wrong in their job to simply because they became redundant. Those are one of the most difficult conversations I had to have and I wish I had more training in to how to let go of people successfully because I do carry that weight around me still. I WanNa talk about future planning so Danielle and I over last few years have really tried to build at muscle and we always like to say you know. Our team is in twenty twenty by twenty twenty two twenty twenty three and I was really proud of that and then I read about you and turns out. You're like twenty sixty. You are very dedicated to thinking at minimum fifty years into the future. Most people can't fathom what's happening next week top to us about what you're planning cycle looks like and why that is such a core part of your leadership style you know. I like to say that it's very important in our case to be able to play it short end long by long. I mean that when you're carrying on your shoulders one hundred years of history and you spend a lot of time understanding what were the key factors that made that possible. You realize that. There's a lot to protect so every decision every major decision that you're making in my major decision. I mean if you're going to launch a completely new initiative if you're GONNA make a big investment into something that's completely new if you're going to bring in a partner. It's very important that you pay it forward. They try to think. How is that going to impact who we are as a business for the next ten fifteen or twenty years and I think that's that's been a really cool exercise because it you know it. It just keeps everybody very honest when you're thinking that far in advance you're projecting what the outcome of the decisions can be kind of keeps you from for making bad decisions or working with bad people or partnering with bad companies and it also gives you the ability to make better financial decisions that are probably not perhaps not risky by that are gonNa keep you afloat when things get complicated and that's definitely proven to be the case during the few recessions that we've had in our lifetime having said that we also are very good at playing very short we as a business group were known for making decisions very big decisions very quickly to move on opportunities very quickly to execute very quickly. But I'm sure if I wasn't running a a very old family business and I was just doing a job that I thought it was gonna be doing for five or ten years I don't think I would be as obsessed as what the next fifty years might look like. A short part is really interesting because I think as leaders of growing startup we would love to be able to say that we make decisions quickly and knock things quickly but we always do. I think that that is a theme that we hear a lot from growing companies. What do you think it that has allowed you to set up a team to evaluate and make those decisions quickly? So that's A. that's an excellent question. My grandfather believed that. He didn't want his core team to be specialists. He wanted them to be generalists. And so he believed in having a team of ten fifteen twenty executives that were very well rounded that could be given the task to run any of our new businesses until the new teams of specialists. Were set up. A group of twenty executives has stayed with the company for a very long time. Where groomed in that way so they were great leaders. Were very good at organizing and deploying without having to be specialists in different industries. And that's something that's very much in the DNA over company and it's very much the spirit of how we do things and my core is like that we are all generalists. None of us are excellent at anything. But we're very good at a lot of things and I think that allows us to be on the one. Very quick study is on the other hand to not be biased towards ideas one or the other and united we can. We're bringing such different perspectives. That we can. We can decide if something is good or bad rather quickly than the next step is saying. Okay we're not the experts now. We really need to bring in the best experts that we can to run and execute on a new venture. Ariza the phrase that people say all the time to lead by example and I think that's something easily turned around but I'm really curious what that means to you and especially in the context of the enormous influence that this company has a lot in America where there's a lot of volatile political situations that come up. There is a lot of corruption that you guys have to navigate as the business has expanded and especially as you've taken over what is leading by example mean in your day to day what is leading by example mean when you think about this narratives role in the world fundamentally in our DNA we believe in doing good and we do think that doing good is really good for business as well every time that we come up with a a really bold idea of a new business that can change a country or continent or region. There's a part of our brain that's thinking. How can we use this new initiative the energy around the new initiative to create something that will also be beneficial for society as a whole assault given example when we launched direct TV in Latin America? That was in the early nineties. We realized what the power connectivity through. Tv was going to be an. We wondered how that could be used for educational purposes. This was at a time in Latin America when they had just started putting televisions inside classrooms with educational programming. And we said wow. Wouldn't it be interesting? If we launch a PAN regional educational channel in Spanish. That can be part of the school system during the day but could be family channel in the afternoons in the evenings so that parents could learn together with teachers. That channel was called classy. It was a huge success. One of the programs that we had on there was called English highway which was sort of how to learn English and to this day I meet people at Random Conference at. Tell me the reason we learned English was because we used to watch English highway. So these initiatives were massive. Meant that we had to work with the Ministry of Education of every country to understand what the curriculum was to understand with. The technology was available to understand how we would be able to get the signal of this TV channel in there. What training the teachers needed and so forth. We just do that because we think it's it's the right thing to do. And we have an opportunity to contribute positively to development of our society. It's the backbone of who we are DNA and and going back to your question about bribery in politics in all of that goes back to this perspective of playing very long. You know if if you're GONNA be around for the next twenty years you have to be a good citizen and you have to treat your neighbors with transparency so obviously going down a path that is not honest and transparent would be sustainable for a business this trying to be around for so much longer. So it's it's very clear for us talking about the long game when you think about fifty years from now when people are looking back and talking about you as CEO. I think it's very clear the elements that you've brought interior leadership from your father and your grandfather. What do you think are the things that are distinctly are uniquely traits of your leadership style? I and I think this is probably something that resonates with a lot of people generation and I have a feeling. It's probably the way that you guys run the skin as well as I believe in a much flatter and the organization that the one that I took over it was probably combination of percival being so young and second of all trying to figure out how I was going to be the CEO for people that were twenty years older than me who had been at the job for so much longer building an organization that is much flatter and that is much more transparent in terms of the open conversations that we have with Team ended up being a really good idea for us. So we're GONNA switch now to our difficult segment the lightning round. Go work from home edition. Okay are you ready? Are you a morning person or a night owl? Both which means that. My days are very very long. Now that we're all working from home. What's replaced your morning. Commute having longer breakfasts with my family which has been really nice thing. Can you skim your nighttime routine earth? A lot of things have changed with this whole whole thing. I used to either by cried very early in the morning or very late in the evening and now since the day seemed to be so long. I'm trying to exercise like mid day to just break it up and that's actually been really helpful so the afternoons have changed. The afternoon is now the time that actually get to be physically with my kids Instead of US doing either earning resume conference calls. I try to be their coach into an hour of exercise with them and like. You're an intense coach. I I would. I would fail as your time. We always have dinner as a family. We have very strict obviously no electronics at the table. Rule and our dinners last an hour. You know which is nice even even a Non Koga Times. Try to dinner. Yes always unless we have something for work but if we're home we all have dinner and then after that you know. We try to put the kids to bed. But it's sort of. It's becoming a very wholesome schedule now that we're all home. We have so much more time to do things that should be normal. What's the last show that you binge watched? I hate to admit this but tiger king. Oh Yeah I don't know why I'm trying to nine. I can't look away. What about me is it made me no one other away in in times of Colbrad since? We're all home a lot more to have a favorite quick dinner that you've been making days that. I'm really happy to spend a couple of hours cooking because I find it kind of therapeutic. So I'll do something more elaborate L. Rose something and they're days that the idea of spending two hours in the kitchen is the last thing I want to do because I just WanNa be outside and do something else so about once a week. I'll do a lot of pasta sauces bullying and so forth. We FREEZE THEM. So my quick one is to just do some pasta with frozen homemade sauce and idiot. Abyss has been great. Thank you so much for for making the time during a very crazy crazy time in our world stay safe and healthy and thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much bye guys. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign up at the Skim Dot Com. That's the S. K. I. M. Dot Com. M's a little something extra.

CEO Latin America Venezuela US Miami Danielle Weisberg estee lauder New York Adriana Cisneros ABC Harvard carly Columbia Undergrad Dan America Family Group apple youtube president
Laura Prepon, actress and director: People are going to tell you no. That cannot deter you.

Skimm'd from The Couch

36:39 min | 1 year ago

Laura Prepon, actress and director: People are going to tell you no. That cannot deter you.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. People are going to tell you know people are going to think you can't do it. That cannot deter you. You have to just keep going. That is something that I've learned a by having the fortune to do this for over twenty years and being told way many more times that I've been told yes by the way but you know you just have to keep going. I'm Carly's Aitken. I'm Danielle Mason. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. This show might sound a bit different today. Because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is working from home for the time being because of Cova nineteen. Today we have Laura Prebon joining us on skimmed from the couch. You know her name from her breakout role as Donna on seventy show or from her acting and directing career on the hit Netflix series. Orange is the new black Laura's new book entitled You and die as Mother's gives an honest and emotional look at navigating parenthood Laura. We are so excited to have you with us today. Welcomed to skin from the couch. Thank you thank you for having me. I'm really excited to be here and talk about this. So thanks also. We want to give Laura a big shoutout for being one of the remote skin from the couch guests who just has been on it with her. Yeah Yeah also reminded me to press report which is important when you're trying to do a podcast. Look guys world is trying to get through this together. Let's start with these skimming your resume. Let's see I've been doing this for over twenty years. I'm trying to think I became a working professional at fifteen. I actually moved out of the house at fifteen and I moved to Europe for a year and a half and I lived there by myself very unconventional upbringing. Where you're I lived in Italy for a year then I lived in France and the UK did a little stint in Brazil. My sister she works for a magazine. An had mentioned that I should model. I'm from a small town in Jersey so for someone to say you should model. It was like speaking a foreign language. I had no idea what she was saying and she was like. Just go to this agency and check it out so I went. They signed me and then I moved to Italy for year alone yes alone. We had a conversation. Talk to my mom and she's like go. I pack my bags and I went to Italy by as a mom now. I would never do that. It's not an easy job is very unglamorous for as glamorous you think it is very unglamorous especially for the boots on the ground models. Who are like trying to just get basic work just to pay your bills because also in Europe at that time which was in one thousand nine hundred five in Italy. They took a fifty percent commission. Five zero in sixty so trying to make a living as a model is very very hard when you're just kind of pounding the pavement everyday trying to get a job to get by so that is really not glamorous but I remember calling my mom nice that I want to try this acting thing and she said okay. What do we have to do when I said I don't know I have to learn how to act so then I flew home? And we literally took a yellow pages. The thick yellow book yellow pages opens it up and just pointed to some random acting coach in New York City and I started going to classes in New York and then within a year. I was seventeen and a half at this time. I that seventy show so then I moved to La. I started that seventy show and then that ran for eight years while I was on that I learned to direct and I was always following our director around. I learned so much from him after seventy show. I did a chokehold October road. Yeah I watched it. Yeah yes I told my mom. I was talking to you today. She's like I love that show. Oh that's how many shows no the other one I love doing that show and then after that. I did either. Chelsea where I played Chelsea handler. And she played my sister and then it was after that that I got oranges any black and then that we did for seven years and that I also directed multiple episodes. So what is something not on your imdb or wikipedia? Page that we should know about you. A lot of people. Don't know that I used to be a really big mixed martial arts fan. I would fly around the country and go to mixed martial arts fights. I was friends. With a ton of fighters I dated some fighters I was like all about that world kickboxing. I was like I was with this it this this was I mean honestly for probably I would say ten years I got really really into it. I loved seeing how these does when trained in their work ethic and how they would work out so that and also I used to play a ton of poker like way too much poker. I've played in the world series twice. I actually as they. I knew that about you. I didn't know the mixed martial arts. So that's wow. So let's talk about the buck. You take your ear. Vanna Raiders back to your childhood in. You really jump into the early years where you know you mentioned in entirely unconventional childhood but also part of I think that unconventional childhood is you with a lot of trauma as a Kid. Kind of just set the stage of war things that you were dealing with. And what was the family dynamic? You had at home well. It's interesting because because I was a working professional at such a young age. I never thought about children until I got with my husband. I think it's because the now being a mother. It was the first time that I really had to look back at my childhood. And because when I first became my mother I was so blind sided. My hormones were all over the place. When I became a mother I was so out of control. I felt like I couldn't take care of myself. I felt like I couldn't take care of my family. I didn't know who I was. I had so much anxiety which is not me and naturally I looked back to my upbringing and how I was mothered and what I looked back at it for the first time. Really to really analyze it. There were a lot of things that I realize. We're not okay. There are a lot of things that were great but there are a lot of things that were really dysfunctional. And for the first time I thought about what those things were and how it really truly affected me as a person and as a mother. I've always kept my personal very private. My husband is very private with our personal lives so for me to open up the way that I do in this book I felt like in order to really have this conversation that I felt like we weren't having about motherhood. I wanted to drop these defenses. Sheriff truths get this conversation. Going in a real way and one of those things was that we all have complicated relationships with our parents for the most part. There's good there's bad there is. It's and everything in between my situation with my mother was one of those complicated situations where I really had to analyze it for the first time and I felt it was really important to talk about. 'cause this book while it's you and I as Mother's there's a lot of people who've read this book and that are not mothers or may choose not to be that still get so much out of it because there's things like looking back at how your mother and how it affects you as a person and or as a mother and there's things that were so important to me to talk about because we were all mothered in some way or not that still affects us. You know what I mean. It's so interesting in doing prep for this interview. That in seeing you from that seventy show to October road and two oranges a new black. You've always come across as so confident in this book you bravely right about your experience suffering from an eating disorder during your early years as an actress and you were struggling with your body image. An industry that is very focus on appearance. How did you get out of that? What was your road to recovery? Like will you bring up a really good point? Which is yes in my industry. Unfortunately the way that you look. There's a Lotta pressure for that. Which is why I was so fortunate to be on something. Like orange is the new black. Because it's so celebrated women of all different shapes and ethnicities and backgrounds. But the thing about what happened with my mother. Yes she equated. Being thin things successful hundred percent and another thing I had to do was look at how she was raised and get understanding. Because I couldn't understand why you would teach your child while teaching them all these other great things and then you teach kind of dysfunction. That did take me years to get out of. But it's really understand where they came from the fact that she equated that with success in thought she was helping me. That's what was very complicated about it and for us for myself on my mother it was. It was a shared secret. It was how we bonded and because I so badly wanted to bond with my mother you know this was how we would spend time together and when we were growing up my mother was always off doing some. She was eccentric chef. She was always off doing things at restaurants perfecting her picking duck recipe. And all these odd wonderful things that I grew up with but when I did get time and spend time to hang out with her. I couldn't wait and my father. He was an orthopedic surgeon most of cases in two hospitals. We never saw him either. He was gone in the morning before we went to school and he would come home very late at night. It was a very odd upbringing. You know and then so when I have this time to be with my mother. It was really special. So that's what was so hard about this thing that she taught me and the other thing too is the reason why I struggled with this dysfunctional relationship. To food for so long is because you have to eat to survive. You can't just quit smoking or stop drinking alcohol or stop doing drugs and things like that. You have to eat to survive so there's triggers all day. It got to a point where it was just. It was bad and then when my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's that's was a game changer. For me while the blame Ya. I don't think that the dysfunctional eating attributed to that it might have. I don't know but when that happened I couldn't help but wonder could it have been different if she was so better care for self and that was a game changer for me and then when I got pregnant it's like a switch left and when I got pregnant. That's when everything truly shifted for me. I would never even think of doing that kind of abuse to my body again. Appreciate you sharing that story in obviously very dark time in your life. This is podcasts. Are we really focused on people's careers and every career path has seen some sort of disruption in and I think has been really interesting about your career path is while you you're dealing with real challenges? Personally you started learning about directing and learning about more that you could be doing in the industry so want you to take us back around where you I got that exposure to directing how you started to to really think about what your skills were and how you were going to develop them so like I mentioned I always follow around David trainer who directed that seventies show and I was always very curious with what the crew was doing what he was doing and because I got the show. It's Shang Age. I got most of my experience spy being boots on the ground by being immersed in it and I just tried to soak up any kind of information that I could. My first movie I ever did. Was this little movie in Cullman Alabama called lightning bug and I remember doing this movie and it was my first time being on location as an actor and we were in the middle of this muddy field and I saw this group of guys because it was a group of guys standing around with van and a camera and I went up to the house. Who are this group of guys over there and they said well that's the second unit and I said okay. Why are they just standing around and he said well my second unit director quit and I said okay cool. I'm off for the next two days. Give them to me and I'll go get the shots and he said. Do you know how to direct and I was like oh course. I had no idea by the way I'd only followed around David trainer on the set for your listeners who might not know second unit does all of the the montage shots establishing tone and feel so. I had to get a guy riding by on a tractor or film in a chicken farm or a shot of the lead characters car without them any but someone else driving. I got a list of sixteen of those shots so I went out with this with this group of guys. We jumped in Dan. Just like pinged off all sixteen of these shots and then my director saw the shots dailies and he was like these are great. You're the second unit director so then these guys became my crew. And then when I wasn't filming and acting I would go get the second unit shots and then that was how I really started from there. I had a friend whose father taught film at a local college to where I would shoot that seventy show. I track this guy down and I wouldn't leave him alone. I'm like I need to learn how to direct. I need to go to school to learn this because I wanted to be able to communicate with my crew and know what I was doing. He would teach during the day college classes and then put me through the film school. At night I would film seventies during the day and then I would go to film school with him at night and then after that I really just wanted to stay sharp and I really wanted to just keep learning and learning so I created this web series called neighb- rose with two of my friends and they're still on youtube somewhere. I'm totally making this up. After what's crazy is I was a one woman crew so I waited direct it at it. I was the sound person and I taught myself how to edit and I would edit them together and I would just ask friends to help me. I had two friends who were editors I was just like please come over and just teach me how to edit shortcuts this that and then it was just hour after hour after hour learning how to edit. It was such a learning experience for me. I can't even tell you I want to put this in perspective. Juror young you're on a hit hit. Tv show that seventies show at the time. You are making money and I think that a lot of people probably would have been enjoying that and going out and living it up and instead you are learning this whole new skill set and really thinking about the next step. What was it looking back on that moment in time for you? What was it that you think is pushing you to do that? And not just be like. Oh Hey I'm Donna making money. This is awesome. This is it is such a good question. I love talking about this stuff. You're totally right. I was on a hit show. It was amazing. I saw peers around me. Who were just kind of resting on their laurels and just kind of like partying and doing whatever and look of course go out have a good time but at the end of the day. I was taking that time to learn these new crafts and these new tools. I immediately had it in me to always have work ethic for me personally. I always had this driver. I don't want just rest back. I want to learn as much as I can because one thing I did learn was especially in my profession when you get an opportunity because it's so hard to get an opportunity that truly matters in a lot of different industry when you get that opportunity you have to kill it and you have to be ready when I finally got my opportunity to direct orange when I was like Hounding Jaji for so long to finally get my shot and then I got it. I had to kill it and because I had done all of this work on my own on my own free time and knowing that I could do that and knowing that I taught myself how to edit so on something like orange is the new black so many people to to cover in one scene and time is always a factor as a director. And there's times where something happens or something happens with an actor or a piece of equipment fails or you know. There's always stuff that happens. That'll set you back on time. Because I taught myself to edit in this professional situation with all these pros in my head. I'm editing as we go and I know what shops can drop. What shocks we need so for me. Just about distinct sharp so that when you get the opportunity you kill it. And that's one thing that I hope your listeners. Whatever their interest is especially now with being in quarantine use this time. Look at videos on Youtube like use this time to really hone in on a crafts that you like good at it so that when the world is back up again go out and do it. I love this lesson and I think we talk about hassle a lot on the show and you obviously are are showing. That looks like what do you think is the best way to approach your supervisor boss or who had have you when you do. Have that craft when you have actually been working behind the scenes. How do you avoid the feedback of stay in your lane? I've gotten feedback many times many times. And especially as a woman. Let me tell you wanting to break into directing my own agent who was representing me new. I wanted to direct but I wasn't making money as a director yet but I would constantly say I wanted to write to one a direct and I wasn't getting the opportunity to do it one day. She looked at me and I was in her office and she said Laura. Look it's never gonNA happen. She's like you're an actress. It's going to be really hard to break into directing and by the way she'd never seen anything undirected and I said okay the next day I fired her and then I kept doing it and doing it and doing it and just learning my craft and then I get the shot to direct on orange and it was incredible so for your listeners out there it's like. I was told things by my own team that it's not going to happen. And it's really heartbreaking but you have to just persist. It's not easier. Everybody would do it. So whatever profession. You're in or whatever you want to get into. You hear this kind of thing about. Don't take no for an answer or whatever but you have to just keep going you cannot let people tell you know people are going to tell you now. So just get ready. People are going to tell you know people are going to think you can't do it. That cannot deter you. You have to just keep going and that is something that I've learned by having the fortune to do this for over twenty years and being told way many more times that I've been told yes by the way by you know you just have to keep going even now directed multiple episodes of orange. And there's this whole new support around female directors. I gotTa Tell You. It is still really tough. It is still a man's game we have to change things and we just have to keep doing it. The last few months I've been thinking a lot about what my wife routines should be and then the world through me for Lupin was like why don't you stay home and think about this a lot so I've been thinking a lot about how to best take care of myself which also means I've been thinking about revisiting my morning and nighttime routines one thing we found to give our nighttime routine to boost is estee. Lauder advanced night repair. It's got lightweight and oil free serum it fights the look of key signs of aging. So you can wake up to more rested. Healthier looking skin will take it. It has powerful antioxidants and Hyler onic acid. It reduces the look of lines and wrinkles for radiant younger looking skin head to ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. dot com start tonight with Estee Lauder night repair serum another thing. That makes it tough. You write that in society. There's a quote Macho Approach Timid Turnby. You returned to set a weeks after giving birth to your first child and you wore. That is what you said as a badge of honor but that must have been really fucking hard. How do you think about pressure that you felt or even the pride to get back to work kind of as quickly as you can? It was a lot of pressure. The thing that was weird for even me to understand was it took me writing this book to realize. Why did I feel like I needed that? Macho approach to maternity. Why was that even necessary for me to go back to work and prove to people that I'm not affected nothing's changed I'm going to kill my job just the way I did before I had a baby. I am changed. I'm a mother and I am changed in the most amazing way. I would never WANNA go back. I often say that when I became a mother I woke up. My priorities shifted the way that I approach. My art is completely different but in process of writing this book. I did have to look back at that and see. Why did I feel like number one that I needed to prove myself again? Now that I'm a mother and just had a baby and it was something that I really didn't realize I was doing and that's not necessary. It's okay to admit that we don't have everything figured out. There's nothing wrong with that. We don't have anything to prove. And that's another reason why I wanted to have this conversation in the book. Talk to you guys right now. The conversation does need to be had and you know the mom guilt that comes with going back to work so quickly the fact that we feel like. We need to overcompensate so. Nobody knows that we're struggling. And while being a mom is the most magical incredible thing. It's also the hardest thing I've ever experienced. And the scariest thing to protect your children that was crippling to me in the beginning emotionally. And it's taken me a long time to get a handle on that that I definitely had that approach going back to work and this time very different. Because the process of writing this book really lobby to reflect on that analyze it look at it and realize that doesn't have to be the case. There's also a certain aspect of you have to believe in yourself and know your capabilities. I didn't have to put that approach on because I know that I've done enough of really hard work so that I will be able to handle the situation when I go back to work. But it's those moments where you have to believe in yourself that you'll know what to do. One of the the more heartbreaking parts of your book is when you talk about personal time that you boss control really which was how you had to tap into that interesting once again during her second pregnancy. Do you mind sharing that story or listeners. So after my daughter was born I was filming orange and I got pregnant again and we were so excited to have a sibling for our daughter. When you get into your second trimester you feel like you're in the clear you're always told by the different things that you read and your doctors that once you get into the second trimester usually safer from miscarriage. You're usually kind of then on the road to have the baby and things are good and usually when he gets your second trimester and you can it to your family and things like that so for us we had gone into the second trimester. We got all this testing dawn and everything came back perfectly normal. There was one little thing that that was a a measurement that was slightly off. But it wasn't alarming. And then in the second trimester we found out that there were some devastating health issues with the baby that we had no idea. We basically found out that. The baby's lymphatic system was outside of its body in a sack so I knew when out system was outside of the baby's body. This was really really bad. You know I was like. Is there anything we can do it? My husband and I often say that it was whenever this comes up it was the worst day of our lives when we found out that the baby wouldn't even survive and that. I was at risk carrying any longer. 'cause you never think that this is going to happen to you and then when it does it's puts things into perspective in a way that you never imagined so then we weren't left's with many options so we had to terminate the pregnancy. I was in the middle of filming orange and it was real and I was very very private about this. Nobody knew you're trying to grasp for some reason. Why did this happen? Why does this have to happen? And then you start grasping for answers. Did I do a stunt at work that like knock something loose and did something did I eat? Something wrong was under too much stress. Did I do something too hard on my body? Try to grasp for Angela. No I didn't do anything at work that attributed to this and no. It's not because something I ate or whatever but you're trying to grasp for some answer to make it make sense because it just doesn't make any sense and it's so devastating and after that I dealt with a lot of shame and a lot of anger towards my body and it took me a long time to get out of that and I talk about in the book different tools that I used to get back in communication with my body and to be able to be open again and it took me a long time to get to a point where I was then able to get pregnant again and I did a lot of self work that I would do daily because I was so angry at my body and I felt like I was angry because I couldn't grow another healthy sibling for my daughter which was not rational. I started doing this thing where I would place my hands on my body parts and just say I love you like I love you arms. I love you neck. I love you chest I love you belly and I would literally every day I would do this exercise that got me back in communication with myself and then I was at a point where once I got pregnant again then every day I would put my hand on my belly and I would just out loud. I would just say these things just putting intention there that it's a safe place for the baby to grow and that your body can do this and it's going be a healthy beautiful experience like I would do these things every day and it really helped me a lot. Each how caps what you were going through tried to keep it as private as possible while you were still working. Obviously we are all it a very unique situation right now in the world and have no idea how much longer it will last and how long we will be working from home if we're still employees and just dealing with so much pressure. Take your family's ourselves some curious what you would say to listeners right now. Who are all dealing with? Different things in different viewers in differed burdens ball at home but also trying to either figure out what their next steps might be in seeking employment or trying to keep their current job had sort of find any semblance of careful. Use that word on the show but I think any sort of sense of normalcy or balance right now helpful. People's I'm curious. What your advices I think for me. It's just about not being so hard on yourself right now and cutting yourself a little bit of slack. It is really scary is speaking for myself. Who knows what's going on with the industry that I'm in it who knows what's going to happen with cinema. Every set is shutdown. Nobody can go to work. There's a lot of unknown. The thing for me is I just have to create. That's what helps me keep my sanity. That's me personally. Look being an actor you go into a room and with so many different jobs. It's like you put yourself out there. You go into a room you put yourself out there. And then it's somebody else's decision whether you get that thing or not and it's such a lack of control for you you know so. I have my own ways of dealing with that one being that. There's only one you which is so true. There's one you nobody else is going to do that. Particular thing the way that you do and really leaning into that is something that's going to give you an edge like you would not believe so. It's just really leaning into that when I was coming up and being told no all the time and you're constantly putting yourself in another person's hands the way that I could have control over my own. Life was by something that I create myself getting ready so when I got the opportunity to get in there I knew I would kill it. So things like that really gave me a sense of control and independence back in a world. That's on shore. So I kind of apply that same thing now where things are very uncertain but what I can control is my own emotional and mental state of mind and the way that I try to stay healthy and that is by creating writing and doing my my my things with food preparation food videos on Youtube things that I can do for. My home really helps my sanity so I think it's just if you're on hold on your job right now which so. Many people are so many my friends their businesses are shut down right now. Find something that you can be working on right now. If you're a chef watch masterclass watts Thomas Keller and pick up a new trick and get really really good at it. If you're a writer watch Shonda rhimes or Aaron Sorkin or David Mammon and get tools and really sharpened that blade so when the world is back up again you have this extra thing in your tool case that you can even better at your job and I think it's like no matter what your profession is. Try TO USE THIS TIME. Creatively to get better added and hone in so that when you do have that opportunity you can be that much better in that much more successful. That's what I'm personally doing to try to keep my sanity and all this. That's the great advice. Thank you for sharing. We want to go quickly to our last segment our work from home lightning round. Are you a morning person or night out? I would say morning person. What's replaced your morning commute now that we're all just in our homes feeding my newborn routine. My nighttime routine is I bathe my toddler. I do sort of my toddler. Put her to bed finished getting dinner. Perhaps my husband and I we feed the baby. The baby goes to sleep. My husband and I eat dinner. We might watch an episode of Tiger Gang and then we go to sleep and then wake up early again to wake up with our toddler and her newborn and then we're up a lot throughout the night because we've been baby so we're up a lot throughout the night feeding the baby taking care of the baby in a sleepy haze and then we actually our like alert again in the morning other than tiger. Cain what is the last anything David Attenborough? We Love David attenborough. So literally will go onto Netflix. Or I tunes. Or whatever and just type in David ATTENBOROUGH MIAMI. I have a final personal question Ashton or Mula. Oh man that's to oatmeal meal as part of my mom's squad. I gotta say me out good. That's the answer we were hoping for. Laura thank you so much. Congratulations on everything. And we wish you all the best. Thank you guys. Thank you so much for having me. This was such a treat everyone. We're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty. We WanNa take a moment to spotlight some new female founded companies. We've heard for many incredible skimmers who are leading small businesses and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin from the couch. See the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or front. My name is Kendall Bird. I'm from Los Angeles and I am. The CO founder and CEO of frame frame is a mental health platform. That makes it easier for people to connect with therapists. Both in person and digitally our company is really on a mission to change the way people think about therapy. We WanNa help people understand what actually happens in therapy and we also want to celebrate those who are using it as a tool to improve their mental health on our platform. We offered to key services are first. Service is our digital workshops and these third livestream discussions between therapists volunteer participants. That you can watch anonymously from the comfort of your own home. We really wanted to create this product so that people can get a sense for what therapy was really like. Our second service is really catered towards people who are ready to work with their own therapists. This is our therapy matching tool. So if you answer a couple of quick questions will match you with the Therapist. That's right for your needs. People are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety and depression. And I am so proud of our team that we were able to push up of our product so that we could offer immediate resources to people who are suffering at home right now. This global pandemic has collectively shifted our perception of mental health and made people more aware of the importance of it and our team at frame is really hoping to build on this in a positive way and continue to spread awareness about therapy and importance of mental health right now. We're really focused on collecting as much feedback from our users so that we can improve our own products. Were also equally as focused on helping therapists. That are on our platform so for anyone who is curious about therapy feeling anxious or depressed at home. We would love if you would visit. Try FRAME DOT COM and test out one of our digital workshops. They're all completely free. And we also offer live workshops every week that you can sign up for and participate anonymously and we're just really trying to get more people to understand how therapy can help. And so we'd love and really appreciate if you give us a shot. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the scam dot com. That's the SK. I am DOT COM Xu. M's for a little something extra.

director Laura Prebon Estee Lauder Europe Netflix youtube Italy DOT COM David Attenborough Danielle Mason Cova Aitken Alzheimer Donna Jersey La New York City David France
Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Fear and ambition together is incredibly powerful.

Skimm'd from The Couch

31:40 min | 1 year ago

Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Fear and ambition together is incredibly powerful.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode fear. An ambition together is incredibly powerful. I didn't know where it was going to go. I just knew that women need this and if women need this it was just a matter of figuring out how to get it to them. I'm Carly's Bacon. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have flipped from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff. Like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it? All out than where it began on a couch. Hey everyone this show might sound a bit different today. Because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is working from home for the time being because of Copeland nineteen. Today we have Aryan Goldman joining us on skin from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of hatch a brand creating style at solutions for pregnant women. And it's changing the conversation about maternity. She's also the founder of two birds accompanying that makes wearable an inclusive. Bright's May dresses. That can be worn long after a wedding Ariane we are so excited to have you with us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks thanks for having me. So we're going to start how to start all interviews scam your recipe breasts. Sure so after college. I went to under business. School at University of Michigan. Got An internship and then a job American Express in New York City. Climb myself up the corporate ladder for about nine years before realizing that it wasn't necessarily the right move for the rest of my life and then really. Fortunately I was engaged at the time and started my first business. Realizing there was a white space in the bridesmaid's dress market where I wanted to create address that women wear again after the wedding and that was my first baby and then after that I got pregnant a few years later and realized that nobody was speaking of pregnant girls who were looking for someone to really understand what they were going through. And that's when hatch was born since then. I've been managing companies. Why something that? Your team would be surprised to learn about you. I'm an avid puzzle. So before we get into your story. It's obviously hard to these remote interviews and not talk about the time we're living through right now with cove nineteen. It is so difficult to be a business leader at this time. But it's also terrifying when you think about what expectant. Mothers are thinking about an everything. That's on their minds right now. How are you helping both leave your team and also your customer through this just to step back? This is such a strange unique moment. Not only as a citizen and a human being but as a mother and then a CEO and a founder. So I've been going through many emotions and ebbs and flows personally and at the same time trying to prioritize what needs to happen for us to make sure that the lights stay on because we had to make unfortunate furloughs and layoffs and pay cuts to really make sure that we could get through the survival mode this moment of just getting through to the other side and that took the first three to four weeks of just navigating professionally how we were going to see hatch birds through the storm and now that things are starting to feel a little bit more normal. Were able to turn to our community which we've been so focused on for the last couple of years and yesterday we launched an amazing resource page because just the terror that these women are feeling right now the unknowns the questions that aren't answered yet about being pregnant during this time we're hearing them loud and clear so I'm so proud. That hatch now is kind of a foundation and a resource for all questions not all questions but a lot of questions and resources that are out there for pregnant women. It's such a scary time in anything we can do outside of just selling them beautiful product and things that make you feel better. What else can we do? We can hold your hand and let you know that there are people listening and that we've got your back so we actually asked our audience what they wanted to ask you something. Our community wants to know is how are you balancing productivity while working from home while maintaining sanity? We're working on maintaining sanity got some great advice the other day that when thinking about your employees and their productivity working from home. They're not working from home in a normal situation. We're working from home in a crisis right. So it's just a totally different. Playing field and our expectations are totally different. And so this time. Around or leading with empathy and making sure that our employees are feeling safe and okay. Our team got hit pretty hard. Several of my team has recovered from Cova. So we have been doing mornings. Zoom calls and and you know it's been very apparent over the last few weeks. Some of us are second not feeling great. And that's been emotional in pretty tough for the team to get through so uniting and making sure that the team knows that we're there for them and leading with human. I has been a real win for us. I'm really grateful this morning as surprised the team with a day off tomorrow and everybody was very very appreciative and I think it went really long way just so that they know that we support being saying and breathing and kind of trying to find some normal right now. We want to go back to how you started your career. You started on Wall Street American Express and you work your way up there but we spent a Lotta time in corporate America and you know Daytona both come from a big corporate company in curious. What do you think you learned most from being in a large organization? And what would you tell those? Who are listening who might still be employed at large organizations. Went to soak out of that experience. First and foremost thing. My appreciation for American Express and the corporate world has only grown as I've gotten further and further away from it. I think the idea that they celebrate especially Amex celebrates the fact that you can move around to different jobs During your career path they really urge you to get different tastes and flavors of your career as you're moving up and I really appreciate that because when you're running a small business you know there's there's no pinch hitters. Nobody's replacing you. There's no wind if you go out on maternity leave. That job is kind of vacant for that time so I really appreciated the fact that they wanted diversity in in your experience I also really appreciated the benefits and the fact of working together and just the the structure and organization that takes years to build in a small business. Because you don't necessarily have those people in that pecking order to kind of guide. You and so I was able to take a lot of the feedback forms just the way that year ends were handled and bring them to both my companies and make it feel a little bit more official and I would have never have known how to do that. Had I not had that experience I think a lot of people obviously would have been happy to climb the corporate ladder especially at a place like Amex. What is it about your upbringing or the people around you you had or even your education that you think made you. WanNa take the leap into doing something different. You Know Amax is a beautiful organization. It was almost like golden handcuffs especially as entering your thirty s and potential motherhood. I mean they treat women so fantastically maternity care at the whole bit. I have a certain thirst for life and I've always. I was born ambitious after spending eight years growing growing on this journey. I wanted more and I needed to kind of use my hands to make something happen. I'm daughter of to entrepreneurs my parents work together my whole life so we would be at the javits center and I'd be kind of those booths with them and I just you know I would nowhere. Their factories were in India in New York and I kind of knew the language and the recipes there and I just a little claustrophobic in the corporate safety and you live once and I want to take risks and I was searching for a way to express my creative my creativity and I. It wasn't necessarily something I was able to do it Max so I went to Parsons at night to try and kind of cultivate something and I thought Interior design might be that and then I fell in love with a creative filmmaker. You didn't understand any of the ACRONYMS that was talking about American Express and he urged me to kind of really chase. My creative dreams and of us are born with talents and arts and some of us have to find it so I was searching for mine having a business school education and also kind of being savvy in the fashion front when I was getting married and realizing that nobody was kind of fitting that void of why do you have to hate your best friend for buying a bridesmaid's dress one like there should be a celebratory. You great you want to feel hot and sexy and awesome at your friend's wedding. Why do you have to suffer and spend money to do so so that that kind of light bulb and off? That's where I really knew that there was something there. And that's what kind of urged me to take the chance to jump ship. So let's talk about that moment. You went into what the idea was for two birds but you were experiencing a lot of changes kind of all at once getting married thinking about potentially leaving Amex. What was going through your mind. I was searching for something to hold onto to grasp onto something that gave me the momentum to kind of say. It's okay to take this chance. This risk my parents wanted me to stay safe. I remember talking to my mother-in-law. She said absolutely do not quit your day job area. You'd be nuts and yet it wasn't good enough for me because I couldn't imagine the next ten years of my life climbing this ladder higher and higher so for me. I was using the transition as time to ask the questions and kind of get comfortable with the change because my life was changing. So why not throw something else into the mix because if we're GONNA start a fresh really start afresh. But I wasn't that bold what I did was. I was fortunate enough to sign on with Amex a consultant. Which allowed me to get incoming. Y- dollars a paycheck while I was able to kind of build two birds and go to the factories. And do some of that stuff so I was able to. Kinda work both where it wasn't lacquer white all or nothing I want to understand. Can of your poached to side. Hustles. Especially right now. In a time where a lot of people need to be creative about thinking how to turn their side hustles into their main hustle. Choctaw US just a little bit about how you treated. Your Company Aside Hassle. I think anything that inspires you on the side like starting a business recreating something. That wasn't there if that passion is inside you and you can feed it daily somehow one way you know designing your logo putting it on a business card sending it to anything. That's kind of low lift to get that snowball rolling. I mean that's when it's building in. You're not necessarily doing a one eighty and shifting everything but if you can build something that has value enough to make that change Safer for you. My advice would be to do something every day. That just kind of drives that forward because before you know it you're going to build something really beautiful or you're gonNA ask your questions and find out the hard way that maybe it's not. It's not viable but at least you're doing it on the side where you're not you don't have everything on the table. So let's talk about the other white space that you discovered which is when you're pregnant. Talk to us. About what the sturdy was what you came upon crazy. It was just really an idea. I was wearing vintage moves and dresses and I've always loved my mom's kind of south of France fashion and just I was always looking for ways to feel beautiful and when you walk down the street and you feel beautiful regardless of what you look like. It's that feeling inside. People notice and when I was pregnant I felt amazing regardless of nausea. I felt powerful. I was growing something inside with a man that I loved like I was just. It was just an amazing moment but there was nothing out there that allowed me to celebrate that moment and there was nowhere. I could go. I was so excited to enter this new category and figure out what was out there so I can have that conversation with that community and I just couldn't find it and so I would get stopped on the streets for my style and it just dawned on me. Well if no one's talking to this community someone has to and I think because of the success of tubers and the fact that I was able to take that concepts across the world ultimately I had the confidence to start hatch which at the time I thought would be a layup and it completely different business model. A completely different set of challenges. But here I am eight years later and it's just incredible. Why do you think that there was that white space in maternity? Wear which is when you think about such a big category. So a lot of people including investors are daunted by the fact that it's a finite period of time right so women would be spending on themselves for what say seven to ten months during this time. And what does that look like from a lifetime value of a customer? That's on that front but on the fashioned front at the time social media wasn't celebrating self hadn't necessarily kind of come to their their fullest and vogue. And W W D. A lot of people wouldn't write about the category because it was almost poo poo for women to celebrate a growing and changing body. Fortunately that has changed so much. I think women's self confidence and the perception especially with instagram. And these editors over the years kind of turning the phone on them and wanting to look good and feel good women. Now recognize that rocking. The bump is something that's amazing and I'm so grateful that I and hatch went against the curve. I had no choice but to keep going. Even though a lot of these press outlets wouldn't cover US I. I saw the need of the community but it was just a harder left. Because I couldn't get the coverage that I needed to kind of breakthrough and then as the first few years past. We finally saw the light and people were turning and saying Pregnant women are actually powerful and beautiful and hatch. Was there when they were ready for us. Which has been amazing the last few months? I've been thinking a lot about what my wellness routines should be. And then the world through me for loop and was like why. Don't you stay home and think about this a lot? So I've been thinking a lot about how to best take care of myself which also means I've been thinking about revisiting my morning and nighttime routines one thing we found to give our nighttime routine boost is estee. Lauder advanced night repair. It's got lightweight and oil free serum it fights the look of key signs of aging. So you can wake up to more rested. Healthier looking skin will take it. It has powerful antioxidants and Hyler onic acid. It reduces the look of lines and wrinkles for radiant younger looking. Skin HAD TO ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. DOT COM. Start Tonight with estee. Lauder Advanced Night Repair Serum so in listening to you. It's very obvious like we both are smiling. When you're talking about growing up ambitious and kind of the natural hustle that you very clearly had an. I think like an authentic sense of confidence. I WanNa understand what your mindset was in the early days of hatch. Did you know that it was gonNA take off and it was going to take time? Did you have self-doubt around it? I'm curious kind of where you were from a head space standpoint. I went at it with nothing to lose so I let myself a few hundred thousand dollars from two birds to build the website and to get samples but I didn't know what I didn't know which was the blessing because if you understand what a big beast it is to build a business. I would have gotten started so the way I approach. Things was just to kind of build from ground up. I didn't have kind of an end goal because I don't know I didn't know how to grow at the time million dollar company a two million dollar company. I was just trying to get product in front of women who wanted it and so that's just day by day ground up and that's been my approach to growing hatch from the GECKO. I'm not necessarily trying to work backwards from this end goal. I'm trying to build a brand. That means something to women where they can look when you hear the word hatch smile because in someone's life we made a difference whether it's beauty or community or fashion. We mean something to people that to me is what it's like to build a brand so when you start that every day is different Challenge experience failure but because you're building from ground up. I was building kind of support underneath me every time I fall. I wouldn't fall too hard because there was nowhere to fall right. You know I was just going day by day and fear and Embiid Bishen together is incredibly powerful. I didn't know where it was going to go. I just knew that women needed this. And if women need this it was just a matter of figuring out how to get it to them and at the time was happening and worby and all these online companies were starting to blossom and unlike tubers which was much more of an appointment based brand more manual so to speak hatch had to be in the digital landscape and that was unfolding and it was time for digital so paid strategy to acquire a customer. That wasn't really in play. I didn't have like. Oh my God we're going to get the money to acquire new customers for me was how am I going to get people to tell people that there is a solution out there for them and how can leverage old school. Pr To get the word out there so it was very grassroots and raise money for the first six years. Who are you talking us through it? I have some other. Friends were entrepreneurs. Fortunately both tech friends creative a friends you know building. A business in a spectrum is three six day ride so when I think about who helps me. It's who's smarter than me in this specific question that I have and fortunately I've surrounded myself with amazing friends who depending on what they can. Help me and just kind of helped me. Along the way at the time Serena from strain Lilley was a fantastic female mentor. Who is definitely a couple years ahead of me so early on I would call her off in just to get some advice on on whether or not was doing things the right way. You started a company when you had a newborn which is very on brand sick in that way you know. Great timing in another way could be doubly exhausting Was that time like I have to tell you the adrenaline. I had me when Charlie. My first daughter came out when I looked at her. It was like a starting line. She came with me. I was working. I didn't have really an office for the first eight nine months so I was working from home. But you know newborns sleep most of the time but I was so inspired an ambitious and excited that it wasn't really like an either or it was just like okay. Let's do this. I'll breastfeed do line plan. I'll go to the factory. Fortunately I had some help so I have to say that that was incredibly beneficial to allowing me the time and the freedom to pursue this but it was adrenaline. Having Shirley was my impetus to to making sure that this happened. Let's talk about that. Markle sparkle was awesome. So for those. Who Don't know what we're talking about. Can you walk us through what happened? Yeah I mean January tenth. I I know the date very well because it was my birthday so to speak allow January tenth I woke up in the morning to a bunch of texts from some of my friends in London saying she's in hatched she's an hatched and I was looking around and they're Meghan Markle was for her first appearance doing public visit and hatch dress and it was kind of the official announcement of her in society wearing maternity piece and it was hatch and I gotta say out of all dreams. It's so funny because it's rather small and spectrum of life but what an amazing experience and what they say is true. I mean the traffic. When off the charts? You can't pay for the press. That happens when the princess. Where's your stuff and it was just one of those moments where I was able to sit back and say. Wow Hatch has made it as a brand. I mean this is really cool because you can't gift royalty right so I was able to push that along at all. She and her her stylist obviously chosen. And it was a great day so talk about community and what community is for your brand community right now to me is number one and it didn't start that way. I started off making beautiful clothes and then I was hearing questions from women about. How can I get a trusted source of everything that I need to get through this time and while it was always working with amazing women going through this time and it was connecting the dots only when we opened our first retail store and had this roof to bring women you know underneath and educate them? Did it dawn on me how much the in person community piece of hatch was missing? And how much people wanted it. We've opened two stores sense in. La And New York and we do all forms of amazing community educational seminars for these women. Whether it's lactation consultants prenatal consultants music classes for new moms where you can meet people who have babies the same age as you. It's really just been the most remarkable halo effect to the brand and while I'm really good. Person Hatch was always about revenue and driving sales and selling stuff and now hatches about uniting people who need us all ways for someone who believes in building a brand from ground up. That is been the most amazing evolution. And I'm really so proud. You had bootstrapped the company for six years as you said before you brought on outside funding and you recently closed your series a. It wasn't the first time you had approach of fundraise. Can you talk through what that process is like with the caveat that we would say raising money be worse process ever? It's an absolute fulltime job. And I speak business. I know business but I'm really creative part and that's where I wanNA spend my time. And the first few times I went out to raise money. I did it on my own. I was pregnant with my second daughter. Georgia and I was out there meeting every single day. Just would several several people a day taking all of your energy pitching your concept and I got exhausted and I. I realized that I couldn't do this by myself. And I was eight months pregnant and so I took a little break the first round of fundraising and then I had Georgia and I was able just to kind of gather myself and my thoughts has been profitable for the first seven eight years so looking for money was really to fund some big ideas. I had to really step on the gas and grow this thing to its potential and that was developing beauty and opening retail stores. So I can build out the community and the hand to hand touch with the product but it wasn't absolutely vital for me to survive and so I was able to take that break for a second and really reassess kind of how I was going to approach this without killing me where I can also kind of support the team that I was growing and be a good leader and be a good vision air fundraising just takes you off of all of those things and I was just exhausted and as I was taking my space and kind of regaining that Sanity I. It was very clear to me that I needed help and I needed help on the inside of someone to really run operations and do the things. That aren't my favorite spots. And then I'm not necessarily the best at it was then that I connected with someone who is now my coo who she is fantastic and speak. Spreadsheets and fundraisers and cap tables and knows everything that I don't really wanNA focus on and so with her and getting to know each other ten months later we decided to go back out to the market and it was me being able to fill those voids of where I didn't feel competent and having that confidence to go back out there where we had proof of concept again I bootstrap this. I didn't take a salary for the first five years. Blood sweat and tears everything. I could possibly show that I was in this to win it married with someone who could sharpen the Pencil and get into that room and talk the talk together. We did it and found amazing investors. What are you like as a manager? I lead from the heart. I really take pride in that and I have some room to grow in and not letting the days that are tougher. Get the best of me. And in order to motivate and inspire my team sometimes they see how I'm feeling before I even like sit down at my desk and I'm really working on kind of tightening. It's nobody else's fault. What happens to me right so trying to figure out how to kind of balance. That and I've been going through coaching for the last two years which has been a game changer. For me and trying to separate the emotion and the littoral from really building an organization. Amazing people that care so much about what we're doing and inspiring them to do their best work and be the best that they can be so that they can stay with me or move on to something that that makes them happy when you think about how to protect against what you're talking about in being remote right now. What are you like as a manager remotely? And what is your advice for those who need to kind of show a stronger face for their teams right now? Yeah it's not easy but I will say connectivity you know. We didn't have morning meetings every day in person. I think everybody's yearning for an for connectivity. I happen to be fortunate enough to be in a house where I can look out at nature Some of my employees don't have that luxury leading with empathy and allowing us to all be human I. This whole thing puts so much in perspective rates so The email that you know. That didn't necessarily tell the story properly. Like how important is that right now in the realm of things and so I've been able to reprioritize shift what's important and I really think in my in my leadership right now. Just chilling out a little bit and backing off and letting people find their groove and taking a little pressure off. The top has really been helpful for everyone and again. We're going to get through this. We're going to be on the other side of this but making sure that people are okay on a daily basis is our number one priority. I hope every morning and I'm pretty confident every morning in our meetings that they're feeling that I think it's going a really long way okay. Let's go to our last round her favorite round the lightning round. So we'll ask you short questions. You answer as fast as you can. What's replace your morning commute the class by Taryn to me. I've been dying to try it. Everyone is saying the I haven't done it. Virtually I won't go in Person Online. It's amazing because it's emotional in the music. Let's a lot of stuff go out in happen. It's pretty great. Can Escape your nighttime routine for us. Dinner my husband's becoming an excellent cook which is fantastic for me with the family. A lot of puzzle time. We've gone through maybe five puzzle so far. Who Do you want to be in a puzzle exchange with me? Oh my God I would love that A bottle of wine and then finished off when the kids were down with a Tequila on the couch in front of the fire with my husband. Gas White is for those who are searching for things. Try to entertain young kids anything that you found to be helpful in quarantine. A gardening set off Amazon where we can grow herbs and watch them grow every day which is like super helpful to see progress happening and I think I need that for myself. Yeah it's pretty awesome. Tastebuds kitchen is amazing where you can kind of set up shop and live stream while you're making stuff and outside of that yum trying to get them off the computer as much as possible. Now that education is on the computer. Were actually working out together. Hatch does daily workouts where we to like the whole team to like tunes and my kids are part of that so trying to think outside the box as the weather gets nicer. Hopefully getting them out of here. Are you getting dressed like you would for work or YOU PAJAMAS? I am getting dressed in the morning. I wouldn't say like for work but I will say I am making myself feel good in the morning and it really helps productivity and when my team sees me in the morning on zoom. I want to show them that. I'm ready to go and at least from the waist up. We're looking good. That might be some inspiration for me but but maybe maybe not maybe after another month way is the last show you streamed or benched Unorthodox Metoo so good so good okay. Shameless plug for coming out with a content platform called Babe Babe by hatch. It's the strategist needs baby center. And it's everything we need to know. And why. Why do our kids? Pr New SELENE BAGS. Can ID my placenta while I'm driving. It's all the things that just keep us up at night and the hypocrisy of leatherhead. We has one of your children. Actually Pete Honestly Bag. I mean how about a paint brush across it of Lake Nona superbowl paint now. It say what time limited edition bag okay. Well this has been lovely Q. I think that's a great way that yes. Thank you so much. And congratulations on everything. Thanks for having me stay safe. I everyone we're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty. We WanNa take a moment to spotlight some new female founder. We've heard from many incredible skimmers. Who are leading small businesses and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin from the couch see. The Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or a friend. My name is Mary mcgrew. And I'm the founder and CEO of supply supplies more than so simply supplies. The best. Hope for you the health of your skin and our planet. Plus every ounce of so quite so sold funds life seating water sanitation and hygiene initiatives around the world. Everyone needs though and today. That's even more true than ever before our small all female team is working day and night to make sure that we're getting soap in all the hands that need it right now and that means that on top of our normal donation of one dollar for every eight ounces of Soak sold. We are also choosing to donate our product to match the need for so great here in New York City where we're base. I'm literally packing five gallons of soap at a time and putting it in suitcases enrolling it through the streets of New York City to make sure that homeless shelters and other organizations that need it have it. We are also seeing our community asking questions around Washington so and we've prioritized ensuring that we're getting people the information that they really need and on top of that. We're making sure that our community has Needs so that they can stay clean and healthy and honestly that houses working into the wee hours of the night pretty often these days like so many small businesses were working hard to solve the challenges that are being thrown at us every single day. But we're also celebrating. Wins things like the fact that last month we were able to donate more than we have ever been able to donate in a single month being able to provide something that people really need and being able to give back is something has kept us extremely motivated as a team. Get Twenty percents off supplier when you use the code the skim at checkout. Just go to so Cli- box DOT COM that's S. A. P. P. L. Y. B. X. Supply box dot com hit a starter set subscription or bundle depending on your soak needs so high is more than so end. Your purchase means more than you know in advanced. Thank you for being a part of our story for making a different side washing your hands. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information you need to start your day sign about the skin dot com. That's the S. K. I. M. Dot Com. M's for a little something extra.

Hatch New York City founder and CEO founder Amex Lauder hatch US official American Express University of Michigan American Express Danielle Weisberg Aryan Goldman Meghan Markle Copeland Georgia nausea DOT COM Cova
Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department: I started seeing that when I advocated for people, it was different than other people doing it.

Skimm'd from The Couch

35:51 min | 1 year ago

Jennifer Justice, entertainment exec and founder, The Justice Department: I started seeing that when I advocated for people, it was different than other people doing it.

"Today's episode is sponsored by stay. Lauder the nighttime skin-care expert will explain in a bit but first let's get into the episode. I started seeing that when I talked and advocated for people. It was different than other people doing it. I was really doing it from a place of I knew of the right thing to do. That was really advocating for people who deserved what I was asking for. I'm Carl I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk at all out than where it began on a couch today. We welcome Jennifer justice to skimmed from the couch as an entertainment EXAC and she spent her career advising some of the biggest names in music. You may have heard of some of her clients. They include Jay Z and beyonce. She has now started her own company. The Justice Department's we love the name. It's a female. Focus Legal and advisory firm dedicated to helping women achieve their business potential. Jennifer Works Senate too happy here. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here. I am obsessed with the Justice Department as the name and still jealous so I will just skim your resume for us right. I'm from Washington state originally and I came out to the East Coast to go to law school cornell. I went to university Washington before that and when I was trying to figure out what I wanted to do after college have any mentorship so I looked on. Tv lawyer Doctor. Banker is that and decide. Be a lawyer after graduating from law school however and got into big wall. Street firm called Hubbard and read litigator and realized that I didn't really have any connections to get clients. A who could I attract his clients and I really had a passion for music so I started looking to being an entertainment lawyer and started at From called Kottakal Carol. We don't Graffman. I started working there. There was a very then unknown artists at that time named Jay Z. I started working with him. At building up. Working with other artists for Mark Ronson and outcasts method man. Red Man it's Cetera on then I helped. Jc START ROCK nation. I did that deal and win. Inside as the general counsel then became the MVP doing all strategic marketing and business development tizzy hobbies into businesses. And I was helping him. And the other artists that were on the roster from viansa Arizona and Cohen Hymens onto gold etcetera. Do the same. And then I went to superfly president of corporate development helping them build out there entertainment properties and then I started the Justice Department Peres so much there to dig into all of this as kind of lay the foundation. Here what is something that is not on your linked in or that bio you just gave that we should know. I don't love Sushi okay. That's that work okay. I want to just go back a little bit. You're from Washington state. Where exactly I was born in a small town called Centralia Washington. No it is most known for being the halfway point between Seattle and Portland on I five. Okay talk to us by your upbringing. Was Your family situation scenarios. A very you know working class town. My family was like loggers. They own little. You know mom and pop grocery stores and you know no one went to college. Everyone got married and had kids very early. Like sixteen fifteen seventeen like really early and it was just kind of expected of you. No one really thought about going to college but I started doing really well in school at a very young age and you know my head. Teachers were saying you know you should really think about moving on. Beyond what is expected of you here and then. My mom got remarried. When I was in sixth grade on in ninth grade we moved to eastern Washington to Yakima Washington. It's a very kind of wealthy community. You know so kids were going to college. They were going off to Stanford Harvard. And you know even you know U. DUB which school but they were going off to college so I was like okay. I'll do that when we've met you've talked about a lot about your mom and the influence that she had on you Tell us better. You know we didn't have a lot of money so she had to be very crafty with how she raised us. She was in and out of some bad marriages and I was me and my sister and then she got remarried and we had you know younger brother so to figure out what to do with three kids on very limited money had a fetus. How TO GET PEOPLE TO WATCH US etcetera? You have to be very smart and with how you're taking care of your kids yourself and feeding us all. Was your mom surprised that you wanted to go or sue getting out of Washington right. I think so. Everybody was a little surprised but they weren't at the same time because I was very gregarious and various. Martin vary like ambitious from a very young age. I could see myself in a place like New York City at a very young age. But it's also a fear based thing. It's like what happens. What happens if you fail? What happens if you know you go like it's really scary because it's really the unknown but from my perspective? I was like the only thing that happens if I don't go is I'm still here. So what's the worst that can happen? So you end up going to you DAB. A law school and coming to New York. Walk us through what it was like to sort of be the kid from the city coming into these corporate law firms and it sounds like you were such a rising star growing up in the schools that you were and did you still have that confidence that you the star or was there a moment where you're like. Wow everyone here is also really ambitious. You start noticing things it's like you're the rising star and then you can get to you wwl. There's other people are smart. You know. And then you're like okay but I'm still kind of a star after four years and then you get to Cornell and like Oh wait there's only stars but there's people who lost names match the buildings you know and you're like okay. I can't compete with that you know. And nobody is the Justice Department's Shit. No one had my last name. Thank you carly so you. You start going okay. Well what makes me different? And how can I separate myself? And what is my star because it's different than the other people regardless of how you were brought up so it was scary and you know a lot of imposter syndrome like should I be in this room which you know when you have that and you have that as women in your have just as a child you have that for your entire life and it just something that. I have to talk to myself constantly about when you look back at that time. Is there something that you remember where you're like? Oh my God. I didn't do that or I said that because of imposter syndrome I mean there's so many things a lot of time when I was in the music industry as a music attorney didn't really put myself more for a myself. I it's like I was getting a lot of clients but there's a lot of times before every phone call I'd be like Oh okay now. I got myself for this. You know I loved what you said about figuring out what it is about you. That's different regardless of how you grew up or your circumstances. What was that for you? And when did you start to figure that out? You know it takes a while. You're like there's no in there telling you you're great and you deserve to be here and I would see people reacting me in a different way and it took a long time it took. It took some therapy at took an executive coach really to be like you have these patterns in your life and I started seeing that when I talked and advocated for people all. It was different than other people doing it. I was really doing it from a place of I knew it was the right thing to do. And even though there were financial benefits it wasn't just like being an activist. It was really advocating for people who deserved what I was asking for an almost getting a lot of that. Push back on it. I was like okay. I'm really onto something. Because if they're just GONNA capitulate than obviously wasn't asking for an off and so it kind of drove me and I knew that that thing was that I was really good at advocating and really good at marrying art and commerce. When did you start getting into the world of US editions and entertainers? So I mean even when I was in Seattle I was hanging out in the grunge scene. You know we didn't know the whole world was paying attention even though we all these bands have been signed and not albums out. It's small in comparison to New York and so I just identify with most of them from my background. You know and they weren't college educated. Are I WANNA jump into Jay z? just lay some groundwork hair. Where was Jesse his career? How old was he roughly us about what he just recorded? The hard knock life hadn't come out yet and so she was probably what twenty eight twenty nine and he'd really reasonable doubt volume on and he was about to release hockey. It's right before he becomes a superstar. Yeah what was your first meeting with him. Like I had been a fan of reasonable doubt which when I interviewed at Carol Grade on and they're like how do you even know who he is? You know because it's an amazing at that point as many copies as it has now and then we had to go to a meeting. Def Jam which was a tiny company at the time and I'm met him for the first time walking in so only seen a picture of him and I didn't realize how tall he was and hoskin skinny was. Are you like Mr Carter? It's nice to meet you or like Jay Z. No he liked leans over in the introduces himself. And I always like. Oh I'm your day. What does he yeah? I'm Jay now it's like I'm your new attorneys. Oh you're jj you know. And that's what we're not does he call you. J. J. Yeah J. J. my good friend Jay. He's famous for being an incredible businessman. He is known to be Astute at identifying business opportunities optimizing for them and obviously doing really well and making money. How did you get him to trust you? He knew that I was fighting for him. You know that really cared about what his assets were how he should be treated and I just saw really early on. I mean hip hop wasn't even on you. Know live telecast of the grammys. At the time they didn't even have a billboard chart separate for it and he came out breaking all these records you know he just saw how much you know. I fought for him and cared about making sure. He got what he deserved. I'm just fascinated. What was your lifelike at this point? We're you going out with these guys every day all the time all the time. How does that work? When you're the lawyer going out with them at that would make me like very very anxious. Yeah so I mean look. I listened things. You don't get involved in the entertainment attorney right. So there's no company in the ministry that is open before ten. Am there's no reception. Nobody's answering the phone before ten and then a lot of shows are at night so it just is you know what I mean. And it's just the way that the business works the you know. There are a lot of us running around together all the time they were in it and it was a lot of fun. How old are you roughly at this time? Mid Twenties like a young kid. Yeah but you're US superstar lawyer superstar lawyer. How did you ensure that you were respected as a professional while also socializing with your clients and I'm GonNA assume maybe not the most professional settings board room at night? How did you find that balance? Well I didn't to be honest with you. I was just going along because all the guys were to right and I was like well. You know it's fine everybody else's out and then there was a shift actually and I started to realize that one client in particular not any of them that I've mentioned and he's in a little bit of a different genre Saami outlet at night and was like I don't like my lawyer being out late and I was like okay but I was with your male lawyer and you didn't say anything about that that's when I really started to see because again I didn't have any mentorship so I didn't know that women are treated differently in Business. I didn't know there were glass ceilings and then all of a sudden I was like. Oh there's a double standard and what was your reaction to that at first I was like. Oh my God you're right. This is awful and it was like wait a minute. No this is not cool because I'm in the same room with other male attorneys other managers. Other you know accountants. This is the music industry music. Entertainment Law. We're not curing cancer solving world world. Peace here so it was very eye-opening to me when I think about some of the people that you've worked with even early on whether it's Mark Ronson obviously Jay Z. Back in the day and then you know to what he is today and beyond say specifically talking about those people it's a mix of creatives who have strong business intuition. How do you think through when there is a creative idea that super compelling but the business around it just doesn't necessarily make sense thus the thing it's like the creative and the business half to meet and if they don't then you know whoever it is my clients they have to make the decision? Do they want to fund it? Is this a nonprofit that you partner with a museum you have to do the math and give them all the options? What could really be the outcome? Is it you paying for it? Is it finding philanthropists to pay for it or returning in this into a real business? And that's my job is helping them Mary. Art and commerce. We are all in a period of working from home for the foreseeable future. Thanks to cove nineteen and if you're like us it means that the workday just kind of goes on and on and on because there's sense of routine and we're already home and there's a lot of screen time and screen time back to back is not good for anyone. We recognize how lucky we are to stay at home. But we're trying to focus on a little self care so fortunately we found a great way to put that Aren are into practice and that's with anr Estee Lauder advanced night repair serum use it before your moisturizer. The fast penetrating serum helps can maximize its natural ability to repair by night and protect by day. Like a superhero but for your skin. When over five hundred women tried it. Eighty percent noticed more rested healthier looking skin in four weeks. Their skin fell more hydrated and had a radiant glow head to ESTEE LAUDER DOT COM to learn more. That's E. S. T. L. A. U. D. E. R. Dot Com star tonight with Estee Lauder advanced night repair serum. What's your personality like as a lawyer and I say that knowing we worked with lawyers who are very quiet they take it all in and then put them on the phone and it's like Oh my God really a pit bulls. Yeah obviously. There's like their reputation or stereotype of like litigator. Where do you fall on that kind of in between all of that? But no one has ever referred to me as a wolf it's aggressive. I've been called a tiger. I don't yell let somebody starts to really disrespect me. Then I'd totally raise my voice. Certain men you talked to you know like okay. Stop yelling like if you would listen to me then. Maybe you could hear you know. I don't quit. Where does that come from? Is that from your upbringing? Where do you get the I mean? There's something nature versus nurture. I was born like that. I really found representing certain artists that it was like people would underestimate them and so came very easy for me and especially representing women became very easy for me to argue on their behalf and advocate on their behalf that they were literally being treated completely differently than a man. So it just came to me. Naturally I WANNA talk about your decision to become I think that it's something that a lot of our listeners. Think about you know. Once the best time how do I make sure that I'm optimizing for different options going to do to my career and you have a different story. Look we just talked about this amazing career I had you know is making money. I had every bag I needed and it was like really great but I was like I came from nothing. I'm sitting in New York City. Living in my grade apartment and Tribeca with all these great bags. I'm not religious but I was like why me. How did I get out of this situation? How did I get into this situation? Which is Great? There's gotta be more right so I like looked forward to my life in five years and I was like okay. What else is there just making more money and getting more bags and having better vacations and then I was like. There's got to be better reason. I need to have kids. You know I was so hyper focused and a tunnel vision of like my career my career because I never wanted to go back to where I was from and then I was like wait. What am I doing this for and so I was like I have to have kids but then it was like but I don't date men that I would want to have kids. I could ride thought was not like maybe I should date different men. It was kind of like a hard time to pivot. You know it was like in my late thirties. How am I my brain into something else and so I guess I gotTa do it on my own and I just started looking into it. I looked into adoption in. Ivf and everything. All at the same time. And I was going forward with all the same time I was very quiet about. Didn't tell anybody about it. You tell your family no told nobody. Because I didn't want anybody to be giving me out when I make a decision I just do it and I don't ask for permission because when I had in the past people. No you can't do that and I was like you know what I'm doing what I WANNA do. That's what I'm doing and so I just went forward and I remember there's is woman who has friends she needed IVF. She had him very quickly. So I was like what's that Dr? My friend wants to know and I went to him. I'd gone to like Cornell and they were like you can have kids by by blood test and I was like you don't know me you know and then I went to this one doctor and he was gay can and then you know we started. I started with him in January and I was pregnant with Jackie Nico by July. Wow see twins. I have twins that are currently six years old. Yes so you are about to have twins. You're an rock nation. Yes I am guessing that in the music industry there aren't a ton of female executives who are single moms who are about to have twins. No let me think None I mean there weren't a lot of women that I knew at that time doing that. I mean now you have more of on but like as Jackson Nico progress in school. They're going to be the first you know. What was it like from a career perspective? Well it was a little scary but Jay had just had blue right so we had other people in the in the company that had small kids. And you know once you have them in. You're like right okay. This is what this is. Why it's different. Everything that you do is to make them healthy unhappy and so I was confident that they were going to be very supportive of me. Which the absolute were. I didn't anticipate a couple of things like baby brain. It's real. I mean more mistakes after having them coming back after maternity leave than I'd ever made my entire career but you don't WanNa admit it right. No one wants to talk about it because you can't be a woman you're an executive so I don't think enough is talked about that postpartum depression. I definitely had a portion of that. And so you know it's a lot on your body's crazier literally like an all you can eat buffet like growing a human being and then it comes out and you're like oh my human all the hormones that are co your body. Got Flush out of your body. It's crazy so I didn't anticipate that and then I didn't anticipate the guilt of leaving them but like going okay. Here's this person that I've hired now. That is basically raising my kids for the most part. How long maternity leave to you take. I took two months. I mean it was up to me. It was really stupid. They were like whatever you need. You know. But when you're representing one person that needs that trust in privacy of that level it was hard to have somebody else come in and then I was like part time for another month. It was too much. I never should have done that but I survived. So you decide to leave rock nation and your kids were about two and a half years. You didn't have a plan and points no talk us through that point in your life. What were you thinking seriously so it was just like I had been there for. I'd been Jay for seventeen years at that point and we've grown rock nation. It was amazing but I knew that there was something else I needed to do. I'd spent a lot of time working with women in my spare time. Represented them as a music attorney as you know when they were getting their executive employment and I just wanted to like take reset at to go like okay. I've been working a hundred percent like forty hours a week. At least up to seventy eighty. Since I was fourteen years old. I never been unemployed and had money in my life and I was like we. What do I want? My kids. Are tuned a half. They're about to start preschool? I WANNA know that every time I leave them when I come back that they understand that. Mommy's leaving for purpose and passion and doing fulfilling work and I just needed a reset I it was like. Hey and then. I was like wait. Is this thing on my phone and then I was like. Oh my God I gotta get a job to do something. So what did you get well so then I went to superfly so I really was thinking okay. I was thinking about starting the Justice Department but I really wanted to focus on women and I don't think women were really ready for yet. Shockingly only four years ago women were still like. What do you mean we're treated differently? You know a really wasn't intellect Gretchen. Carlson in the METOO MOVEMENT. They started to you know. I've been talking to this company already. I met them when. Jay Z headlined. Bonnaroo superfly. They were raised the money and they wanted to expand really in the corporate development space. And think about how they could use their capabilities to to grow and you know it was still in New York. Still tangentially related music industries my network worked and I became the president and that was a really great transition kind of phase in that moment like that. That's a huge job Did you have any insecurity or awareness of where you still had? A skills gap. Yeah what was what was the learning curve for you. Well yeah then went in. I was like wait a minute do I not doing you know what I mean. Yeah like I was on autopilot forever and I was really really good and I could do my job my sleep basically I mean. Obviously there's a ton of juice in like it was a very challenging job but I knew the lane and now as I oh my God. I don't know the players the what if I don't know what I'm doing. The partners there were just really open. You know toes very. They're very supportive. And that was very helpful. You know I I had to go through it and be like can I do weight you can you know and just try to like think for the first time in a barely outside the box of like what would I do if Jay Z. Asked me to start a new business but it was a lot of imposter syndrome situ going on in my head for shore before we talk about your decision to start your own business with with the Justice Department. I WANNA go back to that moment that you just spoke about. Which was you left. Rock nation don't have a job it's before superfly and your phone goes silent Because I think about our day to day how often I'm on just texting e-mailing Lakey can't keep up right. Thea compounded with the fact that when you turn on the TV or watched the grammys. That was your yeah. Yeah did you have withdrawal? I mean honestly no. It was more like okay. I needed this quiet I knew this was the right thing for me. And for my growth as a just an executive human being and as a mom and a friend all of the above so I didn't people were reaching out like hey what do you WanNa do like. Let's talk about this. And and then because so many people reached on the very beginning about that and nothing was clicking. I was like I need a moment and I need to like just take a step back and the reason why I go back to that as I feel like you know you hear so much about glorifying being busy And I think we all have the moment in our daily lives were. We're like Oh man. I wish that I wasn't so busy. I wish that all stop but actually imagining what that is like. It's really scary. Yeah it is and I mean you would not believe how I'd say I would like oh I have a hole in my cashmere sweater. Let me drive up to fifty surgery. So yeah you make yourself busy. There's a lot of working at. I'd be sitting on the couch while the dog Walker came to get my dog. Okay let's talk. Starting the Justice boxster. That's what made you want to be a founder so it wasn't releasing. I want to be a founder. Like what am I really good at? And what is my passion? And what has not changed like I just saw a wide open gab whenever superfly and loved it but then I was like you know still doing things on the side. I was the chairwoman of we you know. I was joined the Board Annenberg Inclusion Initiative about female equality and empowerment and. I still giving all his advice to women you know when their executive contracts etc and like how get equal pay and I realized that I was making money for men by day. Trying to overthrow the patriarchy at night and I needed to walk the walk. I'd been asked by a few had been talking to a few different women about like perhaps coming in being the CEO or President of a female founded company and it sounded really great. But that was like but I feel like I have more to give. I feel like there's more experience that I can share and I just saw that. The wage gap was saying the same or only getting bigger and. I was Kay. How can I help this? I have advocated for an underserved population for a real long time now under Serb population has happened to be women. Even though fifty percent of the population nothing was changing. I knew I had an experience. That could really help them. And helping advocate for them and so it just clicked one day. I was like this is what I need to do. This has to be. My next step is to work with all female talent regardless of female founder female brand and executive still in a patriarchal system or any kind of talent and advocate negotiate their best business deals and like help manage and advise them and getting toward equality financial quality to man. Because that's how we're GONNA MAKE IT TO NUMBER ONE MISTAKE. You see women may at the negotiating table negotiating for themselves. Not Hiring people to do it. I mean most people don't have the means to other. Don't have the means to hire somebody to do it or in. Their industry may not be the norm or appropriate. Exactly yes. You can't do that you can't you can't play good cop bad cop at the same time. You don't have the means or it's not the norm in your workplace. What advice do you have for our listeners of? Don't make this mistake negotiating. Don't ever offer the first thing and negotiate against yourself. Let them come to you. You never know what they're going to you know if you don't feel like you understand it go you give me the offer. Somebody like a friend asked me for advice today. They got a job offer and the company said this is our best and final offer and they asked me to do. I push yeah. It's your advice in that situation. Yes you still push because you really want to go to a place like this is my best and final offer and if you ask me another question then you can't come here because that's what exactly they're going to be like when you work for them. I understand that some very like privileged kind of situation but I I'm I'm representing. Women like cease. We you know things because I really do believe that when women have more money and equal to men trickle down economics will actually work. And it's going to trickle down to what you said about women hiring people to negotiate a and I think is really interesting. Do you think that is a tactic that anyone should use or you think women's specifically need that buffer? I think men do it all day long. Of course they absolutely need it. Women pay a lot of money to get their hair done their nails done and childcare. Why is it in business that you think you gotta be like? Oh I can do this all myself. That's what men have been doing since the dawn of time. They were bred to do it. My six year old son is around other young boys. Their dads are all in finance. He turned here terms and understand and understand team in how you help each other. I wanted system where women graduate from college and they reach out to their mom network instead of their college. Roommate Dad Network and we can do that. It's just educating women. Unlike a deserve to have representation. Because that's one thing right like women are often like. I can't afford a financial advisor it's like. How much money do you need or a can't afford a lawyer? We'll we'll figure that out you know you're going into a situation where you're getting money. I can figure out how to extract more money. You need somebody to advocate on your behalf. have to climb to just sold their company and it was barely big deal. I represented Pierre and Christina Refinery. And they've said like I didn't find any twenty nine listeners. You know I didn't even know that there are people that could advocate for me on my behalf and fight that hard. I didn't even know it was possible. And of course it is. You know it's like so necessary for you to get that person that can get PAT. You Pass Your impostor syndrome like do I deserve it? You know because what you deserve is not even what you think that you need like. I'm fine with two hundred thousand dollars a year. It's like okay but the guy next to you mix four hundred so you need to get four hundred because if you don't get that then the girl behind you doesn't get it either and we need to educate women like no you're worth you know at like. Don't just ask for free advice all the time. Like or give free advice all the time. Like if somebody keeps asking you get into advisory percentage you know get on the board of that start really creating your financial worth because that is going to be where we move the needle and how. I can get a lot of these women to to start thinking differently especially if they have kids. You don't represent that company you represent your kid okay like Iras and Jackson Nico. You're working for a company. It's like that's that's who you're working for and get yourself out of that space and so if you can't really afford an advocate. Lynne. Then that's your voices that comes in. That's that's a great piece of advice. I feel very motivating. I've never thought about it that that actually is a simple switch. That thank you go along. I love that all right. We're going to be favourite segment right now. The lightning round. Are you ready first? Job Dairy Queen Workshop Dairy Queen and use. Skim your nighttime routine com home. Hopefully see the kids convince my son to go back to bed. After two times of waking up sit on the couch. Pretend I'm watching Netflix. Show while working and then pretend like I'm not working while in my bed and lines everybody about it the next day. What's the last Netflix? Show you pretend to to watch while working. Well this one. I actually did watch her. Just cheer what's your biggest vice tortilla chips and potato chips and wine is beyond say everything I want her to be. Yes yes I think. What does something about John? We should know they're just normal beautiful couple that love each other and like wake up every day. Who's your favorite artists? Dolly Parton? Ou I love that. What's your shameless plug? Oh my God. What the Justice Department only guy or US Jennifer thing or. Jj Yes thank you so much. Thank you thank you I everyone. We're trying something new during this time of economic uncertain date. We WanNa take a moment to spotlight new female founder. We've heard from many incredible skimmers where leading small businesses and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin from the couch. Siegel Lincoln are episode description. How to submit yourself or friends amy young. I am the owner and founder of Tribe which is an up cycling indigenous. Women owned business located here in New Mexico doing a lot of great work on our ancestral lands. I'm also Navajos. It was after thirty five year career in in the apparel business where. I just didn't feel like it was where I wanted to be. That current state of the business wasn't something that resonated with my soul. I had also given birth to my daughter and was a young mom and just decided that I wanted to do things differently. A Lot's the indigenous culture. Actually we look at what? The impact of each decision is six or seven or eight generations after us so it's actually just need socially conscious of mother Earth so I actually started jest using vintage found objects that were already here on the planet and finding ways just your reimagined them really slowly focusing on the upcycle process how has coveted nineteen affected rented. Try You know small business but we certainly felt the impact in our our sales over the last month but it gave me this ability to refocus and really get down to the heart of what I love. Doing which is the reason I moved back to new. Mexico was being a service. Might try so even. Though things got quite quiet on one side of things that quietness allow me to refocus and headed into religious starting on funding on a we quickly built a fundraising platform where we could bring a mediators auction or sale of items that are solely built for one hundred percent of the proceeds going to critical age. Navajo nation. We are religious facing the peak of Kobe in an area completely unprepared for that whether it be the hospitals the way the infrastructure is set up. So it's been a unique problem to look at. Certainly something as did not prepare an past business except that I could come up with some really exciting solutions for them. System of those things have been quick. Turn manufacturing for masks and everything entailed in making sure our Indian health services have the supplies they need and also really looking at the food because food was something that needed to be delivered. So we're working with major food vendors in the nonperishable area. It was always the path of getting to this point where I could be at service and I could help my community through this other life I had before. The name of fun is spread. Love Shine light pretty much all the channels for that are on our instagram. Which our website where you can give either test red light shine love working with indigenous impact rapid response initiative which is also a great auction donation but really finding any way we can to deliver aid on a very basis our website which is rented tribe dot Com. It's O. R. E. N. D. TRIBE DOT COM. You can find everything you need there. Regarding donations hike you can help even have an online auction. Thank you so much. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until then subscribe to our daily email. Newsletter gives you all the important news and information. You need to start Your Day. Sign up at the SKIM DOT com. That's S. K. I am DOT COM chew. M's for a little something extra.

Justice Department executive US founder attorney Jay New York president Estee Lauder Jay Z Mark Ronson Seattle New York City Washington Jay Z. Jennifer justice Cornell partner Jackson Nico
Joan Van Ark "What's *Knot* great about this?"

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

54:37 min | 2 years ago

Joan Van Ark "What's *Knot* great about this?"

"One. Regard. Joan van Arcus in my house. In the house are not Lynn. How's everybody? Okay. We've already bonded. We I didn't. That's what I wanted to start recording immediately because we've already bonded in so many ways, I look at you. You're beautiful teeny tiny you were just like a little tiny actress honeybee just. Honey is that you're buzzed? Yeah. Absolutely. You're not drinking. But you just had a little drop of Essen. My daughter said mom, do you know that is just once molecule away from Alabama hall navy? I'm doing my own thing. Honey wine. Let's use that backstage. That's your little. Yeah. At my security blanket. And is that all you Ingrid? No. It's been Anna's peanut butter, and I gave it up for lent, strong, Joan van ark. Aren't you really need a banana on the video cast? I will make me so much money. And if you love me, you will do that. I do love you, and I will do that. And you maybe not immediately. I'm going to save it. Met you at Donna mills Christmas, not to namedrop. But an I just 'cause I love you. And I we just bonded and first of all I was saying I was like how. You people are all just because Donna mills happy. You're just you're way prettier than normal. Humans like, you could tell Aaron spelling people you're like all of that must be a right shirt, Dallas knots landing. Yeah. Right. All those this palace, by the way that all started before I went to not slant who were valuing alley. News, the Dallas, and well, she was actually from Tennessee, Chris Chris left for three years, and then came back, and so we I made him get him. I shower naked and do a scene where he gets out of the shower morning. Yes. And I was like. Looks. Okay. Maybe not people our age that references so fresh. I was like he's doing it. No show. I love him though. Patrick duffy. He is the best without a doubt. Okay. I so many I don't even know where to start anyway, Donna mills, it is interesting to that a lot of people that play vicious horrible bitches are the nicest world, that's true. Donna is the most grounded even unbelievably professional all of it. And then she plays the bitch. Right. Right. I just I hate it for that. No. She does the best Christmas parties first of all everybody's there. Yeah. I felt like I was the ugly person in the air spelling with that talk about tiny and perfect and felt in all of it. Here's here's what you gonna find me. My future wife Joan van ark. I will. She goes, what's your sinus Lieber, she said oh gem manner because she's Gemini she goes, Jim. And I'm and I'm like, Honey. So I don't need a gym you need girl offense. You will find you tell you gotta give me the specs. We'll do it after the show. Give me the specs. I'll find not a dog. I wanna die. No. You almost kidnap both of my dogs. I wanted to because Lafi and hug -able. Yeah. And we had to put our golden down about a year ago. And we've been looking and looking and yeah, just hasn't happened. We have a deal. I will get you a dog if I. Bitches? You're funny. I did not know this about you your Hertie areas. Stop talking until we turn on the okay, speaking, cuddly and adorable. Your husband bind, you who is cancer and rock-solid he and Donna should go off into the sunset. You just told me he had cancer. Now kids are okay. Okay. John down astrology, she. So that kind of zippy way, that's. That's her. I tell you that was so terms of endearment is our, mommy, dearest. No, he's too. It's one month to the day. I'm June sixteen just Gemini. Yeah. July sixteen. Yeah. No Polian and his wife, whatever. Her name was. Wow. Good. Chris. You know when shit. Points. Good maybe later, but no Josephine they were the same way one month to the day award. So we're high school sweethearts so boring on so, yeah, no, I was saying a lot of my ex's urge. But and they say libra Gemini Aquarius. Like our air signs are the most air. That's it. And that's why I run I don't run now as walking walk jogging, I need air. And it's my glass of wine to go every evening after I've done the Joan van I do show really way you run to know. I trick wine hike you hike, and I walk. I can walk everyday. Well, you're in a beautiful place here to do this. Yes. Thank you. Perfect. What did you say the Joan van ark show? What are we talking about? That's what my husband calls every minutia boring horrific layered unbelievably obsessive thing that I do. It's the Joan van ark show. So and yet, here's the funny thing, you're one of those you've played like. You had how many husbands on Dallas? Have one in real life. Yeah. I have one been married since as I had eight husbands on more than Donna. Abby. A whore just say I love every second. It was wonderful depend on what season. Oh, she's. Oh. That you're always poor Val. How I know that was it. Until the central Val. No, you're supposed to swear on this show. Listen, if you're not going to drink or talk, politics or talk shit about Trump, you need to swear swear a lot ready. Okay. I'm there. I'm there. Donna, michelle. And I actually have been working on trying to do. I it was reality. We're not done yet. But now, yes. Cayenne OT on not done yet. And then we've also been pitched a scripted show, which we it's called was and it's really kind of a not a send up but a parallel on Charlie's angels. God. And he's called a calling. It ravens, Dan or something like that. He's road. Right. Ravens stand. But we're trying to put something like because I think the three of us, and it is absolutely true. We are not done yet. I'm sure you would go there when you say Donna mills Christmas party. This woman is flawless. I always want smacker. I was my friend invited me. She's her friend. I was like, oh, I am. So in there's nothing about that setting. You just said, and it's everything think it'd be a hallmark card. It is the food all of atmos- perfect was in an area spelling miniseries. Art one hundred percent, right. The house is exactly that. It's whatever was hobbled Joan in the front and the little paths up. I know it's too much. You'll make using the all made like a zillion dollars. Right. Well, we kinda did because it lasted New Year's off landing. It was more than that. It was fourteen total. Okay. And I left and ran away to do a pilot to comedy with Chris Maloney. Then came back for the very. Last season. But it just it went forever, which is quite a miniseries back to the cul de sac. Yes, you're missing. Got it going on. Indeed does. I'm gonna firmness. But anyway, but I know I okay. But the and you said Michelle, so we should people know you mean, Michelle Lee who is your real. You're very good friend on the series and in real life. Totally one hundred percent all three of us because I don't know when you spent fourteen seasons together sharing funerals, weddings. You mean fake ones? Real. Real John is a cancer does not have cancer and sharing real. We were sharing real life altering incidents both on and off camera. I remember when Michelle split with Jimmy tarintino who since has has God bless him. God, rusty soul. She called me. And said you have to pick me up today. I can't I can't drive out there. I can't she was so upset I mean, there's just so many layers that we've shared an moments, and so we we're joined at the hip. Yeah. Until we hit forest lawn. Okay. I told you when you walked in. I just wanna do a whole show on you. Giving me beauty tips. What first of all? 'cause I know people are going to wanna know, how do you stay that thin? How do you look so amazing? Well, first of all that the, and I know that and that's may be another discussion, but for me or lie handed porcelain figure. Well, here's the thing though. I have to my husband puts it you have to break a sweat every day. Well, I can do that on the set with flop sweat, right? But but in life, I do need the run. I have a lot of either energy or mental energy, or whatever it is an I need to level out. Right. And I do my best thinking on the run. I solve things that I can't otherwise deal with during the day. And somehow I I see the way out by doing the miles. And I do tend to twelve I've done fourteen marathons including Boston while which you have to qualify for you for women. You have to do with three and a half while fire which I did out here. It was. An exciting adventure. You walk over the starting line Qazir a bazillion runners. And when the goes off your way back probably go Hollywood actresses in. You know, it's like you because you do the work. I mean, 'cause you you know, you don't look like that by accident. No. Here's the thing. I think you have to buy mantra is you have to do the best and be an look the best. I have to there are two areas. That's Aaron spelling as I age. That's not a great fun thing. It's exhausting me. And you know, I need to go lie down with a coal towel. Because it just gets. My dog. No, if you had a he's concerned for our democracy, but that's not important now. We're gonna talk right. Just go ahead. Right. I'm with the dog what? Why? A little hot. By the way, charge a little judgy back there. I mean, I love him. And he's handsome and get the whole thing. I get the animal magnetism. But he was like, you know, I go for run or whatever that I have a drink. I'm like what John I get fucking three o'clock. So you know, what it's cocktail for me. That's bed. That's. Maybe he's going to join your may goes to bed at three o'clock. No Joan does. Oh Jones terrible. Because it's quiet and I owned now he's eating your pretzels. He's very should parties trained. Go home till I love it. No. This is home here. I love it. Very only. No, really. It's the real deal for sure so running every day. Wow. I need it too. Crazy. I used to run I I hike now and walk and do whatever doing whatever you're doing you. It's right. It's okay. There's something I my joints are too old. But you're look at you. You're wait a minute. You did a guest star on million dollar on the six million dollar man you stole some bionic. Joan van ark. Delighted me Noonan annoys him by onyx ongoing stuff in your arm. I know where did you get that I-? He pulls back thing and shows his arms with all the wiring. I said, ooh, where did you get that? You know? I remember. So it turned out to be gay. I had the biggest crush on Lee majors. I thought I was gonna merrily majors also Chad Everett and medical center, which you also that one. And he was mean to me because. Yes. But here's here's what what because he is gorgeous. And I loved every minute of that of looking at him. But they suddenly changed elastic and entire scene, and they handed me the pages saying, hey, we're chained in and he screamed and yellow. Oh with your. We're going to do it. We're gonna change it. And that just I I just completely locked, thanks. Well, you know, what you just made me gayer. Thanks. Not you know, what I still have my Chad Everett now, she's snow. No Lee majors Chad Everett. You're right. Good choices. If you're going to go that route fictional relationships this fictional men. Okay. Well, I go with it. I buy. Hold that thought. Joan. I this is so exciting this happy or I need to go take a little nap. And my casper mattress. Oh, the most comfortable bed ever it. Right. You've had one for years. Jody Hamilton finally just got one. Yup. Carlos is rocky is had one for years everyone's getting one because why warmer weather's finally here time for spring cleaning. You could spend time sprucing up house in yard. But if you really wanna I parts spart start. Yes. 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Casper dot com. The code is Miller and get one hundred dollars toward the purchase of select mattresses. Additional fees may apply for Alaska and white terms and conditions apply. Now back to you Joan. But you know, it's so interesting. We joke around about, you know. Aaron spelling pretty people. What it was he had that was at the party was in the creator of air spelling lessons there. No, he wasn't there. No, not him. But I'm sorry. Who was there that one of the executive producers who was done mills party? Well, I don't think it wasn't definitely wasn't Aaron spelling. Maybe maybe it was the one that did the movie she did with Jennifer Lawrence was anyway. But what I was saying, Jack. Oh, that's another discussion. What's happening? Okay. He's something. Oh, my dog is another the scene from airplane. Like, I'm looking at you in behind me, my dogs on being your husband. I apologize. Og, Stu love him. Yes. I have to say that my dog is going vow on your husband apologize now. Laurie. What was I saying? Oh, no. But you know, I the formula first of all look people do like to watch really pretty people. But here's the other thing. Not in your more. See, I think that's changing. Right. But what I'm saying is it is interesting because I told you politics in the eighties, right? Like, my dad ran with I voted for Reagan. I was a dumb you ac- kit. I didn't have voted husband to steal my eyes floors. So you dad that particular I vote different depending, you know. No, I, but what I'm saying is like it's interesting because you're saying like, you're from an era where people you don't talk politics, right? Where you're like. All you hear and see and breathe, right? Is different than the eighty like L title. Like Reagan seems like a nice guy. I didn't I was twenty one when I voted for I didn't. But I thought I associate that whole era right Dallas knots landing like right, though. It's perfect. You know, you have to be perfect in that it couldn't be more different. Now by it's in fact, the more imperfect would Patricia Arquette has just done a movie, which I'm dying to see I think it's called act. She's a moon chalices syndrome. You know who? Yes. And and the thing is she's right? I Dordogne that she says she's got the scruffy old wig on and she's disappearing into it. That's what an actress does in in trying to be perfect where read like Nancy Reagan on my God. That was that era and dynasty and Aaron jailing and all of that perfection. Perfection perfection. But now it's about real and kinda risky and edgy and rally show stars. Yeah. And everything you do far belch. It's it's everywhere. Yeah. I know. I know what about the Kardashian? Don't even get me. But you're right. This is how we got here to Donald Trump. Sorry, I'm talking. You're not talking about exam is that you're right. It's just it's it's the fame and the just, you know, anybody that's famous or a reality show star. I you know, it's weird. I was never a fan of reality shows from day one made them I never watched them. Well, as an actress, I'm not a fan because it's not scripted in. It's just whatever happens you. Oh. Oh into the bathroom. Yeah. I don't know. I don't use my point. I was trying to get to complement, and I weighed myself, but it was not just that you were pretty people who really great actors. I mean, you look at your background Broadway. Tony Tony award. Stage experience that that's the other thing is you were great actors, your just pretty the great storylines. It was CNN you think of it as it was fun and fluffy. And they're were also pretty offensively. Right. But I mean well in a way fantasy, but Chris feels like in some ways Dallas was more fantasy because it was wealthy in know, furs and diamonds dripping and all of that. And not was was much more. Why overs it was more fly over forgive me? But it was more that so in contrast, but the soaps by nature are kind of fantasy buckles bubbles going. So that does give it kind of pastel thing. But not was more real than Dallas. Yeah. I mean, okay. What my point is good. God. I've totally forgotten some of this Broadway debut in barefoot in the park. Tony award for school for wives on Broadway. We had. Oh, God morpheus Sean helped me Fishburne Laurence Fishburne in homeland. We're talking about, but the same thing with you think of it as a fluffy eighties pretty people series or you think of it as these comic book or whatever kinda series action. There's great actors. That's what makes them great fish birds at great actor. They also they don't get, you know, it's not like they're crappy actors because oh, this is a big, you know, like just bubblegum kinda whatever. Right. No it. Absolutely. That's the the tissue in the DNA of the actor that comes into some of the more frothy shows, but the truth is they can execute. What the writer gives them on the page and make you believe every single word of it. And that's what the Laurence Fishburne actors or Michelle Lee, who's also incredibly Broadway. But I I agree and Larry Hagman. God bless him. He was he was the bomb. I was another crush. I drew genie. Oh that. Yes. Well, that was his warm up though. Because look what I mean they are in Dallas for him. I don't know how many years it was. And now, it's the medical show. I'm going up on the name that that's going like eighteen or nineteen years Ellen Ochoa pay a graze. Yeah. Many years is that run on when something survived that long. It's just been nominal upset Oli phenomenal. Yeah. So ari. I don't even know where to also you wanna daytime EMMY for hosting tournament of the roses out here. Right. Well, that that I don't know if the daytime EMMY, it was soap, I think that that I was not young and restless, I did ready agreed days pedia was ever wrong. What is this for the president host of tournament of roses? Maybe there's well-made. This is a good day. I need that. I want to hear about that. I wanna read about that one thing that did happen. Just last week that I'm kind of through about the New York Times, crossword puzzle. My cousin saw it had a picture of him. Doing the crossword puzzle in the newspaper. I think it's big time because I was born in New York City. It's time to me if anything I say, oh, that's so New York. And if I don't like it, I say and forgive me Encino. But I say, oh, that's so Encino. That's so Tustin. You know, bad. I don't like to put anybody down though, want everyone. Did love me. Yes. Let the truth is anything New York to me is. And that's Broadway. Sure. Yeah. That's the real deal. That's the super test. That's there's no faking there you really have to go balls to the wall. Yeah. Which is also a runner saying. Yeah. No. It's a runners term. Well, right. And you were born in New York City, right? Like you were born to a madman an advertising VR guy. Exact that. Okay. Yes. Indeed. And my mother was a writer. Yeah. My sis- ill is both riders three siblings. So we and then you moved to boulder boulder. What a why? Running from law. No, yes. My father was in trouble. No, he was in Denver to do some he wrote for time and life magazine, and he was doing an assignment or a project in Denver. And somehow for some reason drove from Denver to boulder and got out on this hilltop. Which is where our house was built. He got out. And there were no houses on the hilltop. And he looked around. And there was one hundred eighty degree half of the three sixty view Pike's peak on one side and Cheyenne, Wyoming on the other side and all Rocky Mountain vista there. And he got out, and he said, this is where I wanna raise my family and enough went back to west nyc New York where I grew up until age seven, and we hacked everything up and moved out to Colorado state in a house while our house was being built. And even now there it is on the hilltop are comb stead. Yeah. Did you? Did you love it? I loved it. I rode horseback, which I know is by. Running pill because they're solitude riding horseback. I need to go running with you. I need to know. So you were you were runner and now you high. Well, I yeah. I mean, I've always run a little and hike because my daughter lives right near here. And she likes get your dog Gimmie wife to run to hike. We're going to this is. So is this is this is heaven. Are. I just okay. I love the arcs of your life at age fifteen is a student reporter, you met and interviewed. Actress Julie Harris who lake literate commended you to the Yale school of drama, and then Harris later appeared on knots landing at your mom. Do you believe that? So that was my lily Tomlin lily Tomlin got my first agent. She I interviewed her is a baby radio DJ. She got my first agent ICM. She's been my sort of mentioned of pheno. I know she's just love I love because I feel like we're in this whole era of the sisterhood between me too. And the women's March fierce new female congress empowerment, I just thought like those are the stories, right? Where I know that she helped you and then like, right? Yes. A continuation and a continuum of of female energy goes and goes from one to the other. I think it's amazing. What's happening? Now. I'm wondering now because you are so politically savvy s you think our next president might be a. Yes. You do. I hope and pray because one just got fucked out of it that rightfully one. But let's not go there to talk about politics. I john. Careful careful. No, I have a ninety six year old FOX watching Trump voting Republican mom, she still think my dad's been gone since eighty three and she thinks he loved Trump. And I'm like, I know he would hate everything he stands for my dad was a prosecutor at Nuremberg, and he he would him saying like they're very fine people on both sides in Charlottesville with Nazis there. I'm like, no, he's okay. Sorry. John. I won't these disgrace. He's a disgusting. Pig. Trader of a man. All right. I didn't say that you say that I echo. Who said that? Okay. I didn't say that. No, not at all not at all. Not all right. But no, what was my point. Now, I've gotten off my boy, I know, but just that it's interesting just politics when you it was it really just was different to in the eighties and the whole way can ehre, and it wasn't everybody's business. Now is everybody's business. That's an rather than that. It's like the I'm not gonna say name where Jesse smollet. What I mean? Why don't know? I don't know yet. Can't that is talk about layered situation feel like one black gets away with something. It's probably and we just something. Okay. That's maybe we should talk politics. Instead, I sit a lot of white guys John. I'm not saying that anybody would take a lot of stuff that one John loves me. I can tell no listen. He does what he at the party at Donna's guests and on the way home. I'll he did talk about he'd loves he listened to you on the radio. And he said was it KFI where were you on the radio s KFI an KABC? I've been. From everywhere on could have heard me almost any he'd love to he listened to you all thinking, John you have great taste in women. Have I mentioned that we're going to bring you fully to the light the light wing amid to the law. But no he did. No, I totally bonded with both of you. I was like what a delightful smart. Just interesting funny. Couple like, and I just love that you've been together since nineteen sixty nineteenth. Well, fourteen don't let's not do that fake out with numbers. Because basically, I'm an idiot, but numbers like how much you weigh? How old are you Seventy-nine that? No not. And you have a beautiful, right? Avoid this model. Singer nessa is just wars ING you guys would have such beautiful daughter. Well, she inherited all his yes, it is shock. She has all his microphone kind of thing because she's done. Can you move your head John I've been a fan of your's ever since you were can NBC handsome man's reporter. Okay. All right. All of this is too good. It's true. I wanna know I could have music behind. I love it. When I see John just wafting. We're going to go on vacation together me and my future wife that you're going to find to find on boy loved his Cayenne BC. Okay. All right. Go ahead. Okay. I will John Vanessa is guardians of the galaxy playing Zoe. Zoe Saldana part in guardians of the galaxy Star Wars rebels. There's like two or three pilots they are some sort of an offshoot of Star Wars. She goes to all these Comecon things and the autograph shows and all that stuff because animation. It's a whole new. Yeah. I'm actually going to do my first one like that marvel marvel is the one she worked for Disney on one. I think it wasn't and marvel for the other so mom doesn't which is wit. But she's and she has set up not as elaborate is this amazing space. I'm in right now. But she has yes, very. She has a whole set up does everything from the house. It's just amazing task. I should go over and record with her. Yes, please. Let's do that to wait. You can meet her. I would love to she straightened ARL. Yes, listen. I'm sure she is I'm keeping the family. It would. No, it'd be beautiful, and then we can all drink wine. Like, we'll just take a story and maybe from the same bottle, John and I will just sweating sweating and sweating right lurks. Slurping sweating and slurping. I'm doing an animation tomorrow tell me because you're playing a do the voice because you're already will. I wanted my ill additions was kind to wanted to she's from New York, and they said upstate New York. And I just I didn't really know Amy buffalo wait that far upstate buffalo. Yeah. I think says you gotta get a flat Ailey cheektowaga and Tanta window. What town Lackawanna tell tell me give me the from port up to transit from cheektowaga, a one and ten window. So a sentence like the flay lady, it's very. Hits. I did a Florida. Be here. Okay. If you're not going to video cuff, you just need to do it. Just get the video cast support the show. It's about as flat as it can get my mother said if I had breast cancer I'd throw away the. Throw away the breast and keep the lump because it would be bigger. I know that's not funny. Jack doesn't have pants mom. Louise van ark is. Oh, I am dodge Negga, Norwegian Princess. No. No. But I'll tell you Joan van ark. By the way. Yes, what it is Joan of arc in Dutch. In dutch. What? So when I heard a moment of John criers where he came in with what did he have on a superman or we just had on two weeks? I was listening. Right. Yeah. So I wanted I thought maybe I should wear. My jacket has flirter leak is everything the house in our house Hasler league, Joan of art Joan van ark. My father always said I wanted my first daughter Joan, so the so it looked good in lights, and I did barefoot in the park in London. Yeah. And on the marquee was Joan van ark in barefoot in the park. And I got a photo of it which I have in my office. But my dad sadly had passed away. So he didn't ever see that. But exciting though. Yeah, here's really magically full circle. Gem flirts Lee story. This is why we were meant to be best friends and go on vacation together for the rest of our lives. Okay. Because my longest term ex. No, I know her Gemini smoking hot heat, if it were still France, anyway, she group of partially here and partially in Israel. She was tank she was a runway model in Europe and a tank instructor in Israel army. You know, as you do what's her name Puron show? But what is her? Shop not is not not guilt. It's not wonder woman. Okay. But anyway, she had flirted lease a tattoo on I don't know. I'm working somewhere. Anyway. But you know, where she got it. She got drunk when she was growing up in a Tel Aviv, and they went to the Palestinian side and she s for flirt Elise. And I was like I don't think that looks like a flirt at least I think that looks like all Jews die. I don't know. She said that she knew what she was like, I don't think I don't know. I think that she was drunk and didn't know too. It was too late. Right. Not until right drunken teenager. Even. She went to the that. It was where it was not that many people would see it. Right. Would they are what they need to wait. Let's look at all of the threads of your life. You also appeared. Okay. In an episode of wonder woman, all other gigantic. Carter has been on the show a few times right with Ted Shackelford who became of course. Your husband, Harry, Ewing. I mean, seriously all the beauty unbelievably pretty people in Hollywood, you just right? They can they connect and interconnect almost saw them all at Donna's party one thing. It's a round us. Oh god. There's there's Honey Celica was she there. Startlingly beautiful very startling. They beautiful. Yeah. But Ted Ted an idea wonder woman, just a few months before they wanted to do the pilot of knots landing and they saw a lot of guys because I did Dallas with an actor named David ackroyd, and he was unavailable shooting along a miniseries hersal and couldn't do the part, and they wanted CBS needed to shoot the pilot. So they made a ton of guys to play Gary Ewing, and they call me said Joan we really kind of like this guy named Ted Shackelford. And we understand you just worked with him. What do you think? I said oh my God. No, no way to alike. We're both crazy were both. He's not Gemini. Yes. Actually, he is. So we're nuts. I said we're too much alike. It would never work, and I go to the week later to the table read and who's across from me, but Ted show how much did they care about what Joan? Yeah. What what do you care? What do you think that didn't work? This is going to be a stupid general weird question. But I want to know what was it like to work on those kind of series in that kind of era that they were just because you're over television. Because now like you were saying, Chris, so many niches, and that's that's on this. Channels everybody in the country. Allison don's landing. That's because I did Estee Lauder during all those years. It was like twelve years of doing voiceover. Estee Lauder lips as I you can look like in van ark. This lips if you fucking with you. But go ahead and buy buy anyway at nordstrom's for much more for less, but I was doing both China's some genetics and also run seventy five miles day. Good luck with your fucking lipstick. I guess is you because you'll never make it with stay Lauder. You have to run seventy five miles to. But I I did both jobs. It was schizophrenic. Jack is the reason that I even agreed to the Estee Lauder because I love it that I got the got the voice over gate ahead of Brenda Vaccaro, whose no slouch with an incredible voice. An incredible town always sounded to me like she was a smoking the temp on she was selling. I know she. Car. We're not number one. But we're up there ride and exotic. All right. Finally, but Brenda and I see her at parties, and I'm like, oh, dear. But it was a great job for twelve years. But we couldn't record until I told Estee Lauder, and they put me up at the plaza incredible per diem always by new pair of boots at Bengals downstairs. Bottom line is they would question for every detail on Dallas and knots landing that was upcoming. They had to hear the scoop. What's what's going to happen? What's next, and I would have to go through all that. But then it was too solid days of recording. I the thirties than the sixties then the tags all the stores across the country. But isn't it interesting? Now, it's like when the mullahs report the back, then it was like who shot JR, right? Who the fuck shot? Completely fictional. He was in London. And he was strategy wise. Larry Hagman he played that. So, of course, Leded. Yes, so correctly, but it is different. And you know, I I have to turn off the I was watching news because my that's my husband's whole life. Yeah. And I would always listen to KNX or the OJ trial kind of got me on everything all things news besides jet jackass career. So no, I can't do that. I'm listening to k I s all the rock, I heart radio. I'm listening to all that. Because I don't want to commit suicide. We have I I listened to all the buzz in the U here. Barbara Bush blamed her heart attack on Trump. No, Trump for everything. But it's true. There is a lot these may mean, but there is a lot because he's given permission. I'm not saying, you know, if I made a confession. It would just I don't know. I've Chris I'm sorry. Shawn. Take out your Oregon just in case to harden. Pardon me. Okay. Beg your pardon. Go ahead. Yes. Okay. I better not. Have some more Honey? No. No, I have to. So it's so bad and dangerous. No, maybe toward the end. Just when I know we're going off the air, and I'm out of out of the house. Okay. All right. All right. All right politics. What you're right. It's like how can you not be now? There is no disconnect. But I can't this is my job. And so I know psychologists that you have to. Meanness? And it's what I was going to say is that Trump. No not. That's not my confession. But played anyway, 'cause I can confess on this Trump does give permission to everybody to just no filter base. Awful as you want to be as sexist misogynistic, something violence as you want to that's wrong. That's wrong as a not a leader. But a I happen to have this handy. The mail bomber mentioned Trump synagogue shooter mentioned Trump, the coastguard white supremacist mentioned Trump that New Zealand terrorist mentioned Trump if only we can identify pattern is that rut back true. It is you see, you know, who I want when you mentioned new-zealand, I want that I want that has a husband said a baby, but he's just trying to be a fucking because logger buzzkill when he tells me that because I listened chills because good. Say someone's straight. There's the woman I wish I will say this on the air. I wish that woman whose name I don't know that I could if I remember. And if I remember something, and maybe it is. Let me Miller. This. Okay. Prime minister Stephanie the partner that the. He's a he's a inconvenience. But this woman it she must come airfare. Through her husband Val while through. Lean if you sweep e which is what Julie called me Juilliard, but this woman is capable ship. We need. She is succinct. She's artesia youthful. She's wonderful hugging. People and talking to people wearing. And doing a Muslim call to prayer and banning automatic weapons in six days, no political parties and meetings and gatherings, and she just leads and she clean and positive. I don't want to say positive, but just it's succinct forgotten. What a leader look-a-like. Yes. She is a standing going because but we had that with Obama, and you saw him cry for sandy hook. You don't have gotten to be friends with Fred Gutenberg who lost his daughter at parkland lost his daughter, Jamie and. I just don't you seen this to parkland kids committed suicide one Newtown dad just committed suicide this week. You cannot imagine you can you imagine Gutenberg. You know, he talked about the air. Fifteen can you imagine getting your mind running semi daughters spine was severed by air fifteen? I mean. That's why you can't listen to the news now because if it isn't political it's things like that that the it's in the air that I it's it's very. I can't wait. Now, I'm going to run out the door because that's why I run running just takes away. The maybe the word is exiled positioning Zayed's in a way, and I hope to God literally that this next time around that there is something or someone because right now, there's what how many candidates Twenty-one is it twenty. That it's in the twenties. It's a lot. Yeah. So I don't know just mind boggling, but you know, there is something Joan what this we're talking about that you and Michelle Lee have and Donna mills that I was saying today, this extraordinary Amy klobuchar just tweeted a link to camera harasses op Ed about teacher salary how to how to fix teacher pay. And she said, here's a great idea from comma Harris running for president. Here's a great idea. Now, that's this out. What comal? Beautiful. That's beautiful. Yeah. And that's also in the right place because the young I mean, if you don't empower that what's generation rhyming up AO, see who I think is founding, and and you know, she they all have each other's back when you know, Rashida to lead took shit like Bronx Detroit ride together got your back on that is beautiful sisterhood. Ansi Pelosi, Maxine Waters mentoring. These fierce young women that I don't know. How old your daughter is? But. The generations going to save us. Hopefully, nobody it always is that it's who's coming up. Now, you want to empower them, you know, they always say, what's the most important thing. You can give your child. I think it's confidence Jack is a master at that taking care of an Esa when I'm busy doing my makeup and trying to go back east to do some Mickey Mouse anything Jack has been a part of that. It's very much empower them and give them confidence and make them. No, you know, the fearlessness and speaking of that could be questioning for someone like, Jack, I'm saying I question, I mean, maybe what you know what? Chris maybe. Jack. What do you think about the college of the admissions? See I love Felicity hoop Huffman. I. Okay. Let's that power. Just the nessa went to Princeton on her own power are our daughter, but I Don. Use of my mother's name. Actually, that's my mother's name is Dorothy van Mark they called her dotty. But she did. In fact, go to prison, but but but is now now I've lost track. But but but the the layered thing of the college admissions, I I understand what a busy mother like Felicity or maybe Lori. Yeah. I know. But that's all it. That's very layered too. Because you always want the best for Europe but daughter, but is in fact, true, the old fashioned way is the way to do that. And you can't cut corners. It sounds like you and jacker like that. You know, you guys do the work do the work in my father did to my father dad was a janitor. But he went to Notre Dame on his own power. And I got into UC on my own power get into Stanford and Notre Dame. And you're right. There is something it doesn't have to do with, you know, black or white or rich or poor whatever. Basically, fairness we all have. One of us played by the rules by the rules. Pay the dues and do the homework. See it's the homework Mark favor for your kids to get them into somewhere. They're not qualified for by cheating. Well, I'm wondering what is shown on everything in his whole life. Sorry. You're not saying that I am by cheating. We are teaching our children that it's okay to cheat at everything in your life, including election to get if you do that. But I also think some of the DNA for him is Brooklyn queens, a there's a bit of that street. Now, there's something St. street not not filter because if he's up at three which I can relate to the thing and doing the tweets and the things I don't think he's a think things are just firing out like bullets, and there has to be some I don't know some thinking power behind it. But here we go that would require a brain. Okay. See I dragged her into it. Okay. Can I just let me just try to calm down a minute. Because I already was so excited you were coming. I love you so much. Much. And then you get the note, no politics. We're ready for that. We're doing valley of the dolls. All star benefit reading at LA's LGBT center may third and fourth. I have to be there. I I'm already there. I'm gonna go go make sure I get a seat. Now. It's only March who's playing mealy. Okay. Okay. My Bruce Vallance. No, no, no Wilson Cruz who just did the happy hour. No, I'm selling all the all the guys like Alec MAPA, and Bruce blanche, and Greg Louganis is in okay. Joely Fisher, first of all there's one decree. Stephanie Miller happy hour separation because Wilson Cruz was just here. He's playing Neely. I do a teaser. Yes. All com. Okay. So hang on a second. Joely Fisher is the narrator you have to get her your booking her for us. Mokgathle was just here as Bellamy. Greg Lou gayness, Tony polar? He was just here. Lorraine Newman you have to get us her. We haven't had her yet. Also, narrated Shirley Ralph. I just met her you need to get us her as Helen Lawson. Oh, Joan van. Loss of production. And that's me Helen Lawson frus- Falange as Jennifer, okay? Okay. Okay. Mersa Jared Winokur as misdiagnosed. I can't we play. This is an all star cast. Saying are you can get tickets but going to hang onto Andersen. Our favorite drop ever for Stephanie Miller is ju- out of Hollywood. So you can crawling back to way, we'll roadway doesn't go in dope. Get outta my way without going to man week for me. Bye. That was how. Rebellion results the train with Swiss. Oh. Bruce blanche loose reliance for sure would what get on train with me. Okay. It's WWW dolls valley dot com. So that's d l L S valley. V A L L E Y one word WWW dolls valley dot com for tickets. All right. And we're having all of these people that we have already had on because you're gonna stop joely Fisher getting us. Okay. Lorraine Newman, Sheryl Lee Ralph this is you got to put a little stars the ones Maria. Jarrett winokur. I can't wait to how do I how do I explain where do I how explain how excited I this? I don't. Okay, you are. So speaking my language valley of the dolls. It's. Number returned valley of the dolls all God. And Patty Duke was in the first or. Neely? That's oh, I think that's Bruce. But oh, no. You said Wilson Wilson rose Neely, but also it's in tuxes and evening count. And I'm playing Lee grant, I'm sort of debating, whether I would get these because I want to look away a certain, and maybe the blunt Kuttan, I want I want to get the glasses with the rhinestones on it, which isn't grant. But I wanna do my of right? Sure. Yeah. Kind of thing. Yeah. That's it. And sooner than later, you know, it's just I think it's going to be unreal. And they they think tickets will go quickly people here this. They're probably gone, but we're going their thing you netting a matinee on Saturday because it's Friday night. Amazed third and fourth LGBT centers, Ren Burgtheater. That's right. And it's on what is it? We'll take. You don't worry about this. You just worry about your wig, and your fucking whatever you do rhinestone lessons. Right. Yes. Ganz's in it. Jim. Well, he's going to look, you know, cut in his was just a huge splash on the half hour. See what I did there? I'm such. Right. There you go. Perfect dive perfect. I talked to him about because I met him at a of some kind of thing on rodeo at ju restore was doing a special something cocktail party. And I said I think of him as in the Olympics taking it's the rep for an actor before the died. I said I would watch him because he was so focused. It's one two three four steps bounce bounce perfection. He showed me more than anything in the world. And he said you have to do imaging or something is some word that I didn't understand shrink talk may be. I don't know. But I think he's right. It is a it's an image and a focus, but he showed me that more than any because I love athletics. It shows you how to be good actor. Yeah. Isn't that a weird full circle the conversation? We had with him. No, no. But talk about the hysteria in the eighties when he hit his head. And there was blood in the pool it were frayed about as but look at was Linda Evans, right who kissed oh a rock Hudson Hudson. Yes. In the was this hysteria and God bless angels. Like, Elizabeth Taylor. That's not yet when it was not popular yet been career ending to to support to support. That's the whole that's kind of a little bit of the vibe there's but that is very true. It's what in what you believe in. What you stand for? But see I wanna do Elizabeth Taylor in a short going to the abbey. Yes. Yes. And I want rupaul because I wanted to be a contemporary driving mistake where an to have as a partner of friend and have them walking down the street of West Hollywood, I see the walkway at the end of this short. And there's a line and driving miss daisy. You know, what Hogue you may be the best friend. I have which is the mistake says. Yeah. To him I want that. But and I wanna get rupaul to to that. And do this kind of partner to characters we happen to have a very good friend that works at race. Rupaul my Honey holder, and they call this a cozy did rupaul drag race that was one of the judges. Yes. And they got me because he knew I needed the Honey they got me the Honey and this too cozy, and it's just a little sock to put on their on. Never. Yeah. They had a lot of socks, I guess. But. Precious little tiny actress honeybee, injure, just not. And now you in a Jack of told me about all the nuts crazy knots landing in Lauder money. I'm just saying you're not only gonna find me my wife, you're going to pay for the vacation together because your dog. And I think that's a fair that would trade. Yeah. Signed, but he has to be two or three years old. Okay. Male first choice, but mayo mail. No, it doesn't matter. Doc. You know, what it is? Entity in your recipe choice fluidity. Yeah. And in the decision, but the fact is it's you always know to see dogs is these two I line. Oh, the moment the Seoul. But it's in. Yes. And look at this. I want to be the person my dog thinks I am. Oh, you're the things you have Jack has what's the thing behind the desk? Jack that that you had because a semi about going to have an all the best things up there in heaven, not people but dog house is not a home without a dog. I used that went outside. I have. Yeah. It's so true. Yeah. And now Jack has made me fluid in terms of my future spouse choice book good that whatever we come up with. You know, it's. To be your choice mortgage board. If you will whoever changes my bed pan. Okay. Listen, Joan van ark. You are. I you are everything. In more. We expected you are at the value. The goal balls thing is just sent me. Into the. Did I lose my shit? When she told me this silly learning a diaper, just yes. Like I've been for ten mile run with you after eating seaweed. I listen Joan van ark. You were fantastic. How do we what do we do? Do. We follow you on Twitter on the no I've got to do that. I know they don't. Joan van ark down dot com. I have my Shakespeare that I just is Joan van ark dot com. Perfect and everything. Oh, you get closer. Yes. And I will bring you or try to bring you your. Thank you choice of wonderful talented, amazingly funny, people doing valley of the dolls on may, what did you tell me three and four may. Yes, we will bring meal. So my future wife an hour. It's a package deal on the website is dolls valley dot com. All right. Joan van. What's not in great about this? Cayenne, not you not. What what's not great, not not? Not we love you. Joan Ben are happy happy hour. Thank you. It's been the happiest hour. In the year.

Joan Jack Chris Chris Dallas Donald Trump Joan van John Donna Donna mills Aaron jailing Stephanie Miller Joan van ark Michelle Lee Hollywood New York City Joan van Arcus Julie Harris Larry Hagman
Dame Karen Pierce

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

49:57 min | 9 months ago

Dame Karen Pierce

"The. PR AND WBZ CHICAGO. This is wait wait. Don't tell me the NPR news quiz who needs Ted. How about bill's excellent adventure I'm bill, Curtis, and here's your host of man who sits quietly all week until I say his name Peter say. Thank you bill and thanks once again to our fake audience, which this week is everybody who's cable went out right before nine pm eastern on Tuesday. And stayed out throughout the rest of the week. It really was quite a week. Now, we all expected an October surprise, but we didn't expect it at eleven pm on October first, and when you think about it, it really was more like an October. Oh, what a surprise later on we're GONNA be talking to an expert on dealing with the unexpected with APLOMB. That's the British ambassador to the United, states? Dame Karen Pierce. But right now, we are very eager to hear you say the appropriate things at a time like this. The number to call is one triple eight. Wait wait that's one, eight, eight, eight, nine, two, four, eight, nine, two, four. Let's welcome our first listener contestant. Hi, you're on wait wait don't tell me. This is Chrissie I'm from Grand Rapids Michigan Michigan. So is it fun these days living in a swing state? It is. It is what it is. There was there was a time when living a swing state was like, Oh, it's great to see the candidates come your face a lot of attention and it has become. It is what it is. I completely understand Chrissy. Let me introduce you to our panel I. It's a comedian. You can see at the Tempe Improv in Arizona November twelfth through the fourteenth his podcast back to school with Mazda O'Brien is available anywhere. PODCASTS are found its Mas Job Ronnie. You're voting. Next an emmy winning writer, as well as the voice of Jesse on the animated hit Netflix show big mouth. He's also the author of the New York Times bestseller you'll grow out of it. It's Jesse Cli-. COMEDIAN PREMIERING HIS NEW TV pilot I of the idea on November eighteen that Chicago ideas dot com it's Brian Babylon. In the building. Welcome to the show Chrissy you're GONNA play who bill this time Bill Curtis is going to reach three quotations from this week's news. You can correctly identify explains two of them. You will win our prize any voice from our show you choose your voicemail ready to play ready. All Alright Chrissy here is your first quote. We will get through this together. That was the president announcing on Thursday night that he and the first lady both have what corona virus. Yes. That's right now we absolutely hope. That both the president and his wife get will soon and we do not want to make jokes about him getting sick because it is a very serious disease. Despite what you've heard from the president the say one thing you may Jesse. So. So important to where mask. Important I'm just saying it's just really important to where miss is as a concern a concerned citizen I hope that he just takes the time to rest and stays off twitter till November fourth and. Things will work out I. Feel like we need to feel bad for the president I mean it's going to be hard for him to just I dunno sit around and watch Fox News all day instead of his. Team, which is pacing back and forth while watching Fox News all day. And he's announced the White, house I should say has announced they're going to be canceling or making virtual of his upcoming campaign appearances, which is another blow to the president because he had his first idea was to hold a get well soon, rally with twenty thousand people on Monday. It's really important to also social distance you've gotta search this. Just trying to say helpful things I, appreciated I'm sure he's going to come out and be like we had the best locked down the most tremendous not was tremendous. Most amazing. I keep thinking and and and I'm sorry because you know we've all been quarantining for months now but the president famously sort of refused to do it now he has to what is the trump quarantine gonna look like is like is Baloney going to post pictures of her sour note starter and trump will be like bake news. Boy. It's also so important to wash your hands. Those things are really our main tools and fighting this pandemic. Or Chrissy, let's move on to the other Earth Shattering story from earlier in the week. Remember there was an earlier in the week Your next quote is from actor Mark Hamill. That was the worst thing I've ever seen him. I was in the Star Wars holiday. Special. Mr Hamill bless his heart was reacting to something that everybody ended up regretting watching on Tuesday night. What was it? Debate. Was Yes the first presidential debate, a twenty twenty ended up being one of those epochal historic moments years from now people will ask, do you remember where you were when man I walk on Chris Wallace? Nobody has seen men talking over each other that much. Since every zoom meeting, we have been to in the last six months. And the insanity of it made all the previous debate brew has so quaint. Remember when Al Gore lost the debate because he side no thing when I saw the base first thing. and. I've been asking myself. This is when are they gonNA come out with as xanax messed. Zanex but in a missive warm, you can spritz really on people just to tone them down. You know more subtle than just the tranquilizer dart to the neck you I thought you were talking about something for us. I. was really into this, but it was Chris Chris. Wallace was almost like a substitute teacher that couldn't handle a class at the noxious boarding school for old guy. Man Boarding school like, Hey, down can I tell you the truth though I? I did not watch it. You didn't. Nor will I be watching the other ones? Should they happen but I didn't because? Because obviously. What you're the kind of person who can drive by a car crash and just keep on going and never slow down. That's just. Good. I need to get where I'm going right away and I'll tell you what my counter programming was was one made. I literally made myself of Banana. Split. And Drinking Tequila. And I'm GonNa do it again according to the ratings? You had a better time than sixty million Americans. Time, I put three chocolate chips on top of the whipped cream, and then I, ate it and then I ate the whole bag of junk. Felt like it was barely touching when I need to touch all the other chocolate chips thought they had escaped, but they didn't realize. It's just a mind game. So. Trump's performance at the debate was panned all over the place Republicans Democrats everybody you have to hand to them after the debate he really needed to change the news cycle somehow and boy did he go for the Gusto? Would you have to give you have to give trump some understanding He was specifically asked to condemn this white supremacist group the proud boys, and he couldn't do it but give him a break. He's never had the chance to say proud and boys in the same sentence his boys are done junior eric. Don't voice found like a horrible barbershop. Quartet, from the fifties. Such it's such a bad name it really like To help them in any way. I kind of feel like they need a better name you are spot on because at least on the left Antifa anti-fascist via. The right has proud boys and then they got the boo boo horrible naming they both sound like a like things that Dunkin donuts almost made and didn't. But antiques antique for sounds like old soul singer that didn't make because aretha Franklin was better. Anti. Facet as anti far. Because There's a Netflix documentary where it's like we all should have really been listening to. All Right Chrissy your last quote is a spokesperson for a major sandwich chain. Are Bread is, of course bread. The spokesman was responding to a judgment that there wasn't really bread. What is chain? A might yes subway very good. Out that, when you buy a sub sandwich at a subway shop, you're not buying meat between two slices of bread. It's more like to lows of Candy, the supreme. Court of Ireland ruled that it can't legally be called bread and thus be exempt from a certain tax because it has too much sugar in it. This is why so many parents tell their kids they can only have their subway sandwich if they finish their dinner I'm confused wait a minute. So subways like so's not bread is more as closer to cake than it is. So in Ireland, they have a tax on all foods except for what they call staples, which includes things like bread and vegetables and stuff like that, and they determined that subway bread isn't really bread because it has way too much sugar in it. So it's more like as you say, a cake of some I, mean if you've eaten subway have eaten at subway anytime in the last ten years let's bite into that bread. It's a rush. It's pretty clear. It's not bread. It's like an Improv show about bread. Ribs on Brad, we need we need a suggestion of a grain please. Yeah. I need a location, the sandwich, a name brand name. Bill how did Chrissy doing our quiz? Kersee you Michigan Proud. You got them. All right. Congratulations, Chrissy. Thank you, l.. Thank you. Thanks for playing and take. Care Yukio. Right. Now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Brian. The UK's National Parrot Sanctuary head to remove five parrots from public view after they kept doing what? Swearing cursing swearing yes. They foul-mouthed parrots. Given to the sanctuary by five different owners in one week, and then when they were quarantining together, they taught each other to swear. The park CEO says that when the parents eventually went on public display quote literally within twenty minutes, we were told that they had sworn at a customer. If the next group of people, all sorts of obscenities came out they say they're worried about the children and honestly this is the only thing that would make me want to visit a bird sanctuary, those parrots, their pg thirteen those are are, and I'm sorry if you WanNa to look at that parrot I'm going to need to see your ID and have you sign a release. Disney grows. Indices rose I was just going to say, do we get those parents to moderate the next to? Hop. into. Green. Coming up, we popped the NBA bubble in our bluster listener game call triple eight. Wait wait to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of wait wait. Don't tell me from NPR. Support for this podcast and the following message comes from capital one with a capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles in every purchase every day, and you can use those miles towards travel expenses like flights, hotels, rental cars, and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital. One what's in your wallet, Credit Approval Required, capital one bank USA, and A. Their these networks of staunchly pro gun groups on facebook and one of them is run by his three brothers the door brothers. Turns out, they don't just do guns. The door family name has been attached to other causes. Their goal is to eliminate public education and to replace it with Chris Louis the roots of the door family on the no compromise podcast from NPR. From NPR and WBZ Chicago this is who wait wait detonate the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Curtis. We are playing this week with months job Brownie Brian Babylon and Jessi Klein, and hearing it as your host the moderator of the next presidential. Debates. Heaters Sagaing. Thank you bill and God forbid right now it is time for the wait wait. Don't tell me bluff the listener game called one triple eight wait to play our game on the air. Hi, you are on. Wait wait. Don't tell me. Peter. Thank you. This is Michael White from Lancaster Pennsylvania Lancaster. I. Haven't been there but I understand it's the heart of Amish country. Is that correct it and how have you been doing during lockdown? I have doing great tons of baking. Lots of NBA Basketball Lately, insurance a lot of time with my my one year old baby boy. Oh my gosh will what it came at a good time. You can stay home for him on that. I know well, Michael Welcome to our show. You'RE GONNA play the game which you have to tell truth from fiction. What is the topic? Bill? And the bubble toil and trouble. NBA. Bubble is awesome because even if you're not into basketball, you like the idea of rich people being trapped inside somewhere. Our panelists are going to tell you about someone making the most of their time in the bubble pick the one who's telling the truth win our prize the waiter of your choice on your voicemail you ready to play. Oh My life ambition here I'm ready to go. I'm both flattered in a little worried for you but okay I. Let's hear from Mas Job Ronnie the NBA is now truly an international league. So what happens when you put a bunch of foreign born players into a bubble with a lot of free time on their hands for iranian-born Magid John Son the answer was simple open up a language school to teach your teammates, how to speak Persian or Farsi. When the seven foot third string backup center for the Indiana Pacers found himself cooped up in his hotel room. He decided to offer free language lessons to his teammates I had to come up with a name for the course says son. I personally learned English from the APP Babble and we currently in a bubble. So I took the letter A. From Babbel, and the letter you from bubble and pick the letter that comes in the middle of these two, which was K. so I named my classes apple. which is the sound chickens used to make on my farm back in Iran popper partner. To his teammates pleasant surprise. Many of the basketball terms in Persian were very similar in English. For example, the word for pass is poss-. Shoot is bishop basket is bus skit. If you had the opportunity to watch the Pacers play you would have also heard them using. Persian to trash talk their opponents one time upon scoring a three pointer. The Teams Point Guard to his opponent and screamed AAH Matt, which means your aunt. Asked why the term your aunt is an insult Johnson said, it's like yelling your Momma but mother jokes are a big taboo in Iran. So we make fun of your aunt. Johnson has chosen to stay in the bubble during the finals and offer his course to the Lakers and heat players. So they too can cuss each other out in Persian and Iranian player taking advantage of the isolation to give Farsi lessons to his surprisingly enthusiastic colleagues inside the bubble your next hoop scoop comes from Jesse Klein. There are two things it's hard to get in the NBA. Corona virus and a good cup of coffee. So. The enterprising star for the Miami Heat Jimmy Butler has started selling coffee out of his hotel room in a business. He calls big face coffey. Butler who had six foot seven is considered. VENTI has an unorthodox business plan. A large coffee is twenty dollars. A small coffee is twenty dollars to small coffees, fifty dollars. The high confusing prices gave the heat athletic trainer Brandon Gilliam in opening. He started selling coffee out of his room at five dollars a COP under the name little face coffey. It should be pointed out that five dollars is still ridiculous amount to pay for a cup of coffee especially when the guy making your coffee's other job touching groins all day. Little face started posting reviews on his door, all of which are made up big face had cups, t-shirts, hats made with his own personal logo, what a fun rivalry or quite possibly or witnessing what happens when you lock grown men in isolation for several weeks and they slowly go mad. But Hey, at least they're not murdering. In the end it's all just good for team spirit. As Butler says, quote, we got a little competition, but it's all fun and Games. Now, I make way more money than he does over fees you should know that. An NBA star starts selling coffee for Twenty Bucks a cup out of his hotel room leading to a price war. Your last story of a bubble diversion comes from Brian Babylon. In the early days of the NBA bubble of few players got into serious trouble for escaping to a club and that ended any opportunity to have any fun at all. Then on a Saturday night in late August players heard a thump thump thump of dance music coming from the hotel lobby those who came down found a very tall man in a white tracksuit and a marshmallow mask who called himself, DJ. Carmelo playing some serious beats on a very expensive sound system. Mosa. The dance remix were all made of basketball court sounds the squeak of sneakers on hardwood the clink of balls hitting the rim and even players cursing. It's not a club, but it's not bad said James. Harden in it sounds like basketball practice which makes up the fact that there are no women to dance with. The identity of DJ car smell was unknown. But as one coach said, he said tall how many people could it be? Oh. Yeah. Lots of them. All right. These are your choices of a story of players amusing themselves inside the N. B. Bubble is it from Mazda Job Ronnie. A Iranian player teaching anybody who wants to learn Farsi. So they can trash talk from Jesse Klein one of the biggest stars of the League starting coffee business out of his hotel room selling it for twenty dollars a cup or from Brian Babylon the mysterious Dj Karsh Melo who plays dance mixes of sound from the Basketball Court Like I said I've been watching lots of. Basketball in the bubble and I've been following it as well. So I'm going to have to go with very very expensive cups of coffee from Jimmy. Butler. Yeah. Well, they could afford it I. Give you that Alright you've chosen Jesse story of the coffee shop wars in the bubble to bring you the correct answer we spoke to a journalist who has been following the real story in the bubble Jimmy Butler selling coffee in the NBA is amazing. Imagine your Barista charge you twenty dollars for a cup after they just dropped forty points on. Mandy Buffington sports writer for Fox twenty-six ESPN's undefeated talking about the coffee war in the bubble congratulations Michael you got it right or practice. Voice of your choice on your voicemail congratulations oh. Yes Bill. Kurtis. Coming at you. Thank you. Tipped your choice, but I can't blame you. I hope he doesn't build me. Sir. Thanks so much plan my take care. Thank you. Fill up brings back sweet memories. Heard you say, suge. Just. That's all it took. and. Now, the game where we asked very respected people to knock themselves down a peg dame Karen Pierce of great. Britain is one of the world's most accomplished diplomats she has served around the world, and now she's gracing the US with her measured presence as ambassador to the United States. I should say, by the way we recorded this interview before the news, the president's diagnosis. Dame Karen Pierce, welcome to wait wait don't tell. It's a pleasure to have you. You have been on the job not quite a year is that right and less than that I came in March and walked straight into lockdown asked actually I've been out and about much in Washington. So your your impression of America. Then it's about four conjoined rooms and not very well populated after all likely me this is the time I've sent diplomatic the in. America. twice in New York and this is my second time in Washington. So I think that helps now it does it does Abba question go ahead Brian I've always wanted to now I guess this was a lethal weapon movie. This guy was saying you can't touch me I have diplomatic immunity what is that real and of so what can you get away with as a diplomat? I. Need to say we are very respectful at the laws in all the countries we serve and including in the United States Mary cat, right. So how many people have you killed? I'm in good civilian and we obey the law not not even a little temptation like twenty items in the twelve under less line just just just a flex, the muscle a little nothing you know. All right question. Are there any world leaders that we see depicted in one way but in reality they are actually very different like like is there anybody that surprise you when you met them? You Go whoa maybe a good way. I used to work a lot on the Balkans and I was always surprised dignity given the terrible things they did to each other in the thousand ninety s but I was always surprised when you met the MS individuals no matter which ethnicity they came from they were the so two people You could easily go to a party with and sing songs with all right. You've just raised an interesting question. So you were talking about your service in the Balkans, which is a byword for vicious internecine civil war. Let's not pick on Mr Wallace if you were the moderator at the next presidential debate, do you think you could handle it using your lifetime of diplomatic skills? Oh, I wouldn't seem. generalists like like Chris Foley's is there a way? That you can basically tell a powerful arrogant person to their face to stop behaving that way in way that. Will. Be Heard and here I'm asking for a nation. Asking for a friend who is also a nation we had. When you're the president of the Security Council, you actually control the speaking buttons said, that's great help or wait a minute you actually you're sitting there when you're sitting in the president's seat, then you can actually turn people off if you like, yes you can are there any electric shock collars that you can or in the seats that you might be able to use and if so can we borrow them? I. Think you actually don't need anything other than the power that. I that's that's that's a wonderful power to have. You also had the time to go viral in a video about making a proper cup of tea if I'm not mistaken. Yes that's absolutely right. Though is in the making ninety living in the UK who puts on Social Media House make. In Microwave? It may be difficult to combat your audience. Why how dreadful that is. Refreshing. Point of view. Minute she felt particularly strongly about it. So. They asked if I would from tap. This little twitter video and we had them you know clips of a paratrooper. Making. What we call a brew out in the woods somewhere with hardly any equipment we had someone in a jet plane We had someone else on the ship the whole point being that wherever they were, they were not using microwave. Right. Triumph fish and chips. Next is an electric kettle. Okay. Was that countered as it need to be over fire? No No, you may use. You may use an electric kettle. Okay. But egrets will. Almost ted themselves part on whether you put the milk in I into a Catholic or you put the milk in law. Well, you I. You are Numb I have been. So politely yelled at by my British friends about T- yet. So, if someone gives you a cup of microwave T W- to spit it out like how dare you give me this microwave water is, can you tell microwave water from boiled water? That's what caused the war of Eighteen Twelve Ryan not sure you knew that. Yes something I think you can tell I wouldn't spit out 'cause that will. But I might find a reason to link. Right Ma. Well Dame, Karen it is an absolute joy to speak to you, but we have to put you through the paces. We've asked you here to play a game we're calling. I like by ambassadors to go room room. So you are, of course, an ambassador by trade and training, but we were wondering what do you know about the AMC ambassador one of the finest low end luxury American automobiles of the nineteen fifties and sixties. So we're going to ask you three questions about the classic car get two out of three right you'll win. A Prize for one of our listeners, the voice of their choice and their voicemail bill who is embassador appears playing for Sam, Vixen of Orlando. Florida. Here's your first question. The ambassador was sold as a more affordable luxury car. So luxurious that the one thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight ambassador was the only one of its competitors to offer what is a standard feature. A Ashtrays for the whole family be five wheels for that extra wheel feeling or see fur-lined breaks. Oh please tell me it on breaks. Now do you want me to tell you that it is for lined breaks or are you asserting that it is in fact for breaks? Now I. Think it's five wheels. Wheels for that extra wheel feeling knows actually ash trays for the whole family. To in the back. It was a different time ambassador. What can we say tumor chances? Here's your next question. Now the car line had its share of problems through the years. Why did consumer reports Pan the thousand nine, hundred, Sixty, seven ambassador was at a the ambassador convertible model was just a regular car with the roof ripped off be if you hit the brakes too hard of the car would spill gasoline all over the place or see the glove compartment was so big people would actually lose their gloves in its depths. I think. The limits of my knowledge of of costs yeah. I'm going to go for the first one the first one that the when they sold the ambassador convertible, it was just a regular ambassador car that they just ripped the roof off and sold it as a convertible. Yes. I'm sure it's. It is in fact wrong. The answer was the second one. You hit the brakes too hard. The gasoline would slosh all over the inside and outside of the car because they didn't make the gas tank to secure. All right. You still have fomer chance ambassador. I'm sure you'll get this one now Tom Elliott who is the CO host of NPR's famous show car talk often talked in the show about his beloved sleek black beauty nine, hundred, sixty, six, ambassador convertible. What were the circumstances under which he parted with a he sold it after knocking over his mailbox while backing it out of the driveway for the eighth time. Be when he was out to lunch one day, his brother and Co host Ray Mali, took it to the crusher or see he forgot where he parked it and never saw it again the breath it's okay to the crash. That is exactly right. That's what happened. Car Talk Fans obviously would have guessed that anyway ray the guy who got rid of the car said it was so rusted that it couldn't even cast a shadow by that time and Tom The guy who owned it in presumably loved it didn't even notice it was gone for six months. Bill how did Dame Karen Pierce do on our quiz or Dame Karen we wanNA remained diplomatic got one right and we're going to spread that into three rights. And judge you a winner on our show thank you hard version of diplomatic immunity. You cannot legally lose on our show because here it is technically the territory of Great Britain and you're a winner. Kind Dame Karen Pierce. The British. Ambassador to the United States, you can follow her on twitter at Karen Pierce UK. Ambassador appears what an absolute joy to speak to you. Thank you for your service to your country and ours and thank you so much for being on. Wait wait. Don't tell me well, thanks they should such. This is being one of the best things I've done since I came to Washington I'm both flattered and very, very sorry. Take care. Just, a minute we go to outer space. Look great doing it and our listener limerick challenge call triple eight. Wait wait to join us on the air. We'll be back in a minute with more wait wait. Don't tell me. From Peel. This message comes from NPR sponsor better help. Help offers licensed professional counselors who specialize in issues such as isolation, depression, stress, anxiety, and more connect with your professional counselor and and private online environment. When you need professional help get help at your own time in your own pace schedule, secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. VISIT BETTER HELP DOT com slash wait to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. With the unemployment rate at record highs right now, millions of Americans are without health insurance this week on line however healthcare became tied to our jobs and how a temporary solution turned into an everlasting problem. Listen now to through line from NPR where we go back in time to understand the prison. From NPR a WBZ Shipka go. This is wait wait. Don't tell me the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Curtis. We are playing this week with Jesse Klein Buzzed Jubran Brian Babylon, and here is your host, the man who needs no introduction but it makes him feel good. So here we are Peter Sago. Thank you bill in just a minute bill reveals his favourite George. W Bush. Speechwriter is David Frame. It's our listener limerick challenge game. If you'd like to play give us a call at one triple eight wait wait that's one, eight, eight, eight, nine, two, four, eight, nine, two, four right now panel some more questions for you from the week's News Jesse, The observer of London notes that what Time Fashion Faux PAS is. Now a must have look for men. And Ninety five ask. No not that. Yes, you can have a hint they call them birkenstocks. Wearing socks channels yes. Socks with sandals are cool now. Turned on acting. Well Tim Gunn in. Bed quote unless you are a fifth century Pharaoh socks and sandals is terrible look unquote. But then just recently David Beckham was photographed wearing socks in sandals his wife posted it to her incredibly popular instagram feed and that said to unfashionable men everywhere. No. Even if you do it, you still won't be cool. Yeah. I don't like a man in a sock and Sandal David Beckham Yeah I. would tell him to wear something else or nothing but i. The Sandal makes sense because we're all lockdown get go out of the House to go by I don't know Tequila something and he's just put on your sandals but with a sock, it seems too much. It's like a glove. Inside omit you don't need it, right? Yeah. Pick pick one and go with it. Brian a man in France is a tattoo enthusiast who has covered his entire body, his face and his tongue with tattoos. He even recently had surgery to turn the whites of his eyes black to go the rest of his face, and now he's complaining that his particular lifestyle choice has cost him his job as a what Oh, a pre owned. That was the the Preschool Dragon Preschool. Yes Reagan. A. kindergarten. Lost his job as a kindergarten teacher after parents of a three-year-old complained that their child had nightmares upon gazing upon this. Hellish nightmare of a face officials at his elementary school told him. He would no longer be allowed to teach kindergarten. You described their decision as quote quite sad adding quote. I was exposed to freaky body modifications when I was a child and yet I have turned out. Fine. If you. See this dude, he looks he looks like some type of anime villain. A Harry Potter. More. Reptilian, he looks zillion scary. He like all these kids are like calling their parents to the room because they're terrified their teacher is under their bed I'm. Forty five years old and I saw the like headline picture of him and I was too scared to click any. Here's the best part. So they said, no, you can't teach kindergarten preschool whatever they call it their you're too scary for the kids from now on you can only teach and this is true first grade. A.. Coming up it's lightning fill in the blank but I the game where you have to listen to the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air caller, leave a message at one triple eight wait that's one, eight, nine, two, four, eight, nine, two, four, also check out the wait wait quiz for our Smart Speaker Bill and I ask you the questions and you win fabulous prizes. We're using the third definition of fabulous their meaning having no basis in reality mythical. High. Wait wait. Don't tell me I. My name is Brittany Sue hines and I'm calling from Chicago Illinois Hey Chicago once the city right next to mine. Now an exotic destination I haven't been to an years. How are things going there? It. Fine. It's. It's fine. That's about as good as we can hope for what do you do here in Chicago and you're allowed to do it well, when I was allowed I was an actor but I'm also a youth theatre educator which has surprisingly transitioned well online. How is it possible to teach kids theater over zoom or whatever you use? I'm Han everybody just wants to kind of create though. I. Think just gathering a bunch of kids on zoom and letting them come up with their own material material and letting them perform it the world is my. Parents. So glad, gratitude. Well, welcome to the show Brittany. Bill Curtis is going to read you three news related limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each. If you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly to the lyrics, it'll be a big winner you ready to play I. Am I'm glad to hear it here is your first. Limerick. All by head bobbing 's not just for show. Is it Cau- or just cau- I don't know. As you see there's much strain in my tiny bird brain. There is plenty of thought in this. Caro-. Yes. Very good. New Research Shows Crows are capable of conscious self aware thought something scientists have previously only seen in primates and humans. So in cruiser eating that rotting possum corpse, that's not instinct they actually thought that's what they'd like to have for dinner. Now all we need to do is cross breed crow, which can think a parrot which can talk. And the birds first words will be wait. Why do I WANNA CRACKER Not. That's terrifying. It's terrifying. We've always known that crows were smart. They use tools for example there, but they're they're very smart. Apparently, they've the kind of like awareness of time and place in memory that we've only seen before in primates. Well, it's just the cruiser so creepy and now to know that they. Know, they're being the the counting crows might have actually been counting. That's. All Right Britney here is your next to limerick going to and from work brains reboot. Plus you might finish projects and route. As you're working from home, we will let your minds. Rome. On your virtual morning can you yes, commute if working from home has you missing the rush of morning traffic or the smell of the six people cram next to you on the evening train Microsoft has your back. A new update to their teams software package recreates the sensation of a daily commute by forcing you to start an end each day by yourself, reflecting your job and swearing at the idiot in front of you. So the idea is that doesn't make you actually drive around till you get on your meaning it gives you like time at the start of your day at the end of your work day to reflect even though you're not leaving home right. The software prompts you to set goals for the day and in the evening gives you space and time to replay over and over that awkward moment when you accidentally said, love you to your boss. Isn't that just a meditation APP the problem is when we used to commute, you could you could kind of zone out neil listen to the radio, whatever whatever. So should take the time, but Microsoft is a need to create A. New Thing to tell me that just tell me to get off my stupid computer. And go look at the trees with at the crows outside or something. We made this Microsoft Microsoft who brought so many good things gratis something called windows. Your window, the first, the first meditative break was when Microsoft Windows wouldn't work for hours at a time. All right here Brittany is your last limerick. Far From flaky skins a disgrace. You need night repair cream for the face. The shuttle's in motion. So put on Lotion we're launching our skin care to. Say. Yes. NASA. This week announced they were partnering with Stay Lauder to send ten bottles of advanced night repair face cream to the international space station. This seems foolish but remember in space, it's always nighttime. You'd be a fool not to use advanced night repair face cream. You'll launch looking like balls Aldrin you'll return to earth looking like Zendaya I'm sorry are they spending money to just send the cream or someone on their way and they're like, please take this cream. The, cream is going up in a regular resupply mission to the space station although. The makers of the cream stay lottery paid NASA. Eight thousand dollars for this basic product placement, this sounds like an elaborate instant cart order. Just, one I just ordered one bottle. You sent me twenty the pressure on people to look good I'll say people but I think Muslim women to look good while they're in space being astronauts. Really depressed. I'm going be honest with you. If you have never put on face cream in zero gravity, you just drop you to spray the little drop in his floats around and he just float your face into the droplets. Brian, how how would you know? Oh I've had this dream for a while. Bill. How do Britney. Doing our quiz she got them. All right perfect score way to go Britain congratulations Britney a great job and as a big fan of Chicago Theater I hope I see you on a stage around here pretty soon but Peter Take care. This message comes from NPR sponsor we transfer. Are you perfectly happy with the way things are right now? Are there any doubts you have about the world as it is if so perhaps they deserve your full attention perhaps, they could even change things for the better we transfer set of tools is made for just such an endeavor by helping you collect sketch present and share the ideas that all started with doubts meat paste paper, and collect by we transfer go to tools to move ideas dot com to learn more. Now onto our final game lightning fill in the blank. Each of our players will have sixty seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as they can. Each correct answer of course is now worth two points bill can you give us the scores? Brian has to Jesse has three and MAS has three. All right. Brian Your in third place, you'll be up for the clock. We'll start when I begin first question fill in the blank on Thursday president trump signed a bill temporarily preventing a blank tick tock band a no a government shutdown in this case before Tuesday's debate Joe, Biden and Kamala, Harris, both released their twenty nineteen blanks. Tax Returns Right. Tens of thousands of people in California's wine country were forced to evacuate as blanks continued to spread buyers. Yeah. Wildfires this week police in Florida who were called to investigate someone threatening to shoot somebody instead found blank. A, TV on. I'M GONNA give it to you was a man yelling shoot shoot well, watching a hockey game on Thursday General Stanley McChrystal. Endorsed blank for President Joe Biden right on Monday the Tampa Bay lightning beat the Dallas Stars to win the second blank in the team's history. The Stanley Cup right this week officials in Thailand threatened tourist with a two year jail sentence after he was caught blanking. Chewing gum not posting a bad review of a hotel online. The man was frustrated by fifteen dollar cork feed that the hotel restaurant charged for bringing in his own bottle of GIN. Which is an insane thing to bring to a B.. Y.. O. B. Restaurant but you know you do you. So we took a trip advisor and posted a one star review of the hotel. He now facing two year prison sentence for breaking Thailand's strict libel laws. But he may actually enjoy his time there as the jail has promised, there's no fee for toilet wine. Bill how did Brian doing our quiz Brian had five right Ted more buoyancy now has twelve and the lead. Good, Brian all right. I'm just GONNA arbitrarily choose Jesse go next because you know I'm in charge who cares here we go Jesse you're up next fill in the blank on Tuesday eighty coney. Barrett met with GOP senators on her push to be confirmed for blank. Supreme Court on Sunday a federal judge blocked the trump administration from banning social APP blank tiktok right in our following Tuesday's debate blanks campaign raised over four million dollars. Yes. Wednesday. The Kentucky Attorney General was granted a delay in releasing grand jury transcripts in the case of blank. Brianna. Taylor, right. This week court in the UK rejected the case of a man demanding that his parents support him financially likely because he was blank asleep forty one years old on Thursday merchandise with the phrase stand back and stand by was banned from online giant blanks marketplace Amazon right following an outbreak of covid nineteen, the blank postponed Sunday's game between the titans and the steelers and the NFL right this week realtors in Britain's during the promotion to help sell a home by the House and get a free blank. No A FREE GRAVE JESSE? Real estate agents in. Britain were having trouble selling the house because it was located right next to the town cemetry. So they did what any smart realtor would do. They made the house smell like cookies. But when that didn't work, they decided to offer a free grave. Instead, the plot is the standard nine foot by four foot area or as it's known in real estate circles a one bedroom apartment in New York City Bill. How did Jessie doing our quiz? Very well, Jesse had six right for twelve more points. She is fifteen and the how many days month running through. The MAS. Need six to tie seven to win outright. All right. Mas You ready to do this. Let's do it. All Right Mas. This is for the game filmed the blank on Monday, the worldwide death toll for blank surpassed one million people. Corona virus according to a report. Ice is planning raids of so-called blank cities right ahead of the election. Sanctuary cities right during a Senate hearing this week FBI Director James Comey defended the investigation into blanks election meddling. Russia, right on Thursday, the CEO of Maderna's said, the company's blank wouldn't be ready until spring of next year vaccine right on Wednesday. It was revealed that the White House had blocked CDC order to keep blanks docked keep blanks. Oh, the cruise ships right citing massive losses at their theme parks blank announced they were laying off twenty, eight thousand employees. Disney right. This week the staff at the University of Alabama had to post a sign in the school elevators reminding students not to blank not too far not not to quote, push the buttons with their. Genitalia. How it is in college, you're going from class to class. Your hands are full of books means there's only one way to hit the fourth floor button. Apparently, the problem had gotten so bad that the University of Alabama had to warn students that cameras we're watching them really makes you pine for the good old days when every elevator hadn't attended who would ask which floor you're heading and then press the button for you using their genitalia. Bill did Mazda well enough to win. Well, he had six right twelve more points that means he's got fifteen and just has fifteen. They are co champions relations. Everybody wins everybody wins massacre. Won You won I won it's awesome. Just a minute. We're GONNA ask our panelists to predict, and now that we've gotten the I stuck over surprise out of the way early, what will be the next one? Wait wait don't tell me is a production of NPR WBZ Chicago in association with Urgent Haircut Productions Doug Berman Benevolent Overlord Philip. Limericks are public address announcers, Paul Freedman, her house managers, Janika Dona. Our intern is Darius. Cooker web guru is Beth, Novi and this week we are forced after putting off for six months to say goodbye to our intern amadeus she was a delight to have around genius at these memes that young people are so excited about these days and on a personal note, the only person ever to ask permission before she made fun of me for being bald good luck Emma. Thanks for everything especially for photos shopping my head onto the body that one time. BJ Liederman composed our theme our program is produced by Jennifer Mills Miles during Boston Lillian King Peter Gwynne is our lawn care specialist technical directions from Lorna Whiter business an OPS managers Colin Miller a production managers rubber house our senior producers in Chile the executive producer of wait wait don't tell me is Michael Danforth okay panel. What will be the next October surprise Brian Babylon economists say that since there will be no. Trick or treating the stock and candy. Corn will, tank. Jessi Klein. The October surprise will be that after four years of trump's political insanity and a global pandemic Americans are so incapable of being surprised there can no longer be an October surprise. And Moscow Browning. The, big October surprise will come at the third debate when Joe Biden pulls off his mask and reveals that he actually is Bernie Sanders screaming I fooled ninety nine percent with the Donald is the one percent who knew I was one hundred percent Bernie all along. If any of that happens we're going to ask you about it on wait wait. Don't tell me. Thank you bill. Thanks Brian Jesse and MAS. Thanks to all of you for listening I'm Peter Segal Hey we made it through October we are doing great will continue to do great and we'll see you next week. THIS IS NPR

Bill Curtis NPR Brian Jesse president Jubran Brian Babylon CHICAGO Brian Babylon Karen Pierce Britain NBA Chrissy Jessi Klein Basketball UK Lillian King Peter Gwynne Trump Netflix United States Chris Wallace
Melissa McCarthy

Fresh Air

49:37 min | 2 years ago

Melissa McCarthy

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from internet essentials from Comcast, connecting more than six million low income people to low cost, high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more now they're ready for anything from WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross Smith fresh air today. Melissa McCarthy, she stars in the new film. Can you ever forgive me as a biographer, turn literary forger. We'll talk about growing up on a farm. Her early comedy act, her breakout role in bridesmaids and playing Trump's former press secretary, Sean Spicer on Saturday Night Live. She was initially skeptical. She could look like him the really lovely special effects guy. They're just said, oh, yeah, that's not going to be hard at all. That'll take like a half an hour, which I thought, oh, I thought it might be harder to switch over to a man, but it really wasn't also, John powers reviews the BBC series bodyguard. Which premiered in the UK in August and became one of the biggest hits of the decade. It drops on net flicks Wednesday, that's on fresh air. My guest, Melissa McCarthy is known for her comic roles in movies like bridesmaids and the heat, and for her impersonation of President. Trump's first press secretary, Sean Spicer on Saturday Night Live now she takes a different direction in the new film. Can you ever forgive me which is based on the two thousand eight memoir of the same name by Lee Israel? Israel who died in two thousand fourteen how to moderately successful career, writing biographies of people who had fallen out of the popular consciousness like actress to Lula Bank had and gossip columnist Dorothy gallon. But after her biography of stay Lauder, flopped, she couldn't find a publisher for her next book about vaudeville star fanny, Brice finding herself broke unable to pay her rent or her cat's vet Bill Israel deplored her writing skills to forge letters by literary luminaries, like Dorothy Parker, EDNA Ferber Noel coward and the actress Louise Brooks and sold. The letters to collectors, reviewing the film in the New York Times AO Scott wrote Lee, Israel may be the single most interesting movie character you will encounter this year. Let's start with a clip from the film in which Israel confides her secret to Jack hawk, a fellow alcoholic who scrapes by on charm wit and numerous scams and hustles Jack is played by Richard E grant. Each of these characters has an acerbic sense of humor. Can you keep secret. All my friends are dead. Quite by accident. I find myself in a rather criminal position I count fellow criminal activity could possibly involve except to cram efficient. I mean, embellishing documents. You forging checks out letter, Mary letters by writers. Little tricks, millage does. If you're not understanding the world of elite collectible, literary artifacts were suppose not how thrilling to be full djing pieces of paper. They go, where levers I selling to some, she getting. I don't know why I told you it's a, it's a waste of a secret actually gone out there and gotten a rock and told the rock because I get a better response. If you told about this. Deal? No one without France. Melissa McCarthy, welcome to fresh air and love you in this new movie. So congratulations on it. This is a really different role for you. You play somebody who is very funny in a caustic sarcastic bidder way, but I wouldn't call a movie a comedy, and there isn't any physical comedy for in it and you're very physical comedy. So I know you're starting saying Vincent, an dramatic role, but you consider this movie a new direction for you. I think it's a, it's a new direction for how I think most people are used to seeing me. I was in New York for many, many years, doing dramatic plays. So I'm quite comfortable. And I always kind of think, if you, you know, put all the all the things I've done together. I may have even done more drama than VIN comedy in its totality. But as you realize, I most people haven't seen a lot of that. It was incredibly far off Broadway plays. So the thirteen people at each performance don't don't have much impact. So I skim through the memoir because you know the movie is based on a memoir by Lee Israel's. And so I might have missed this, but you don't really get a sense of who she is physically what she looks like. And I don't think there's a lot of insights into her personality. So we had to go for those insights. And did you have a sense of what she looked like. Now there's a true to lease personality there. There is not a lot of her personal life to get to take a look at and also with before everyone felt the need to document in every single moment of their lives. And I was lucky enough though the two of our producers David year now had known her for twenty years. He was, you know, had a very big part in kind of poking and prodding her to even write the memoir, which he, it says she was very difficult about again, true to lease kind of caustic, prickly nature. She didn't want to write about herself. She didn't didn't like the idea of it and finally did which worked out well for her, but and carry another producers newer for ten years. So I really just kind of sat and listened to their stories and listen to, you know how difficult yet to me always so witty and kind of fascinating. She was. So I, I got a lot of the. The characters from that, and then the rest, you know, a kind of conjured in in created. So something I thought was a very telling detail about Lee. Israel's personality is that she had a twenty one year old cat who was like infirm and addled and living under the bed, and her apartment was infested with flies. Yeah. And she writes, I found no connection between the flies and my cats litterbox, although it should have been clear that she was doing what my grandma Lena used to call her business under my bag, and her business was attracting flies. I did not smell anything rather like those serial killers who garnish their flats with hacked off human parts, but never seem bothered by or even aware of the stench. And I can't help, but wonder like how you see on the film that the whole underneath her. Bad. It's just covered with cat poo and she's totally unaware of it. But when someone else walks on apartment, they they have to leave because it smells so much. So you had to ask yourself right when you were playing her like, how could she not have noticed? Well, how how far into denial and there was such an inner. I thought, you know, there was such an inner spiral for Lee in terms of just shutting down and pushing people away in in in going inward. And so much played, I kind of there was there seemed to be such a struggle and interior struggle for her and so much kind of anger and frustration. And it was at a point in her life where the one thing she could do, which was right, and she was a great writer. She was being told she was upset elite, and I think she was just no longer just as though in the same way that she was not flexible or capable enough of simply starting a new career or even. Getting a job and just dealing with people. She, she did not have that ability. She could only do the one thing. And I, I think the more her life spiraled out the less. She could, you know, see what was literally right there in front of her. It's like, you know, I, I think there's a thing when people kind of just start to barricade on the interior of themselves that they're, you know, you do truly become in denial of what's right in front of your face. If you're just joining us, my guess as Melissa McCarthy and she stars in the new movie, can you ever forgive me? So I want to ask you about something you did so well, which is playing Sean Spicer and Saturday Night Live President Trump's first press secretary who had a very oppositional relationship with the press. So here's, here's, here's that leases analysts here. Here's your first outing as Sean Spicer on Saturday Night, Live. Begin tonight by pollen is ING on behalf of you to me. Traded me these last two weeks and then apology is not accepted. Because I'm not here to be your buddy. I'm here swallowing and take Nate. Okay. Something, shiny funny monkeys. That you know, President Trump announced his Precourt picked on the national TV today when he entered the room. The crowd greeted him with a standing ovation which full fifteen minutes and you can check the tape on that. Everyone was smiling every happy. Red shoes. Every single one of the women was opulent in west in right. No one. No one was said, okay, those are the facts forever. There. Something else. Now the president scheduled for today at three forty, five to president will host shit encore screening of finding Dory. The story of forgetful fish. Okay. Everybody likes that. Then six PM. He's gonna bother the national perk system, but. Good stuff. So great. Mike. Spicer. What do you think listening back to it? I, it's strange to hear back. I forgot just kind of how truly absurd it was and yet kind of true to form so rattling I always wanted to know whose idea was it for you to play Spicer? Did they call you? It said descend life folks, call you and ask you to do it, or did you suggest the idea to them? No, my no. I did not suggest it. I would never ever have thought of that in a million years. My friend, Kent sublet. That's one of the head writers at SNL that I know you know, going back to the groundlings theatre in Los Angeles, he called and said, would you ever come in and do Spicer? I wrote something that I, I think you can play and I was like, what? The the, what I can't play him. I don't. I don't do impersonations. I'm not a man. I don't know. I have no interest. It's not in my wheelhouse and he just kept saying, you know, I think could do it. I think. You know, just come in, can I? Can I send it to you to read? And I think I said, oh, I don't think it's quite my thing. And then I believe the next day I saw another rather, you know, insane press conference where I thought this is weird or than anything I could actually do it. We can't even. We can't even match it on us analysis. So absurd and I just thought, okay, I'm gonna come in and read it and talk to you guys about it. And you know, I think then the the real humbling blow as I thought, well, how how long is it gonna take like can can we even get me to look like him and the really lovely special effects guy. They're just said, oh, yeah, doesn't not gonna be hard at all. That'll take like a half an hour, which I thought, oh, I thought it might be harder to switch over to. Man, but it really wasn't and they got it down to like, you know, at one point we were doing it in like fifteen minutes, but it was just thought, I think I got the feel. I started to think maybe it's time to kinda hold hold the mirror up and see if anyone realizes how kind of ridiculous they're being. So one of the things that you became famous for within that sketches, the moving podium which you've kind of drive aggressively reporters. And then there was like one one sketch we actually drove it down was a Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. We were all over Manhattan in that podium which was very surreal, shooting it. I, I think pitched it at one point of, you know, do we go? We have sale into the to the sunset, and I think I just actually thought it would be fun to drive kind of a segue podium around Manhattan. I didn't think they would ever let me do it. Oh, a several. Is that what it was on? Well, it was kind of based on that some, you know, these incredible people built this whole. Rig. So it was kind of a podium sitting on a segway type of contraption, but they built, they built this whole thing and rigged it, but it was weird. There were just, you know, all up and down the streets are all these people watching, and then you could. I'd look up into the building and just see, you know, hundreds of people's kind of pressed against the glass. And I thought this is the most surreal moment I'll probably ever have. So something else you're very famous for as you role in bridesmaids and the most famous or maybe infamous seeing is Len. When the bride and the bridesmaids get food poisoning as they're trying really expensive, fancy bridal dresses, you know, bridesmaids stresses and they get like super sick. And of course there aren't enough bathrooms. So you end up sitting on the bathroom sink in your expensive gown that you're trying on. And the whole scene is very intentionally growth. And I'm wondering how you felt about that scene because part of the of the scene part of the point of the movie is that you know, women could do gross out comedy just as men can, and it really wasn't the point of, okay, none of us felt that way about it and that that scene was actually kind of injected into the film kind of late into the process. And I think at first everyone bristle betta in thought we don't wanna do this grow for the sake of gross. It really isn't any of our humor. We didn't find it funny because it did feel like for like a better way determine foot Mullick. Guy move. And do you remember us talking about it? And they said, what? The only thing that appeals to me does seem funny in kind of. The type of thing you watch and go. Thank God. It's not me. I said, if we just play the, the horror in the embarrassment of it because we are things like this do happen. I said, if it's less about gross for gross in more about, oh my God, I can't make the earth swallow me up. And if you play, I think how maybe more women would do it in terms of it was horrifying. Not. We weren't going like, yeah, look at this. We were all desperately. Even though we were friends within the movie saying like, oh my God, just look somewhere out like we couldn't escape it. And then I then I think we started to reconcile with the fact that like it could be funny for the sheer sake of being like, what is the worst thing that could happen to you and in how do you kind of like just like a horror movie get through? It is interesting to hear you say that because the second half of my question was going to be, okay. Some women found it liberating that you know. Women can do out Umer like men, but then there's the question. Do women went to establish their quality by doing gross out scenes? So yours is really interesting because you're saying that's, that's not really what was intended, but it wasn't intended. It was really talked about because I'm not one for bathroom humor or stuff like that. I think sometimes there's that horrible in wonderful feeling you get where you're so embarrassed for the character. And I think that's showing the character kind of going through such a vulnerable humiliation that we can all laugh at it because in some way, we've all done it. We've all fallen said the wrong thing had some shaming thing done, and I think I think at least for myself, that's that was the connection to that's a real human experience. Even if that particular action hasn't happened to most people, Melissa McCarthy, something else that you're famous for is insults insulting. And not in real life, maybe unreal. I wouldn't know. I don't know you in that way. But, but the most famous example of that is in this is forty and there's there's a feud between your teenage kid and pull road and Leslie man's teenage kid. And this becomes a feud between the three parents and they're all called in to meet with the principal and the the, the other couple, the Leslie man, Paul Rudd couple have threatened you. So you're all just kinda going at each other in the office. So yes, let's hear that seen it starts with you. These people are liars. He said that my son was an animal and if I didn't keep him on a leash that he would hit him with his car. Did you say that that's that's ridiculous who talks like that you do. Say what I said was that we need to keep an extra. I on our kids because with all the technological advances, they need to learn to use them responsibly. No, no, what he what he said to me was he called me a what language, Catherine language, voting. How can relay what these two nut balls said to me, unless I say, can you please not talk like that, Catherine, music manage for her next door? Sorry, music man. Maybe I looked more like this fake couple. Looks like they're in a Bank commercial. That's what you look like. You're abate commercial couple. None of this talk is productive. I would like to rear up at Jack knifed my legs and kick you both in the jaw with my foot bone. Really scaring me. This is what happens when you corner a rat, you corner me, I will shoot through you. I'll shoot you. Okay. And then as the credits roll at the end of this is forty, it's just you kind of improv ING insults in that scene. It's just goes on and on with more over the top insults. Is that something that you're famous for outside, like in the real world, being able to to do really funny and sold? No, I know I do not go around insulting people hope ever. I don't know if it's a cathartic part of the work that you know you do something so kind of like yourself and maybe it's why I don't do it in life. I get it all out on onscreen, but yeah, with the first time I watched that back. I kept saying, I didn't say that. Never say that. And the person sitting with sid for watching you say it, you set all of it. And I, I didn't remember saying most of it which made me feel slightly crazy. There's just trying to say every anything that came off the very top of my head. I hadn't planned anything. So you know, maybe it was just that so much kind of free free word association that I didn't kind of log it into my memory head. You improv insults before? Yes, I've had coincidentally, I have played a lot of kind of very assertive characters that you know, I think in the heat. Especially part of part of the part of the characters. DNA was just too literally say anything kissed to kind of tear people down, and I think to try to stand her in her own authority. So it was a big part of that character. You're very regressive detective on that very aggressive detective. There is a fun to it. I mean, I would never want to do it in real life, but it's part of the fun of getting to act. You do these things that you would never do your boulder, your harsher, you know, you're, you're just ripping insults at someone and there is a there is a fun to it because hopefully, you know you, you don't do it in your real life. My guest is Melissa McCarthy. She stars in the new film. Can you ever forgive me? We'll talk about growing up on a farm after a break and John powers will review a new BBC series that drops on Netflix Wednesday. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air, and here's a song from the south. On-track of, can you ever forgive me? It sung by blossom Dearie. I'll take Manhattan. The Bronx and Staten Island too. It's lovely going through. Sue. It's very fancy. Support for this podcast and the following message come from trader Joe's where the concept of fresh is something that they take seriously. There are fresh episodes of their podcast inside trader Joe's and trader Joe's has fresh fruit, fresh meat, fresh milk, fresh eggs, fresh Hawaiian shirts, fresh bread and fresh values on all products for fresh air. You need to walk outside the store or listen to this podcast, I guess, is Melissa McCarthy she starring in the new movie? Can you ever forgive me as a biographer, turned literary forger. It's based on a memoir by the Israel. You grew up on a farm in Illinois. It's hard for me to think of you as a farm kid. Would you describe the arm. It was in Plainfield Illinois. It was about three miles out of town. It was a corn and soybean farm at any given time. We'd have between twenty and thirty cats just on the outside. It was it was that because you were, you know, a cat people because of my well, probab- probably both. But really the main reason was that, you know anytime someone had a litter of cats or couldn't get a cat adopted or alliterative opted, and they had nowhere else to go. We would, you know, my mom and would take them in and she thought, well, what's the difference? We're on a big farm. It does help to keep mice from ever getting into the house and she's a, you know, a softy and we all liked cat. So they would stay outside. They weren't, you know, it wasn't. It wasn't like a a horror movie where there's. Living. But you know, and people would put boxes of cats. Like in our driveway was thought it was kind of sad and terrible, but we take him in his kids. We'd love it. I think I think it did definitely frightened parents of my friends the first time you know, the first time I got taken home. There was always a bit of a catch in my chest of like when they finally get down the gravel road, pull into the driveway. There are going to be twenty five cats that rush out to the car in a very friendly way. But it does seem like, oh, this is this is how we'll all be killed. And I just remember the first time parents were always like, oh my God. Oh my God. I'm like, it's fine. I'll get out here. I'll just get out here and they're like, well, why do you have so many cats? And you know, it's like an eight year old kid. You're like, well, you know, we just take them in and it's it's not as weird as it looks. Meanwhile, you know, they were just like, get out, get out of the car. What did you see them? You must have had a lot of cat food. There's a lot of cat food that were we'd make like big pitchers of food. I remember using j. have not thought about this. We believe, lease carnation powdered milk, and we'd like rip up bread and lots of cat food and make this kind of Stu concoction and then go out on the back porch and you know, and call all the cats. And that's a lot of cats to come running at one point. You know, especially if some of the cats were newer and a little more slightly Farrell, my mom was very aware of shirt. All the cats got pets. So they got used to people used to being around and she's really sweet. So sandy would always pet each cat while they were eating and make sure that they got used to like people touching them. And at one point she was out there doing that. And when she stood up, she realized that one of the cats was a skunk been. She had been chatting and petting the skunk being like, oh, you'd like that had a good dinner. Oh, then she stood up in the light that she had been block. Being with her body, the light hit the skunk. So yeah, it was all all were welcome. I guess, is the take away their hope. She didn't get sprayed by the skunk. She didn't just kept eating she, you know, it's probably the only time for sure it got pet by human. Melissa McCarthy. At what point did you start thinking about either acting or comedy, which came first like acting or comedy, but combination stand up, stand up, came first in kind of suddenly and moved to New York. When I was twenty kind of out of the blue of living in Boulder Colorado, not sure exactly what I was doing or why I was even there. I'd moved there with my sister and then just was still kind of lingering and had a friend come and see me. Why are you in boulder? Like I said, I don't know. I only want to be in New York. So three days later moved to New York City that night, he found a place to do stand up the next an open mic night the next day because not because I'd necessarily talked about stand up, but I think I kind of did a lot of telling stories and like to, you know, I found it fun to make people laugh and our first night he said, you. I should do. You're, you're gonna do Mike night tomorrow night. I said, all right. I think because I was twenty and. You just kind of think everything's big deal. You know now I would be terrified, but at twenty I just went, okay, that seems fine. We're not doing anything else and I went up on stage the second night. I was in New York and. I kinda thought, oh, I think this is what I'm gonna. Do I remember calling my parents saying, I'm not going to go back to school. I had planned on finishing up at FIT hidden finished school, this fashion? Yes. And I wanted to do women's clothing. It's kind of all I kind of ever thought about from, you know, my grandmother was a seamstress, maybe that was imbedded in me, but it was really my. It's what I did. You know, I really loved it. I loved making close loved watching other designers studying what they did. I love the whole process. I was always sketching. And then I did stand up one night and I just thought, I think I'm gonna go this direction. Do you remember any of the material you did that first night? I do strange. I'm sure it was terrible. I was at stand up New York for an open, Mike. And I remember first of all, I hadn't written anything. I just kind of got up on stage. I didn't know that you were supposed to write. I mean, just oblivious oblivious to any any preparation. Or an went up on stage and I had a bigwig on and kind of a very eccentric. You know, I think it was like a silver metallic of trench coat dress and and I remember just starting to talk about being in New York and being so tall and wealthy and having everyone love you so much. And I think it I, it really threw people as you know, it seemed so egotistical and nurses, cystic, and I thought other not liking this and I went harder and I kept complimenting myself more and more, but in ways that these were not factual compliments, I was saying everything I wasn't. I had thirteen cents. I was not tall. I was not fabulous in sought after in New York. So I do remember that feeling of them realizing that I'm making fun of myself. I'm not complimenting myself. And then when they started to laugh, I just thought all. This is really fun. This is really strange and fun and such a tight rope backed of. They didn't like me a minute ago. And now I think it's okay. And then I could say anything because they knew it wasn't serious. And I think I pulled somebody up on stage and talked about us being engaged, and he was clearly there with a date and I didn't really know how to do joke. So I just kind of, again, I went on as a character. I went on his miss y. I never would have gone on as myself, but through a character I could be more ridiculous and more bold and brazen, and I would not go and just plop down on someone's lap and talk about how much they love me. But as this character could and I just felt a great freedom in that. Would you always rest the way you described? Yeah, I was always completely completely in a different. I was always in a huge wig. Some very elaborate costume, but. Almost club kitty, but not as alternative at that point. I was living with on my still best friends, Brian Atwood who now is shoe designer, but at the time he was at Fatih. So he was making all these different close. So I would wear, you know, I would grab things that he was making for class, and we would go out and go do stand up that night. And I would throw on one of his like, you know, we, we're LeMay swing Cape or some kind of scuba suit thing, and it just seemed so fun. It was also much more ridiculous in fun, and I just thought, well, why not? What else do you get to wear? Like a scuba dress out? Let's take a break here and then we'll talk more if you're just joining us, my guess is Melissa McCarthy, and she stars in a new movie called Kenya, ever. Forgive me, we'll be right back after this break. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from each raid. Are you ready to make moves with your money, invest with each raid? And you'll see how simple investing can be. No. Matter your level of experience, each rates, easy to use platform keeps you in the know about your money every step of the way, but it's not just their platform that sets them apart. Each rate has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you for more information, visit each raid dot com. Slash NPR each rate, securities, LLC member. FINRA as I p c, Olympic gymnastics doctor, Larry Nassar abused hundreds of women and girls for more than twenty years before he was caught here. How a team of women brought down a serial sexual predator believed a new podcast from Michigan, radio and NPR. Let's get back to my interview with Melissa McCarthy. She stars in the new movie. Can you ever forgive me when we left off, we were talking about her early stand up comedy career. So did you perform at gay clubs? I did. Duplex was one of my favorite places to perform. I just loved it also because. You know the heckling wasn't there, which is really why stop standby didn't do it that long. I think people think I did it longer and probably better that I did. I didn't. When you went into a regular comedy club? Something that I really didn't like was there is this element. There was always one. So he's one guy that always really did literally seem like, do you just go club to club like, are you actually the same guy? 'cause it was the always the kind of you know, one, you weren't even fully up on stage yet, and there's always somebody like take your top off. You're just like, what? Like what you're taught like? Does that ever work for you his any woman ever been like, oh my God, I wasn't thinking of it, but you know what? I'm gonna take my top off like it just, but every time or something in that vein. And especially when you're starting out, you have, you know you four and a half minutes. And the only way to stop someone from yelling and heckling is you have to really shut him down like truly shut him now, not just like, okay, buddy, you know, got it. They're going to keep doing it and they're going to keep doing it. So in order to actually make them bequia, you would have to kind of truly humiliate them not in a joking way because strangely just trying to indicate to them that like Etta wanna do this. I don't want to have this back and forth with you, and I'm not gonna take my shirt off because I'm not saying so I felt I had to get so mean and so cutting and actually really make the person so Barras that they stopped talking. What was. One of your favorite insults that you gave onstage in response to a heckler God. I don't think it was my favorite. I think the war at work, the more I hated it. It usually would dissolve into some kind of thing about or you hear with your girlfriend and then, oh, you're not. How's your mom's basement? You know, it would always kind of go down that road of like this. So surprising like can I get a show of hands from women who who isn't crazy about this guy asked me to take his shirt off like and I would do votes in the talk about like, wow, you have no takers and it would dissolve from there but afterwards, and then. On a selfish note. I also thought out of four minutes. I've taken two minutes doing something that makes me feel bad about myself. No, you feel terrible. 'cause you'd watch the person finally be truly embarrassed enough to stop talking, and then you're looking at this guy who even though I think he's a jerk and should have been quiet to begin with now, he actually feels bad like to his core, and then I'm supposed to somehow transition to like, so I was walking down Madison Avenue and you're just like, how? What's first of all there's no real good transition there. And then now I've got two minutes left at the ask is if you go over time, they're gonna play you up stage. Is there somebody there was a comedy club owner, like tapping his watch and saying times there's the light. Oh, is the ever present not to ever not be heated light that the first time I I went up, I didn't. I didn't know what the Lightman flashes. Yes. When that light flashes, it is literally like finish your sentence in get off stage. You have ten seconds before you know the stage explodes. It is really a big deal. It's a big deal to the owner or manager who's ever running the night. Also a huge deal to the other comics because you don't get to suddenly do eight minutes. If we all get four that's like a, oh my God, it's a really big deal. Yeah. And other people's time. Here's stealing it. Yeah, you're taking it out of. They're going to get less. But the first time I did stand up right there was people actually laughed at something much my surprise and as they laughed, he flashed the light from the booth. And I thought it was kind of a non verbal applause from the manager like, yeah, I thought I thought he was saying, like, Atta girl know, keep it up to they. I didn't know why he was. It was the first time that I'd seen him flashlight, and it happened right on a laugh. So then he continued flashing it, which I thought he meant keep it up. It's going great. So I kept talking and the light kept flashing, and I thought this guy really likes me. He's really encouraging me. And then I, I got off the finally did get off the stage. I can't remember if he came out and was like his arms were flailing or Finally, I was just like, I don't know us to say I've been. Here for like nine minutes. And I came off and I just remembered him screaming at me in a hallway, asking me what's the matter with me? Have dumb. Can I be? And I was like, I thought you were encouraging me which I think blew his mind that I was like, so naive that I truly didn't know. So you one of the women who has taken on like producing and writing films and has that been an attempt to make sure that you can at immaterial that means something to you that you care about and give yourself good roles because yeah, I think it's often hard for women to get. Good roles. I think it is. And I think you know the day goes by where I don't realize how lucky I am and I've never minded how much extra work. I always thought I wanna be a part of making these three dimensional flawed. You know, often challenging, but to me really real women, I just thought so many things I read. We're kind of. I don't even know what in the in the breakdown you would describe them as pleasant? I was like, I don't know how to play pleasant, like who? Who cares? There's nothing to sink your teeth into. It's like the perfect close and they look really nice and they have a nice relationship and their houses. I just thought, oh my God, like who who wants to watch that. I don't. It didn't wanna play it now. So thought all the people I love in like our. Filled with quirks and eccentricities and isn't that why we always love or even dislike. People take were were bundle of all these different weirdnesses. And so often I I've, I've felt that everything I read for female character was really bland in often a bummer. Just kind of everyone's having fun. And then in would come the woman to go like Karl Sam. Phil, I thought, oh my God. How many times can I just randomly walk into a room in, say, the guy's name? I'm like, why doesn't she ever walk in and go like, what's going on? This is fun. Why? She always a bummer. I just didn't know how to play it. I felt like I don't have the skill set to play this because I don't know why she's doing it a morning. If you feel that you've been affected by the metoo movement, which you know, I mean, like Harvey Weinstein fell several actors. Their careers are at least temper. Rarely, and it because they were outed for assaulting or rossing. Passing behavior to two women. So like as somebody who's both, you know an actor, a writer of producer has the kind of change in climate been meaningful for you? Can you feel the difference? Do you feel that women were being more empowered in Hollywood now? Every little inch. I will take every centimeter forward. I'll take. I think the more we talk about it and the fact that it is becoming less acceptable. You know, I think I think the treatment of of women just can't be dismissed. You can't treat half the population so poorly in have it be like me, you know, boys, there has to be repercussions in happening in all fields, which is what I think is so important about me too. It's it's branching out to everyone. It's all women that need help that need money for representation. It's saying that we're all in it together, and I think the more we link up and realize your strength in numbers. It can't be for the worse. Melissa McCarthy, I wanna thank you so much for coming on our show of greatly enjoyed it. I love you in your new role in Kenya, ever. Forgive me and let's continue the conversation. Some other time I would love to this has been just a dream. I love the show so think so much for having me on Melissa McCarthy stars in the new film. Can you ever forgive me as a writer turned literary forger after a break, John powers will review a new BBC series about a police bodyguard assigned to protect the woman politician who may be a terrorist target. It drops on Netflix, Wednesday. This is fresh air support for NPR and the following message come from ZipRecruiter, the smartest way to hire ZipRecruiter's powerful matching technology finds the right people for you and actively invites them to apply. That's why ZipRecruiter is rated number one by employers in the US based on hiring sites with over a thousand reviews on. Pilot. And right now listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash fresh, hey, this is stretch Armstrong Gosse at the hosts of less good. We're back with a brand new season. We've got about do Lenny. Kravitz black thought m more. You'll hear a b side stories from A-List guests subscribe. Now. When the BBC show bodyguard premiered in the UK last August, it instantly became one of the biggest hits of the decade. The series which drops on Netflix on Wednesday tells the story of a war traumatize police bodyguard who's assigned to look after an ambitious woman politician who may be a terrorist target. Our critic at large power says, it's recklessly entertaining near the end of John Maccari's great spinal tinker tailor soldier. Spy, one of the agents notices that his car's passenger door is unlocked. He instantly begins wondering how that happened survival. He thinks is an infinite capacity for suspicion. That capacity gets put to the test in bodyguard. A new BBC series created by Jinro Curio whose numerous compelling shows about the dark side of public institutions unfolding over six episodes bodyguard is decidedly not a remake of that old Kevin Costner Whitney. Houston movie, and you will wait in vain to hear someone built out, and I will always love you. This is a high powered state of the art thriller about terrorism political chicanery, and the perils of acting in good faith. The series stars which would med the handsome Scottish actor best known as Robb stark on game of thrones. He's actually far better here playing Sergeant, David, bud and ghanistan war vet with PTSD in a broken marriage who works for the London police as a buddy guard for visiting dignitaries. When we first meet this tightly wound loner, he's just learned a terrorist plans to bomb the train. He's writing a tense twenty minute opening that announces the shows intention to keep us permanently on the edge of our seats. Such but handles the situation. So deftly that his boss gives him what looks like a plumbing sinement. He sent to protect Julia Montague played by Keeley Hawes the home secretary in the conservative government who beneath her good looks possesses a spine of the purest Thatcherite steal the ruthless, Julia intense to supplant her party's prime minister by whipping up fear of Islam, terrorism, it's an approach that her bodyguard despises here the to talk after she's done to TV interview, pushing national security and defending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may ask them. Then few that don't tell it. Did you mean what you said. I'm sorry. By the Middle East. I don't own you say, well, the people want to hear. I'm about doing the right thing making the hard choices. This is David slash, Dave. I don't need you to vote for me to protect me. Let's shoot them. I'll do required. What's required extremely tricky. Dick, someone really is trying to kill Julia Montague, but who could it be Islamic militants renegade elements of the security apparatus, her conservative party enemies before he's even settled into the job sergeant, but is dodging assassins bullets being ordered to spy on the woman protecting and discovering that he finds the home secretary kind of well, hot one bodyguard aired in the UK a couple of months ago, it became a national obsession. Not only does this show offer more shocking twists than a tankful of electric eels, but it's hero is in many ways. The male version of homelands charismatic carry Matheson a devoted, but psychologically frame officer who susceptible to the allures and manipulations of those he should know better than to get entangled with. He must find his way through a minefield of unreliable characters. His ex-soldier pal who's hell bent on vengeance. The head of the London police forces. Anti-terror squad who's at war with 'em. I five and the conservative party's nasty chief whip. All of this makes the series gripping it doesn't make it serious, like homeland scandal, house of cards and their spiritual godfather twenty four buddy guard taps into big issues like terrorism and government snooping, but only to keep us guessing more concerned with being a good ride than exploring character politics. The show is a wash in a timely cynicism, the paranoid thrillers of the sixties and seventies seven days in may or three days of the Condor or all the president's men were made for an audience that assumed a stable law abiding political system such thrillers took their sting from the cautionary suggestion that we didn't know what's really going on that the system was being threatened by conspirators rogue generals rogue spies even rogue presidents these days in both Britain America. Countless millions on both left and right. Believe that the state itself has gone rogue. Lawless conspiracy has come to seem so normal. That seventies paranoia now seems almost innocent without the ballast of a stable world to keep the action anchored. Anything becomes possible on today's shows. Kevin Spacey Shelvin reporter in front of a train in house of cards, a sleeper cell marine murdering, the vice president in his own office in homeland. And so it is with buddy guard. A finely tuned series whose delirious improbabilities reveal themselves like clockwork. The show doesn't seek to alert us to the dangers of terrorism and government malfeasance by now we've had all the warnings we need instead bunny reduces the things that scare us to shamelessly white knuckled entertainment with a neat resolution. Don't worry. It suggests it's just another thriller. John powers writes about film and TV for vogue and vogue dot com. He reviewed the BBC series bodyguard. Which drops on net flicks, Wednesday tomorrow on fresh air. We'll talk about voting rights and voting restrictions. My guess will be journalist Ari Berman, author of give us the ballot. He says, twenty four states have implemented new restrictions disproportionately affecting minorities ranging from requiring voter ID's to closing polling places. He'll also tell us about the seven states where efforts are being made to expand voting rights. A hope you'll join us fresh Air's executive producers, Danny Miller, our technical director and engineers Audrey Bentham. Our associate producer of digital media is Molly seavy nesper Roberta. Shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry gross. Support for NPR and the following message come from circus oh, lay crystal, a frozen playground of world class ice skating and stunning acrobatics. See it live at Capital One arena from December. Fifth to ninth tickets available now at circus. Oh, lay dot com.

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Zanna Roberts Rassi | Milk Makeup

The Emma Guns Show

52:32 min | 2 years ago

Zanna Roberts Rassi | Milk Makeup

"Well, hello. And welcome to another episode of the gun show. I am your host, and we're gonna wardner and joining me on this episode of the podcast is on robots resi and feels like a special episode because goes I I met Zana sixteen years ago when I was a bright eyed bushy tailed first time beauty editor stepping into the industry for the very first time. I would go to events with wash. All the other beauty editors or in magazines, like vogue, Cozma politician, Harper's bizarre w L and beast thoroughly intimidated, I was there on my own go, and it was like a new good experience every single time. And there would be in the penthouse of five star hotel or some restaurant that have been decked out learning about a new fragrance or new foundation formula. And I would be so stressed because I just felt so un-pc together be worrying about my mismatched. Outfit. My basic bitch Cote will the fact of my hand terrible. Because all these women all seemed effortlessly groomed glamorous together. Now, I've had enough of those editors on this podcast you tonight that they are kind and welcoming bunch and Zana will that says she was back then with one of them warm sweet kind and funny I used to love it when I turn up at an event or an apple or train station. And she was there. And then it seemed she was gone. She moved to the US to go and welcome Ari Clara, New York, and it wasn't really surprise to anyone that she was going places because she's a real grafter, and you just knew she was on a steep trajectory, and that impressive things were fit, and none of us were wrong. Well, impressive doesn't quite cover. It walking up to the milk makeup in Covent Garden the other day to be reunited with Zana person after so long. It was just teeming with people enthusiast people taking selfish outside with the logo people. Keen to people? In and see what was on offer. The three will brand finally came to the UK, and it really did say with a bang. It has a waiting. How'd waiting this of over seventeen thousand people, and that's the biggest ever Brown wait list to for a brand coming. I think from the UK from the USO over to the UK and there were over four and a half thousand shoppers who attended the pop up over the weekend. Really impressive stuff is no mean feat. It was a big big deal in this chat. When I talk about the old days what's been happening since we last had a wind together wanna beauty how milk makeup came to be. Why being I'm vicious, and knowing what you want is no bad thing finding balance knowing what you want and so much more. It was such a lovely afternoon. Having to having to getting to spend time with Sana I'm saying that to bring her to the poll cost and we were in the belly of the pop up hidden away in the production room. So you may hear the hustle and bustle from the studio next door, but it just adds to the charm as far. I'm concerned. So please welcome warmly, and please do enjoy Zana robots resi on the gun show. This is this is exciting. Because I have interviewed a lot of people on this podcast two hundred two hundred. Yeah, they're over two hundred episodes. I'm raining introduction. Quiet. Off the carpets. But this one feels sit of. Slightly emotional slightly wonderful feels like had I known this fifteen years ago when we met it would have been a bizarre sort show. Sure, it would have been what those days where we both beauty additives going on for fun presser together. Yeah. So my guest on this episode of the Magan show is an aerobics resi who among other things the co founder of makeup, and so much has happened for you in the last fifteen years. And I don't know how you're going to take this. No. But I feel as though even the first time I have met you. The it was inevitable. Yeah. You one of those people. It was inevitable. You were gonna take over the world. Oh my God. I've never heard anyone say that about me before. And that's very very sweet because I actually felt the same about you. I just remember the Panaji that comes from Emma. Obviously all listen to a parka. So, you know, but there's a you're just very funny and situa warmth about you when Burlington above both start crying in this. It's fine. But yeah, it was so excited to be Milt makeup here. It's been three years of living breathing mill makeup in the US and now bringing here finally this week, and it's really exciting. And it does feel like a moment. And it feels like this particular territory has been like a hard fought one. It feels all the sweeter for being here. Totally we've been it's funny. You look our social platform, which now is a million deep on Instagram. The majority of all messages come from people in the UK. And obviously, I come from not obviously bio is a beauty editor in the UK before I moved to New York, and it's all my friends as well here all who still all in the beauty industry. Like, what is where did this brand come from? And when you getting here, and that has been so satisfying and truly the rocket up our proverbial 's together. Yeah, you know, and it's happened. We've gotten incredible team behind it. But just the just the buzz this week has been off the child's kind of mind blowing makes tingle a little bit. So I said it was inevitable. You're going to take over the world, and it could have been anything. So I'm interested to kind of lifelock horseback day dot and why it was this. Because when I first met, you you were beauty editor that you was so much more. You like the beauty to the Mukden did a bit of modeling hand model, you would've you would've carried an entire set on your back to shoot location is it was going to be worth the shot, and you were very listeners know, my background. But I'll say when I came into magazines in London I was from local newspapers, so I've been doing tea parties and cake sales. And then I would see someone like you. And it was like we'll she's the real deal because she's like making it happen as you flying out to New York, and she's doing shoot with this celebrity, and that means so much. But I think you're right. And that's maybe why we would try to show the. Beginning because I'm grafter. I'm definitely an all round. I will if anyone needs my help doesn't matter like how high you are in food chain know, how low you I think all about everybody should help. And down manage up manage down. Yeah. If someone needs to carry a. See stand up amounted to get the shot, and I will do that. And then someone these shoes cleaning, I'll probably let them clean, it someone these my house. But that's what's interesting about being a beauty editor as well in the UK. And I think the best schooling. I could ever have had because as a beauty to hear. You were writing copy, your creative, directing your shoe styling covers you out directing your calling in your own clothes, you a casting your booking office. And so that background me in such good stead when I moved to New York and moved into a much more skeletal the staff in the case, you get to New York, and I started the fashion to that which was one role unle where I was used to doing seventeen job. So I kind of always just carried on doing seventeen jobs, but that's quite jarring because I've had similar experiences where all used to put together fashion beauty section and all the pages. I had my finger and all of it in some way. And then you go into other worlds when freed on. You'd literally have people say don't worry, we do that. We have that department for that what I to see it. So it makes sense. I think for the old school, which what I our generation to have actually diversified and create platforms do everything themselves content, creators pose the earliest foam of influences slash content creator. Yeah. It's just all round. You have to be an all round hard work to be able to get anything done then. And today the same. And that's why I love all these just new kids just creating so the photographers then models their editors that journalists and good for you. Yeah. I'm interested in it. And I'm interested in their opinion, the way they see things. Yes. And I think it was very interesting about your time in London. And then going to New York is that I lived vicariously through your ships. Someone saying Zana's going to a wedding. And I don't you. I don't he's wedding. But you're going with your new boyfriend and show the dress that you were going gonna wear which like asymmetric, reg, very beautiful. It was like three colors anyway. But there was this kind of transatlantic the that was very exciting on press trips. It was very exciting. Very exciting. For me. I mean, this is kind of relationship where I'd be on like of beauty shoe like Russia, do this shoot. Sorry, editor of you listening right now. Well, I slid that's kind of in the middle of New York inning looked remember do actually one of the best probably did that down Feist. And we went there, we did a whole shoot. And then Rossy which was off on the last day. It's been a few days in Iceland. It was very romantic time. And we had a love on. And after two years of doing that, though probably every few for five weeks would be traveling Posey kind of reached his point where I was like, okay. Something's gotta go. But I was not going to give up my job. I was for a guy especially that. I was like I do love Rossi, but I'm not moving to America for a guy because that's just against everything. I've built him. We're so hot got the best friend got great industry. And I love the people I work with colleagues friends family. So it took a job off to be on the table before I would actually move. I wouldn't I wouldn't just wing it. No way. But then also about that is the fact that during those times when you trans Atlantic, and I think it's. Very Representative of other areas of your life. You were like, well, let's make the most of it seeing an opportunity and kind of leaning into it and not not actually being scared. Yeah. That's very true. I'd love you. We talk about you don't talk about. And I bring bring this up because I think it's really fascinating to on the show who have gone out of their comfort zone and have lived to tell the tale. Because I think fair can be a thing that really stops us can be. I was very fortunate to always have. It's funny eggs able to my upbringing in Manchester. My parents who knew my a what I did from an early age. I knew I always had them as a back. I always have them as a backup. I always had that back, and they always have mine, and I could go and do whatever I wanted to without fear of failing. Because it kind of always had this amazing secure very normal background, which kind of gave me the confidence to just go on. And I think the confident I dunno. Sometimes I look back. What did I do that? Having that safety, though, can sometimes be the thing that makes you a grafter. So I think it's interesting that you had that safety net. And you're like, Yep. With that safety. I can do big things. Not I can take it easy. The same. Do you think that saying, I don't know? I just I always love creating always loved doing. It was meeting people. I would love to travel. And I just liked hard work. I like the feeling nothing makes me happy than working really hard and something and seeing something through from soup to nuts. It's like literally finishing a project and that. That's me. Happy done like the ice get so much. Rush of that, the adrenaline is ridiculous. And I think that's. That's probably a bad thing to say. But that's I do that the adrenaline. I got off them will keep me going onto the next one. I totally agree. And some might say that makes someone a workaholic. But I think it I love what I do. And it's not unhealthy. How many hours a day? Do you spend working? It depends. But until the job is done. So you fall to sleep with the phone all the computer in your hands at night. Yeah. And you couple six new thinking about in new sleep, you get up and you get cotton. And you just full of ideas. And I think that's what it is Emma stuff. Right. This you just want to get out all times. And I think we're lucky enough to be in a world where we can do anything that we really online team today that why not? Well, why not indeed remember when I started this podcast? I'd wake up at three o'clock in the morning. Maybe if I could upload it via this or maybe if I could do all day falls this way game changer and get up and I do. Do the night. Yeah. All those crazy, creative genus Susan. That's the sign of success when you start will you will do anything to make it work move to anything. And I heard you say before that one of your biggest fears is the fair of not doing something regretting the thing that don't do without doubt. If I will never regret only, try them failed up. If I don't I will always sit with me about like, I would have happened. If I hadn't of I on a TV segment when I was get witless to go on American TV and someone said, oh, you should just do this segment. I remember being petrified. Like truly surprised to work out. My mouth all of a sudden the cameras rolling. And I was just chat. No way. I was gonna ask you because it wasn't just cable. It was we're talking the today show Rachel Ray yet. And then I remember. Listen, I like reality TV. I remember watching was running in. Oh, jeez. Every time you came on. So I did not know that was going to be the show. It was. And I remember saying Merrick magazine editor at the time Joanna Coles of mazing was great mental to me. But she's like, oh, it's fines on they're just gonna like Mike you up. Maybe they're not the won't be won't be creating stores might just follow you around a little bit tier two being on a beach in Mexico accrue twenty people we've all doing odd journey there with a few interns, remove winning this competition. I mean, it was Harry, but it made me laugh because everyone else is like chucking around Manhattan and Wes on it. Oh, she's a Mexican beach the horse that definitely produce onto the show. But it just like that makes perfect sense. It's like well. I'm shooting shooting in Mexico. Come join us, and they did got. Yeah. That was the first proper show. And then I definitely transferred. I think I'd say was my beauty added to skills of journalism and always imparting takeaway Tim's to the reader into the TV segments. So to me it was like just heaven because you dry illiterate, come up with the concept pitcher to produce. Then you'd write your own scripts Stahl your own muddles, you come up with all your talking points. And you go in and host it and call me a control freak. But I find that really good fun. No easing. Also, all of your editorial. It was always accessible because I was aditorial that can be quite yet looting. I often say am I think it was very interesting is even when you do those like bits on the today show or Rachel Ray. It was about this is the current trend. Let's just kind of deconstruct it. And this is how you can take it away and make it relevant for you. And make it something that you can incorporate into your life. However. And so is about the takeaway tip. Yeah. Four four the every woman, the obviously we have to cater for readers magazines. But yeah. But then there's always that thing, especially when I arrived in America, fashion shoots. And there was all these. It's kind of easy to make a six foot model. Look, amazing and beautiful location with a fabulous photographer amazing designer MOS in the hair makeup team from God. That's not hard work, but make some more affordable close. Great and just provide take way tips with whatever outfit you're point together. And that was something I was pushed for in the early days, Michael US and something Joanna Coles Myer to really resonated with her. And so we we did we were the first ones doing shop the shoot under a hundred under fifty bucks. Get this. Exact look let's face it. How many people in office really what around in hedged oversaw sake? Now that manning. So let's make let's let's be real here. And let's really give some good advice. So it's of no surprise to me that the makeup you then create is something that is practical that is for everybody that is incredibly user friendly credible and universal universal to the fat. Yeah. The the whole ethos behind it. Not only are we one hundred percent Vigo. And we obviously would never test on any animal, and we full of all the good stuff on the bad, but super utilitarian to us and think me as a mom someone with eight seven jobs, which like most of these days, we wanted something that was very very simple to use. So taking out all the tools so from component Trie sticks for example to formulation. So melting into your skin as opposed to sitting on it to the functionality of every product it was just super easy to use. And on the go was very. Very important for us to create products that would very user friendly at whatever time. And then it was started for milk studios, which is based in Manhattan downtown you've been there many times. My husband started milk studios twenty years ago. I know. I didn't know about then note to all listeners. But yes, so he we had this incredible community there and they wear makeup in such a unique way. Yes, you've got editors there. But then you've got these musicians Taga face celebrity influences. People just work there the coolest kids in Manhattan, basically inhabit Milt studios, and it's where trends born, and we would sit there every day watching how they will make up and it was like a walk in Pinterest board on my look at her yellow eyebrows. Oh my God. Look about light what's going on with her tattoos. Look that Inca line. And it was like we need to create a makeup line for this community. But they're also really demanding. So they're not going to settle for a bunch of batting greediest on the skin they want, and they won't clean ingredients. They want epic payoff though. So that's why initial tagline was good ingredients epic pay off, and we create the lion literally around the community that inhabits most dude. Ios and they loved it loved it. What was the fast put God, we launched? We went big Diana Ruth is my partner, and she creates all the product. She did hot candidate back in the day. And how much we love that. Oh, I remember going to Bloomingdale's my first ever trip to New York and having a hard candy may Togo incredible. Right. So we poached. Down. I should say. Oh my gosh. I'm in the rusty. We knew she was the one every meeting would have as we went to Sephora with just a deck, and then idea, and they will if you can make this product you are in so myself Rossi, Georgie the other co fi Sephora in before they try. Yeah. Because we had a Declan idea in community. Oh, I bet with good. I was real. And then Georgie had so she's an amazing film, brighter cheese music. He's one VM as and she's so create a moon, then and yeah, she has on the test. But she we had this sizzle and an idea in shitloads Pasha reverse bounced in there, and they they said, yeah, you can do it will take you. And we needed a product developer when we found Diana who we heard from nanny people that she was the woman that we needed and Rossi, basically. Tried to down wooder. She came to me on the first time she literally sat around the table. And she was like, okay. You guys were all crazy. This is gonna be interesting, but I'm in. Okay. And then she launched seventy skews from the get-go. It's ridiculous. I don't know what we think that when you talk about going all in in business that's going on. It was I'm vicious, but it actually really what favor. Cooling water was one of the initial ones which is still an icon today. Sticks. It was all about the sticks. Brunza the highlights in lit the cooling water all those like big jumbo sticks which the Phillies huge, by the way. If you buy them in for trait, and they're never going to run out. Not good for replacement. We realize. Soon enough to that. Next in. But it's like is an iconic. And I think that's when something becomes iconic. You can almost tell it by silhouette always think that you know, that's and that's from from these jumbo sticks. What what was that? Was it just because you wanted something you could see what was inside you could see how left so it was that that stick formula and everything just about transparency transparency absolute right from the get-go of been very transparent and packaging in. All of our creative campaigns. I mean, I come from. We had a guy ago, they kissing you couldn't even tell which the guy the go was we've always had boys not campaign, and it was so something that gender was a moot point towards it. Didn't we weren't like, oh, should we put a boy? Oh, when we began the line, we knew the community millwood just boys guilty won't make company really cool way. So it was always going to be gender neutral. Everything neutral Rayleigh how long ago was this three years ago, we launched literature in New York. Yeah. So that that's why that is headed that doesn't surprise me that somebody with an editorial brain was thinking in that way, people thinking that way now because of everything that's happened. But with the new business. Yeah. It was a risk. Yeah. Well, probably risking insofar. As it was something that may brands had to consider before. Yeah. Even was relevant. That's exactly it. I think is was so in Nate within the culture of milk that we didn't think twice about it. And. It was funny to see a lot of friends do it after we even to destroy about the boys of Instagram later. My client was kind of interesting that we just it was just innate with us within. And I think a lot of the things that we even do, you know, it's always progressive aggressive in campaigns progressive in casting where progressive in formulations and innovative and how how does somebody remain or continue to be innovative by having an incredible team? Like by led by Diana Ruth. I mean service you, Diana, resi and George Jarrell. Yeah. We all come from different areas as well. I think really helps because I got the aditorial. I do the TV. I'm in the mix of red carpets behind the scenes that shows I'm with the best in the Business Times of getting those tips and tricks then. Then you've got somebody like Jodi who's an amazing creative. Brian crazy Jarrett by trade, and she's like an Elliott, Dr of all trends, and then you got Diana. He will never settle second-best. She's so focused on what she takes out of products as well as what she puts in. And she will never create anything already exists fact who trust me, I've tried, but we need an I learned not until I find the right formulation not into made it like she will just natural. Never settle just just to fill a gap in the Mark. And then Rossi Hughes, the guardian of the milk brand. You obviously started in. He used like OCD about everything look, and he's got great vision to and he knows more about makeup now than ever imagine. My husband. He started milk studios. Did he know that it was going to expand into all of these other areas? Do you think he ever could have imagined I'm going to marry from London, and we're going to great brand. Proud. I it's an empire. Now. I mean milk was anyway had the studios then they have a digital the palm. Then they have a quick then they an agency they have a gallery jam room downstairs where you go down. You see ace up playing like literally just go down there and. Wait. No, they are Waco within the I go down there. And I'm like, okay. Maybe I'm just to go home and look after the kids. But milk in that is Rossi even though he's. Older now all the goal kids. Love him. He's like Puffer Rossi and the. Built this amazing community of do is there and creators and trend leader and great great people. So it's about continuing to be inspired and putting yourself in these physicians like you say, you'll backstage lawns. Yeah. And you do a lot of TV it's been so delightful to turn on e. We see I forget you guys. See your hair makes me nervous about doing. The thing about if I'm watching TV with somebody. He's not in the industry. Yeah. I know Ma. Eurest together one. During. It's it's probably also ball from between writing features about anti-oxidants Glenroy. Red great. Thanks. So the TV side of things you have become. I don't know how you gonna take this. But you have become a celebrity a toll. Everybody's celebrities today got Instagram posts you celebrity following. I love what I do. I love my work. I do have a low of we just did the Golden Globes and going to Oscars in a few weeks a minutes. I do pinch myself on the Oscars copy going gosh Reese to leprosy on the Poland is pass me. And I've worked with them in different capacities and editors yeah. But when you watching them in the finery on a red carpet, like the Oscars kind of. Yeah. That's never gonna get old. Ecorse. Not. But I meant that it will. So again, that's the adrenaline. I've done red carpet. Not televised. I hasten to add and is an adrenalin just like nothing nothing else. Right. Because what you'll be talking to someone brought to keep his new peripheral vision, and it'll start rice, and you. You either. It's funny. The the rise to that. Or you crumble into me, clearly you and I it Trenton junkies. We just thrive on it. And it just keeps us going exciting. Cut him. So lucky to be in this world of entertainment, and fashion. Amusing that most people because. Surely pastime, and it's my job to create that. So so I've be interested to know is do you ever can you because I find it difficult. So I introduced you can ever take stuff out and go and try and have a consumer experience. I do that a lot. And I think that's so important. I think that's maybe the editor me because you always even writing or giving tips for the person on the other side. We have an interesting at the other day with us, which semesters three. Three key words to describe Milt makeup. And my three words were very consumer facing. So it was like was me as a consumer. What do I wanna know about the makeup? Whereas maybe Diana's was very different. It was more industry. George was more creative. And it was I think just hardwired in me, I wanna help people and from whatever I do. I just wanna be able to impart the information and help and tips and tricks anything, I do you ever go near the milk. Concession and just all the time. You know, what's funny, though, I always hear an English accent? And I see people stocking up on it. And that to me was always telling the film, it I stakes and then take take pictures of people and take him into the office too. I totally believe that because I've been I've been there. And I've done that. I think one of the things when you spoke to Sally. I remember hearing and thinking I think the reference to being friendly we mentioned about three or four times in considering your life such a traveler made so much sense so much, but actually TSA friendly anyways, very daily friendly. A commute can just be as draining. So true. Love whole like iced idea in these quick tricks in the back of cars, and is now become this. Remember doing one was just purely functional because I got off the plane in LA had to get to a meeting did my make up on my phone and using a mirror and did it in time lapse and then put it on Instagram funny. Because I literally went from death to bell. Okay. And the next time I picked up my phone after the meeting had two million views as like, holy moly might be onto something here. And it was all went viral. And then everyone I did after that kept one game crazy amounts of youth. This up an interesting because I find it incredibly fascinating using Instagram an editorial tool, I think, it's we should be able to do it. Judy to be able to do that. Well, I see kids today during it really really wrong. Yeah. Well. Yeah. I mean we used to franchises. We used to story. Tell them used to take way tips. We know what people we should know what people find interesting from facts figures, pick to imagery Slough world. Right. So I do love and skies. Probably spend way too much time on it. I don't need to know what I want to look I enjoy it. And it's not as not anyone anybody. Anybody's mind. Now, the world of celebrity is about world in New York. And to a lot of people listening to him. I think it was quite it's quite scary. It's really hard to get into. And we look to August for sources of inspiration. If somebody looks at your career or looks at aspects of what you do and things I really really would like to do that. But I'm not entirely sure where to start. What do you think fundamentally is the central pillar? You would recommend they follow all big question. And I was definitely not lucky. I would I think I definitely had some gonna pass it bounced me in certain directions, but first off the willing to learn and say yes to absolutely every single opportunity like you say when we vote Mike Zine, so. An opportunity common. It'd be the worst timing and have some trip planned or wanted to be with family or friends. I've sacrificed a law when it comes to that. And I still do today. I have to make decisions daily, you know, if I'm going to see yester-, something, it's usually note to something else. And that. The yes is always pay off the willing an all rounder if you're onset learn about every single person's job. They're not just your own understand what the photographers assistance doing what the production is understand all the cage was doing and how they get their food. Like, the more you understand about any environment. The better. Yeah. And then, you know, read this so many amazing resources out. That information is so much power. And if you are in a fashion beauty will read you should be reading women's why you should be really visits, the fashion, and it's lazy don't because the so much out there that will give you ideas. I can't read one of those articles without eco nine is only. Stay connected. Meet people stay in touch with them. Hound people. All of the usual advice, but it works. If you combine it all together with a nice attitude. Well, that's what I was going to have to have a good attitude. How you well. Yeah. Post part. We know we're gonna work with me. Thing we've been interim. Wow. But the hounding pot doesn't Azam and then and enthusiasm that's well received. And then there's enthusiasm that reads as hounding being in UCS. Do you think this like a formula for being assistant, whilst maintaining charm and humor, I think? You should know when you push someone too in fewer human being with decency, and an understanding, and some empathy empathy for anyone else, you should know how you could push. And if something's received well, then pushed gently no I'm not saying go buying doors. But an Email with an Email follow up, his totally. All right. Yes. Because busy people usually they'll flag it and maybe not get round to replace with follow is totally. Yeah. I love it. When people follow me up because I'm like got him. So sorry, I like law excuses excuse. You and I grew up in the air of the movie the movie the scrappy person like you see them during the hot often in the mail room. Yeah. Yeah. Getting lucky break, whereas it is different now speak to young journalists. You're trying to get into the beauty world. And they say, well, no, it's not like that anymore because they're on these intern royals, and what have my that was my role for sure. Yeah. Yeah. I wouldn't go into journalism at it not been for working for free. No way to six those sleeping couch. Yeah. Was I would do anything that has rest me one hundred percent. And that's but then go over and above like if I was given a recent project, I would go to the library the library. And we all have that generation. It was like Lexis Nexis. I think it was the closest thing I would buy the books, and I would give you every piece of history on the lipstick and every like this from the psychology and the different colors from that to the past to the present in interview every single makeup potus put together a big binder, and then present it. Yeah. That'd be that gun. They were like, well, I only needed a couple of quotes from make. Well, it helps it stunned you go above and beyond the people. They remember it. Well, speaking of going above and beyond seventy skews is above and beyond for new brands in our two hundred right? We're going to have to deconstruct this go through this. So you start with seventy and that is a lot for new brand. And it wasn't. It's not like this is an independent brand. This is an somebody coming up. Stay Lauder one of big houses so funded for milk. Yeah. So that's a lot. And that that's a completely new muscle to flex this whole kind of right? We're starting this new business and on paper, you've got all the things that you should need to be able to make a success. But I'm curious on the daily just did you go and hide the day. We launch a well. I will be to really big party. But they learned you can only do my gosh. No, it was very milk party. And we had salt and pepper befall on Spinderella. We will like what's the ultimate female empowerment? Right. So it was them. And we had Zoe Kravitz there as well. And we had leaky me play. And it was like all these girls would just bad ass girls really represented up. Ryan. That was amazing. That's been a I was pretty the day after it launched. I was just in bed with a really bad hangover. Then from that. No. You just charge for us. You get by. And you get one great review, and then you realize onto something keep building that. And you keep the relationship Saban we've gotten amazing team, and I'm no way negative take. Credit away from them who are just phenomenal. So. Fifty fifty with feel teams as well. Yeah. Offer them hair. And you came with us bouncing around town taking kitchens on top of buses with Milton makeup. Sticks up stairs, six amazing new grey. It looks. So it's exactly what if twenty years ago, you'd put me in that room. I would have started sweating profusely like before I go into the industry because it's just gorgeous product everywhere in everything looks like it'll make my life better. I think. From in that used to be the thing. Speaking of the makeover ahead with the hog handy. I shouted quartet. They were I just thought. Well, I want this because this will make everything better. And I think I only eyeshot quota for like three years threes loan time. I think I think I might replenished it. But it was like this is I'd invest as much and yet. And then his abuse yet as one can get jaded because one can the products come in you get faster, you got to watch everything. Yeah. And so I think it's interesting I wanted if there were things that you knew absolutely didn't want to do on never wanted to go near in terms of formulations or particular types of products definitely from an ethical standpoint would never test. We don't put silicones die method cones and VERA products only good stuff on the there's no reason to put the bad stuff in these days. The substitutes is so great. But yeah, I would try I have an instinct now, which is come from all that watching beauty being onset. I just no good products instantly. And it's an instinct tool thing everyone else in the team has the facts figures the science behind it. Mine is much more got. But I think there's lots of that because the women in the stores not going to know the facts and figures, it's like literally she likes she doesn't or he likes. He doesn't. I do this thing. And I'm sure you second. You get any any products. You just watch on the back of your hand. Totally. And I can't my hand is very glossy Matt 'cause I've been using the. You can tell instantly. I mean, look at my hand without being funny. It looks gorgeous healthy rated looks great doesn't it used on that it was the the forms and one of the hydrating. So so good. Yeah. Different to mine too. So. Listen to this was readers list. So they won't. Lovely people out there. They're all additives beauty directors in our business. You have a beauty editors hand. They're normally that left hand is looks visibly younger around hair. Just you've must've see no, I never even thought about that. I'm not one of them clearly. This white mall. We all Kate is absolutely fine. But yes, I the ethical thing was very very the ethical thing. I make it sounds silly. But being ethical was really really important, very important. The functionality of the transparency the clicker TSA friendly TSA friendly. Innovative as well. The one of the we have a sunshine oil which is essential oils. And it's in the component is actually based on diabetic Penn. So it has a click for and it's super easy to use glass. Roll the ball, but that's only glass in the oil. So when you take in your bag, you not going to arrive somewhere bunch of smashed glass and oil all over you bag, which I've done home. So smart, we think about the packaging the ingredients the way she's the user experience really really hard before we launch something and all this too smart ingredients. So the other one hundred thirty dollars that you so you started off with very much it was very small skin complexion. And then you've moved into other areas, and you mentioned not wanting to create an eyeliner until yet was now we have a longer eyeliner. And it is I think it might be behind another tattoos. The Long Island has the Wanaka minute. So literally goal lied on so smoothly, and you've got about a minute MAC. Thirty seconds Plato playtime, and then, you know, earn you're stuck with it for as long as you want. Which is that she was always part of our initial idea because this girl guy like they worked top of the posse. Todd. So they wanted looks that we're going to last them all night probably into the next day of when they showed up with the makeup still bang on next day makeup. Don't get into it. And I thank you for giving us all. Actually, the thing is without even look slept to still like to stem talk. It's not the one on your Instagram where you to the cat's is. How does own my view trolleys makes me so happy. I never think that people should look at it. You see the views whatever's just nonsense. Does it does it feel if you look back now two thousand three when he was in the middle of your time? Mary clare. Yep. In the UK. Does it feel like this is where it was always meant to does it feel like destiny? That's a big question. No, I think. I wish I could say was this strategic. I don't think I am. I think it's I definitely worked really hard and had some lucky breaks. Maybe I. I would never put myself here in our up shop in common garden with all of us in this incredible buzz around brand that I was building in the US now, I wouldn't have. But I'm really glad I am very. During those fifteen years. I could look we can look at social media. I could see you e and I think sinus living charmed life. Now. I know your hard work. So I'm just going to go. Yeah. She panicked. I have been knocks along the way. And what's the what's the most important thing to do when you do feel knocked or setback or bike? You're not where you want to be. Focus. We take step back figure out. Really, what makes you happy has disdain your life on was to go in your life. And that could be work could be people that could be different practices that you do or don't do. And I think you just got to give yourself a bit of me time to figure those things out. And that's something. I didn't do enough. I run myself ragged. And I'm trying I'm actually still going through that. Now, I'm just really trying to figure out priorities, and I have kids. Well, obviously, the most important thing in my life and family here. And so it's like constantly evolving. Still trying to figure out and I wish I'd advise people. But like, I suppose just give yourself a minute. Think about what makes you happy. I think from that I take and I think something that is so hard to do is don't worry about anyone else. Things really understand. What makes you happy because the happiest happier. You all the happy of the pieces around you, ruby don't try and people please too. So the a horrible question. It's not going to be how do you Joel motherhood and being? How'd you travel? You have shed Joel that is not. I would imagine your schedule varies not just week to week day today. Does use whole totally right. So there's no patents. That's my excuse with penalty not game to the gym. Well, I just don't know L tomorrow. The only half of that is no such thing as balance, I think that's a made up word to make working mothers feel bad. I believe that I have to be in the present wherever I am and his with kit. My kids I have to be with them. I've to put the phone away Ming myself put the phone away. I have to environment work. I have to be wherever my body is my head has to be to. That's my new thing love that. But it makes sense, right? Then I don't think there's going to be any time with my kids and time with work every week or every two weeks or months, but I believe that if I. Warms like physically mentally there as well than trying to make sense. Does is that thinking that's come out something like yoga, meditation, or, you know, just just being just not being present on many jobs and just clearly being nine people because I'm not there. I'm juggling another job, and that's not fair and anyone around me. And I probably let the hard way because I just see it's not fair the team that I'm with all the other people. I'm not with you know. So it's now about what can I really let's just think what what is possible. Yeah. Person think about this. And also saying though, I have an amazing team of people obviously mill makeup incredible. And then outside of that I have mazing help with the kids. We have an amazing money. I'm going to deny that you need the kids need that you know, on dancing around the planet. They need help. Yeah. Okay. Two working parents to working parents who aren't always in the country with them when really with them. Yeah. And every weekend we actually just got place upstate New York's two hours city. So every Friday night, we all get in that car, and we shut off drive it, she hours, we decompress. We laugh we sing. We talk about the week. Even though the fall, whatever the ever let the learning in school. And we spend the weekend. Together, we run around with shoes on like be with nature that to ozzy's. Ozzy's medicine if you like somewhat making it okay to be nuts for the other five days. Back in two thousand three I think that. Felt it feels to me. Anyway, that was of the Mickey Mouse club example, the Mickey Mouse club when it was Ryan JC, Justin Britney and Christina. Right. And I. That you know. The idea of that. If you look at who used to go in these press with strips, but it was you it was Alex Stein with Nadeem bag, and it was the mole of your seeing this week, very, I know, and it's been like willna style to this week to look at social media as Alex together. Warlike I was on the phones and the dean yesterday, she's I'm just going into go and see it feels like a real real moment of we also hunger all wanted Alex skincare. Rain say she's done so incredibly well, the deans like storming on YouTube who all we really hungry. And we wanted it now, and I feel a sense of joy and kind of taking a step back and going. Now, it's all hair. Yeah. You bet that full site. I mean, that's I do feel like it's a reunion and even from we've gotten amazing hair now. Future seen my own multis. One of my dearest friends. Still is today, but incredible into vogue and the team from the scene Hera all old friends. And it's it's amazing. And it's like coming full circle, full circle, full circle. But was so it just feels like I often said on this ball. 'cause when I was twenty five I didn't understand why didn't have it. Now. I'd see other people haven't they? Why haven't I because I wanted just body and all work the extra hours, and now I can relax because I think a lot of the stuff that is desperately wanted. Then I hadn't I hadn't really end. I didn't deserve. I wouldn't know what to do with. Whereas now, I can I can do with it. I think you get what you can cope with at the right time. And you do have to put in the groundwork. Yeah. No doubt about that. There is no overnight success. And if it does happen overnight, I pretty much guarantee you it's not gonna last. Well, also, it might look like it happened overnight like Milton. And put it didn't twenty years in the making my husband's been having events. They're having studios that he knows every single person in Manhattan he worked to but he he's a social butterfly is paid off. Because this is what we built a milk make up from the community that he studios, and it's the combination of all of your years of variant here. And I remember when Joe Felli came on the cost, and I know I went to house and Hastings. It's. And we were talking about writing jobs, and if somebody says, can you speak to how long will it take you and Joe's answer is two hours and thirty years. Oh my God. That's I'm taking that one. Take it. Home loan Milt been born three years, plus the other exactly the combined experiences so true. So as we draw to an end of the. With you. So sitting dream, but you are Infinity. Visit this is when you have lain in. So I don't want to take up loads of your time. But I do wonder because I asked myself this question. If I could put bags two thousand three and I just is so embedded indelibly etched in my brain meeting you on a trip and like being hit. Is there anything that you now we'd like to tap Saana from two thousand three on the shoulder? Just whispered Howard. You just say is actually does exactly why would tell us on it. I would have had more confidence in myself. 'cause I don't think back then I would have ever knew million years. Someone was like even remotely excited to meet me. And that's why would tell because I think I was very shy while I was there. I was I was definitely the Shiloh on. So I would probably tell myself to have a bit more confidence in myself. Yeah. And then just go and do what you gotta do. Yes. Just keep walking talking. Thank you so much. Delighted to see all your success. I'm so incredibly do. To try every piece of Milt makeup starting with Christmas. I will be wearing all of it. Thank you so much. This is obviously I will be putting all of the links to milk designer in the show notes that you can fight on apple podcast or it is the US streaming and downloading the show. But thank you for listening to this episode. This is just been a reunion Mahat saying me to thank you everyone thinks he won't sued. Thank you so much listening before you go. I would love it. If you could get in touch, not distraught me, an Email that the podcast at gmaiLcom, one of my favorite things is to get emails from you and to have a little chat, why not slide into my dams on social media. I am at Emma, gums on Instagram and Twitter, and you can also click the Lincoln my profile or the show notes to join the closed. Facebook group where we have lots of checks and insightful discussions about the podcast, and many many other things I will be back next time with another fabulous guest. But for now, thank you so much for this. And I will see you on the next one.

New York editor Instagram UK US Diana Ruth Puffer Rossi Milt London beauty editor Manhattan Zana milk studios apple America Panaji Mike Zine TSA Covent Garden
"Bomb and gouge"

The Tony Kornheiser Show

1:10:20 hr | 2 years ago

"Bomb and gouge"

"Previously on the Tony Kornheiser show. One suffered a broken wrist and the other just cuts to a knee. But everyone seems to be doing. Okay. What was he driving? He was driving range Rovers a black Land Rover SUV right near the Royal family's Sandringham estate in anyone in the car with him. No. He was lying. So I love in my mind back. That's right. Yes. Yeah. That's one for dry too much at this family. I'm done. I'm gone. The Tony Kornheiser show is on now already. This is a holiday and we're live at chatter at the corner of Wisconsin avenue northwest and Jennifer street northwest. It is not raining. It is not snowing buddy cold. It's cold in Washington DC. Gary Braun is here. Chris Liz's here. Michael Kornheiser was here. Nigel is going to run the board do everything want to wish you happy birthday to Nelson. Who's in the crowd? Be wanna tell people, and I assume you can do this wherever you are. Because the moon is not simply full in Washington when there's a full moon. It's everywhere in the country. I did not see the blood red moon, the giant wolf Blitzer wolf see that. But I did see it about seven o'clock last night. And I did see at about six o'clock this morning and last night, it was in the eastern sky this morning. It was in the western sky gigantic moon was Gigante rate. I stayed up to see the red thing. How how was it? It was interesting. It was cool looking even had some binoculars one of my kids telescope. So it was able to check it out. But I have to say someone who went to catch the solar the totality of the solar. Eclipse a way different which was emotional thing to witness. This was just like that's cool. I'm only getting mono here. Oh, by the way in my ear. Just so Gary, and I are talking speaking our inside of my mouth, I went outside and watch after the games. And after watching the tape to doesn't matter so three, oh, I didn't didn't wanna was eleven thirty or something, and it was in full bore. It was I tried to take a picture for my kids Petit Doug of the moon. You know, you can go on the internet and get of pretend you took. You can get time lapse of it. You can see the whole three hours, thirty seconds. I just love my kids. So I wanted to go out. Did you? Did you? Just look the I will say this about all of those astrological things when they happen. I always. Purpose. It makes me think of. Hundreds or thousands of years ago. What would have gone through the minds of? Yeah. Just like what's going on the move back? Many gods the going away as the earth comes between all three of them removing or two of them are moving. But as the earth comes between the some in the moon the moon, which was very bright to your point. There starts to dark. It goes from full moon all the way down to sort of crescent. And then it transitions to read weird scares me. Let's get never go full moon. We are once again, and we will continue to do this. We will offer fifteen not fifty. But fifteen percent discounts on most food items. Not happy hour at chatter for people with government ID's. We feel I'm not saying the Royal. We I'm saying for everybody here. Everybody feels bad that this shutdown continues to go there been you know, sort of false starts compromises that have been taken just I'm not dealing with. I'm just not doing it. Both. Let's go. Let's go to the football both games. Go to overtime. The greater game. Because. The saints game. I'll get to next but hinges on a no call. They get cheated. They just get cheated. They're going to win the game. They get cheated. We'll let's go to the New England game. That New England beats Kansas City is the greatest fourth-quarter ever play this thirty eight points in the fourth quarter. The game ends exactly how it begins. Tom Brady gets the ball in his hands. And goes the lane of the field handing the ball off a running touchdown. This is the way the New England should not have had the problems that had had because on the they go seven nothing, then they go down that was in seven plus minutes. Then they go down the field in eight plus minutes, and it's going to be and should be. And I cannot believe it's not fourteen nothing. Daryl bevelled got in there and made a call. What are you doing you hand the ball off? What are you doing? Why even Tom Brady? Why are you throwing? So now they have to wait till the end of the first half. They put a lot. Pressure on Mahomes homes. Look like a kid for a half. And then Mahomes, look like the next great thing of all time in the second half. But they had to go to fourteen nothing late in the first half. Kansas City came back it the fourth quarter is spectacular. The two calls that you can talk about non as agreed just as the saints. Call are the Eshelman call saying that it did not touch his hand or did not touch his body. No, touch and it so it's not a muff. And they got it back. Anyway. Right. And the second thing is the roughing on Brady, which is just a big paw. A big necessary town radio on the left shoulder. That's a bad. Call later in the show. Michael wilbon will tell you that. That's the reason the NFL must be disbanded. And I would add to that the the Microsoft circus surface destructive pick call pick. No call on that pick play which was clear pick players her three or four yards down the field screening, the patriots defender. Those three were there was a stretch. There was just like man this. So I think that all of it was fixed for New England as will bundle. So makes hold that the chiefs. I believe are now one eight in playoff games at home. That's bad. It's not just the anyway, it's a lot of guys one in eight playoff games at home. They did win that one. You've got they did win one eight one last week. Yeah. The patriots have played the underdog card, which nobody believes mean, it's not it's not the look I thought I had the Rams winning and Kansas City winning. I had those two teams. It wasn't that. I thought the patriots were the underdogs that I thought at this particular juncture, they were not going to be able to stop Mahomes. They totally contain Mahomes in the first half not at all in the second half. But I think you have to go I think you have to go to Brady this is the ninth Super Bowl. We're not going to we've never seen it. And we ain't going to see this is the ninth one for this guy him and Bella check. This is the ninth time. He's forty one years old and. Even if you think he's not what he was. He still great. He's not good. He still great on those drives. He gets rid of the ball so quickly. You those third downs in overtime drive. Hausky who we didn't think catch the ball more? Did I was I was going bananas. My in-laws are in town in my wife, and none of whom are big pro football. I'm trying to explain to them. Brady's throwing the ball to in the last drive. He he's throwing the ball to a quarterback colleague, Kent state, right? That's right lacrosse players from Penn State who played football at the titan of planning towards Monmouth than a guy with a mechanical, arm and guy who basically we assume this wash gronkowski's is indisputably great. But the point is he's throwing the ball to HOGAN and adamant old before. Hogan heart. It's it's third down. You're like, well, it's throat. Adamant. I am getting opening use other cornerback just like shake his head after that last one. I mean, he is doing it with people who I just don't think any other quarterback could do it with. I just want to tyreek hill and Travis yesterday much Travis Kelsey military took him out of it. I did get the sense, right? That mahomes. It's just it's not going to be long. Yeah. Be this. Last two drives the third down throw. He made where. The guy is about to crush him. Slings it sidearm perfectly these. So then let's go to the saints the saints. The saints have had problems the saints in their last six games scored an average of nineteen points. That's not good enough to win what they get yesterday twenty three points. That's that's not good enough to win wherever and let's give all credit to Greg's arline is that his name leg forty eight and fifty seven these are not cheap kicks the one for fifty seven went through the middle of the upper fifty seven, but it should never have gotten to that. That is that's the worst. No, call I've ever seen. He not only hits them in the head helmet-to-helmet three yard on ever had some the head. He's not playing the ball. But you hear his explanation that the defender said, yeah, I got there early. I was beaten for a touchdown. And I just wanted to take the penalty. Stead when they showed her around whenever a back judge who who's the judge on that that guy can never work again. It's cabinet is. Britt, kevin. Never worked again beer. That's that's so bad. And Sean Payton, buddy, the way other people would have been far worse than Sean Payton was due breezes, not going on other soup. This was in his arm has has gone the other way, you can see he can't hit the deep ball anymore. Let me point out forty years old the other guy forty one but forty years old. I think that's it for the saints. I think that's it for breeze. And that that is robbery the coal. Also takes Sean Payton, largely not entirely largely off the hook with a minute forty something very bad. Call on the first of the Balts hair. Call terrible call which also could have easily cost them. But they're going to get the ball at the two or three if. Carrizo kick a field goal teams going to get the ball with one second. If that correct over over what are you doing? Now they had chances to put it away after that call as well. I mean stand. Yeah. Got if if they like to call guys. Those to the credit. I don't know the name of the guy in the Rams who catches it. That's a hell of an. Falling down. Michael Thomas, basically blocks him down, and he's still called it. I mean. Also since now in back to back years, they lose to the Minnesota and into that Moore Stephens, a play non call ever, go to overtime crushing visitors one in both cases, the the best bet I would have made and boy what I've had to sweat. This out was the over on the New England game at fifty six and a half. But you you need it again. Did you ever see a better quarter than our nose remarkable? No both games for his bad. As whatever the round before this is called both. Both of these games were that good the round blast round with the exception of the patriots game. No, the exception. The eagles game. Not grandma's good. But this round I mean, I ever rake Gary first ever championship round both game. Jackie yet. I. Person and however, many years playoff in where there were two overtime games in the same day, but first ever championships. Now, the refereeing is going to be something that is discussed and that is a problem for people. I will I'll be first to admit, it's aggravating. But I don't care. It's not gonna affect my watching. I mean, it is as as to my relation centers system. I left likes to remind you it is first and foremost show telling me, and it is and it is the best show on television for my money. Now, it's it's it's just becoming less of a TV show like March madness and more of a TV show like and I'm dating myself here. But when like, Charlie Hefner, whatever the referees name was used to turn around and Nikolai Volkov or the iron Sheik would reach into shorts. Grad a foreign object and hit HOGAN in the head with it. It's sort of it's kind of a coming like that sort of TV show. But still amazingly entertaining. And these things never you can always. Point two one play, but they never come down to one. So we've seen over the course of this year. We've seen Aaron Rodgers in this position lot. We like to think Aaron Rodgers because Brady's forty one years old. We like to think iron Rogers is the greatest quarterback out there. He has failed to deliver Tom Brady delivered the mail. Yeah. They didn't touch the ball. Tom Brady went the length of the field. It I don't know how you can say you can say that other people in your mind's eye are as good as Brady, but you cannot possibly say that anyone is better Brady has to be right there with whoever else you have ever loved in your life at that position. He's impossible every single time for best ride. Raise your hand if at twenty eight twenty four chiefs after the. With two minutes and three seconds left. If you thought Brady nothing going dislike, I did not think he was like why nine times forty? And he goes dead you, and I said stop, okay, forty does every damn time. It's like as the eagles. Look the coin. I know it's a fifty fifty they say heads, of course, it's going to be frigging heads. They're going to take it the stupid overtime rule. Take down when they won the toss. What did you think? I thought there was a real chance they were gonna win. Yeah. And it reminded me that Andy Reid deferred you deferred in the to get the ball. And you let this guy. Go eight yards. Nothing that defer with that offense and defense you want. You want them on the field as much by the way. Bella check. Again, they run it. They run it. They keep Mahomes. He only through how many passes Heathrow Kerry thirty forty six passes over eighty thirty one. I mean, they got to him they, but but they just didn't have the ball much the first chord he throws it at fifty four. And then they throw a touchdown. Michael wilbon, who's going to slam the NFL until you this wasn't any good. I have tweets that don't just indicate this to me, they say it, very explicitly. So we'll get out of the way. We'll we'll join us when we return. I'm Tony Kornheiser. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the Indochino ad in and asked me to talk about how made to measure suits better compared to generic off the rack, suits. It asked me to talk about my personal experience with Indochino. It asked me to talk about how every man looks better. And feels more confident when he puts on a suit. But I'm I'm going to yield the Florida Nigel because Nigel has three of these things do they fit. Great, then mainly look great. It's just carried away. They make me look as good as possible. That's. Correct. I work with that. What is the best suit? It really doesn't cost that much. You can design it whichever way you want. There's also variations you can get at doesn't take that long. It's only a few weeks once India measurements. And so what you waiting for. 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Fifty percent off the regular price from eight to measure premium suit. Plus shipping is free. That's chino dot com. The promo code is Tony Kaye for any premium suit for just fifty nine dollars and free shipping. And for those of you who haven't bought suits lately. That's really good price. That's really good price. It's an incredible deal for premium made-to-measure suit. You'll listening to the Tony Kornheiser shift. This ascend to us by Brett whiskers and his band the benders. Listen to this. Mr Tony crew little backstory back in December. I submitted to be a performer on the run away to paradise with Jon Bon Jovi Carribean or Caribbean last week. I heard back from the powers that be that I was in fact selected as one of the ten national semifinals while I don't subscribe to the notion that music or art is competition or popularity contest. Unless it involves painting murals, I figured I'd have least tried advance my career and get on that big boat. This is where you law little come in. I need your vote. It will only take a minute literally. So please, visit the new revamped website, WWW dot Brett, Wisconsin of you. I dot com for details and information, that's lovely hear the music at the end of the show, Michael wilbon joins us. Now, I had all sorts of things to ask about do converge Inya and Michigan and Wisconsin. And James harden. And in light of what happened yesterday in light of the tension of those games and the spectacular play from so many people in those games the fact that they won't both went to overtime. And to me were at least thrilling, let's just let's just start with that. I think the lesser game in hindsight. Because of the coal is is the saints. The saints got SoHo Zed what can anything be done about that? That is a lot of times they call pass interference in. It's almost phantom. This is he ran right through him helmet to helmet. What are you supposed to do? I'm my picture of even bigger than that. I suspect you, and I have to disagree about this on this topic of those games yesterday as much as we've ever disagreed about the games people play in other words, dot culture, or do that the games were fraudulent. They would taint the outcomes not the performances the outcome of the game. The NFL has reached a point where it can't even guarantee the integrity of the outcome of his contests championship games. They were. And so what can we do? We can express outrage we express outrage those games were tainted. I think the first one was I don't think the second the second one is to when you can't do Los Angeles Rams to practice to the next two weeks. They have to practice breathing away from Tom Brady because if you breathe on there's going to be a call there were three consecutive calls. It made it look like that. There was an agenda for the patriots. I mean, you can't you can't say that that was conclusive evidence to overturn the the muff by element. That's conclusive. Now, it was not that that's your perpetrating the fraud Tony on the audience and then Tom Brady a guy brushes his chest. So there's now a penalty for hitting Tom Brady in the PECS. This is this is not I'm sorry. This is not just I'm obsessed with this. And I'm gonna tell you right now, if they want me to just celebrate these games on co host. To celebrate them. You don't have to you can say what you want to say. I they were entertaining. God loved him. They were they were entertaining. But but you can't the games the outcome. New integrity. Tony the the New Orleans team any get hoes. They just took the they were they had them being taken from them. And I'm not sure because of the. Don't call that penalty Tom Brady. They don't score. They scored a touchdown on that possession. My right. This scored a touch. It was the greatest fourth-quarter I've ever seen. What was third in? Okay. So even Bella check from his own thirty is probably not going forward on for the ten. No. I wouldn't touchdown in a game. That went to time the outcomes the outcomes have integrity, and it's I don't have a team. I don't I don't I don't have a t I I thought actually I thought that the patriots gonna wind up the way it started up going to blow out the city herald. Herald wall on the second drive. What are you doing? What are you doing? It's just terrible cool in. So I don't even with Tony. I he's been I've never said thirty eight years of doing this as a sports writer, whatever I am. Now. I don't care about the Super Bowl. I do. Gene, teams reached it in front of the manor at no fall to VIP. But if you can't if you're gonna sit there and look under a hood talk to New York or New Jersey, whatever they talked to the NFL go through that process. Take two commercial breaks. And you come back, you tell me could close if you're lying, you're you're lying. The results is painted. It just happened. NBA? People would want the abolishment of league when the can't happen in the NBA. It's a faster game. It's a more fluid game. They don't stop for the calls aren't the same in the NBA there. The different kinds of calls. It did because of cost, but what has to happen when you have this. You have an exhibition to me. You don't have a sport. You have something where how can you have the three calls in consecutively against the chiefs that went down, so yeah, we're disagreeing. And I don't I I don't discount anything you're saying. But I would also just point out. There was the pick play that was not called which also led to the chiefs touchdown, which gave them the lead inside a two minutes, or I guess. They were terrible across the board in my opinion. More of the calls favored the patriots. Specially the the blowed Brady's head which didn't happen and that hit him on the shoulder. But they're just this game. The players get bigger faster stronger, which makes the game harder to officiate as the refs. Just get sort of older and slower, I don't know what the answer let's say they throughout the rulebook. We'll we'll write about the calls going in order the three. I guess I could see potentially how that could happen because well did he touch the saints one to me is unforgivable eighty one who looked at it? Anyone tackles has to be there has to be a mechanism where the league steps in. And. Is it that that because my that's the game? They're going to win the game point out before that plane, not handing off the ball. And I down equally on for me. Don't I think the league has to step in because Now Sean Payton this two years in a row gets undone by his own stupid db? And now he gets done by the league. It's unfair. This is done in a way Sony in tweeting about some of this of yesterday. I don't know this. I was told that the CFL action looks at it appears penalties or maybe you'd have to at least look at it. Maybe in the last few minutes already for our name. You don't wanna do it forever? Because then the game is going to go to long. That's right. But this is this. This is a playoff game to determine who goes to the Super Bowl game. That's who title games are tainted. I think I don't think the second one eight. No, I think they are. No, I think New England did exactly what they had to do. I think that Li overcrowded eight one right down the field. Do how do they do what they have to do it? They're facing fourth and ten from wherever they're facing it. They they do Tom Brady was penalised guy. Touched is chip just cost over this. I'm not Tom Brady. Tom Brady was spectacular during the game. Tony he was spectacular except he shouldn't have had the theories of opportunity that was one how many others did he get? How many other team the team possession when it shouldn't? But I'm saying that that he cheats are supposed to have possession. Don't you five yard line? Don't you think that Brady was great come on? He was racially. Tony, Tony, Tony? The OJ kill those people and he was trained. Pretty in the patriots. Great. And they are given opportunities by the I'm sorry, Thom pretty should twenty. You know, what it's really easy to be great when you should be on the sideline on the bench because it was fourth intent that you can't disclose his over. I love the game shooting for -tunities. Unity to what he did. I thought more than any other game all year. I saw the the past the present and the future. I mean, just Mahomes in the second half. Well, it was great. He was great. Wow. The entertaining. The, but you know, what I mean? So were so were certain TV shows. I mean, if you have an exhibition because you're you can't guarantee the integrity of your outcome. One of my watching. So then you want sensually you want review on every? No. I don't have the answer. Right. I don't have the answer. All I know is the only time I have written. If I was still writing this is all right about for a week. I watched the Sacramento Kings have a chance at a final visit in therefore championship taken away from them. I watched it. I bet there courtside and people who remember that game and talk about it. They talk about that being a low point in the modern history of the NBA the Los Angeles Lakers, essentially, awarded a chance to go to a championship. 'cause the foul calls or something like twenty five to three in shooting in the fourth quarter. And you watch that you say no just my role is still put on the hat sometimes as a skeptic not as often as you. But I put it on. And when I put that hat on last night. I can't accept what I saw Japan. Tell me what. Tell me how many which about golden way quarterbacks talk about one the golden Tom Brady, and that's earned performance. But it's also earned by treatment. ES drew Brees sometimes in that category. Been around this burger at times has in there guys Aaron Rodgers business. You got Tony no-one gets a penalty that extends fifteen yards. And I down it with the game on the line because someone touched his chest. The call was a lie ally was perpetrated. So so for me to just step that a side. I can't do that. Maybe everybody else. Can't. I can't I won't. So you're not. You will not watch the Super Bowl. You'll watch watch it watch it. I mean because like the college bowl game three weeks later to me now where you just saw the season. And it was unfinished. It was unsatisfied. It was it was fraudulent. Do you think that the Kansas City? Chiefs are better team than New England Patriots. No, no. I thought we would win was the better team. But but the patriots received a handout. Government cheese one hand out. To possession bell. Lease the muff. Eshelman turned over on the next play. Right. Yeah. But the the one the Brady was overturned. They scored a touchdown. What did you think in the overtime? What did you think of the way they went down the field or were you so upset with? I thought it will look this is what this is what he and they do this is there late. This is what they failed to do against the eagles last year. Yes, they did it against Atlanta when they need it to a couple of times ago. Yes, they should never Brady through the pick. Yes. This is what they do. I'm expecting them to do that. I'm never going on ever gonna look I'm the one who ever you says do you stop the patriots when they win. I don't care for the best team. They're going to win and they win for they they come within an eyelash of winning. So I don't again, the both things can be true the patriots and their greatness can be certified, and you can look at the league and say really this is what you put out products. All right. I'm gonna go to one other the number on that game, by the way that that game that that hockey dicusss, I'm going to go to one other thing because I know it was sort of. I'm sure you watched it intently do Ken Virginia. I did not. I did not expect I didn't expect to win. But they did not a lottery pick. They didn't have. They didn't have the come on. I'm not gonna go coach K on this. Sorry. I mean is as I told her I told the person who lives in my house who went to both those two Sion's before the gay. It'll be a narrow win to win. No Virginia's gonna win this game. Don't tell me about the point guard is fix. Six hundred eight pound guy, you got three horses out there who go one two and five in the NBA draft sop. Okay. Doesn't have the one two and five Virginia has has probably to pros. And by the way, they are wonderful college play really good team. They're a really good team the way Zion junior. If I was voting today. Virginia would earn my number one spot in the poll one because they went and played dead. Eat great. I agree with that. I mean and Michigan had its chance. Michigan. Michigan lost by ten on the road. So I I've been saying that Michigan's the best team in the country. I think Michigan I still think Michigan is the best team. But I would vote for Jinya one today. I would vote to two or Tennessee to Duke three and who else was left for Michigan for and by the way. There's no shame in that. They're gonna play these games out. Yeah. Everybody's going to the integrity. Of them will hold. Unlike unlike the NFL, but I I watched that game. I love that Duke Ginny games Gregor. And I think I don't know. I never going to be told at a team with three lottery pick not lottery, the top five players next half those gonna be it. It's not going to be told their home. They can't win again tried. I'll see you later Michael will behind girls that was good. I neglected to say at the beginning that the Michael wilbon interview is brought to you by lows the new home of craftsman. So I'm saying late fraudulent segment. Yeah. Well, it's I don't even know on. Well, you can't well news channel eight. It's so other than that. All right. We'll take a break news when we return, I'm Tony Kornheiser. This is the Tony Kornheiser show. Here's the rest of the lows add. Here's what I say to you. Even though we're winking at each other lows is my new go-to destination where I can explore the latest innovative craftsman products, including the new v twenty power to a battery platform cranston's v twenty cordless power to lineup features a high capacity lithium battery that's part of craftsman's interchangeable battery system. So it works with all tools in the twenty line of giving you the run time you need in the power, you deserve the one battery system works on multiple products making the v twenty lineup easy to use and Vercel. When I go to bypass tools. It's got to be easy to use personal. Yes. Twenty brushless. Power tools are all proudly made in the United States America their global materials being used, but they're manufactured, Charlotte. North Carolina all have brushless Motors. Living high efficiency, better Runtime more. Bauer better run feel lively you can little girl more power and greater durability for all your projects. You can explore the entire class when b twenty lineup but you local Lowe's store, visit lows dot com slash Tony. That's lows dot com. Bax Tony cause lows is the new home of craftsman? You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show county, Gordon. Tim Scott has sent this in Tim, Scott, and the love puppets attach is a song. You may play a couple of times a pay I corrode playing for no money with my bandmates Steve Lillard over the years, we've listened to our fellow musicians and artists complain about not getting paid, admittedly. I've mixed feelings about it long guy. We decided long ago we decided that most folks will never understand the amount of time and energy it takes record one three minutes soon or the prep in practice time. It takes to a bar gate for what amounts to gas money and a meal, we decided to take gigs for people. We like many of them were club owners in restaurant tours who were struggling themselves to make payroll and survive another month. Don't get me wrong. We love getting paid. And we've enjoyed some good paydays. We just never wanted to fall prey to the tyranny of a high payroll expectation, it's not creating to that. And you can visit our extensive catalog at WWW dot love puppets, L U, V, love puppets dot com and purchase all one hundred plus songs one buck apiece permission to play any of them. Any time. Michael of people like the love puppets who are out there. Working hard wanna send in their music. How do they do share your music by emailing it to jingles at Tony Kornheiser show dot com? And you can always listen to the music and full at the end of the podcast, even those just bumper music. Now, I understand we're selling Johnny oh stuff. We are partnering with Johnny oh to offer a free hat. If you make a purchase I think the purchases a get to a hundred dollars and you'll get that hat. You may or may not have to add it to your cart. But use the code TK hat, and they'll take care of you in the business believes GWP gift with purchase. Wow. I didn't know that then. George Washington University. So have a p WP which is purchased with purchase you buy something. And you're allowed to buy something that's exclusive which seems to me to be a scam things along. Tell you can only buy this. If you buy purchase Estee Lauder does it. I know you have to do it because I work retail for stay Lauder purchase from purchase. Unlike purchase awareness, by the way, New York fund stand ups, Tom Brady has now appeared in more Super Bowls or we'll have appear to more Super Bowl nine every single team in the NFL except for the patriots. How about that? And we didn't mention this. But I do think it is worth calling out de Ford's absolute stupidity in lining up in the neutral zone and cost his team that was that. Games can be over. What do you do about being over? It's over it's an interceptions over do. You think that low von will make sure that that they told them to do that. Like he wasn't technically in the neutral zone. Did you read the script? That's where you're off sides on. This attorney was started with college basketball after only mustering up. Can I mention the Tony Mendez died over the weekend? Yes, absolutely Mendez was the CIA agent. Argos exploits in in getting hostages American hostages who are living in the Canadian embassy and getting them out of Iran became the spine for the movie Argo. It's it doesn't matter how they tweaked the movie Argo. The fact is that he did this thing by creating a production coming every single thing that happened was made out of whole cloth. Tony Mendez is an American hero in here. What is all go mean? So after only mustering fourteen points in the first half the bed. Cats rallied thirty six in a second still not enough. They get nipped by the catamounts knits seventy eight fifty killed. Where was that game? That game was in Vermont, but say this is quite good there. This is the game before we had fifteen in the first half. Yes. What are we doing in the firsthand? What exactly are we doing against northwestern? We had seventeen in the first half. What are we are? We not ready to play today. Think the game is scheduled for an hour later you doing it appears as if they've been tough time getting getting going and plus the bench against six points on the bench. Yeah. That's John undefeated. They haven't been able to get over the disappointment of you not coming to the UN be. That's still lingering. You mentioned the again, did you understanding more about now? It's a really great game. I wasn't great. You'd be a great team a great team. Yes. And that was you know, you've got five guys who can handle it. And then do what they're supposed to do UVA's not gonna lose in the first round this year that they're not so good. Unlike years past they score. I mean, you know, they can that wasn't particularly high scoring, but they can score do do with two guys sending reddish hair in or something. I mean, the beating with guys like thirty something and thirty kit Williamson appears to be pretty good. He's about five combined threes for both teams like see jump shot. They had they took some shots, but they weren't dropping. Those are really good games up. Really michigan. The number two team in the country. -sconsin Maryland beat the other day easily. Yeah. Well, not easily but in the first half killing him and Kansas another took ten loser. They lose by one point two West Virginia. Mister, tony. Did you go to the NBA? And it looks like Lonzo bold is expected to miss four to six weeks. Four four to six four to six with a grade three left ankle sprain. So can I ask a question about this? Didn't the Lakers. Get Rajon Rondo. He's out to house. How? Six. Well, let's see. Now the couple weeks. I think did something arm. I think they won't make position until. Until. He's not he's not what the number two pick off to be. He's okay. He's getting better. Not yet. What the to pick ought to be can't shoot. It. Would you rather have him or false him him girls? Get better ball handler. No. He's not even close full was the number one pick. And I mean. Ankle. Yeah. Yeah. To Mr Tony Mickelson shot. Fix show. Would a fifty nine six sixty still does not win at Lakisha that on a goes to Adam long, right? Dookie his stuckey. Yeah. Did you watch that? I was I was flipping back and forth because I was at the end of the early game. Now that was that was a great back nine the big story that you're going to focus on is. Why Phil couldn't close he missed a couple of short putts early. Which was a bit surprising as you heard me mention last great putter know that you can't fault the kid who goes out and shoot seven under on a Sunday and has a walk off birdie when twenties tied with two other players and is in the worst position coming up for his second shot. So all the credit in the world atom along come big chip in on the last couple of holes big trend to watch though. Phil mickelson. He's doing something that we have not seen somebody his age really try, which is you've heard of bomb and gouge he was pulling driver everywhere and was trying to hit it as far as possible. And you're just going to see in pick and choose courses where it doesn't hurt somebody of his ability with the wedge to play from the rough. I have not heard of bombing gal. Oh, yeah. I've heard of shock and awe what? His bomb on share peanut butter. He's essentially going to try and look at the stats and say, even if I'm in the rough if I'm say fifty yards closer to the green than my opponent average proximity. The whole be just a bit closer hail bombed couch. I read long has as many this. I guess his sixth start on this j event. So it was so Phil had as many majors. This guy had had events. Subsisting hawkiness to Tony things are not going well for you Washington. Capitals defending champion Washington county up eight yesterday, they lose eight five to the Blackhawks fifth loss in a row. They currently tied for second place in the matter fine. I mean, they're in second place to fire trucks. I think. I think trust he's gonna go. Try. This is in first again. Islanders. He is. He he played I didn't know finish day. So I don't know Hopi started. But who finished Phoenix Copley their backup? The great on hold a copy in. Put her in the net between two five garys friends with his parents via not friends with them. But met them at the Stanley Cup final last year. They were having a time. But the caps you went through a stretch not that anyone cares. But went through a stretch a little later in the season last year where everyone was screaming to fire trots where they lost a bunch of games in a row. So they're fine. I care Gary Player coach Pete Rose used to do. Maybe wasn't our basketball. Okay. Pete rose. Didn't do that didn't play. No. Was there a basketball guy? When someone's done Russell. Yeah. I thought chasing kid did it for a while. Bill. Russell certainly did it Lebombo. Drove play player-manager in the manager sport of baseball. Ted Williams Williams, cricket matches right games. Or is that what we've been tennis? Speaking of tennis matches. We'll take you down to the land of one of the land down under the Australian Open Francis fo- grew up idolizing Raffin the doll and now he will get to play him in the quarterfinals. If I thought he grew up idolizing wilbon, well that is well not as well to two biggest icons for him. Yes. We'll an adult. He moves on after winning in four sets any wins that he takes off his shirt and pounds by his son. I like it. Roger Federer though is out. He's out. He loses to your boy. Yes, that's right to fund us. It's poss-. On us. It's poss- free sit suppose since a poss- yet sounds like something you would take your band if you're back her got a ramp. Yes. One of those sit supply the Greek taken. On Hillary creek. I haven't heard that taken. Sure. And on the other side of things of women. Serena Williams moving on if she takes out number one seed Simona up and she's the best. Yes. Even even sixteen seeding. It really is. Yes, that's about it. That's it. That's it for now. Okay. So we will come back with old guy radio. We have a lot to fact that it's fifty nine degrees in here. Is that news that doesn't it really jackets and scarves? Yeah. I like to wear an indoor scarf just European five. Attention was saying Michael was saying that he doesn't ever remember a day in Washington DC this call TIs if the climate change. No, no, I remember a lot of days in the low twenties but teens we don't get teens here often. How's it so cold if the if it's global warming Gaza great with that? Thanks. But it's gonna be I think by today's Monday, I think by sometime Thursday. Exactly. Yeah. Links. So okay, we'll take a break, and we will have old guy radio when we return. I'm Tony Kornheiser. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. This is all guy radio for the day. These are the BG's. This is the soundtrack from Saturday Night Fever is that what it's called. That's right. The why are we playing this Travolta strutting? Yes. Hoping paint. Can't right? Holding a paintcare because on this date and not in seventy eight the soundtracks. That's forty one years ago. Hit number one in the US in stay there. How many weeks ten twenty twenty four weeks? Okay. So in the area of critical commentary. It's a very good movie. It's a very good movie. It is based on a story that was in New York magazine by Nick Kona, British journalists called tribal rites of Saturday night. And he went he was the guy. He went to all of these places and talked about this particular. Out of teenage. I mean, they're in their early twenties. Subculture he's a brilliant writer cone, and that's how this movie the movie script was written. And it is a very good movie. It made John Travolta's star. If he wasn't already a star from television. I don't think he wasn't quite the same way. It's. I don't think you can knock the movie, right? I mean, I don't think it's very good. Great slice of of how life was in that particular spot at that particular time, and yeah, it's yeah. It's a great movie many gets lost. They just like the disco music, and sort of the disdain for disco me. It's not the movie is sort of not. Yes. Yes. It gets put in a garbage can and sent out to see because it's disco music. But you know, what it reminds me of is working? It's the whole exact I wanna get to that spot that means everything. And so he plays. Tony minero is that his name in it that place? Sounds about right, by the way, the original drummer for this recording passed away during the sessions, so then taking a bit of his drumming tracks in looping them over. And that's why the change. Oh. Incredible. They credit to Bernard loop as the drummer woman who played the lead who danced with Travolta was somebody from a soap opera that. I remember her name was Karen Lynn Gorny or something like that GIO are any y Karen Lynn, Gordon does. I only movies terrible. We should never another job. Yes. She was terrible directing the movie at night. Don't you come home and say, I got a problem with my leave here because she's actually terrible. Maybe she knew somebody. Okay. Let me get to something very germane to this show about our good friend Howard fineman who has apparently been tweeting. I guess tweeting that we have come to some mutual decision that how it's not going to be on the show. That's not my understanding at all. My understanding is that Howard said about a month ago and wrote us an Email and just said, you know, things have happened. And I'm I'm going to back away for a while back away. I've enjoyed it tremendously. And I'm going to back away from this. And that is my understanding I have a series of text back and forth with Howard, and I will tell you briefly what I have said to Howard. And now I will say this to everybody out there. Howard fineman is was an always will be the chief political correspondent of any show that I do he is welcome back at any time to talk about politics, which he does fabulously wealthy best. He's just absolutely great at that. I have myself. I mean, Chris does this for living and rarely do we ask Chris about this? Chuck Todd does this for living and almost never except for the the other day. We ask Chuck about this. I have moved. I have receded my political interest has gone down, and it has gone down because because Donald Trump whatever he says, it tan is going to be different at twelve is going to be different to is going to be different four. And so it doesn't have a handle that I'm interested in and because of the back and forth. And just all you have to see is what happened last week with Nancy Pelosi and Donald Trump and ANSI Pelosi went out to cut his legs off and he got up like in. Accent. Just say, why are you? Why is have so because of the nature of the conflict because of the distaste I have for it that there's no there's no over arching philosophy. That's interesting. It's just about meanness and individuality, and what people want that I've moved away in the last certainly in the last year. I mean, we don't do it nearly as much as we used to. Powered probably and justifiably recognize that and said, well, what are we doing here? But again, let me repeat this again is was and will be chief correspondent politically the Tony Kornheiser show whenever whenever I move away from that people Gary said, I should say this when I was here. The last time I did the show on Friday. I was in tremendous pain. I went to the doctor went to crystal afterwards. I took a series of x-rays. In fact, the eighth rib on my left side is fractured. Oh gave. It's frac. Carson Wentz over here. Can't get on for the show now. So you know, quarterbacks play with fractured ribs all the time. They shoot them up. Which? Oh my God. Not at your age, though. Well, Brady's close. You know, it hurts. It hurts less today than it did on yesterday. Do right tape. It. Nothing you grow. I'm told nothing. You can do I I've been given a prescription for Tylenol three with codeine, which I've taken occasionally not enormously enough. Didn't I don't feel anything different than Advil? I honestly don't I don't know. I have had as Michael can attest. I've spent the last four days sleeping on top of the covers in my clothes. Can't get because I can't I can't get under the hurts. My back hurts too much. And I don't I can't take off my clothes. We went over to your house on Friday for dinner, and my wonderful life recommended that I take you upstairs change you pretty. Come. So you keep talking about your two. So think of a rib I guess the part. I know, but there is sort of wrap around. So it's not your side. It's your left back. It's only it's my back. Okay. It's always said anything, I can do everything right handed. But we over a period of of our lives. We reach out with things to go off not that it matters at this point. But I presume the original fall did that or maybe line. Made it worse. But yes, it was the original fall. Sure. Absolutely. So I got the extra. This is left field. I hate to do to it's a visual. But how's that for the best headline ever the New Orleans times picayune referee? Unbelievable. Unbelievable and take a page from wilbon, they say blown no call Rob's. New Orleans NFC championship sets up tainted Super Bowl on. Shown, you're you are on the road to recovery. No future action need it. What's going to be insured? It is it is a common fracture. It is a non displaced fracture. It will take I was told three to four weeks. And I was also told the first time I swing a golf club in three to four weeks. Don down on the ground so out go, boom. Yeah. So that's that. We should talk about it. Because because will is not going to join us and paying attention to the Super Bowl, we should talk about the Super Bowl. And and I meet personally, I think the Rams should be favored over the patriots. So now. Actually. Yeah. Bet to one and a half patriots, minus one and a half. I think the Rams I think their defense is awfully good. Now. Let's awfully good. Big and strong and Donald disruptive is player goes down. Consider real dirty. Oh, if he'll take breeze ears and rhythm was on yesterday. The one thing I would say about that though. I know the chiefs do not have a good defense. But they do have a pretty decent pass. Chris Jones, Justin Houston. Nice reward. No, I agree. But now it's like Brady was never really. Him in your point Jones Ford, Houston, all outside rushers when Brady's had trouble and Super Bowl spin up. The middle said so says that was a third and ten that was a second second second. Same thing. Brought that he's completely correct exhibition distance wrong. I would disagree with you. I think the Rams advantage. There might be that it's indoors and the surface that they're playing on that used to apply maybe too old to outdoor to indoor Rams team. But the Rams are team that extensively was gifted this appearance. Oh, yes. Playing against a team that for the same reason why we said we like knowing that I'll believe they can't do it. When when they're beating they're not granted this is nine Super Bowls for how about this story. I mentioned number talking about this before the show if Nance correctly yesterday, it will be seventeen years to the day. Yes. Eighty lead patriots beat the heavily favored ram. This rams. The Rams did not get to the they were at the one. They were stopped at that was a great show. That was different one. No different. I think this Venezia airy kick the field, right? Yeah. So don't play still gonna Terry brain. Yeah. Would that be nice ride into the sunset for those? It's not going into the sunset wave feel differently. If they wouldn't if I were him if you still like playing he how could you argue that he is is anywhere close to Peyton goes Super Bowl position own. Visit komo's mud that matter the passes. He jam a lot about the game. But the passes he is throwing to Eshelman the right home and into grunt are in a two and a half to four inch window. Yeah. When they get in Tonio Brown. That Bella chick against McVeigh. Don't you find that a little bit intriguing? Well, it's a fraudulent Super Bowl McVeigh's what thirty one thirty two. I mean, it's the biggest George H Nigel off the air before. But when Louisville school hair when you look at the Bella traitor when you look at him in that outfit yesterday. He looks like the ghostly apparition rowing people across the river sticks. That's what he looks like he looks himself penny himself and taking people to be dead this gnashing of the Microsoft surface. Harry, notice your face. He throws it down. Then he take picks throws it over the bench fish. She doesn't like I did want to mention this before we get out of here. I did spend the weekend watching movies that have been nominated for a variety of sag after awards. I watched three movies. I watch vice I watched the favorite, and I watched black klansman. Vice is brilliant. But not a very good movie. It's brilliant. But it's so mean, it's unbelievably mean to to Dick Cheney. To wind chain. Mean was did you see the toy? Somebody who plays. Yes. Yes. That's not mean it is. So mean, it's not history. It's not accurate history. But it's brilliant in spots. It really is the favorite. I didn't even know much about it. It's a period piece in what appears to be maybe the seventeenth century in England. The Queen is Queen Anne and these are two Emma stone and Rachel Wieser become advisers and their rivals. And it's it's nasty. It's ill-tempered it's beautiful to watch of course. And like nine, you know, it's totally forgettable. It's totally forgettable temporarily. Forgettable black clans will win costumes. Competitiveness. Stone is great competitor his favorite though, black in the British white clansman is based on a true incident. So that's what gives it credibility. And that's what makes it. Good. And they'll Washington's lead, right? No, no, dense Washington's not in the movie kid. Oh, I don't know that is that kid kid. Yes, he's fine. He's fine. And Adam drivers find glowing nominated for the. K it's a cartoon. It's a cartoon the lane are are portrayed in the extreme to such a degree that ego. So I've watched all they were there. Okay. They will. I that was like eight hours of your weekend. The wife which Glenn Close is in. Then there's a movie with Melissa McCarthy in some guy. I think they're just drunk all the time. No, I don't know. And you did not watch episode three of its well. I did not because games. Try. I tried it after well for my worry, I need to take some time to see what's going on here. So and the movie that I have that I suspect best movie is black Black Panther black Black Panther. I don't like those kinds. I don't like superhero moon just give it a show. We talked about the movie that you need to wait for that. We all need to wait for is the Irishman which coming out this year. Okay. But I'm watching now I can't want. When is heck. Heck, we will have what we have. For twenty years. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. You too. He's got your emails printers broke. The board two zero folks. JJ metal. Michigan writes, given the recent woes of the in house printer. I thought the male jingle may need an update catches my short rendition of carries original, very nice, very well. Let me thank Michael will bond coming. Love count is on the show. He's not he's going to be. So he's going to totally sabotage PTI today. Totally and we're going to get a lecture on the Sacramento Kings I'd also like to thank our sponsors lows and Indochino. Remember listening subscribed to new an archived episodes. Tony Kornheiser show wherever you listen to podcasts including apple podcast Spotify Google play. If you listen to the show to I tunes, please leave a review. I mean, he's certainly entitled to that. He was on in the moment. He was that way. Yes. But it's just gonna make PTI miserable. And but in Frankfort Michigan, we all know how much you love the lows. But yet you loudly exclaim that, you know, nothing about the tools you're touting. Well, I was at Lowe's today in something caught my eye that would be perfect for you. For those watching news channel eight I've attached a photo of the fifty three piece craftsman kids, toy workbench, the tools light up and make real. Sounds. So I presume they're battery powered although I suspect not by the twenty interchangeable power system. That's the ball. This tool set is for ages three and up. So you can learn on it for two years. And then give it to boot. From Kevin Hayden in Richmond Virginia. Did you see that Bill Simmons just put out a pod with Aaron Sorkin? There are two ways us Little's can play this. You get your chance. Just stare at him over dinner chatter. Oh, of course, you'll be too afraid to say anything out of the well-placed fear that they'll find it stupid or Bill. Simmons has big time to an army of will rise up and do just about nothing the BS pot huge. But now, you know, someone that is spoken in personnel. And Sorkin got that going for you, which is nice leftover oatmeal with maple serpent pecans for breakfast. My dog was fifty two pounds. Simmons. Got himself in a little bit of hot water over the weekend. He did freed Zaccaria show. And he said the young democratic candidates need to stop acting like young people the the left on Twitter did not respond. Well, all their and Sorkin. This is this is where we are. Yeah. Doug. We finish your dog. Adrian. Yes, dog way is important. Jesse wise, seventy nothing. Adrian michigan. So the NFL can take a few minutes and use math and stuff to overrule the Ataman fumbled punt. But can't take one second and say, we miss this past interference and fix it. Right on the spot. But till the saints after the game. So obviously do better. Coach's challenge for this to full speed replace for that get it right now. Come on man doing out here, man. Man from Bob K. Hey, yo Mickey I gotta chapel with a ceiling. I want you to paint you do it for free. And I'll make sure everybody says you'll make a million. I'll put a sign up at the entrance and says look at the beautiful stuff on a ceiling. Even supply the ladder from Jesse Hightower Beltsville, Maryland along with being a loyal little. I'm an avid listener of Adam Corollas podcast just wanted to let you know that he also does a Los graphs and to read the dichotomy of his versus yours is truly a sounding reads often include how us craftsman tools earlier in the day on such things as masonry worker hanging doors, whereas yours orphan contains phrases akin to I don't know how to do any of this to say I unfortunately, fall into the latter character categories. Well, Adam Karol is a working, man. He's award. Cover new. He was a boxer was come on stopping the MoMA David walls Mun in Colorado Springs in light of Tony's accident. I wanted to recommend my doctor. He's wonderful. He came over to the house sat with the family walked us through the entire process. He was very compassionate and caring. He's put our dog down in a very dignified manner. I'll ask if he does this with people from Jeff in Cleveland signs. I've been listening to your horrible show for too long. My nieces excitedly telling me about our trip to see the new Mary Poppins moving my idiot brain drifts off during a movie review to the internet radio days in a store, you told back then you had an NBA game will bond Aldridge in David Stern. You had an umbrella. David Stern looks at you and says who brought Mary bleep in Poppins money seem to like the new movie as much as I remembered that story from Steve the sycophant. I never cease to be amazed. But you and your cracks staff's lack of basic cow knowledge only cows bred for milk milking, success whole Stein's currencies have to be relieved of their milk on a regular basis. Non milk cows. The vast majority must do not require milking. I must also state the obvious that trying to milk a bowl is an action fraught with peril. CS an exact quote from lady co workers knowledge of cattle was tenuous quote. Of course, I know what to steer is a steers. Boy. Cow, actually, it's a male cow minus two very poor. Adamy and from Alex Lau in New York City last Friday, read, numale for my twin brother. Chris Lau asking me to be the best man at his wedding of happily agree to do. So on one condition. He agrees to paint the mural chapter. If you're out on your bike. Everyone is always do wear white. You know, what I want to happen to them? They want to be stabbed. My cocktail. Oh, my. Gotta keep. She. Has gone to. Bone. Fast. Cast. Gotta keep open. Day ship Colby. Hobos all day. All the time. Voting. Kick. One day. Douses? Gear. Tumble. Dirty filthy drunk. Trailer guitar. Rocking. Scurries? Air. Worse. Sometimes it's what you got it. Borno poverty. Worse. Thank you. Four, no. And sometimes what in. Speakers are too heavy. Sale. Drummer, mikey. So. I am with fire. Coke. That get by. Four no money. Four. Probably just get a single.

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The Problem With Palm Oil + Why Creating a Sustainable Beauty Brand Takes Time with MOB Beauty's Victor Casale

Gloss Angeles

1:00:53 hr | 2 months ago

The Problem With Palm Oil + Why Creating a Sustainable Beauty Brand Takes Time with MOB Beauty's Victor Casale

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Back skincare brand in every product of theirs is validated by independent. clinical testing and features nine one one. Four a patented form of nice in that strengthens the skin's barrier. They've got a new ice cream called intensive. I concentrate for wrinkles plus and it's clinically proven to reduce the look of crows feet those eleven's between the browse and under eye puffiness starting in just five days. I personally love how lightweight it is and how quickly it absorbs. I've been using it for a couple of weeks and it's really helped tired under area. Thanks babies zoe look more hydrated and bright. I know kirby feels the same learn more about intensify. Concentrate and see some before. And after his by heading over to strike back then dot com email subscribers get fifteen percent off their first quarter. We cannot recycle our way out of the position. We've put ourselves in. We have to change behaviors in a lot of the behavior. Change when we change the way we perceive what is valuable food. Kirby i'm sarah welcome to los angeles every week. We break down the most important beauty news and launches interview your favorite beauty experts influencers and celebrity guests and review our favorite beauty products. At the moment as your beauty editor. Bff's from the beautiful and great city of los angeles glam. Joey knows we hope you stay awhile. Wow happy well. While yesterday was earth day happy earth day everyone happier day to our planet. We love you. Thank you for all that you do for us of. I always used to sing. We are the world we are the children on earth day. But that's not what that's about that's on earth day. Yeah now. But i mean maybe we are the we are the people what other like mother nature song God is a woman where arianna guerande fingers right. The earth very sexual back into it. She would be quinn's like so naughty. Okay this despite the intro to this podcast. We're not talking about sexualizing the planet. We're actually talking about saving the planet and we have an amazing guest. We have talked about this. Brand on the podcast. We've talked about many of his brands on the podcast but he just launched a new one so our guest is victor khazal. He is a legend legend. In the beauty industry. He has served as a product formulator for thirty plus years. You may know him from a little brand called mac cosmetics. He is the co founder of mob beauty. Which is a sustainable beauty brands. That i have been talking about. They really walk the talk. Their products are performance based their clean. If that is super important to you but mostly they are over this single use bullshit. He's vic vic is gonna drop some knowledge during this episode. Yeah he's very very passionate about this. I mean like we've had many founders obviously on the podcasts who are also very passionate about sustainability and recycled packaging all those things. But you can tell like this is just like it gets him going to talk about it for like hours and hours and hours. And he's so knowledgeable like he is the guy who knows all about. I mean he is like leading the charge in this right. Yes and he is going to explain why it is so hard to to make. Sustainable beauty happened. Because it's not just a brand deciding to do it there are so many facets that brands depend on to make it happen And if you're an indie beauty brand. It's especially hard so he's going to get into that but just a little bit of a background about him. He's the co founder of mob beauty. He has three other co founders. That our veterans in the beauty industry. They know what's up Mob launched this past january And the goal of launching mob was to make beauty better They're focused on non irritating ingredients with reusable and recycled recyclable. Packaging and he's gonna explain all about that like i mentioned. He helped launch matt comics. The chief chemist managing director. He created some of the most iconic products that you probably still use in love today. for instance mac russian red. No big deal. There is a baywatch story that you're going to die over. And when he left max he created cover affects and the story about how cover facts came to be is really incredible It just came out like a passion and a need and want to help others and he served as the branch chief innovation officer so yesterday on earth day mob announced that themselves credo hudson's bay which for those of you in The united states who may not be familiar. It's the most iconic largest department store in canada. Hello to our canadian friends And then element. Packaging launched a not for profit take back program called packed. P. a. c. t. And this take back. Program is exclusively for the beauty industry. You may recall last week when we were talking about recycling. We brought up credo and tara cycle as of yesterday. Credo no longer works with hair cycle. pact is the new. Take back program. So this launch launches in north america starting yesterday They have it in the hudson bay stores. They have it in the credo stores but they have plans to open this up on a wider scale within the industry in late twenty twenty one. So i'm sure there's going to be more news about. They literally just announced this news yesterday on earth day and I mean i. I think this is incredible. It's mob is literally a brand. That's only a couple of months old and they're really trying hard to make strides. And you know sarah one thing that i really you know when i was listening to this interview vick very he is not pretentious about like mob being better than other brands like he wants to help other brands. Get to a good place when it comes to sustainability yet and we were even trying to like ask him you know putting our reporter hats on and like get him to talk about the things that other brands might be doing know greenwashing and all that and he was saying that everyone trying like that's great like everyone is making an effort and we should celebrate that. Yeah i found like was really sweet and really nice to hear someone who is leading the charge to say you know what. It's okay that you can't do it all but you're trying and you're making an effort and that matters totally and he he knows both sides of it like mob is considered indy right even though they have launched all of these brands together in the past like they're still a new baby brand they don't they're not owned by anyone And i but he has the power because he has worked with all of these supply the suppliers all of these people in You know and the chain of command. Able to kind of say if i want to make something with you know. Pcr in it doesn't exist like you need to make it exists so that are also you're not going to get my business so anyways it's a really fun interview i think you're gonna love him and We hope that you will i. I don't know why am i trying. Why am i trying to make this. Like very we are the world. Just enjoy the interview. Just enjoy it. No i mean. I think everyone will enjoy it. You'll learn something. I know that you know i did. We are obviously did too. And you'll just feel inspired but also lake. I know that this whole month. We've been sharing tips for how to be more sustainable and like we said it's can be very overwhelming to the point where you like. You don't know where to start and you don't know what to do. But i feel like after listening to this interview. You'll walk away with some. You know actionable things that you can do every day in your life whether it's like not using a certain beauty product anymore or like buying less is shadow pass we can all do right So yeah we world we are the world. We are to make a brighter day. Civilised okay thank you everyone. Please follow us on social media for more of the chicanery. I g- los angeles pod. We have a website. If you care to visit that and of course you can subscribe to us on apple and follow us on spotify we will speak to you next. Tuesday okay vic. We are absolutely thrilled to have you. I'm happy to be here. I mean first of all you just look like a guy want to hang out with like like put together interesting. I love the vibe in in your Where are you living Study basement living area in. I guess i would call it my studio room. Then it becomes a spare room with people are visiting. But this is where i hang out. I've actually sound proof the walls here because it makes the sound better when you're talking and doing video conference with. I liked that sound. Music is in my family. So i i'm used to soundproofing things my son's a drummer. So you know you get you. Get it so vic. Let's talk about your background. You're responsible for some iconic products that people still use today are still wildly popular today. I want to know more about your background. And this is like a family affair year life partner works also in the beauty industry. Correct she actually. She works in the short johnson and johnson so she heads their external innovation so melinda richter's her name and she started bioscience incubator here in california for women who wanted to get into science and needed some support and infrastructure to help them get started. She built it up. It was called prescience. Johnson and johnson saw and said. Hey that's an amazing way to do innovation. They bought her platform. She rolled out. What is known as j labs in it's a division of johnson and johnson's innovation and basically it's ten or so incubators around the world that are hosted by johnson and johnson. She runs them and allows entrepreneur scientists that come in and read the little labs spot and develop the next generation drug product. So that's what she does and we have a saying in kind of a relationship especial in so many ways but one of them as i said. Listen i say honey you keep them alive and i'll make them look on my god. I love that. No that's a little little saying so we have a responsibility to each other in so many ways including that when i just said well she sounds incredible. Yeah we need her on the pied. Tell us about your background and your come up in the industry. sure okay. Well i was fortunate enough to be dating my future wife who we met in high school. Her name is julie. her brother actually is frank toscan and we were having dinner and i was like nineteen twenty twenty and i was studying chemistry at the university of toronto but just because i liked chemistry and i was good at it in high school. If you don't study hard on a subject and you do well that's what you wanna do right. That's the the subject you want to do. And he was working on makeup artistry photography and he asked me he goes listen. I'm trying to source like matt makeup. And i can't find any. It was back in the early eighties as shimmery sheer shimmery. Kind of stuff that you could buy and pro. Makeup wasn't really around or hard to get. You had to go to a special place to get it and he said listen. You know how to make lipsticks. Russia and i said no but i wanted to impress my girlfriend in his family and i said well i'll see if i can figure it out so you know it was studying overseers. In my second year of chemistry. I set up a makeshift lab and literally reverse engineered experimented sato ingredients from suppliers and over about a year year. And a half. You know steady by a mad scientist by night started to work with frank toscan and his team of makeup artist because he was very connected to the makeup artist community and we started to create some really cool stuff and he. We were really focused on that at the time because because there was lots of shimmer and remember this is before any pro makeup artist. Anything right this is when you basically went to the department store generally and everybody was dressed in white lab coats or pink lab coats or whatever and was selling your product and they were makeup artist salespeople. Right that's what you had exposure to it. If you want professional product you went to the name l. a. or wherever in around the world so what that did is it brought me right in twenty years. Old as chemist rb connected me to the professional community and frank toscan who was a genius creative person himself and i started to formulate and really go out there with the technology that was available in because i was tied to the industry. And this is something. We're gonna talk about later on in the podcast. But because i was tied to an industry or had a history in the street i went out of the box. People say out of the box. Well i went out of the box or out of the beaker. Whatever you wanna call it. I just went out and tried everything things that most chemists that were in the industry. Say you're absolutely crazy to try that. But you know what we got some cool stuff. The first one was our matt lipsticks. A frank was keen on met we needed met. The artist wanted math. They wanted like dead matt matt. And you know. I experimented and try to try and vic vic did you say mac cosmetics already or did. I miss that. We're talking about matt cosmetics. Look you're burying the lead here. Yeah burying the lead there. This is incredible. Visit incredible stuff happening. Okay right let's rewind. We started cosmetics in one thousand nine hundred four and one of the first products. I worked on. Was the matt lipstick. And i developed it in a read. It was like a fiery red color. It later became russian red. Which i think is still selling today actually. I was in an ulta store. Last year and i saw it in alta some point thirty five years later so that's amazing anyway worked on the met russia and then we launched the matt lipstick and so many other products i mean. I got to work on products that so interesting. Unique in this is kind of before their time like a wet to dry foundation studio fix powder foundation. Remember working on that and it was so unusual thinking well. Who's going to do this. This is kind of like the nineteen forties pancake makeup thing but we took it to the next level. There was lots of technology. I brought it all into this formula. I think it's still around. I think you could still buy studio fix the shading system in foundations. I worked with the team that make up team and said look guys we gotta change this naming system. We've got fawn alabaster. San desert row is. I don't know what that is if desert roses to pink for me. What's the less these big as it road like. What is it. So i said what we need something more systematic so we came up with the nc the end the n. w. numerically. You know the small the number of the later the shade the deeper shade the larger the number. So you can actually navigate and say look and see. Thirty is too light for me. But it's the right toe undertoned than nc thirty two or thirty three might be the next one down. It'll be the one that we're so worked on that. That was exciting. Never knew at the time that it really would take off the way it did but we could not keep it in stock so this is back in nineteen eighty eight i think is when we launched it and i know that it's still selling i see there. I think it's doing very well but yeah Other things you know lip gloss remember doing that one and you know this is kind of back in the early lip gloss years and that was challenging because you know lip gloss you know. We still have the problem today. Can you believe it two years later. You want it to last but if you make it last and it becomes sticky and of course you could trigger your hair your hair. Sarah is long sticks in it. And it's like we can't. We can't have that is just as challenging. But you know lip gloss is a is a product that was really interesting facing body foundation. That was one that was very challenging. But i have a great story. And i'll tell you that story so you know the pros are saying look we need something waterproof okay because foundations on the face back then. The technology wasn't the greatest. Necessarily foundations would run and crack. And you know it's not the technology we have today so they said we need something. That's waterproof. I said okay. I'll work on it and it's challenging because when you're making a foundation it's waterproof. You have to mix a whole bunch of ingredients together and to do that. You need them also fires in a mall. Fires make waterproof so. It's kind of like a contradiction. Somehow i managed to pull it all together into this face body foundation and i was experimenting back at the time. of course. we're working with makeup artist so we have makeup artist around the the. Us in the globe we might send them some. Say look tripe tell me what you think sent one ellie makeup artist and brokeback said. Yeah this is a great product and she called back two later she was look. I got called them to pilot. And they say i need to bring waterproof makeup because there's lots of water a lot of wet scenes in the pilot so i said fine i sent her whole bunch of facing body foundation prototypes and i never heard back from her. Why did she get back to me. I was hoping for and this is before emails and stuff. So you know you're waiting for a call or fax believe it or not never heard back but then a year later i hear back from her or we hear back from her and she says the pilot got taken. They're running the show. We need that face and body foundation and here the shades. We need and i said great. This is great. It was baywatch. Wow iconic wow. This is great. This is such a great story of a lot of wet scenes like the entire show and you know what this is one thousand nine hundred nine. I think and i remember franken team. We're talking about it. We really didn't they watch it wasn't owed and we're in canada so it's like we knew what was going on but then you of course it became this iconic show anyway. Yeah that was a great experience. I mean we literally did everything. Unlike a lot of the way the industry has moved to. Today i developed around department. We had chemists. We had analytical chemistry tested all the products microbiology chemists who made sure everything was preserved. While we had a testing team we had a network of cros hit thousands of professionals who were supporting working or buying our product. So i had a great channel of people to work with and we focused on making professional auditing product in great shades led by franciscan and frank angelo. We built this great company that we sold to stay lauder. And when i transitioned literally between mac and my next. I wasn't thinking about going back into cosmetics necessarily but during matt was supporting our local dermatology hospitals product we were shipping them. Foundations because it's the largest Clinic in canada. It's called sunnybrook hospital. They bring in a lot of people from all over candidate with rose asia lie go severe acne and they treat the medically but they had a camouflage makeup artist there. Her name was lee graph and she was applying makeup. And i thought this is strange. Why is there somebody in dermatology clinic putting makeup on patients and they said well we want the patients to emotionally start healing right away. Some of them come with a shawl around their face. 'cause they're they got something and it's bothering them to the point where they're covering it and they were doing kemp las vegas so i supported them with product of mac but when we sold that stopped and they came to me and said well what can we do now and said well if you give me a room in the clinic all set up a lab. I'll make the foundations and you can offer the foundations to your patients. I did it as a free service just to give back and we did it. And patients started sending their mothers and sisters in france that come and get this stuff. 'cause they said what we really like it. My friend uses it. I want it so we literally started selling it in the hospital pharmacy where we would just put extra extra every shade and put labels on it and the shapes were named after people. This is sara's shade this kirby shade. 'cause we made it for them. We gave it to them. It was just something we could if we could. We would make the price but what happened was we had stars in. The product ended up going into shoppers. Drug mart shoppers drug mart. Said you know we liked this stuff. What we'd like to sell it so we started cover effects and cover a complex your brand that. We started from a good place. That's where i learned how to do clean. Because i'm literally formulating with twenty plus dermatologists around the sending their patients. And i'm thinking there's a whole bunch of stuff. I can't put in it and i got to put stuff that's actually gonna reduce your rotation because some of these people are very sensitive. I really love that when you guys formulated. Cover facts clean for you. Were ingredients that a dermatologist was like listen. We can't have this in the formula because of the conditions that our clients have and are trying to work through. Are there certain ingredients that. Come to mind that you really kate. These were considered the most problematic. I guess is the term looking for your. the problematic. Ingredients are ones. That are tend to be irritating. Preservatives are always your tents so no matter what preservative. You're talking about back then. A pair of jeans were being used so paraffins were like. Oh my god. We need to use preservatives. But we can't use paraffin so we started to work. Our way out of parabens a fragrance has like sometimes fifty one hundred ingredients sub ingredients in and they a lot of them because they smell and they smell nice have very. Let's call them. Exotic chemical structures that tend to be irritants. You've heard of multiple chemical sensitivity. People who can smell things entity rotates them just from the smell so we had to avoid those a lot of ingredients that were at the time. Sensitizing sunscreens pablo was a big ingredient back. This is thirty years ago. you couldn't use pab. I don't even know people talk about anymore but back then it was paraphrase so we know we didn't use pablo. We didn't use october. Foxy senate these are chemical sunscreens. That protect you from uv but also caused a lot of irritation. I was removing a lot of that stuff when people were just still using it. Just because that's what they used. And so we really rewired my science brain to think about formulating. We called it healthy at the time. Today it's called clean now. I think clean is healthy with sustainability. I'm trying to figure out what the definition is an amateur. Your audience needs to know what is the definition like natural liquids the finish of natural rate. So it's about ingredients that ten not great irritation on your skin. Don't put your skin in a worse position or condition than it was before you use the product and are potentially not as destructive. Let's say to the ecosystem your personal ecosystem and the environment around you. So i'm thinking if i was to define clean that's probably where i would try to define it and those were the things we were doing. And it's getting more prevalent every day. And i'm happy about that. I'm happy that the industry's moving forward. You know. I have to say having been in this interest rate for thirty five plus years from like literally the ground up on many levels with mac cosmetics cover affects now beauty. It's hard to make change because there's a lot of people in the supply chain. Like if i got up in the morning and i was too much i can go by ingredients. I want. I can make my lunch the way i wanna make it and i can present it the way i want percent it. Put it in the dishes and plates. I wanna do but when you're in the beauty industry and let's say you're an indie entrepreneur. You have to go to the suppliers that are supplying and you can only pick what they have if they don't have it you can't buy it or they may have it and they said well you know what if you want a truckload and of course unity entrepreneur. You have no money and no sales so you can't buy a truckload of something so you can buy so you end up. Buying what is available in the. It's not the most sustainable ingredients available or the cleanest ingredients. That's all you can get. So it's unfortunate because it's such a complex interwoven. Industry like many industries. The supply chain is slow to move because either you may have demanded the customer by the time that demand reaches the main key upstream suppliers a lot of friction and pushback and work has to be done to get them to change because they're not going to change for the sake of changing they're going to change because their customers say you gotta change. Need something different. So i know i digressed but yes. That's the clean. And that's where i learned clean it cover effects and now i'm at mob beauty and what's great about beauty. Is that over my years of experience. I have worked with great people. Alicia gallagher whose co founder and our chief brand officer. She is a professional makeup artists. Who grew up in the industry with lower mercy work with me a cover effects. I've got the interested again who is a phd. Scientists who worked with a product of vision for one of canada's largest private manufacturing cosmetic companies. And steve blanchett who actually ran one. Candice largest private label manufacturing companies for cosmetics and has made a lot of cosmetics in his career. We have four people together. Mob that are aligned in our values and what's great about it is that we came together and we said you know what. Let's do beauty better than we've done before than each of us have done before because we've h been in a legacy sort of situation where we're dealing with what we have in. What's in front of us when we get together and create the new where the industry is going. So let's work on where it should be going. Let's stay true to and it's not easy. I tell you guys. It is not easy and i feel for everyone in this industry who's trying to make change. Even the big players like the big players can't just turn around and go from one source of a material to another source because remember supply chain. They have customers manufacturing. They have their retail partners. They may have six months of inventory in their supply chain if they change anything what happens to the stuff that's out there. Does it get thrown. Come back you know. What do we do with our product be compatible with. The new plastic material will disappear be able to make it. Will the supply of recycled plastic. Be there if we run five hundred million of these things a year. Those are the challenges facing mob. And i've said we're stubborn in a way but we're focused. We're focused because we're taking the challenge and we're taking it seriously. Our team is serious. Kirby i know you've had a chance to look at some of our product. You've had a chance to sit with me on kind of linford windsor discussion. We had not that long ago. And we're really trying to move the needle and we're starting small and we're starting small because we have to. It's like an experiment in motion we are as beatrice. Our chief innovation officer says look. We're building the plane in flying at the same time. That's what we're doing and we're trying to do a lot of things at the same time which we can do. Because we're experienced and i have to say i know we're older types but we are experienced and what that brings us is connections to the industry players so i can go to a supplier and say we want to create a lipstick tube but we wanna make it at a recycled bottles drink bottles and they say well. We don't do that. I said well you're not gonna get my business if you don't do it for us and they'll listen to me and alicia and beaches because we're in the industry and we bought a lot of stuff from them before so they say okay. We'll do it for you. But if any indian or change maker in his industry comes in and wants to do that it's going to be hard. Mob is creating a new brand that will lead the way show the way show that it can be done experiment in some respects with a lot of materials and the way things are done you know. Packaging sold separately. All these things are different models but hopefully pave the way so we lead the way but we pave the way so we pave the way now because now there are suppliers that are making a hundred percent. Pcr materials for us. They've tested it. They know it eventually. They'll make it part of their offering and it'll be something. The industry will start to evolve to and so we're trying to do beauty better than we've done before hopefully we'll be paving the way for ourselves and for our fellow industry partners. Okay so kirby. And i have found that of all the quote unquote clean beauty brands. That are out there. Mob actually walks the talk when it comes to sustainability you've been quoted as saying we're not here to greenwash. We're here to do better so being an industry vet. What are some things that brands due to appear like. They're helping the earth. You know being eco friendly but in actuality it really isn't doing much of anything at all and kind of just you know marketing. I don't wanna be in a position to cuss dote or put down. Any of our fellow industry friends saw beauty is not about putting anyone does. It's about bringing everyone up is looking at the positive. It's taking where we are today and putting a positive spin on in a hope for the future. It's like okay. This is where we are today. This is where we can go. Let's try to do it together so to answer your question specifically things that are happening. That aren't moving the needle. There's a lot of things happening but we're all doing and we are all victim to it. You know it's like we have a whole vehicle then needs to move towards greener pastures right. The problem is one company can only afford to make tires greener because the engine is built and they can't change it because it's just too much too expensive to change or the doors of vehicle can only be changed because the other parts of it are so beloved by the consumer that god forbid if they changed any upholstery in that car is like nobody's gonna want it anymore so they've just changed the doors and so the issue we have as an industry and as companies is that we're selling product customers are buying our products they like our products. So we're gonna make things different. It's risky to just do it with what we have. And just hope that everybody's gonna wanna buy into sustainability and say. Yeah okay we understand. The package is not as scratch resistant as it was before we get it. That's because using pet which we use it mob. It's better because there's lots of it we can reuse it over and over again. it's recyclable. Going to be more scratchy okay. I'm willing to accept that okay. The product alicia has this great saying sometimes for clean or vegan is like you're baking a cake. But you can't use bread so you can't use flour eggs right butter because those are all things that gluten. It's got the animal. Now yes me too big a pig kick. Okay us eggs. I can't use milk. And i can't use Butter so what am i gonna do. That's what it's like some customer. Say you don't want to take of that kate. Don't change the on me okay. I want it that way. So there's a lot of consumer friction and resistance. There's supplier friction resistant. So she's a perfect example. We go to our supplier one of my suppliers that of used for thirty years. Okay at mc- at cover vex and now at mob mob know them well they know me. Well i say i wanna make. Pet lips sixers. They said we don't have any pt in any one of our facilities. We twenty facilities around the world. I said well. I wanna make lipstick to because there's lots of it and i want it to be recycled. Said well we. We don't know we can get recycled. Pt we don't wanna do it. I said when you have to do it. You're not going to get my business unless you do it. So the experiment. They come back and they say well. You know recycled pet. It doesn't flow as nicely in conjunction. We don't want to use it or in pits our tooling so we have to polish it. More often divergence stuff doesn't do we want to use the virgin. That's the friction. I'm getting from the supplier side. Saying hey you're asking me to use recycled pcr or post consumer recycled pt. Wish there an abundance. They don't wanna use it because of various reasons plus it costs thirty percent more than virgin. So now i go. Who's going to pay for that thirty percent more by competitors selling it version. Plastic lipstick tube. They're paying thirty percent less now. I gotta sell that same lipstick to more. These are the things that go through the minds of business owners. Whether you're an indie brand or your estee lauder or mac. These are all the issues. You go to your suppliers fiction you go to the cost structure there's friction you go to the consumer base. There's friction you go to the retail channel. there's friction it's not something we can do overnight and so i would be reluctant to say somebody's greenwashing trying and everybody's trying to the capacity. They can afford to try. Because if you don't have any money and you need to change to sustainable my bankrupt you okay. So basically what you're saying is that if brands are at least trying to give it a go especially larger brands that do have the money that do have the connections that have maybe been legacy players. They're at least trying. We shouldn't be looking for perfection right now. We should be looking for good motivation and movement. Okay great so you've reinforces one of our pillars mob is to do beauty better where in pursuit to do better. Our mission and one of our values is continuous innovation. So we've said to ourselves as we will continue to push the envelope for example one of our our lipstick jobs for example we were only able to get the fifty percent. Pcr content because of tooling and supply getting it right. But we've already done experiments to get it to seventy five percent so the next run is going to be seventy five percent this year. We're going to try to keep doing better. And i think the industry will. It appears the industry's all moving in that direction. So the next question is are there any particular ingredients that we should be concerned about ethically during that call. I did press you on mica. Let's talk about our audience like they're shopping for products. Are there any ingredients that they should be give a second thought to before they purchase. Well there are two right now. That are of the moment. I mean it's always been an issue. Just now are of the moment. So they're circulating in media and people are questioning it. Mike is one of them in palm. Oil is another one. So let's talk about mike and we're not the only industry. The beauty industry isn't the only industry that is challenged with this type of information misinformation. Sourcing you know. We went through this with the sneaker and apparel industry what twenty years ago with child labor and you know where things were made were things were sourced right and so now. We're looking at our industry and we say we you know we hear stories about my son. Kids go into minds. They die and it's horrible. It really is horrible. When you hear the stories so might is one of them in so mica is a mineral. That is found abundance everywhere. I think i talked to you about the. Us has a lot of mica mountains. Claude them in fact. I believe i don't have it here. I actually moved my lab now. So i have a beautiful lab. We have mob has a satellite lab on the west coast and a beautiful live on the east coast. So we're kind of developing product and on each coast which is exciting. I have my little micro rock that i picked up at the joshua tree national part. It's because we have lots of mike. And mike the is mind in in the us. A lot of the thing is there are a lot of suppliers of mica and there are a lot of pigments that are made with mica and mica comes from all over the world. And what's important for mob. Is that everyone ever. Suppliers has to certify that the mica that they supply us is responsibly. Sourced okay certify we have a qa department head of qa regulatory is on it. She's like a hawk. I call him the sheriff earnings cats. She is on it. And we don't buy any mica that is not certified sustainably sourced what we mean by sustainably sourced. Its mind in a method that is at the goal that has not abusing child labor. And it's also mind in a way that it's not creating a polluted environment and so those are the two things that are important in a lot of mica does come from the. Us lot of our mica comes from the us or the ingredients. We buy. Come from the us. But what do you do well as a you ask. The the manufacture is the micro sustainably sourced do you you the michelson-morley stores is this similar to. What happened in the animal testing days. Which is still an issue but early. In the animal testing days consumers would say. Do you test on animals now. Of course we have pita and we have the leaping buddy and maybe there'll be a rock icon that you put on your mike association of sustainably source. Mica that approves you at me come. Who knows but that's what you do as a consumer you see mica you say okay. Let me check with the supplier. The brand let me go to their website. They talk about it. They don't talk about it and send him an email. Is this sustainably. Sourced pommel is another one palm. Oil is an amazing resource. Guys palm oil makes so many naturally derived products in this world it would be hard to replace it and because of that a lot of people want to grow palm trees to make palm oil and what they're doing especially in brazil is that a lot of the indigenous peoples of brazil are allocated parts of the amazon forest treaty. And so they wanna make money and they want to farm the farm palm trees because everybody wants palm oil so they're chopping down amazon forest to sell palm oil because they want to survive in live. And so what happens is that that's considered sustainably soest farming because they're destroying an important part of the world's ecological system. They're not allowed to do it. They're only allowed to do so much of it. So there is an association certifies palm oil ours peo- and we make sure that all of our ingredients that are derived from palm oil are are. spf certified. meaning they're farmed by approved. Farmers who are not destroying the amazon forest or having any negative impact significantly negative impact on their environment so those are two big things and again you website you check it out. We talk about on our website. I've seen it talked about it in in my other brands. We did the same thing so right. Now that's the only way to do it. Unless there's a third party resource that you can sign up with like leaping bunny or pita or s p palm oil or ethically sourced my. It's ask questions. I love that you did bring up palm oil. There was actually a really great story. That came out maybe late last year. About the working conditions of the people that were harvesting the palm oil. And i posted about it and so many people did not know about palm oil in general so thank you for bringing that up and listeners. We're going to include a link to that story on our website if you want to read it and kind of inform yourself about what's going on. I think it's a really important read. 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Let's go back to talking about the packaging. One thing that we absolutely love about my beauty is the customizable packaging like the beautiful palette. That kirby is holding up mine is in. I just moved to a new house. So it's it's in a box somewhere. And i didn't pull it out in time but i absolutely love it. It's genius and i think one thing that our listeners might not be aware of is that i shadow pallets and pallets in general are extremely wasteful because of the mixing of materials. And you can't recycle it and it's just you know adding two more waste. Which is why we love what you guys are doing. This might be. You know a similar answer to the previous question. But what purchasing decisions should we be more aware of when it comes to shopping for beauty products like as a consumer. How can we shop more responsibly. Especially if you are a huge lover of beauty like we all are yes. That's an amazing question. It really is important. And i hope you're listenership pays attention. Because as shoppers consumers we have developed habits based on value what we perceive as value the when we make decisions we make decisions based on what we think brings us value or makes us feel good on what we're getting and we've been conditioned i at least have been conditioned to growing up. Is that when something is packaged. Beautifully shiny and has lots of protection with to me. That's beautiful it's valuable while that's something special. We need to move in the complete opposite direction. We have to hold value to anything that we can consume. That meets our needs that is uses the least amount of materials and consumes the least amount of sustainable ingredients. That's what we need to think about and admob. For example we have our refill packaging. It's a nondescript craft molded fiber package that we designed to be as light as possible to protect our product. So it can get you one piece and then you could take it and put it in your compost bin or you can recycle it. That to me is value. I've trained myself not to say that is amazing. I don't want the shiny box. I don't want the stuffing inside the shining box. I don't want the aluminum foil wrap around. It gave me the craft molded fiber package. So i could get my beautiful. I shadow or bronze are inside. That's pro quality by the way. And i can put that thing back into the environment stream either back into the ground or back to be remolded again into a product that is the biggest challenge we have so we cannot recycle our way out of the position we've put ourselves in. We have to change behavior in a lot of the behavioral change when we change the way we perceive what is valuable. And what. I'm hoping is that consumers in beauty and other parts of their lives will look at the way they purchase something. Make a value decision based on how little they're wasting and how little they're consuming to get what they're looking for so in our case. It's a beautiful lipstick. It's a beautiful eye shadow. Try to get yourself an ice show where you're not buying twenty is shadows and only using one throwing the rest of the way. Try to buy yourself in shadow that you can consume completely and it's the color you want and before you buy another one you finish this one and you recycle the package. Those are the behaviors. You need to change you. Another one big one. This is big packaging sold separately. This is a big one. Two years ago when alicia beatrice. Stephen i set out to come together and say let's do beauty better. I was telling people. Packaging sold separately. Brad lobster what does that packaging sold. Separately said you know. I kinda got the term from when you were a kid and you watch the tweet commercials. And it's battery sold separately. That's kind of where it came from his okay. Packaging sold separately and the idea there is. You don't need to buy that package every time you buy your product. It's a waste for me as a manufacturer. I've lifted i've done it. I've been apartheid whole thing. Let's just say a compact you buy a compact for forty dollars. Twenty dollars of that forty dollars pays for the compacted self that you throw out three to six months. Hopefully you recycle it but even if you recycle it. You're buying another compact for twenty dollars and you're doing it again every six months so now you're spending twenty dollars every six months and you're consuming too complex three compaq's a year. The gathered recycled or thrown in that to me is inefficient. It's not a good behavior. I wouldn't reward that behavior to me it's reuse and sell the packing separately perfect example. I have a razor blade and a razor in my bathroom. My razor handle is gotta be ten years old if not eleven. It's a gillette razor handle. I haven't bought a razor handle in ten years. I by razor blades. Tiny little razor blades. That we're out. I buy those. I don't buy razor handle every time you got insane for me to buy a reasonable every time i buy a razor blade. Why do we do that. In the beauty industry you know. Packaging sold separately mob. Packaging separately is the way we do it. If we can't make a package that we can sell separately. We don't make the product so it eliminates us from some categories where it's disposable packaging sold separately to me is the way to go. That's another one of those changing behaviors where we got to think about them. Sarah and i talk a lot about you know. This is a beauty podcast so we do give recommendations and we give awareness to brands that we think people should know about but we also have a saying that we kind of coin dodo hope. So it's actually do you need it you know. Are you out of something. Are you looking to replace something. What's the second ddo sarah. What's about how'd you hear about it. What's the second it's do you need it. Do you understand what it is. Do you know why you're using it in the first place. And we deal a lot with that in skin-care vic where people will buy products because they've been told they need like niacin abide and then they get it and they're like what do i do with this. Where does it go in my routine. I don't understand what what is even supposed to do to my skin. And so we're very very vocal about if you don't know what the product does you need it before you purchase it if you don't need it. Don't buy it just because there's an instagram campaign happening. Don't do that. And if somebody that you don't necessarily trust her have never heard of hawking a product that doesn't mean you need to have it either. Those are kind of like the small steps. Were taken to try to help our audience. That's fantastic. i would sign up for those recommendations. Any don't dojo okay. There's actually some major news that you mob announced yesterday on earth day and it's called packed with anc you for asking. Yes pat collective. What we've done is we've come together. We wanted to really bring awareness and education and there's a lot of misinformation on recycling. And what's recyclable. What we wanted to do is bring it to the forefront our solution to that as a brand so we partnered with industry players along the supply chain we have packaging representation retail partner representation of brown representation. What we've done is come together. And we formed what you would term extended producer responsibility program. So we are a collective not for profit will come together to be responsible for our industry for the packaging that we create and tack collective it has started with an affiliation with mob beauty preto beauty which is canada's largest department store chain pan element packaging which is one of our politics a big industry suppliers so we have come together to form a model an agreement a pact to help the industry be responsible for the packaging creates we are. We are beauty veterans. We are focused on beauty. And what we've done is we've created one program that is you can go into the store in l. a. and you'll see our beautiful pack recycling bin but not so much that we take that will take hard to recycle materials back but we also provide education and better information information that's presented in a more understandable form because it does get very complex things that can be recycled things that are hard to recycle but still can be recycled and things that can't be recycled and it's important that we understand which are which so we make purchasing decisions so pack it's exciting We have in store program that that has launched in the us through credo and in candidate through the mob. Beauty is piloting a male beck program. Because we're a direct to consumer and we are looking to help. The industry create a responsibility for educating our consumer base and reducing the amount packaging that goes in the garbage. And so this is great. We started a week. We are hoping to bring on and to encourage our fellow industry partners to come on board. Join the pact and help us take responsibility for industry but it just doesn't end with us. The responsibility is the whole supply. Chain that consumers responsible the brains are responsible. The retail providers are responsible and the packaging suppliers responsible. We are all responsible. So packed is about bringing them altogether to join a collective that takes us responsibility for industry and deal with it head on with our industry. What's difficult in. What i find really motivated us as a group to come together is that does information coming from all different places in a lot of it is confusing you. One example is. I've been making makeup products for thirty years. You know mac. We started the back to make recycling program thirty five years ago before there was even municipal recycling bins. I didn't know up until like eight months ago that any package smaller than your fists. Even it's recyclable. Doesn't get recycled because it falls through the recycling system in the municipalities and shocked me. That can't be so. I literally called recall aji in california because there are one of the biggest on the west coast. They said yeah things that are really small just kind of off the conveyor belt they land up in a tub at the bottom of the system and they just get disposed. We may be pudding. Let's say an empty lipstick tube cap into your recycling being or that little cab that you have been putting in your recycling bid. Would you know what chances are it's not getting recycled. And that's not right. And i asked them about. And they said well we don't wanna make it too complicated for the consumer because if we make it too restrictive than they're not gonna put anything in it. The downside tonight is that if they don't know they're never going to change their behavior or they're always going to think something is happening. It's not so pack is going to help. Educate the whole supply chain. This is what can be recycled. This is what could be recycled locally in your. This is what can be recycled in the packs. The pact hard to recycle bin. This is what can't be recycled. Don't think that it's going to be recycled because it can't it won't so if you're concerned about the environment make a different choice on the way you buy this product in good example nail polish. You're not going to get that new polish off the glass to be able to recycle that glass bottle. You just can't so that's what packed about. It's really exciting. I hope it's the beginning of a massive beauty extended producer responsibility that we all become a part of and support. We're really excited. I can see it. I can see it amazing. Thank you so much for sharing. That we've made it to the end vic we're done grilling you on the hard stuff but we actually have one more hard question for you. Are you ready. Okay so this angeles you are an actor you've moved to hollywood you've made it big and your headlining a major movie. A major motion picture. Who is your co star. And what is the movie. Oh my goodness who is the coaster Okay let's see. The co star would be julia. Roberts and i'm trying to think of the movie beauty related. Obviously we're what was her famous breakout movie with Pretty woman yeah that one. I would definitely do that movie. Senior the richard gere. Okay this gut. Because i wanted the richard gere. But i would love to do that. That's one of my favorite movies. So i would watch it. And she would be wearing russian red in the film or i guess the other one is is. I would be in the titanic. I think that was kind of i. Get to freeze to death on a door or something like that. That's a good way to go. You'd look so good doing it. That would be good. Yes my what a tough question. That's great. I just want to say i really enjoyed meeting speaking with you. I love what you guys do. You put information out there. You make it fun to put some personality in. I think this fantastic. I would love to come back anytime. You want to talk a stories. I've got a lot of good things to talk about. Whatever you want. i'm here so thank you. yeah we could do like ten other topics with you truthfully. Honestly guys i'll give you the straight up. I'm here to get to to better beauty and we all. We're all in it together. Amazing thank you so much for coming on. Thanks for dealing with seeing me in my lounge shorts. I mean this is. This is all about zoom way flake vic literally solving. He's probably like she even wearing pants. I am i am fans are overrated in my humble but vic just so you know you're the first you're the first guest on this podcast to see me in lounge short so take that as you will thank goodness. I wasn't recording the big trouble. Where can everybody find. Mob beauty beauty dot com or hashtag the beauty where inclusive we have a community. We encourage you to join our community participate. As you know kirby we invite people on to talk with us directly. We have events where you can actually zoom in to my lab and we can talk through ingredients. We can talk things. We're hoping it's about sharing and doing beauty better so come. Visit us in marketing. Awesome and thank. Y'all so much for listening to this episode of glass angeles. You know where to find us. We are on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcast cher. Our pod with a friend if you love these episodes and leave us a five star review on apple. That's how we discovered and we get more listeners. You can also find every episode of los angeles on our website. los angeles pod dot com. And we're on social los angeles pod on twitter and instagram and find our facebook group search glossy angeles clippers juliano's and you'll find us. We'll talk to you next week. look staying healthy isn't easy watching your diet hitting the gym avoiding stress. A good night's rest helps boost your overall health and wellness and couldn't be easier. The new sleep number three sixty smart bet is the only man that effortlessly adjusts response to both result. You wake up ready for anything. Proven quality sleep is life changing sleep and now the new queen sleep number three sixty five. Smart bet is only seventeen ninety nine save six hundred dollars. Only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com.

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Ep 44: Sephories Sale Season with Nicole Chung

Forever35

1:20:33 hr | 2 years ago

Ep 44: Sephories Sale Season with Nicole Chung

"Today's episode is brought to you by nutrition is a vitamin company changing the beauty industry initiating movement. That has already inspired over half a million people to lead healthier lifestyles their mission is to help you look and feel your best by turning your self care routine inside out hummed demystify supplements by connecting users with a free personal ardine nutritionist via a quick online quiz who provides personalized product recommendations based on your goals, and needs and all this happens online and to make your life easier. It ships right to your doorstep. Plus offers convenient and flexible money-saving monthly plan options. They've developed over thirty innovative and ultra specific formulations that work from the inside out to support clear. Glowing skin improved, gut health, fuller hair enhanced mood and healthy Bod and all ingredients in their lines of supplements. Powders and Gumy's are backed by clinical results, sustainably sourced, non GMO and free of soy gluten artificial, colors and preservatives. Plus they. Have a lot of vegan options like glose week low which I have personally been taking every day and a big fan of it contains Hyler onic acid and vitamin C and easy to keep your skin hydrated and glowing. And I have to say it has delicious hindering flavor that I just I just love. Love a tangerine flavor to get twenty percents off go to nutrition dot com and use code forever. Thirty five at checkout. That's hum nutrition dot com for twenty percent off using code forever. Thirty five and now, here's the show. Welcome to forever. Thirty five a podcast about the things. We do to take care of ourselves. I am Dory. Sha. Freer? And I pretty sure I'm Kate Spencer. You are. And we're not expert now Dory were just two friends who like to talk about serums. Yup. Which we're going to do today. Yeah. Can't wait a lot of product episode. This is going to be a product heavy episode because up everyone. Rapid rapid hold on tight the roller coaster is about to ride. I don't know. What that was Dory. I posted on Instagram picture of my current night night table. What are those called bedside tables? Yes, I current setup nightstand. That's that's what it is. And I have a new alarm clock. And I got a lot of questions about it. And I wanted to discuss it. Let's do it quick because I'm kind of working with my old therapist. And then of course, this podcast family that we've had in your Todd fan pod fam- to improve my bedtime habits. Okay. We all know, we all know about Kate's phone addiction problem one listener was like responded to the photo. It was like, but where's your phone? Where are you keeping your phone right now? I was like listener back off. It's in the bed. With me kidding. I love you. Thank you for asking. The phone is currently next to me just because my partner is out of town. And I get scared. Aired at night were Anthony home the phone would be somewhere far away. That's just the compromise of head to reach with my side think that's fine. But I did purchase a new alarm clock. And it is by Phillips. It is one of those circular light alarm clocks. It's not a sunlamp. I did have somebody asked if it was a sunlamp. It is not it is a sunrise simulation, and the way it works. Is that you set your alarm, and you can also set the it's Google it or I'm gonna link to. But it's a circle that is alight. You set your alarm per certain time. And the first thing that happens when your alarm goes off. There's no noise at first it's just the light slowly turning on. And you can set it for pervert preferred. What's the word brightness? Have it currently said at eight out of ten how is it working? It's interesting. I am finding actually fighting it's harder to get out of bed. Really? I think I'm just tired. I need to be going about earlier, which is part of this whole process, but it does. So the light part goes on that wakes me up, and I like it because it doesn't when an alarm wakes me up. I have like the heart racing panic. Yeah. And I also then find myself just kind of like wide awake and grabbing my phone. This is a real gradual wakeup. So what's been happening as I've been setting the light to go off at six fifteen and it's just the light. But then I think about like eight minutes later of beeping alarm stop starts going. Okay. And that I can tap. And what's the word where you what the hell is it called for? You snooze is news the noise, but you can't the light doesn't come on over and over again. The light is only one. Time. So it comes on. And then it goes off. It comes on tap it off. Okay. And it rises gradually to mimic that the sun. And it really does wake me up. But it's not because it's not a blaring sound doesn't jolt you away. You don't have the urgency. No, kind of just like slowly makes me realize that it's time to rise. Okay. Then par too with the beeping alarm, which I will say is a gentle beep, it's not allowed blaring one that I keep hitting snooze on. So I'm finding I've been getting fully up at six forty five. Even though my light alarm is going off at six fifteen. Okay. So I might I'm experimenting with it. But I have to say I do like it. It's a calmer way to get out of bed in the morning. And I feel like my waking processes more gradual. And I also I just like the light something about it makes my body feel like, oh, yeah. It's morning. Not like holy shit. A sound? I don't know. That's what I'm experienced. I'm curious. What Anthony is going to think of it when he gets home, but he gets up really early right? No. I'm actually out of bed before him. Okay. I don't think he'll notice because I found like it's you have to be facing it to really I think to feel the impact. I haven't put it on level ten yet. I might try that tomorrow. Let's see how it goes. But a lot of people were like I've been curious about this. So I have to say I recommend and I bought the cheapest one there are different levels. I did not need the sunset simulation. Which is also a choice on the more fancier models. So the one I purchased was forty six dollars. Okay. So just putting that out there. What else has been going on with you? Well, I'm kind of in survival mode right now because my spouse is out of town. He's going to be gone for another two weeks been gone for two weeks. So you know, this week, I definitely felt kind of grumpy I let the TV do a lot of the heavy lifting. My kids. They didn't seem to mind. So you know, I have mixed feelings about that TV's a big help in my house. We don't watch ton of it. But you know, I kind of just kind of burnt out, and I say this recognizing I have lots of wonderful privilege and support in this situation. And I still have a hard time. But I'm just trying to stay positive and stay on top of shit. I have found Dory. Like, I tend to procrastinate so deeply about everything. And when I just get everything done it makes day so much easier. Feels so good. It does feel better. You know? I was yesterday. It was like making lunches at ten AM and just kind of trying to check off everything like doing the trash feeding the dog walking the dog doing the homework. You know, just check check check that all my work that I had to do you know yesterday as well. And it did start to feel like the day was never ending. I didn't eat dinner until about eight forty five which is fine. It's just was what it was delicious dinner that I made. But anyway, I make sure I get the tasks done. Yeah. I think just makes everything go a lot faster and not looking at, you know, not sitting looking at my phone for an hour. Just all I wanna do because you know, as I said, I left my phone. But one thing I have done dorey as I've streamlined by skin-care process. We'll get into this. Moore's we talk about process. Products. But I have a little system where Sunday night, I use my Sunday Riley could choose and then Wednesday night, use my retinol. And then those are my two like Sierra me products. I'm using okay. During them twice a week. I feel like you've had a an up and down relationship with good genes. It's been a journey. And I realized I hadn't I think part of my problem is I buy things, and I don't kind of set up a consistent. I don't form a relationship with them. Like, I just buy them. I smack them on. And then I'm like, oh, you didn't work in a day. You're dead to me. Right. So also since sorry to interrupt. But I just remembered since we're talking about good genes. I do want to mention I'd set on a previous episode that it is not pregnancy safe. And I've since learned that it is pregnancy. Safe will good you can get back into that. And get back on the good genes train. I will also say we did get numerous people mentioning the new story that Sunday Riley, the company writes a lot of their. User reviews. We saw it. We were just as I I don't know if I was surprised because I'm a little jaded about everything. But I will say good genes. Works for me. Yeah. You know? I I think I think they were mostly leaving fake reviews for some of their other products. Switches a crappy thing to do especially there is one that they instructed people to say that it helped them with their acne that's shooting which is really shitty because people who are struggling with acne like are desperate for anything to help them. And if you read reviews saying this helped me with my acne like, you're probably going to use it. So I also do rely heavily on user reviews. So two things related to this one. Is that friend of the pod Tracy Roby who runs the fan? Serviced blog. Yes. Yes. She did a really awesome post about this. And she made a complaint to the FTC about it. That's great. Yeah. But what it made me wonder as how many other brands is common? Practice. So I think yes, someone else there was a discussion about this in the Facebook group and someone else pointed out, and I thought this was really smart and something that I'm going to start doing which is on Sephora. You can see if people you'd see their VIP status. Oh, so if someone is V I B Rouge or even V I B, it's likely that they're not fake because they've been purchasing because they've been actually purchasing products where the fake whereas the fake reviews are just throw it counted rate tip. So that is something that I'm going to start looking at my think, you can do the same thing with Amazon just kind of see what else the people have reviewed. I mean, it takes I have also installed faked spot which is a site that in a Google Chrome extension that it will tell you what percentage of reviews on Amazon page or any site with reviews. What percentage they think are fake? Oh, that sounds very helpful. Yeah. So, you know, it's just a constant struggle against these fake reviews. But we're doing our best. Yes. And I was I was torn because I do like good genes. Yeah. Do not like the practice yet. I'm also convinced other companies one hundred thousand percent anyway bummer so yesterday, we were texting we were a new sent me a tax. We never Tex. All day. Text in away. How indoor he goes to bed shop around. And you told me via taxed that you are obsessed with your new underway. Ama- obsessed with my new underwear as listeners of this podcast. No, I have long been a diva Tae of the often name changed lace gap. Boy shorts girl shorts. Shorty? They've they've changed names a child during neutral shorts and I've been wearing those for years, but since getting Prague's, even though I'm not that far along I think in part because I always carry my weight my stomach anyway, my stomach was like, hi, I'm here. Remember me? Remember me? So my regular underwear was I like it pulled over the the bump. I don't like it under the bump. Okay. Okay. So I wanted to get something high waisted, and I just happened to be at the gap. The other day. I was like let me just take a little look see. And I I saw that they have like a high waisted version of the lacy ones that I wear. Okay. I was like let me try those. So I found a pair of my regular size. They didn't have a size up. I was like, ooh, the regular size may not fit. And then I saw these other ones those there that like, oh, I was like these look interesting. They are the breathe high rise bikini. So I tried on a pair. I'm usual say I'm usually a medium. Okay. But I was like I think I need a large like, I'm I'm just getting bigger, you're growing growing. So I tried them on over my underwear. Of course. Of course, not disgusting. They were stay are stretchy. They're lightweight cotton. There a cotton blend. Oh, hell, no. I love them. I'm wearing a pair right now about four pairs. I'm going to go back from or okay? And I just think I'm going to be I think we're gonna be able to wear them until I get really big. Let's challenge these underwear underpants. I gotta say I texted my sister. Karen, Vladic Esquire and said, I got some new underwear, and I told her which ones and she's like, I love those. Oh, she's already hip to them. Because you know, she had as she talked about on the podcast. She's had C sections a ha and she knew she was going to need some comfy undies for after her most recent child, and she said I bought those. I love those underwear now I'm trying to remember if I even bought special underwear when I was pregnant or if I just let it like ride down, I find that so uncomfortable. I don't I don't quite remember what I did. I will say now where I pregnant, you know, where I'd go March to Costco, and get myself some Carol hawk though, Carol I love these carols. Now, I might buy you a set. Oh, you would do that for me. I would I mean, I like you a little bit just so you could try them out because very high waisted like they are almost like shorts. Oh, they go way out how they don't go way down. But they are you can get them over the belly button for sure I just I am just so happy that I've found these. Well, thank you gap. Yeah. Thank you gap. I also met and I saw deer of as a great. Did you cry? I almost cry. I love a crowd of musical. I thought it was great. I'm going to see it soon. I'm excited it's torturing now it's in Los Angeles till the end of November. But it's going like all over the country. So if you're in a city that it is going I would recommend seeing. I know we haven't talked about yet, Tori, what a love of musicals is self care. You think that's a thing? We will we talked about a little bit when I was talking about Broadway dance costs. That's true, which I feel like I'm regaining my strength and might be able to return to I am gonna love a pregnant you doing just waddling show too widely. Waddling? Soundtrack cats. Oh, yes. What a vision? Yeah. I am. An also it was like the latest. I had stayed out in months, and you're starting to feel a little bit bad. I'm starting to feel better. I mean, we just ate salads. And you're like a salad. Sounds good. As opposed to literally since August, all I've seen you eat is like a saltines. What else have you eaten? Noodles noodles some breads. Yup. Yeah. That's about it. Yeah. So I'm like eating other things. Now, if feels really good I'm just like feeling better. It's wonderful. So thank you. I'd you're transitioning into this new hungrier bigger underwear phase of pregnancy. Well, you know, people do say the second trimester is the best trimester. I heard I've heard that both times I never personally found that. But I fully hope for you. It is. Well, I don't think I I mean, look, I guess it could be worse than the first trimester. But you really went through. I'd be hard pressed to see how it could be. Yeah. Like, so. And I'm already like feeling I just feeling more like myself, and I'm like functioning as Rusen so good. I'm that makes me thrilled. Thank you. Dori? Also this episode is going to be airing right around something very important. Yes. The election mid-term elections on our number six. This comes out on November first which means y'all got to get to the polls vote vote. Please vote. Just just just vote. Listen to this podcast in line. If you are not an early voter, I vote by mail personally, I'm excited to dig into that this week my husband votes by mail. I'm a I'm a in person per year passionate about the polls. I like a poll I like I used I like going to and then I did my first mail in ballot very recently. And it was so satisfying. I could see that. I don't know there just is something about go. I remember going to the polls my mom like as a kid. Yeah. There's just something very it's like the one thing we have. It's very moving. Yeah. But yes, please. Please definitely vote. If you're inclined volunteer postcard, like five days left is a lot of days. Give someone a ride to the polls. That's a great idea. Right. Yes. Yeah. Why not? Yes. Give someone ride to the pulse. I will drive you notify new needs a ride my neighborhood. See me, I will give you a ride on my shoulders. Hi, my car, but I might be more fun to just show up on my back. That would be really fun. Should we take a little break on Stewart? Today's episode is brought to you by our friends at thrive market where you can shop for thousands of the best selling non GMO foods and natural products, always at twenty five to fifty percent below traditional retail prices because they cut out the middle person and by straight from the brands and now they're offering a special deal for our listeners. If they go to thrive market dot com slash forever. Thirty five, you know, Kate. There's even thrive market brand products, which are the highest quality ingredients that even more forcible prices than the current premium products carried on site, actually, what I'm even saying, you know, that there's thrive market brand products. Because you are obsessed with the thrive market brand halio smack. I was like how dare you even ask do, I know? Chris. I know you know, what else is cool dorey what you can filter the catalog by your values in dietary preferences, like paleo gluten free vegan, kosher Kito genyk and thrived market. Also has a highly curated catalogue, meaning you might only find three to four options for each product. But you can trust. They're the best ingredients at the most affordable prices and safe for your family and your pets by the way by loves those dog treats, oh my God. Those dog treats that are actually toothpaste in disguise trick to bow. So here's the deal we want you all to love thrive market as much as we do. And they're offering forever. Thirty five listeners an awesome deal. Twenty five percent off your first order keep in mind. Their prices are already twenty five to fifty percent below retail because they cut out the middle person. And now they're offering an additional twenty five percent off. Just go to thrive market dot com slash forever. Thirty five. There's no coupon code just use our URL and the discount will be automatically applied. Again. That's thrive market dot com slash forever. Thirty five for twenty five. Percent off your first order. Say Hello to light box. A new brand of laboratory grown diamond jewelry. Never heard of labyrinth diamonds joined the club. Here's what you need to know. They have the same chemical makeup as natural diamonds, but are made in a lab by scientists. It's a pretty amazing process by using a plasma reactor nearly as hot as the surface of the sun. A piece of diamond is bombarded with carbon atoms and grows after four hundred to five hundred hours it's big enough to cut into a polished stone, pretty cool. If you consider diamonds from the earth took about three billion years to reach the surface. Well, natural diamonds are rare light box can make a lot of lab grown ones. Meaning you don't have to be a millionaire to afford one lightboxes lab grown diamonds or just two hundred dollars a quarter. Carat plus the cost of the setting their scientists have even figured out how to make pink and blue ones pink and blue natural diamonds are so rare you've probably never seen one before. But now you can own a lab grown one or several check them out at light box jewelry dot com slash forever. Thirty five. So kate. The Sephora holiday bonus beauty insider event has begun right now. It's only four VIP Rouge people, and they get it exclusively until the fifth of November. And then the rest of us peons have to wait. So if you are V, I be like, I am you start on November ninth? And then all beauty insiders. And anyone can be a beauty insider starts on the sixteenth. Now, I know Rouge or getting twenty percent off. And I believe that everyone else is also going to get twenty percent off on their respective dates. Can I also just say becoming a beauty insider? It's a force free for many years. It didn't do it. Oh, I know. So dumb of me. And anytime you shop there, you're just rack up these points. And it's it's worth it's one of those. Little groups that's worth joining it is although I will say, and I'm not experienced this. But I've heard tell that the Ulta rewards program is actually better. Oh, well, I will be talking that out a satire. Just going to throw that out there. That's that's the word on the street at is what the boots on the ground or telling you. But listen, we love our safaris. And we just wanted to discuss some of the things that we ourselves are planning on purchasing with our hard earned money planning on planning on. I might not go for all of it. Okay. But this is just, you know, this is my wishlist, this is the wishlist, and then I also through on a couple of non safaris products just for fun because you've got a whole list of things you want. Yeah. New goodies new goodies. So if some of them might sound familiar to listeners, I see it in the note, I know where this going K two hundred kicking zone. Okay. So look I mentioned it already, but I got a sample from Sephora of this makeup forever. Ultra HD perfect or skin foundation SPF twenty five and I'm obsessed with the sounds like a the lot. Oh it like it's like a mask gave me a new face. I was new person. No, it just it just. Gave me like a nice smooth buff. Look not buff. Muscular buff, like polish if you could paint muscles on you can like airbrush tanning, I'm I'm very confident that in the second twilight movie Robert Pattinson has painted on abs- when they're in Italy listeners. You know what I'm talking about? No disrespect to our Robert patents. Aren't AB some surely is great natural is. But I feel like I vaguely remember, or at least they're like defining them with a whip but make up all right anywhere shout shout out to rob. So you got a sample this. And now, you you like to so much that you're going. I might go for it. Although dorey, I checked cruelty free kitty, which is a site. The Jackie Johnson, recommended and make up forever is not considered cruelty free. They sell products in China where animal testing is mandatory. Okay. So I might I might set on it. Because everything else on my list, I checked everything and everything else is under the cruelty free category. Okay. But I really I really that that that stuff really hit it out of the park for me. I haven't had that kind of experience even with the Armani style. Sorry. Yeah. It just it just really have to take a few minutes to processes like love at first application. It was just a great. I love how may Mexican how much does it cost thirty six dollars? Okay. But, you know, getting that the sale prices Knox a little bit off for sure what else is on your list. K one thing. I also try to sample of and didn't want to bite the bullet without a sale is this tasha, the Pearl tinted, I eliminating treatment, homey, motza Sephora, every story starts the same way. Just me in a Sephora mumbling around. And I was like the sales person this lovely guy. Just was like, hey, you wanna know this new thing, we just got that? I'm obsessed with and I was like, yes, pray tell and it was his tasha is stuff, and it's like kind of a concealed kind of a treatment. It's very it's kind of. It's also like an illuminated. Writing. It's very learn you apply underneath your eyes. And I loved it. I loved the sample. I maxed it out, but it's forty dollars. And I didn't take the leap. Okay. So the sale might be the thing that pushes me over the edge. I'm here for that might just be the thing. Okay. But I did just get some of the Becca under ice. I should finish that. And then maybe in a year circle back for the old tasha stuff. But I really really liked it. Okay. I love Aramis beauty. I have used their regular Luminas her which is a high later for years. And literally when I say for years, it's I've been using the same pot for like four years, which is not what anyone recommends, but I've been doing that. But they have champagne rose as a color for thirty eight dollars. I'm pretty their their products are great, and we've we've actually had a couple of questions about from listeners about eliminating plastic which I think we'll talk about down the road, but Armas products come in glass containers. So. If the lids must be paused. Yes or metal. Oh, no. I think you're right. I think they are metal. Yes. So that's another alias is also a fav- of former forever thirty five guests. Jessica us who I turned me onto it many years ago. Oh at the thing at my house door hosted a little makeup night. I did. And I'm still using the stuff I bought at that makeup night. That was before you were with your husband that is entirely possible. That pot of Luminoso was gone time ago. That was when this podcast wasn't even a little glimpse in any of our didn't even know, we would become podcast friends. I know, but I really I love their products. I like supporting that brand. And so I might that is like the one I'm kind of on the list leaning toward I love it. Is there anything else? Oh, yeah. Of course. Is there anything else story? There's like fifty frickin things. Let's more things one. I might re up my. Totta Harper regenerating cleanser, I only want to buy that during a sale. Not on your list to or you just. A ho Totta is back. I'll tell us back. I've mixed feelings about Totta. But I like I have this. This bottle has lasted me a long time. I'm still going on my original bottle a lot of things that had for a year. My good genes I bought a year ago at the previous fall sale. So this Totta has lasted me while on a really like it is a racy. It is too much money. How much is it Kate eighty two dollars eighty dollars out is it's bonkers as obscene. It's bonkers. It's crazy. Also on our last minneap. We just finished talking about how cleanser was not the thing that money, I'm a hypocrite. What can I say, at least, you're honest. It's just tempting like I've kind of circle back to it. And I'm like, oh, do I need to buy this again. I might add. Oh, I don't know listeners. Tell me what to do. Okay. Here's the last thing. And this might actually be the thing where I take the plunge this and the s it is I want to try to being this guy. Also, very curious about tubing. I've never tried one. I don't even understand how it works. Can you serve? Explain for listeners and me exactly what a to scare is. I believe it's applied similar similarly to a regular mascara. Okay. But it forms like a tube around the lash. And then when you remove it. It's like you're removing little tiny tubes off your is. I don't know doesn't this sound crazy. I haven't done like you would have thought I would have like Google photos of this. I haven't I just hear the word tubing Messner apple rave about it intrigued. So what brand is here's what I came to a little research. Blink b l I n c is like the OG of tubing us Garros cruelty free. So it's I feel good in that regard twenty six dollars. And they sell it at Sephora. I think you gotta go for. I think I'm gonna do the sake of the pod for the sake of the pod. Yeah. Experimenting. I think where I am leaning is the RS Luminas her because that's a good just every day highlighter. And then this this tubing mascara, I am trying to keep it keep it light this time around. I also like I feel like we often focus on skin-care on this on this podcast. And I like that you're buying to make products which just reminded me, I meant to go back and Google some other things that I've found that I liked like some super groups. It's this is a never ending list. But you're right Dory. I I am kind of playing around with makeup because I'm finding just a sprinkling of makeup like if I'm going out into the world. It's kind of fun. Yeah. Yeah. I like it. Yeah. I like that. Do we look with some lashes totally and I'm enjoying taking off my makeup more because I that tasha oil cleanser, so great so nice. It's so light a used it if Saturday night. Dammit. All right. Your list is long. I might have gone overboard. No. You didn't. It's just listed at all the products in this. It is kit that you have on your list. So take it away. Okay. So I I a fan of doctor jarred. I think they have a great. Moisturizer with Sarah my? Cream stuff in it fischel name. And so I saw that Sephora is offering a doctor Jarque superhero skin transformer set. And here's what it comes with. It's all like little mini sizes of everything. It's the Sika pair tiger grass color correcting treatment SPF thirty the Sika pair tiger grass repair serum the water fuse hydra sleep mask, the ceremony in cream, the premium BB beauty bomb SPF forty five and then to new serums that have not been available in this country. That's tempting the peptide in radiance serum and the peptide in firming serum. So I am very intrigued by this. And I think it might be a good way for me to kind of try a bunch of Dr jar. Products. However, I was dismayed. Ooh. To learn. The doctor jarred is not cruelty free like they just openly test on animal they test on animals now I have not made I have not as of yet made cruelty free a hard and fast line. I have either. But I'm thinking about it. But I would like to go in that direction. And this is you know, this is a good value. This is fifty two dollars for a bunch of stuff, including these new products. And and I'm honestly very torn like do I just stop using Dr jarred altogether. I don't know I need to come to a conclusion about this. I mean, I think our cruelty free advocate friends would say hell, yes. You do. I know. All right. Well, weighing on that. Yeah. So the other thing that I am dying to try which has been raved about by PASCAL on your kitchen who I would call a makeup expert definitely is Charlotte Tilbury bond girl, lipstick cow. I want this reading your little blurb parent. Now made me want it, I'm googling it's it's like one of those shades that supposedly looks good on everyone. You know what I'm saying? Yes. Which makes me wanted even more. It's thirty four dollars which is kind of on the high to me, that's sort of on the high normal end. You know what I mean? Yeah. It's no it's no fifty eight dollar Tom on that wild Tom for. Yes. Not like, but it's not something that I would that I would have to kind of think twice about investing in. But with the sale, I think it might be time to take the plunge. I also am pleased to learn that Charlotte Tilbury is cruelty free. Great. That makes me feel better about putting that on my lips. I mean, I'm just googled it. In a headline on a lure said, Charlotte Tilbury, Matt revolution lipstick in pillow. Talk is actually a universal fluttering this color. The blonde girl is different than pillow Charles. I don't own. I don't know anything about Charlotte Tilbury people love her stuff. Kate. I am toying with the idea of pulling the trigger on one of your faves reveal yourself do your lip gloss. Oh, I do like it. That was a Maureen Gourock amend Asian non cruelty free. It's not. Well, Dior is not. Yeah. You're sure, but I'm very intrigued by this. It is also thirty four dollars. I like it. But I think you could skip it. All right. I would go with Charlotte. Tilbury Charlotte tight. You know, what try mine out? It's a nice sheer look. But if you already have some clinic black Honey floating around I do feel like that's just as nice, it's a different aid. But I mean, you ain't done with stop. You talked me out of it. Okay. Job. I like it. I do like it the other one of your faves that I think I might try is the it cosmetics by under illumination full coverage. Conceal her. Okay. Look, I need you to know. When I read this. I nearly passed out you're gonna switch under I feel. I'm not gonna swit-. I'm curious. What's making you like look? Elsewhere look outside of your relationship with the ball Inc. Stuff. Look, you know, Boeing is great. But after a while it's like, you just wanna try something else. Wow. This stuff is a workhorse. Okay. Well, we'll see we'll see it. Put to the test is really I have to say it is like you're putting spackle under your eyes. It's twenty four dollars in a little goes a long way use a dot of it. I really curious to try it and cosmetics is also cruelty free. Yeah. Thank you it 'cause medics so I was recently. Early at wired twenty-five this. Weekend long event to celebrate wired magazine, and Matt and I did a live excellent adventure. And they had to make up artists. There did my makeup what a treat what a treat. And she said here, I'm gonna give you this mess. Skara shoes a doll and she gave me the two faced better than sex mascara. And you know, I've been a Dior show Devoto for quite some time. But she threw this two-faced on my lashes. And I was like. That's a big cult Fave one right about that. And it comes in two sizes. It comes in a mini sized for twelve dollars and a full-sized for twenty four dollars. Now. Interesting thing about two faced this. They are vegan and cruelty free. And this most of their products are vegan. They've a few non vegan products. This product is vegan. But a couple years ago they sold to Estee Lauder for a ton of money. Congrats over a billion dollars. Wow. No big. But they have pledged not to enter the Chinese market. Now. Estee Lauder does test on animal they do. Well, the they sell a lot of their brands, sell cosmetics and shine bright. So if you sell a mainland, China rich, which retires, and I think I think many of their brands also just tests on animals, anyway, I don't think all their brands are not all their brands were cruelty free. Now, I had kind of been under the impression of like. Okay. If a brain like two phased is owned by Estee Lauder, you still shouldn't buy it. If you are devoted to this cruelty free lifestyle, you shouldn't buy it because stay Lauder tests on animals, however. Found an article on the PTO website. And you know, they are the most doctrinaire of everyone. I've heard of them, and they had an interesting point that I would like to read. Yes, please do quote, it's important to support cruelty free companies such as urban decay, which is owned by Laurie Al as well as to face cosmetics because if their parent companies see that kind and compassionate cosmetics are popular it may lead to a decision to reject testing on animals permanently. And I was like. I hadn't thought of that. And that's an interesting point. And does that inspire you to purchase this to face mask? Yes. Small size are big size. Well, I have she gave me the small size. So you're going. I think we'll go for the big. And then there two other products that are not at Sephora that I think I'm going to take the plunge with while. I'm just kind of updating my product one is the mad hippie vitamin C serums that Jessica hopper talked about Iran into a friend who I was chatting about serums with and they are also using this, and they love it. Yeah. I was like, oh, just go up or just told us about that haven't been using vitamin CS here for a while not for any real reason. Just because I ran out of one and never rebuilt, and I'd like to incorporate it back into my routine and the other thing I'm gonna is Egyptian magic. Oh. I'd love Japan magic. I mean. Now Dori it's a Costco. It's gotta go. And it's like a two for one situation. O L see if they have it then roll through. Costco, sherpa anytime. Well, let's take a quick break. Today's episode is brought to you by third love using thousands of real women's measurements. Third love designs. It's bras with breast size and shape in mind. So they fit impeccably and feel even better. They have a super quick easy. Actually fund fit finder quiz that helps you identify your breasts size and shape and find styles that fit your body it takes less than a minute. And I actually found out that I am a half size. I'm jealous of your half sized status, especially that. 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I mean, I think it's safe to say that our healthcare system can prevent women from getting the care they need whether it's because of insurance or income or just where they are. So simple health just thought of a better way with simple health. You can get your birth control prescribed online and delivered to your door for free. It's affordable convenient and safe. Whether you you're already on birth control looking to get back on it or want to try it for the first time since. Health will take care of you can't you know, what I think about when I think about how great this is go on if you're a dude you can get Viagra online. Why should birth control be any different? It shouldn't exactly. And I just think access to this kind of fundamental care should be fundamental Preecha Dory. Thank you. So listen. Here's how it works. You fill out a comprehensive online health profile and answer some questions formulated to get the best birth control for you your body. Your preferences, your insurance situation, they take it all into account a medical doctor will review your profile figure out if you're a good candidate for birth control recommend a product and write a prescription, then your birth control ships to your door on a recurring schedule with no interruptions, and just to be clear. Simple health is not making their own birth control. They only prescribe trusted invented brands birth control, including pills and the patch and ring. So if you're already on birth control. And just tired of dealing with the pharmacy. It's even easier. You just fill in your pharmacy and insurance information, and they'll start shipping your birth control to you for free and best of all simple health offers Affordable Care, regardless of insurance. They do accept insurance. And luckily, birth control is free with most insurance plans, but for those without insurance, the average cost is eighteen dollars a month, depending on the exact type prescribed and delivery is free for everyone. The prescription is usually twenty dollars, but you all get to try it for free. Just go to simple health dot com slash forever. Thirty five or enter the code forever. Thirty five at checkout. And I do wanna mention that. This isn't a replacement for routine evaluations by your primary care physician or gynecologist, but it is the most convenient and comfortable way to get your birth control. Again. Don't miss your chance to try this awesome service for free. Go to simple health dot com slash forever. Thirty five or just enter code forever. Thirty five at checkout. Our guest today is Nicole Chung. Welcome to coal. Thank you so much Dory. Heke? Hi, I'm just gonna read a short bio, so everyone kind of get to know you a little bit. Nicole Chang is the author of the memoir all you can ever know named a best book of the season by the Washington Post Entertainment Weekly Vanity Fair time. Newsday L the today show and more her essays and articles have appeared in the New York Times G Q long reads BuzzFeed and has let among others. She's the editor in chief of catapult magazine, and the former managing editor of the toast, and you can find her on Twitter at at Nicole underscore su-jong. Welcome. Thank you again. So your book, all you can ever know is the story of you and finding your birth family to reduce it to a very short sentence. But I would love for you to kind of tell our listeners who may not have had a chance to read the book kind of just generally the story, of course. Yeah. So it focuses on might option growing up in a white family in southern Oregon in a in a really white community. And then what happened when I grow up and decided to search for my birth family about whom I'd never really known much anything. And I think the larger narrative is really about questioning stories that were told like stories that are passed down. And and what it means to really go in search of our try to rewrite your own story. So a lot of the book deals with my search which Mitch happened when I was pregnant with my first child a little over ten years ago now, and what happened after what happened with the information, and the people that I found so you became you kind of became more interested in your adoption story when you got pregnant. That's right. Yeah. And I'm just curious what what it was about your pregnancy and kind of the idea of giving birth that sparked that. Yeah, I think it's funny, obviously before before I didn't even know if I was ever going to be a parent. It was the very hypothetical thing as was like the idea of a child, right? And so I had never thought a lot to the honest about what it would mean for my child to be growing up like as the the the child oven. Adopt d I had never really thought about adoption having those foraging affects like beyond. I guess my generation, you know, and I remember sitting at my first, prenatal appointment and talking with the midwife, and she was asking me all these questions about with my family history, and my mother's birth, and if I had siblings, and I knew she did not mean my adoptive family. Are my adoptive mother? I knew she wanted to know, you know, what was my medical history. What what my mother my birth mother's pregnancy is like and did I know why she went into labor so early with me because. I was born about two and a half months premature. And so I remember suddenly feeling very scared that I didn't have this information both from a practical, I guess medical standpoint. But also for the first time I started thinking like Louis child have questions for me that I can't answer. Right. You know, will bother them that I just don't know. I I can't really share this legacy or this history, or this culture with them essentially felt just very inadequate. And that was the final push. I think I needed to stop just thinking about it and actually go in search of my birth family. So what did that entail? Yeah. It's super complicated because it only fifty different states in fifty different state laws about adoption. I was actually born here in the US because my birth parents were immigrants from Korea like they'd been here. Just a couple of years really when I was born. So might option was like a domestic adoption here in the states in Washington state at the time, I searched for my birth family. I had to go through a third party. So I I wasn't allowed to find my information or to contact them directly, which at the time definitely made like a kind of sense to me. But there was this extra level bureaucracy. Also that I had to pay for like I had to pay third tardy to petition the court for might option. File see my birth parents names on my behalf, and then forward them a letter from me, and we weren't allowed to share any like identifying info like last names or addresses IRS like personal details until everyone had consented and writing. And sorry. This is very this is like the red tape this. Is the people's eyes glaze over. But I mean in your book the way, you you you write about it so beautifully. And I I actually think for those of us who who were not adopted. We don't know idea. I so I know it seems like part of your story that you've, you know, you've told a million times and seems like very bureaucratic. But I think it's first of all let's part of your story. And second of all I do think that for those of us who haven't experienced it. It's it's not it doesn't feel tedious at all. Thank you. I mean, I know a lot of us regardless of birth or adoption, and there's only so much access. You really get to the people who came before you there's only so well that you can really even know your own parents, honestly and your perception of your family changes so much over time. But I think it's true that if you're not adopted it's not it's not necessarily common for you to think about what it's like to just have nothing like have questions that no history. Like, no one to even ask and you have to have to. Fission or pay for or both just to get kind of basic information that everybody else has. Yeah. I think you're right. It's it's probably not something you everybody thinks about, but it was definitely a longer process. I even thought it would be like, I remember sort of starting at an thinking started at my first trimester. I remember thinking like we'll get this done by the end of my second trimester. And like I won't be dealing with like all of this while I'm giving birth. And of course, like it's not how it happened. I heard from my birth father for the first time while I was in labor, so it. Yeah. It was all it all really did happen. And just kind of all happened at once. And that was not what I was expecting. And how did you handle things the stress of the process, we talk a lot about self care on the show, obviously. And I'm just curious how it affected you emotionally, mentally in how you kind of handled that especially being pregnant. Yeah. I'm not yet. That's a lot right? My mother. My mother was like don't you have enough going on in your life right now? And it's definitely true. Like, I had a lot going on. Yeah. I remember. Well, first of all like, this is obviously just not everybody's experience while pregnant, but I was like extremely tired. I mean, honestly that probably is everybody's experience while pregnant there was a limit to how much I could focus on day to day, and like beyond I guess, the physical reality and everything that was happening to me like it was. My first two. So I had no idea what to do. And I write about that too. In the book, I really felt just like so unprepared for that it honestly in a way might have helped that I had this other major life change to focus on because if it had been just the search, it would have been very difficult not to be completely consumed by and like, you know, it was it was difficult, and it was a motion all and some of the things I learned were shocking and at the same time like I had to focus on the pregnancy. I had to get ready. There were just things I had to do and get through because because I was pregnant, and it was a nice, I mean nice. That's a trait way of putting it, but it allowed me to kind of split my focus in one thing was like too much overwhelming, there'd be this other thing instead, which doesn't sound like it should be helpful. I realize but for me in some ways it was and I do remember I remember feeling so like I wanted to talk to people. About it. And wasn't sure how to explain it. And by that. I mean, the search because adoption even the people in my life who loved me most, and we're really close to me they weren't adopted. There was a limit to either how much they could immediately grasp or how much they could at least get without me explaining a lot. I remember feeling like, you know, I wish I had let more people into that process like into the search. I wish I'd I wish I'd actually reached out more and asked for more support. But I didn't really know how to explain it. Like what to say? Or what to ask for? I've been saying this a lot in interviews and on the road to. But I I often wish I'd found the good good adoption competent therapist at the time because I really was just going through it like data day. I really felt like. Almost like a puppet. Sometimes I'm strings is being pulled this layer that by like the latest piece of news at a latest shock, and it was really a strange like time. And I think I'll always wish I had looked for and found just more practical everyday support in that. But it also once things started happening happened so quickly. It was you know, it would be like I got a phone call. And then in a matter of days, I'd be dealing with new information. So yeah, it was hard to keep up with two. That must have been that is a role that is a a roller coaster. Like, you said no matter what what time you're going through it in your life. But doing it while pregnant, it seems I mean, it's so interesting because that was what fueled your search. And then to have it all unfold throughout that time must have just been a ride. It was. I mean, there were certainly wonderful things about it all to and. Yeah, it was an exciting time for sure. But yeah, I I don't know. I think too like I wasn't thinking at that stage in my life. Like, what do I need like what would self care look like for me, even in this in this period? I remember being very concerned about how other people felt there out everything like, you know, I was very worried about how my adoptive parents would take the search, you know, like if they'd feel threatened or if they'd feel concerned than I was really anxious once I found my birth family that they'd be okay and not be too freaked out and not be upset with me for just reappearing in asking these questions. So thousands are thing is I think I. I hadn't really even I didn't. Actually, I didn't go about it in the best like way in terms of myself and my self care. I I spent a lot of time this very concerned about about how others were reacting which is important. I mean, it's important to be empathic and to try and feel how other people are feeling care. But and might have at times neglected like my own needs in in that whole process, which to some degree. I don't think I'd fully realize until I started writing about it to be honest. Yeah. And it probably you probably needed some distance from it to kind of realize that. Yeah, I did. And I would have needed a lot of distance to write about it as well. I was writing about it at the time. I was journaling like everyday things things that I learned about my birth family conversations. I was having with them. So I was really glad to have the records. But in terms of like writing this story. I don't think I would have been ready. You know, until now I don't think I could have written it back. Then I you know, I. I kind of encountered you're writing as an essayist. And I'm wondering why you felt like you needed to tell the story as a book, and what that process was like, Sharon. That's a great question. I'm so much more comfortable with essays. And I remember thinking like everyone does when they sell a book like, oh, God, can I actually write a whole book? So just wanted to knowledge the terror of that. And then I do remember thinking is this is a collection of essays. Maybe is it is it linked essays about adoption and search and maybe some parenting, and then kind of quickly realized that while I might like that idea because again, it would feel a little more comfortable for me with my background doesn't essayist that it really felt like there was one continuous story. Arc like I could I could sort of see how I wanted to start it. And what it would look like, and how it would end that it was really daunting, and it took me a while to get to the point where I felt it could be a book. I didn't start writing pieces about adoption till like, I don't know like twenty fourteen inch. And then I really decided to do the book a few years after that. Because I was getting a lot of questions from readers about adoption a lot of people to my surprise. Although I don't I guess I shouldn't have been surprised in retrospect like they had not really read much about adoption and transracial adoption from the perspective of adoptee, particularly like, adopt the of color. So a lot of people were very almost surprised to encounter, this particular voice, or this story at all. And they had really good follow up questions. And I realized it was just becoming difficult to sort of address everything all the complications in the story and do everybody Justice in one thousand or two thousand word essays, we're all disconnected. And so I started to think about like a full story is probably where I'll look at the space that I need to tell this. Actually, actually do Justice. Well, I think you did an amazing job. So thank you for writing. I think you so much. And I actually wanted to ask about. I don't add up teas, and especially at up t's in transracial adoption who have kind of historically been underrepresented in adoption literature. And I think even continue to be and I'm wondering what the response has been to the book from other at up tease. It's been really wonderful so far. I mean, I felt really anxious about people taking my story as Representative of all adopt. These are all transracial adoptees are all created updates. So, you know, it's a lot of pressure, which I wouldn't feel if there were more out there, you know, in the mainstream narrative, so that's a lot of pressure does because of scarcity in way, but in terms of hearing from it out, these it's been wonderful and adopt these no, I'm not representing all of us like that's a given to them. They know their own story. But I've been hearing from I usually get at least a few emails a day now of an have since update from an FD is the youngest was fifteen I think in the oldest is in her. Seventies of all races and backgrounds, and sometimes they say your story reminds me of mine, and sometimes they say, it's nothing like mind, thanks for writing it and. You know, a few created updates in particular have said, you know, this is the first time I've seen anything like my life in literature at all which is really wonderful in really humbling also kind of upsetting because I feel this shouldn't be the first time that they've encountered it and again like, I guess I do feel some resulting pressure. It's it's not from them. It's just it's just the reality of there. Not being a lot of presentation. But I am hopeful that that starting to change we have generations of transracial, adopt. These now that are telling their stories and could tell them, and so it's really I think the question of like are we ready to listen. What is kind of been? I don't want to be presumptuous and assume that it is healing to share your story in this way. But I'm just wondering what kind of? What it's provided you to share in this way. I think the the thing I love most about writing and not just about adoption. You know, when I read on other topics to there are a lot of reasons, I guess primarily I just love to write also. But I love finding community. It's been really important to me at catapult, and before that at the toast, and before the toast. I was at hyphen which is like an online Asian American publication used to be in print as well. But yeah, that just that idea of telling a story, and then not being blown anymore like helping people understand then understanding because you're reading their work to like not to sound alike idealistic in kind of TV, but I I love those like moments of connection, I really treasure community as somebody who grew up without it in a lot of ways. There was no one in my life growing up that I could talk to about any of this. And it was lonely at times to be honest sci-fier. Lack of spent a lot of my adult life searching sometimes in good ways. Sometimes maybe not good ways. But like China search for those communities in those places where I can learn, and I can also be understood. And so that has been really the most valuable part of of writing for me on this topic. But also also out side of it. You write about being the only Asian person your element school, and you know, obviously in your adoptive family. And that your parents kind of tried to raise you in a quote colorblind environment that that kind of left you feeling even more isolated. And I'm wondering just how you reconcile that. And did you ever feel resentment towards your parents for raising you this way, I think in a lot of ways they were really just following advice. They'd been given at the time. I mean, I can't lie and say I've never felt resentful toward my parents for any reason. Most of us have something. And we have definitely interesting because we did not talk about race at all right really acknowledged much. Or certainly never acknowledged that like racism was still a thing that I could experience in my life. We really only started having those discussions when I was older like as an adult and. Yeah, I mean, I guess I guess I can't say there was never any resentment that I think what's been more important, it just the ability to talk about it, and sort of have like these harder conversations. It hasn't been seamless. Like, I it's definitely been a challenge at times. But I think I'm a lot more honest with them than I was like then I knew how to be growing up like growing up. I couldn't have I said this in the book too. But I I really didn't understand what I was experiencing like on the playground as racism like I was hearing on racial slurs. But I didn't think I didn't know what to call it. And I didn't know how to talk about it with anyone including my. Family. So just the fact that I I had to get over some not myself and learn how to think and talk about it before I could talk about it with them. Yeah. I think it was. It was definitely is definitely challenging got enough in that kind of environment for shore. And it took really going up moving away from it. You know, before I could start to really see it for what it was in question. Maybe some of the harm done by it. But yeah, I mean, my parents were very much following the standard advice of the time. I believe in a lot of adoptions, which was in the social worker, the judge I'll told them you don't have to worry about it. Like don't don't do anything special? My mother has hilariously said like expecting they'd recommend a book or something. But like nothing they were just told like just simulate her like assimilate. That's the word the judge actually used in. It's stuck in my mum's memory such interesting choice of words, but yeah, they just. Simulate her and everything will be fine. And that is really what they tried to do because they believe these people were experts. I think I think within doctor now you hear a lot more about talking about race talking about culture and celebrating celebrating a child's coacher in particular. But we just know like that a lot of people still aren't maybe having the harder discussions because because they're hard. Yeah. Yeah. They are hard. What has been like to learn about your background and kind of Korean culture in general as an adult? You know, it's I wish I could just say like it's wonderful in like with. No qualifications. It's whatever. I do. Learn something new or experience something or like try to study Korean or try to cook a create meal, like I'm very conscious conscious of the separation between me, and this culture. It took the longest time for those things to not feel like appropriation when I did them like I honestly felt for a long time. Like, I didn't have a right to this in. It's not like anyone told me that like no one ever told me that it was just a very hard feeling to shake, you know, I would be like at my fetish. Sizing my own like birth culture can a person do that is that is that even possible. So I think like it's been good. And it's been it's been really great to to get to share some of this. And learn some like my sister, for example, my biological sister. Who I'm very close to. But like at the same time, I think I'll always feel like a little bit insecure in that identity just from having grown up without it. Right. I wanted to ask about your your experience as a mother because we had been commiserating about dealing with sick kids earlier and. How how do you kind of handle the challenges of raising children exploring your own career? While also kind of now having a book come out. I mean, that's that is a lot to balance. It's never perfect. It's never seamless. And I'm just curious as my own as a mother myself person who can never get get anything history. With your experience like as a parent, and then kind of piggyback on that. How have you talked to your kids about your search and your experience as an adoptee? Sure. That's a good question. I feel like I was like parents. It's like you wake up in the decks already stacked against you. Like, there's already many many factors working against your productivity. And what you wanna get done that day. And I know I know that's not just true. Parents. I know lots of people have lots of other demands on their time in burdens in that sort of thing. But like, of course, like, this is my struggle sounds like yours. So I don't know it was it was difficult. I think it took me a while. I was a few years into parenthood. When I went to graduate school part time to get a degree in writing. And it was something thought about for years and finally decided to do when my youngest was like an infant like curious timing. But I think actually it was partly becoming a parent and my fear of. Like it being the last slash only thing I ever did that like pushed me to to go back to school, honestly. And also maybe to start pitching in publishing. I think I just felt like I had to do it. Because part of me was a little bit worried about being completely consumed by this other thing in terms of how I do it. Now like, it's changed. My kids are seven and ten so they're both in school now. So I do have a fulltime job. And then I I do most of it while they're gone the book, I have I wish I had clear memories of writing this book like to know, I wrote it. But like, I don't my my husband tells me like there'd be days where you know. I can help and work and you'd be writing and like we wouldn't talk again, so midnight. I was like, okay. And he's like there'd be days where I would take the kids out on the weekend. And you would just stay home and write for hours, and I'm like, all right? That sounds vaguely familiar, but I don't remember like a lot of moments of writing this, it it really was just stuff I fit in mostly in the margins of our life. I should say my husband does like. A lot of the parenting. So like, for instance, when I went back to school he completely took over things like grocery shopping meal planning and most of the cooking. So I kind of joked, except it's not really a joke that I do work. And I do I do a fair bit of childcare running them around things. But like he does almost everything else. Do you fulltime because? Yeah, we do a fulltime job. And he also does as well. Yes. He does. So again, like, I think this life wouldn't have been toss -able like when the kids were babies like, our it was just something that that ended up happening as they got older and got into school will end can I can I ask you, Nicole? Just I'm I think we get a lot of questions from listeners about the. Doling out of the mental load, and the, you know, emotional and parenting labor in relationships. And I'm curious how you and your husband have come to this. Do you? How do you communicate? Really? Well, what are kind of? Do you have any tips or advice for people who may want to explore going back to school, but are currently bearing the the load of parenting with their partners. I'm just it's it sounds like you guys really haven't worked out. And I'm wondering if you have any advice on that front, and that's extremely flattering. Thank you. We often feel like we don't have anything worked out. But yeah, I think I think part of it was just part of it was me asserting locate. This is what I wanna do. And prior to my going back to school. He had spent like six years in a PHD program. Still like without actually having to come out and say we were both kind of like, it's my turn. Like, I remember when we were deciding where to move after he finished grad school. He was just like where do you wanna go like, we're gonna go where you wanna go, and whatever you wanna do we'll make that happen. So it was kind of just a given. Which doesn't mean it's easy to make it happen. You asked about communication. I think we are both pretty good communicators. We have a younger daughter who has like special needs. She's. His stick in. So we naturally are in this pattern of doing a lot of daily weekly like regular communication just about her needs in her support had to get her the support. She needs at school still like, wow, we're talking to each other. We are also both shouldering that load of regular communication with teachers in special Ed staff and therapists in just making sure everything's like making sure everyone's on the same page in her needs aren't really mean met. I like a major concern, obviously for both of us. It's like among the most important things that we do. So I suppose we had to put in place like very good methods of communication to make that happen for her. And maybe we kind of piggyback onto that with other things. But it can just saying I I I will say sometimes I feel like I'm the worrier. So I am the one who says like one who wakes up at two AM like oh my God. Like, we didn't do this thing. And we we have to do this thing or something bad will happen. Like that is knee. That's always going to be me because I'm. I'm the warrior, but he does like it's not like I have to remind him about like school holidays or like early release days at school. It's actually the other way around like if he didn't send me an Email. I would not get there in time to pick up those kids on early release days. This would not happen like, ugh, the end zone at work like typing emails are editing, and like they just be standing there waiting. So it interesting. I think yeah. I guess I'm like emergencies like warrior planner, and he's really good with the day to day like every day. This is predictable. We need to plan for this to happen sort of communication. So I don't know again. I really don't feel like we have like everything off a good out that ado, generally feel where a good team. And it's it is it's very hard to get shit done like in the best of circumstances. So I'm very very grateful that we're a good team. I don't think it was necessarily. Always the case. I think we've been together a long time, and we had to learn. Each other's patterns and needs to and then figure out a talk about them. Sorry. This is this is something like really marriage advice, which I usually don't get into. But yeah, it's it's working for now. Sometimes barely but it's working. That's awesome. No, I think that's really valuable thoughts on marriage, honestly. And we we do hear from people a lot about communicating in relationships, and we're both in relationships. So we're dealing with it all the time. Yep. Yep. Man. It's not always easy. We'll cheese, Nicole. This has been so wonderful to get to talk to you. Thank you so much for making the time. Now my gosh. Thank you both. I really appreciate your time. Thank you so much for being my book to in talking with me about it. It's so great everyone should read it, and Nicole other any we mentioned your Twitter at the beginning of the conversation. But where else can people find you? My website is Nicole Chung dot net. And I have a lot of book at also tour info there, so I'm kind of in the midst of tour. Guess it's like it's not quite heavily over but have a lot of upcoming events. If people are curious about where they can see me. Cool. Well, thanks again. Now, thank you so much. I had a really good time. Chatting with yoga. Likewise, take care. Bye, nicole. Thank you. I. So kate. Yes. How is your power of positive thinking going? You know, it's interesting. I'm still working on it. But I am very conscious right now of the thoughts that are kind of turning around my head, and I have done a lot better job of checking them when they are negative gently escorting them to the exit. I love that imagery, a thank you. Yeah. Thank you very much. I did take didn't get into AP English class senior year of high school and still trying to prove myself. Oh, no. It's it's helping I really I really it's gonna take a lot of time to improve my self image. Both about my inside and outside. But I am trying and it is feeling better. That's all we can ask for. Thank you. I'm you know, what can I say so Dory? When I got here to your house. I shared an intimate moment. With your dog who we've really bonded. You have really bonded. I asked you how his muzzle training is going the you said you started it. Yes. I did. And it's going. Okay. He he actually like put his whole snout in didn't. He's not scared of the muzzle. He he sees it. And I think he knows that he's gonna get a lot of treats he's very food motivated all this dog this dog he's very cheese motivated, and that's all I give him. So I have a very. We we have a stash of string cheese in the fridge. That was originally bought because I thought I had a pregnancy craving for it. And then decided I didn't. So it has now become bows training cheese while he loves it loves it. So that has been very useful for the muzzle training. And we're just gonna continue it and see how it go that must be helping you feel a little bit more calm. You kind of move throughout the pregnancy and head toward it. Baby time is in, you know, Kate as I was saying to you earlier off air, it's very heartening to me that Bo fuel so comfortable around you. Now, I it's heartening to me too. And it is also a testament to your patients and your ability to just work with him because not everyone is willing to do that. So thank you. I really appreciate it. You were really just coming out me with compliments. I love it. I receive them. Thank you. I love. I love your dog. He and I are close. Now, what are you intending on for this week? So my freezer is a disaster. Oh, okay. Like like full of stuff. It's gotten, you know, it's like it's gotten like a frost on it to the have the weird thick ice coating. Yeah. A man. So it needs to be defrosted. Okay. I've never officially defrosted freezer before I never have either. So what I think I'm going to do. I think I'm going to put all the food in a cooler. Okay. And then defrost the freezer clean it out. Maybe put some bins in their inspired by you. I love the bins and my freeze. My freezer is like another planet now have bins. So I need to do a full freezer overhaul. And I think if I have strength after that, I will also organize my fridge like you. I can't tell you how much better I feel having an organized refrigerator and freezer. I didn't expect it to make me feel this joyful. It's just so much easier. Seems just seems very calm ended. His and it's fun to clean it out. Yeah. We did a big clean out of the fridge in the last couple of months we saw. Throw it a ton of just like really expired stuff. So I don't think the actual clean out will be as bad as it could have been. But it does need to be organized. All right. So that's fair. Larry what about you? There are three piles of things in my kitchen and dining area that if now been there for about a month and every day like deal with us files. And I don't want to the piles taunt me every fucking second of the day. I mean, look around our house there pile piles everywhere. So I am committing and I think it's going to happen this afternoon after I leave you I'm committing to the piles piles are going they have to go, and it's so much just papers from my kids weird things like the receipt. The exterminator leaves every time he comes in checks my yard. It's just that. There's a weird fly trap sitting on top of a painting. Justin, nightmares stuff needs to go. So I took a photo. I'm gonna documented as I like to do on the Grammy's, I'll do some pile work for everybody. Sounds great. We'll dory. That brings us to the end. Here. We are here. We are standing together. The end of this episode just a reminder to all our friends out there. If you want to leave us a voicemail to potentially be played on a mini episode. You may do so at seven eight one five nine one zero three nine zero and you can Email us at for over thirty five podcast at gmaiLcom. And look, you know, the drill we say it every time please leave a review and apple podcasts. A friend talk about us on social media. We love all that stuff. And you can also join our Facebook group at Facebook dot com slash group slash forever. Thirty five podcasts. And they're, you know, we always say there. They're a ton of spin offs. They're also starting to be a lot of city specific spin off some a Minneapolis. Or was it Minneapolis, Minneapolis. Just started. There's a very active Boston one. I know Philly's active Chicago just started. Did. I think there's a San Francisco one, Texas, we all just started. So, you know, get in there, meet some people from your hometown or wherever you live and talking about for thirty five things other things or other things, but mostly forever thirty five things can make it about us. Yeah. Anna reminder that everything we talk about is always on our website of over thirty five podcast dot com, and you can post on Instagram at thirty five podcast on Twitter effort, thirty five at pod and forever. Thirty five is hosted in produced by Russia, freer, and Kate Spencer and produced an edited by Santa Cuneo fi.

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LCB Ep. 122 - Top 10 Movies of 2018, New Batman? Green Book, Beale Street and Roma Reviews (Live Super Bowl Special Pt.2)

Lights, Camera, Podcast

2:30:00 hr | 2 years ago

LCB Ep. 122 - Top 10 Movies of 2018, New Batman? Green Book, Beale Street and Roma Reviews (Live Super Bowl Special Pt.2)

"Finnerty? And beyond. Can get me out of this message that he's going to show up. You can't handle the truth. Maybe not maybe fuck yourself. Shoot your kid. What? One dot. Please here. Yes. Kate. Well, we're going. We don't need roads. He thought happy all eight. The camera. Featuring trill ball. Ken. Jeff. Musical cast Adamou movie. Your host Ellen Degeneres. Ladies gentle. The Jeter is. Everybody. Got you fooled. You. I walked them back there. I switched it up because it's our fifteen season. And I've been doing the same thing for fifteen years today. I thought I'm gonna do something different. I'm going to get it from the back. Ellen what a hoop guys we're going to let Ellen take over. Jeff low. Trouble Ken, Jack here. Ellen's warming up the crowd during commercial breaks before we get to our live performance from what we think is to Super Bowl halftime show performer, and Adam LeVine, we're we're not quite sure if he's performing we'll talk about that here in a second. But he's performing here. What's going on guys quickly? We doing good. We're doing great, by the way, we're live at the bojangles in Decatur Decatur. Okay. Once Decatur Georgia crowd is crazy there. Okay. Let me just put it this way. Does anybody in this crowd? Wanna wanna see me drink some pre-workout, the Ford the the taping? Okay. Sounds good. Carry might my pre workout now. This isn't my normal pre-workout. This pre workout is like battery acid normally I drink Emeco energy, a name brand, I went into WalMart and bought this VC AA energy. It's not even blue raspberry the flavors blue razz, they legally cannot call it blue blue raspberry, folks. Now, take my wife. No seriously, take her oh shaker bottle. You're just putting up straight up in a Cup. And I'm gonna take the spoon to it. Please no clumps or else. They're going to get. All right. I'm a chug this pre workout. King children, pre workout crowds. Crowds crowd. Five. Pay them trying to pull him. Okay. Well, that's great. So quickly NFL statement. Maroon five has been working hard on a Pepsi rule. Halftime show that will mean exceed the standards of this event as it is about music. The artists will let their show do the talking as they prepared to takes the stage on Sunday starting with the Pepsi several halftime show. Now, we begin across platform role of behind the scenes footage and content from each of the halftime performers instead of hosting a press conferences, social and digital media rollout will continue through Sunday across our own than operating media assets. As we as well as through a platform of the artist. So his press conference was cancelled Ellen. I know you wanna ask Adam LeVine Aziz performing this weekend. This rumor view possibly performing at halftime for the Super Bowl. What the hell are you talking about? It's a rumor. Wow. So he couldn't confirm he couldn't confirm. So maybe he's not performing. But guess what? He's performing live here. He's going to be seeing don't wanna know at the end of the podcast very excited very excited. So let's we got a big show here. We got top ten movies of twenty eighteen we're going to be looking back on some of the movies. We didn't get a chance to review some big ones. Green book can you ever? Forgive me. If Beale street could talk the favourite Roma then maybe a couple of quick things on blind spotting I reformed the hate you give may even Paddington to. And then of course, the the big REVEAL OUR TOP ten list of the year as well as yours a top ten list from the audience quickly again anything else last last minute things for get into some news. Adam LeVine told me here's a little bit nervous about performing at the Super Bowl. You should be right. Yeah. I would be you know, what I told them. I said, I don't wanna know know about the Super Bowl bowl full. Ooh, everywhere. He can influence. I can feel it on the tips of my van beta Alan bean. Oh, okay. Yeah. We gotta let's blue res-. It tastes tastes like the grease trap at Burger King. But that's why I'm here. I'm here. Unwired tonight. I'm going to good mood. I went to the doctor today, and I told them everything was wrong with me. And then he was like Guinea test down. But he's like oh did sound all that bad. So I'm feeling like I'm gonna live another couple years. That's good terrible for all parties Sheri's berries, brand pre-workout. I think that'd be much better for promo code. Oh beat. They've never sponsored with us. Let's let us be known. But they sent boxes to anyone. They sponsored with in the office, by the way the other day. Vascular is great. This definitely make priroda totally by that. Because they would finally nail the good raspberry flavored pre-workout it's very hard to do. I just like I like see forum I can't drink C four anymore because it makes me too jittery. But I liked the way it has a nice. Iridescent look to it. While also having a color you ever, try a doctor Jekyll Mr Hyde. No that sounds. That's sounds like something blazed with Dake. Yeah. I'm pretty sure like I don't have a impotent now. But I think it was pretty good got a good workout high out of it and make pumps for that. Yes. So I guess we should get into some news. Got a big podcast here. Let's start right off the top some big news that was coming out throughout the day. And actually just became official in the moments. We were just talking about pre workout in such and that is Ben Affleck is officially done with Batman the movie, the Batman by Matt Reeves will still be released. It will be released on June twenty fifth two thousand twenty one. He will now be handpicking a brand new Batman. So breaking news thoughts on that. None of it's surprising, by the way. No. And that's the present. At all. I think we knew Ben Affleck was done. This is the news is great. But in order for me to be excited about this movie. I need to know who the Batman is. Yep. That's that's I mean, I got to know if it's Miller what if they just took as Miller made him, the Batman swapped straight in or make Jason momoa Batman. Ooh. Yeah. Like, you got to take over his Batman. Now, you the flasher you were aqua. Now, you're Batman will apparently thing. Okay. Good. Apparently, what he wants to do this Batman is he wants to focus on how he's the world's greatest detective. So it's just gonna be like Sherlock, except he's Batman. Instead. So doing all that same bullshit with the mind graphics. They did Holmes and Watson to accept its Batman. Now doing I don't I don't like to brag. But I played the Arkham asylum games. Like pretty thoroughly like Arkham night. Whatever the detective parts of the lamest parts of the game. Yeah. So like the out of that. Yeah. As being Batman myself. I don't want to detect a Batman movie. I want the Batman trying to you know, throw batterings villain in. Honestly, the villain is probably the more intriguing part, right? Like, every Batman movie in mostly hinges off the villain because if you have a shit villain like Batman doesn't have much playoff. Yeah. That's true. I wonder who it's going to be in this one right because they feel like they've used a lot of them in dark Knight series and allow them now, I guess in the Justice, and that'd be a lot in the Justice league series. Villains. They they have the tough thing to do with. How do they treat this universe? Because there was a joker the jokers important. But then again, the Nolan batmans weren't Bill on the joker. Now granted everyone remembers the dark Knight the most. But they was built with scarecrow. You know, it was built with another villain. It started out that way. So they don't have to go to the joker. And I hope that the D C you learned from that. They don't need to introduce the big Batty right off the bat, you wanna copy moral than fucking copying. Wait. Do it later on the process. You don't need the big shebang right off the bat. You you can build up to it. You have fucking Batman and superman. It's evergreen people will always see those characters you don't need to do it right now. So I hope that's what they do with as I hope they treat it in that respect. Now. I heard they got the idea from Funke pops from just looking at Cillian Murphy because he is human punk of here. The is it looks like a Funke pop. Yeah. He's got just got perfectly symmetrical face. Why jaws very handsome, man? If you see redeye yes. Yes. The one with what's her name mcadams? Right. Yeah. That was creepy. Good. Actor was very creepy. Remember she stabbed him with the pen. Yes. Now, we get into this interesting scenario where we have a forking joker timeline. So we got Jared Leto. Of course, who's who's the active was suicide squad. Joker. We got by sorry to interrupt you. But to add onto that. So you have context aside squad two will be released in twenty twenty one as well continue. Then we got a Phoenix walking Phoenix who is the back in time joker. So he's like the Tommy Lee Jones m I b joker the older or season joker. And then we had we another joker movie. Then we when their third joker movie could just third cinematic joker. I thought there was going to be another joker movie. But maybe I'm wrong. Well, I know that's going to be the three in the last decorates is gonna be ledger. Leto in Phoenix. I thought there was another joke. Anyway. Yeah. But so do you do you bring you can't do the joker in this movie? Right. Like this new Batman, you just cannot do the job. Can't do this really camp bus that nut yet. Who are they gonna do though because they feel like a lot of Batman villains are kinda lame because apparently they're talking about the penguin and having Josh Gad on that. And then mate what the Ridler all these guys are kinda lame. You need someone who can be dark kind of in the same way that twisted the joker into it. They listed him. Yeah. The joker in the Batman series is like moving into other before getting married. Just like, you know, we're comfortable now. Like, we're going to see if this really works. And then if it does we'll take it from there. They just do Mr. freeze or ooh to to face could work. But how did they introduce that? So I'm so tired to face. I'm just tired of Harvey dent. I don't think the Harvey dent characters all that interests not to face either a never going to face guy. And he was I can't say I don't like saying objectively for movies, but fuck it. He was objectively the worst part about dark nine. Yeah. The weight. Yeah. I know like you went through a really traumatic event. But the way he just one eighty on his entire belief system of thirty six feet from the joker. That's all too. It's it's chaos. You got a point. Yeah. I know it's a comic book movie, and that's nitpicking. But I've never really been like really down with the Harvey dent character because he's always just I never really cared about the Gotham city politics as much I'd like to go deeper into the Alfred Batman relationship who who's going to be Alfred in this though, they're gonna get what's his name Jeremy Irons back like a coming of age Batman. We're just. Yeah. Just like have Alfred and Batman and. I don't know how you do that. Because now I'm talking about seems kind of boring, and honestly, that's kind of the LEGO Batman movie dip, it did the most of that never seen in the entire bap and cinematic universe. Good. Good question. Those who do they get to play right troll in this one because they need Rachel nece on the needle love interest. There hasn't been a love interest while well, it does sound like there's going to be a younger, Bruce, Wayne. That's what they're now saying entertain. Want a young? I don't wanna younger Bruce way is this going to be an origin story. 'cause I can't do that feel like we're past that now. Yeah, I bet they don't do an origin. And I bet they don't do like, Tom Holland young. But I I bet it's going to be like a toddler Batman like a Scott Eastwood age. Ronnie, actually, Scott Eastwood might be a good if he'd beefs up a little bit might be a pretty good pick for Batman squad. He was right flag. Was Joe Kinnamon? I don't think he was in suicide squad. What was the you? Now, he wasn't suicides was he he was a guy guy. Yeah. Yeah. I totally forgot Lieutenant g q Edwards g q. Kidding ret? Con that shit suicide squad doesn't count. Thanks. Spiderman is the number one most known origin story in the behind. That's batman. Feel needs will need to see. The Wayne's dig- in though, like we need that we need a one more time one last ride. I'm still going through some of the Batman villains now. And who they could even use like, I don't know half. These people are hush black mask Klay face. The mad Hatter Klay face mad Hatter. That's a real person to Leah algal. Who I guess was what's her name the French lady? Yes. That man Marion TR. Yeah. Whatever that is anarchy. That's a real Batman Naperville into. Remember? That's another thing with Marvel's marvel us some villains. Not like, they were the great marvel characters us were not as widely known. But marvel us some villains that people. I mean, I never noticed Thanos. But like the average moviegoer did they know fan fans. Do they know LOKI, you know, monger, kill monger else. So they can pick their characters, and they can find ones that work. Yeah. Like calendar, man. Who's on here? Catman? We got professor professor pig who looks like a human with a pig head. You can tell the period where the Batman writers went into the sixties doing LSD was sent microdosing during this point. Man bat. This one's a bat with like human body ish. It's actually bet. Beat the fuck outta man. Bad though. I know, but I'd like I tangle I call them. And then I I took him down. I put him into the Arkham city PD only container. Yeah. Did I don't want other guys sound familiar from Arkham? I haven't played it. Yeah. I mean, a lot of billions were in Arkham. I mean poison Ivy and the penguin and the big ones, I think the thing about Batman is I like Batman villain who's like more grounded in reality and less like Klay face or mud face or whatever his name is. That's just we should we should probably move on. Because we're spent thirty minutes on Batman. We've got a jam packed up. Let's move on. From Batman, which was breaking news. This is not even part of the news run that we initially had. So we'll go to this one quick Super Bowl movie spots avengers endgame Aladdin Hobson Shoah, which the trailer for house and shot comes out on Friday. So there's gonna be a small bit. Apparently, which I mean, obviously, a vendor's excite you guys the most. But what I mean, do you wanna see a little more than the Aladdin trailer? You wanna see some magic carpet? Maybe some jasmine do we see the genie. Do you think we blew Will Smith during the Super Bowl? Yes. You you. Can't you can't whip this lead and trailer out at the Super Bowl and not not come with the blue CGI genie? That will be in just mistake on their part at this point, no Star Wars. Now, there will be no star. The next Star Wars thing will likely come on the film wraps filming or production. However, they want to say in February that will probably the title. And then the first trailer is not going to come into store celebration, April just how it's going to big bummer. There could be a little something with title review review. I could see that I could see that. They're gonna. Reveal it on like Casey new stats. I ve log at Burger King. It sets up a camera four hundred yards away. Newburgh? It's other Hoover's. Like, hey, guys. The jet is apprentice. Yes, or what's his name Guetta? What's gonna matter? Also gave Montereau somehow horizon commercial. Yeah. First teaser for birds of prey, which is not the full name. I'm not going to say the full title, so annoying. Not gonna do it. It's the Harley Quinn movie in a bunch of other DC villains. Birds of prey, what do we think about that weird? First teaser, do we care anymore about this movie? It did numbers on our Twitter. We tweeted it out in the fucking DC fans are out in full forces. They loved it. They loved birds of prey I think, oh, the one thing I'm excited for in. This is Mary Elizabeth Winstead McGregor team up again because I love their chemistry in Fargo season three, and they're also dating IRO, which I think that can either go really well or really bad in season three. I think it worked because that was when he was still with his wife. I think and like, you know, they're still in there. Honeymoon period. So we're not maybe the now hate each other in this movie kind of sucks, but either way, I don't know. I hate this title so much more than anything like it's. Say just police say just remind me birds of prey and the fin tabula Samantha patient of one Harley Quinn. That just makes me feel like Maan tumbler. It looked fine. I think the pre workouts kind of wearing off so hopefully, I'll talk at a normal speed fast. I don't know, dude. I I cut out all caffeine. I just took that pre workout and my face is looking a little bit redder your out. I'm plus out. I'm pre vascular folks, folks. Birds Cray birds of prey, that's just the English title for the none. Actually used that joke. Last time we talked about this. Thoughts on birds of prey before we move onto our next bit of news now. I mean. Kind of I kind of like it. I hate that title. But there's nothing in this that it's making me dislike it so far. It could be fun. I was like it could be fun Harley Quinn was not I would say a bad part of suicide school. No, not at all. She was just sandwiched into a trash movie of really bad movie. So. Yeah. Going to give this a chance without a doubt next of kin day and Oscar Isaac one of them is definitely attached to dune Oscar Isaac Timothy shell amazing. And this is well, then even though of he's doing this movie, which is should be very exciting for people. He's incredible director, and then days potentially going to be an as well dune was movie, and I think nineteen Eighty-four obviously dune is. It was it was a book and dune is something that people been want wanting to get made a wide massive scale for many years, and it's going to happen. Do you like these castings do we like Oscar Isaac do we like this? He's playing Timothy shell May's dad, right? Which seems young seems bear young. Oscar Isaac is what thirty nine is. Also what five? Yeah. Dune the when there was the nineteen Eighty-four dune movie as a cult classic. I think I don't think it got great reviews, but it is David Lynch movie. So that David Lynch. Twitter contingent really digs dune, but Dinnie villain. Wave is just then tap fantabulous. His quote on the movie is most of the main ideas of Star Wars are coming from dune. So it's going to be a challenge to tackle. This embellishing is to do the Star Wars movie. I never saw. And this is the part that I hear for many people want this movie is in a way it Star Wars for adult. So I mean, it's a big scale this potential to be there, a completely massive flop or some, you know, impactful movie culturally of that's the type of thing. Trying to get stowing scars guard day, Batista detached to it. Rebecca, Ferguson lot of named attached to this. So that mean, they're going big, which they should for something this big this. Well, known this beloved like they do need to go big on one thing. Most people universally agree about doing that. It was a movie at a time like they didn't have the special effects off the kind of the scale that they wanted for the movie, and I think that everyone thinks that could have been better if it was made like twenty ish years in front, so I. I personally am looking forward to this. David Lynch guy, and the cast is awesome. So far, everyone loves Batista. We love Isaac stone scars guard. I think is a great villain. He's going to be playing whatever the baron in this remake them, Rebecca, Ferguson has been awesome. Basically, everything I've seen her recently. If you think greatest showman she killed it mission possible fallout. She killed it. And she's also going to be in the boy who was to be king or whatever which. Which he's amazing. King who farted and shit. His pants. So we're going to be I'm excited for it. You know and love shell me. Big. Shell may also how will this caro- because Carell played his dad and beautiful. Boy, like I feel like he's fifty five and is wanna see forty. Oscar is I think is in his thirties. I'm thirty nine. Yeah. I will guess Corrales fifty two and Oscar Isaac. It's thirty nine. He is thirty nine Steve Carell. I think you're close with fifty. He is fifty six boom. No he had shown me young age. Yeah. Big very young age. Well, eighteen I will shout. No show is not twenty one east twenty right? Shellman belief. So yeah, no Xiaomei things old in twenty one twenty three. So he had two years me. Let's say he's like fucking high school sixteen. Yeah. That's definitely started having sex for sure. So you started thinking about having kids. Yeah. No definitely start having sex sixteen and not not twenty making the warm. You're going to read whole rat hole at sixteen zero. No, dude, I was like two hundred and ten pounds and five foot eight and I had neon. Genesis even galleon wall scrolls up. My wall. It was it was like Oscar braille looking all hot and shit and social God bless my parents. They put up because that was that was before anime was even the most enemies on TV dragon ball z on adult swim, even before to NAMI at that point does dark time anyway, so going back to that know, I was a little weirdo high school. If you believe that. Theme song. Stuck in my head moving on from dune again dune ways away. But I am excited for it. Again, as Denny Vilna said it influenced Star Wars breeding, quote here most influential or best science fiction novel time, but it just hasn't had the impact that source material like that has on its own because there hasn't been a major major movie again like index the ninety four one, but that one wasn't quite ready to be made yet that time one more bit of news. And we have one added read add skit slash commercial, the rock not in fast and furious nine that's a bummer. That's a bit of a bummer. He's going to be focusing on the spinoffs. He will not be in fast and furious. There's obviously the all female fast and furious. Spinoff that'll be happening. Put the rock might return for ten but not nine. So that's a shame. I don't think I hate this. 'cause I don't feel like the rock is ever really fully. Ingrained himself in the main line cast. Yeah, uses Jason. Yeah. He's always been a Jason and his plotlines of interconnected at some points. But he's up off doing his own thing. And if I get a hubs and Shah, standalone new the and then we get reunited with the main cast. That's what I wanna see almost then back with the other people are in the main cast pretty much VIN diesel. You still though, if this Hobson shove will be awesome, you're going to be like well shit kind of want the rock and the other one the Hobbes's Shaw movie is going to be awesome. But I'm not sure it's going to be good. That's that's very true. I I don't care interior now. It'll be awesome. It's a matter of if it's like on the level of the better fast and furious movies, though, when we say awesome mission impossible fallout was awesome. And great. So like as an action movie was great and awesome. The fast and the furious movies are, okay, and awesome. I don't know if that makes sense like I love to watch him. But I will never tell you. They're great movies. I think follow. It's actually a great movie that may. Complete sense. The us. I think also the rock has some pretty reconcilable differences right now between VIN diesel and Tyree Gibson both especially they really don't fuck with each other. So I think it's good for them. Take a movie off cool out a little bit. Maybe they get back together the next one. So I mean, the door's always open, and I always felt a little bit of Jason like not necessarily a pivotal line. The same way as Domino's or something I think the rock, look, I'm not going to give the rock advice because I'm not famous and I've never been in the rock shoes. But I think all the good actors and actresses do this is when they go through a spurt of releasing a bunch of stuff they take a year off. And I feel like the rock may be a little over exposed at this point, which I never thought I'd say, but between all of his projects released last year and the year before and the titan game games and everything. Yeah. I seen the highlights that would never watch the show come on now. But I think he deserves a year off. I think it'd be good for him. Now his version of year off is probably eating sushi in filming a bunch of shit like ballers and not doing movies. But I think that he may be should just take some time from south and comeback straw. I don't know what you guys are are you fine with as much rock as you can get or we are we at rock over exposure quantities, probably at rock overexposure. But I also think that when it does happen. He will recognize I think he's very self-aware. Oh, he's so smart. I don't think can't inflection point. That yet though. I don't think we're at that level. I mean, it's it's happened so quickly with so many other celebrities out there like Kevin Hart. It hit that wall with me so fast, Amy Schumer at hit that wall with me so fast. I don't think he's that same sort of actor or a celebrity where you you can get sick him very quickly. Yeah. Well, I actually like I listen to Howard Stern interview Jennifer Lawrence, and she talked about this. And it was really interesting where she recognized. She was on the. Promo trail for red Sparrow at this point in Joe still trying to sell it like, it was a great movie, and you know, that's their job. But she doesn't have a movie coming out until dark Phoenix. And then after that there's nothing else on the docket. So like, she kinda recognizes that over exposure, and is just relaxing, which I think you deserve to do Queen and king's we got a little Jennifer Lawrence news coming up on the back half of this. This commercial. What's the first commercial coming up? Let's let the audience they're they don't hear it here with the podcast. But you know, what I think we have a very special guest that's gonna come out right now and do a little before for friends here at the jingles in Decatur, oh, we have someone here for this here for this one. So without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, Jeff, FOX. Hey. The go-to here at the Decatur bojangles. I'm Jeff foxworthy nam here to do a lot set for my friends at lots came cast. Yeah. It's lights camera. Borstal you should your goddamn mouth right now. You hear me if I wanted to hear you speak shove, my hand up the ask and working mouth like puppet, anyways, if your dog and your wallet or both on chain, you might be reading. Dom Perignon is a Matthew leader. You might be read, Nick. If you order to huge, Bo K, A flowers Valentine's Day early on one eight hundred flowers dot com. Saving a bunch of money in the process. You might be a red, Nick. If you ever bought roses from morning hundred flowers that are picked right up their peak shipped over not to ensure freshman and her amazement, Huma beer redneck. Mr foxworthy's. Just sounds like you're pitching a product Jesus. Fucking christ. You nearly hit me. Yeah. Auto miss twice. You stupid bitch anyways. Quarters Valentine's Day bouquets in in star on at twenty nine ninety nine is an amazing deal. But it won't last long order today and say the one eight hundred flowers dot com, code ill, CB anyways. That's all my Tom. Thank you, all wonderful Putin here at the Decatur. Game. Fakes foxworthy, those wonderful Jeff that bullet hole came very close. That was that was very very tough. I'm sorry about that. We do not know this is open carry state. That's that's keep going on with the news. Yeah. Thanks, Jeff other Jeff great trade to I asked him if he wanted to cuddle in the green room, and he said, he said sure he's that nice of a guy. Oh, he was very mean in the skit which you have not listened to yet. But he's a great guy. Once it gets stage. He's a stand up individuals one of the nicest guys in comedy and to see me just a fan who just wants a quick cuddle with the I'm very damp and wet all the time and he obliged. He's. He's very excited to be. You can see him. He's in the back habits of home style tenders here from bojangle's, thanks to bojangles housing here. Great chicken, Bristol said fuck. No. Yeah. Crystals. Did not want us. There nor did the place where barstools actually doing their shows either. We were told. No. So we're here indicator from bojangle's dark universe, folks. It's back the dark universe is back sort of invisible man is going to be a movie that gets made Johnny Depp is not attached to it. But he has the option to star in if he wants. It'd be gonna say he's in it. It's going to be another invisible. Man. He's going to be like I was another invisible man in the movie, but you didn't see me he's gonna show up on set. They're going to cast somebody and they're like shit. We haven't heard from yet. He's like Hello everybody. I think he's actually good casting this because I don't know if you guys have seen him lately, but he's not much to look at. They his only stipulation is they can't they can't video out the rings. He's wearing so much floating rings and necklaces scarves. I don't know again, we've gone over the fucking dark universe. Many times. They're the dark universe was like the characters were scary and terrifying, the bride of Frankenstein the creature from the black lagoon visible man years ago, Wolfman, whatever they're not scary anymore. Nope. These aren't terrifying monsters, they're cornea shit, and they don't work anymore. And I don't really care how you played up. It's just not scary anymore. They're not they're not monsters anymore. They were scary. When you would be thirteen years old, and you go the doctor pneumonia, and he prescribed you a pack of Marlboros. Folks, that's a long ago. It was. I just again, that's why they took him out of it in the original TV movie while I think wolf man was one of the things turned into. But like those are relevant now these are relevant characters and their legacy characters. I mean, there's got to be something better. They can do with it. But nevertheless, dark universes coming back though differently. It's not going to be the same way. The last one was with that fake ass. Photoshop pitcher in speaking of fake ass. Photoshop posters. We'll get to that in a second zombie too. But yes, true. No, I don't have anything just the pre workouts making me look like I need to say something at all times. Well, let's get zombie zombie land to is now officially called zombie land. Double tap. There was a picture or excuse me a poster posted on their Twitter account. It said like ten year challenge, which they hit the nail on that one three weeks. Iro trend job to release did the thing. Yeah. Right. When that's hot on the trail. Land style. The poster looks exactly like the old poster, but it is somewhat older pictures of Woody Harrelson. Maybe it looks a little older Jesse Eisenberg Emma stone still kind of looks the same age as her original. Poster the only one who definitely Zolder is Abigail breslin. They're definitely not together for this picture. It's completely Photoshop. These picture taken at separate times. Again to make your first official piece of content for your new movie that was a bit strange. Also resort Dawson cats movie as well. That was also announced little lackluster, Emma, stone does not look like Emma stone in this picture, Jeff. I took a look at it. I forgot Amazonas even zombie lane. I'm like did they recast her because I didn't see him stone in that picture? She looks very different insomnia Lynn than she does in most movies. I believe it's because of her hair color hair colors, very dark. She's bangs. So I thought maybe that was it. But even looking at it, I'm telling you this this poster is. I don't know. It just doesn't look recent like. Is a Brooks older Abbott O'Brien looks older. But like there's something weird about like. Woody Harrelson Emma stone in the picture. I just thought it was a strange way to to reveal your new movies coming out. And also I thought about this to ten years. I don't even think it's ten years difference. I don't know if in the movie it'll be ten years, but it kind of has been because Abigail breslin looks on a child anymore significantly older. They've been fucking hanging out for ten years fighting zombies. That's all they've been doing. I mean, I guess they're going to catch us up. But they haven't figured out how to fix this crisis and kill zombies. I just find that kind of surprise Dyson Arab. They're really missing out. Nothing's advanced technologically. Speaking. I have some zombie related news. I don't see in the rundown. You see Zack Snyder's doing his ambi- heist movie? Yes. Yeah. Kind of looks interesting. I like mixing a fresh take on sambas. I don't mind that zombie heist movie all female, though, all female cast. I did. I don't I don't read that. It didn't read that much on it. I don't know. That's not true. Snack zuyder released the snack cut. Yeah. Seven hour zombie heist cut. It's kinda interesting. I like that idea also sort of like this movie, I like the change in name Kazombo lent to T. Oh that was annoying because every single Tommy when he posted it when they originally announced that incorrectly. Everyone got mad at us. And it was like you spelt it wrong. You spelt it wrong spelt wrong note. We didn't that's the way they presented it to us. And I think they probably saw that feedback and change its double tap which and I like that name much better. It's a cooler name is a cooler name. It's is in relevant. They don't they didn't put the number two in the they didn't make like the z two which was probably a leading candidate for new title. So I guess we'll see I'm sure they'll fix anything that I feel like I have issues with. But interesting interesting way to kick it off with with how much movies market like diabolically and have these planned things. They kinda threw a fucking old three week old Meam on their Twitter accounts. Saami land squad wipe just strange. It's amazing how much their careers to take off. I think we discussed this. But you know, Emma, stone isn't a whole nother stratosphere now than when she made a zombie one. What he Harrelson has had some great production some blessed great productions over the last couple of years, and then Oscar he's said all had Oscar numbs breslin before zombie land. It just makes me want the last of us too. That's the sequel I want that game was so Kardam good. Yeah. It was two more pieces of news. This is the Jennifer Lawrence news first bit of Tom and Jerry movie concept are was leaked online and like the sonic concept art, which had Chris Pratt. This one has Jennifer Lawrence. She's not attach of the movie. So it's just the studio with wishful thinking, hoping Jennifer Lawrence is going to be Tom and Jerry movie. But as you said tro, she's been pretty selective I feel like she would turn this one down. I feel like Jennifer loan to be like, you know, what I'm gonna pass on the live action, Tom, and Jerry Jerry kind of holds up those slapstick like when it's in the in the realm of slapstick and not like, let's see homes in Watson ish shit, where like you expect him then maybe a little bit better highbrow kinda work because I can go back and rewatch Tom and Jerry now sometimes think the gags are funny if that makes a feature length movie, probably not definitely. No CO goes. I would rather have an H E and scratchy feature length movie than Thomas Jerry future. We'll tell Mattel eight the Tom and Jerry cartoons. I really do. Just don't I'm getting real Alvin and the chipmunks vibes from this one and not just because they're small animals, but it's a concept of taken beloved sim high beloved cartoon characters and pairing them up with a real life actor now different Lawrence is way more famous than Jason Lee. But a whatever she won't do the move brick and mire on this. Yeah. Do it after Garfield. I've any means out of it. I would rather see new Garfield movie that a Tom and Jerry honest with you with animation and everything if they could make it like they did in a Christopher, Robin. I mean, I'd be into that the my interest in Tom and Jerry peaked at the Thomas air, Ukraine memes. You remember those? It's pretty funny. Jerry, look in surprised or whatever face. He has on people use a reaction picture. Yes. That one in the one where he shooting the double shock on at himself exponentially Elia post something on the one where Tom is rolling up. The cigarette cigar cigarette or whatever. Howdy bitch. Yeah. That's really good video last bit of news before we get into some reviews. This is the big one. There will be this shouldn't be shocking. Mattel is getting on board with another movie after the Barbie craze Barbie with Margot Robbie Hot Wheels. Live-action Hot Wheels movie. So it's just a car movie. It's live action unless like people are getting shrunken down into the cars. I don't know. But it happened. Really? Like the kid, John. They haven't really given an details. But there's going to be a Hot Wheels movie. I hope it's a medical drama were all at follows doctors trying to remove Hot Wheels from people's asses. It's it's an downsizing universe. Everyone's shrinks down into it. We were just talking about that movie game with hopes God Dimos bed. I like that need for speed movie. It's like with Aaron Paul. Oh, yeah. Just a car movie car the label, I guess is what draws people in speed too. By the way, Greg game under underground great. Great game all times. The question here. The big question is will the Hot Wheels talk like cars from the cars movies in cars. One cars two cars three and then also kind of spin off planes. Spin. Hopefully, what was that kid's show at the talking play in the CGI one senior a lot of memes. You don't talking about? It's the face the planes. Like, peru. The propeller is just a face shit. Hang on exactly what I'm talking about the right J J J Thomas the tank engine style. Let's claiming this is creepy. This is far cry tank engine was real toyed trains. Yeah. So true. I'm trying to actually make a male lead for my live action. Hot wife movie, if you're interested in that the only thing you'd have to do is. You would just have to my beloved Sharon on videotape. Just blink that out. Cut that out completely. No, just the the beep, okay? On mobile. Trying to trying to think of an automotive term that rhymes with cook the the audience that anyway, we have one more commercial break here before we go to our movie reviews Kentucky wanna queue it up. It's substitute up without giving it all away. But let's just say we've got some rules Buki surprises coming up for you guys. You silly walk through the pitch. Black land graveyard is full moon shines down on the missed all you can hear is the clamoring of the crows and the noxious laugh of Jimmy Fallon on his tonight show, the grave diggers watching in order to pass the time, you know, Jamie. Most people call me to fall, but he'll call me Willie the friend. The mist you saw beginning to get thicker and more voluminous or like a smoke. In fact, it almost looks like class, and what's that music? Is that from that? You'll. What? The business to protect. Reporter the only thing haunting this graveyard is some spook tackler deals for me the ghost of Richard jewel. That's right. Remember me this acuity guard from the ninety six Olympics that found the bomb anyways, I'm here to get you to buy my brand new subscription. Buck service the jewel box. This smoke surrounding us isn't missed. It's the lists. Vate clouds all the my satisfied customers the jewel box. Send you five new pods each week, featuring distinct taste of Atlanta such as Coca-Cola general sherman's, scorched earth, chicken sowed, but this year from the delta hub Beth room at Hartsfield Jackson international airport. The only coffins in this graveyard is all the people that are coughing on my brand new Pimento cheese jewel pods for the low weekly cost of two hundred thousand dollars a month. Inflation hit is bed. You too can get a buck shipped directly to your house with sixty percent of the profits. Go into the John Mayer. Cricket wireless, go fund me dolls Instagram lives on data. So he's way over his two megabyte plan. All right instead of that one this constantly on the go grinding away at the officer hanging out with friends Joe to think about upgrading your Styler apartment. That's why love getting a new box of awesome. From be spoke post every he's guys scouting quality and unique products send in each box. Now, you can experience it to box of awesome dot com to get started is box. Awesome dot com. Answer a few short questions that will help them. Get a feel for the boxes that'll best go with your style. Whether you're in search of the perfect drink, we'll Kip pad or jet-setting in style. These post improve your life one box at a time each box goes for under fifty bucks, but has more than seventy dollars worth of unique year waiting inside for you to receive twenty percent off your first scripture box. Go to bucks, awesome dot com and her promo code lights at checkout. That's box of awesome dot com. Promo code lights. Twenty percent off your first box. This is author blank owner of the Atlanta Falcons. And you're listening to lights camera barstool live from Super Bowl fifty three in Atlanta. Thank you. Frank falcons, really cool to have him before something for us. There depot, right? Yes. He does that cool. He did that mitt Romney's at Staples. Right. No Mitt Romney was a private equity guy. He was the bane Bain capital heated. Maybe maybe they acquired, you know. Maybe they did someone Staples. I don't I don't remember that to Staples. Maybe he did that Canada expansion that failed miserably hot. I don't I don't know that story guests say the Olympics and other ship. All right movie reviews, a lot of movies that people been begging for us to review we're gonna talk about them. Why don't we started out first up with the movie nominated for best picture one? Some Golden Globes one Golden Globe. Best comedy musical green book. Are we synopsis for every review? Dr Don, Shirley is a world class. African American pianist pianist properly say that word. Tro, take that one way I think as pianist. Okay. Who's about okay? Okay snack. Pre workouts got me interjecting who's about to embark on a concert tour in the deep south in nineteen sixty two in need of a driver, protection, surely recruits, Tony lip tough talking. Bouncer from an Italian American neighborhood in the Bronx, despite their differences, the two men soon develop an unexpected Bunn will confronting racism endanger in an era of segregation green book. Very good movie. Not in my top ten actually debuted on my list today, which would be Wednesday. So yesterday, if you're listening at number eleven I gave green book and ninety three out of a hundred. Green book is a very controversial movie right now, we've gone over this the family of Dr Shirley, doesn't quite love the movie one of the writers admitted to exposing himself at one point as part of the metoo movement. Not great. And then another one I involved with talking about Muslims during the towers falling nine eleven which is obviously not very good considering especially the fact that her Shalit's Muslim so many controversies with this move fee. I assume this is not gonna win anything at the Oscars. That's my guess because typically when controversies around the movie as voting happens it does not win anything and sometimes get nominated. You saw it with James Franco left during the disaster artist. Green book though, too great performances from her, Sean Lee, and Vigo Mortenson and Mayes. Tons of emotion tons of passion from them, they work. So well together, I've said this. I've used exact phrase many times in the vacuum of the movie the movie itself, I think it's really good. I really liked this movie. I liked it pretty much from her show. Alleys performance alone. I loved his character. I love is take love how stoic the character was. Vigo mortenson. Also did a great job. So I agree with you in the vacuum the movie, it's just I just don't like the fact that family wasn't behind it for sure. And I think that some of the quotes in terms of fairly saying there weren't a lot of family members still alive. So they didn't really check up on it or something like that. Don't quote me on that. So I don't like that aspect. I think some of the parts also is I did do some reading on this. Because before I saw it at wanted to know, you know, what a lot of the. I don't know what a lot of the viewpoints against the movie war in one thing is I do think it downplayed how bad it was in the south or where they are traveling another some scenes where you know, it tried to go there. But I think it was way worse than that. And I think they washed over that a little bit for the sake of the narrative but in a vacuum. I liked the interaction between the two performers. I give it in eighty five. I have heard the word fairytale you this will. Yeah. Feel like even with most of the racist. Seems they try to portray the day. Make it almost like a polite racism if that makes sense it's not like people being super aggressive to someone there politely being a total dick it, and I don't think it's like you're saying that's definitely downplaying how how aggressive in route. It can ruin mean in terrible and evil that really that emperor. People were. Yeah. I like the movie a lot. I think that one of my bigger problems with the movie is like what you guys were mentioning the Shirley family, really just not being down. With the way that they portray Dr Shirley, and Tony lips relationship, and that being them trying to gloss over that like he was sort of semi ignorant guy that just turned into like totally open-minded in regular person act by the end of the movie that that probably just not the case. I mean, you can even see in the case of his son Val along the guy who said Muslims knocking towers, and he's tweeted that in twenty fourteen like he's saying that all that stupid shit. So I don't think that was a smart way of doing it. But I think if this exact story if they just made it a fiction like if this was not using those names and about anybody else, I would've loved it. One hundred percent it would have been in my top ten movies of the year. But I think that those scandals running the movie like not just develop things, but everything else knocked down a few points for me. But the movie like Jeff said in the vacuum of being a movie, it was great Vigo Mortenson route transformed himself for the role like the last thing I'd seen captain fantastic. It's like seeing night and day between those two characters team that in this. It's insanity. It gained a bunch of weight. He'd picked up his accent. And for guy who's like, whatever. Danish. Like, he really. Eat pulled off being like an Italian old man as somebody who's met plenty of them a lot especially the ending Christmas seen. Great numb. I put down on my notes when I saw that. They both poured their hearts out like you. You could see they were both very into their roles and they cared. A lot about how they portray them. And I thought that was like you said that was a big reason why the movie worked probably the biggest was Mercia Lee and just performances overall yet. And that's the problem is you have a movie that has a narrative that almost wants to be a feel good friendship movie set around setting like you're saying that was almost a fairytale setting that wasn't really Representative of the the actual realities of the evilness of like that time. Right. And so they they clash at one another. So I guess my stance is like I understand that. I completely get why this movie can be construed as problematic. But I did like the performances. A lot in as movie, it was a good narrative story. But I think you gotta go away from that knowing that like a little more research goes beyond that you can find out more about the time. It just wasn't that way. Very well put very much. So I'm not gonna reveal the audience score. Because I I wanna wait for the top tens. I don't wanna spoil. What's going to be on the edge? And what's going to be in there? So I'll just leave it at that. For now. Next up can you ever forgive me with Melissa McCarthy, and Richard E grant celebrity bog or for Lee Israel makes her living. Profiling the likes of Katherine Hepburn to Lula Bankhead, stay Lauder. Is it a St. water Estee Lauder, Estee Lauder and journalist Dorothy killin? Sure that one I have no clue don't make me read when leave the longest important part. When leaves no longer able to get published because she has fallen out of step with taste. She turns her art form to deception. Help her low friend Jack play by Richard E grant and. Yep. Kendrick best friend, retrea Graham, they're both nominated. I. Okay. Can you ever? Forgive me on my top ten very close though. Again, I have this one at a ninety three out of one hundred. I think Melissa McCarthy turned in the best performance of the year, the female side, I thought she should win best actress she will not Richard E grant was probably my second favorite supporting role behind that of Sam Elliott and a star is born Kenya. Forgive me. I just fucking love this movie. Yeah. I'm right there with you. I gave it a ninety in. This is in my top ten of the year. I love when we talked about this before. But this is something that is based off of a real life memoir of Lee, Israel this name. And I love when they take something that is very myopic and making movie out of it like, this is just a very specific interesting thing in a retelling of the events and McCarthy nailed this role. If this was last year like that field was so strong last year like out even have her for consideration last year, much less this year. Right where? She should win. It like you're saying, I don't think she will. I think link closest probably close to a lock as you can get. It's basically over. Yeah. Yeah. Which is unfortunate because I always get extra points, adding to my score when you have an actress or actor who is primarily a comedic actor or actress known for. Some good movies, but mostly in more recent movies, not that great movies. And then you see this whole other side of them in. It's just great to see. And it takes you like it almost takes you more into the movie and into the character because you're like just invalid with their performance in you're not necessarily focusing on them as a personality anymore. I don't I don't know if that makes sense fight on external. It's all I felt that's how I felt when I was watching it. I was like holy shit. Like choose able to transform herself. So well, and it's not like I'm watching Meryl Streep because one Meryl Streep on the screen. She's been so many great roles and she such personality, and like, okay, that's Meryl Streep. But like McCarthy, that's Lee Israel firstly in transported me. She's one of the ones that you. You know, when we go see my mom goes to college with me like you're like it's most McCarthy party. That's most McCarthy. Happy timers. This is this is not your right? You don't see her? You're like, oh, I know Hooley Israel now, and you just in your head. Mccarthy. That's like the character. She became. Yeah. I loved it. Yeah. Smart. Great, really great script. And it's like you saying I came into this with lilies zero expectations off of happy time murders in life of the party both of which were terrible going from that into this. And then also it being about such a niece subject an FBI investigation into literary fraud. That's not something I would ever think in my entire life. I would find interesting, and they did it. It was mostly because I think grant McCarthy's chemistry was great. The script was awesome, and smart and quick. And like knitted never really has a low at any point. Yeah. And it was also felt the offense to the time period. Like, all the set pieces and everything great in the bars. And everything was so like, I think it was perfectly literary leg felt so real in that literary world, and I love that about it. She, you know, there's so many different there elements to there's an LGBTQ into it her going out looking date somebody, which they do in a way that is very subtle, but it works, and I know that that community celebrate. Does movie as well too. Like, they just the way they present that storyline. You have the storyline of Richard E grant who's also part of that community as well to. But his side story to like who is this guy. You're like she's kind of curious like where he's from where he lives, and you have those kind of side stories to go along with just the literary fraud as you said, and it all works perfectly. It's very funny dark dark funny. But like her frustrations of human being hilarious, just the way she lives. There's a steam the catch. Her Cuneo Katcha that it's disgusting. It's there's just so there's so much. I can relate to being trapped in a lie. Because we've all been there in never to the magnitude of being called to a federal core or whatever or fraud for natural case. I get it. Like, I get how that shit snowballs. I did wanna point out like I wanted to give credit to the director is Marielle Heller. And she is directing the Tom Hanks, Mr. Rogers movie. So just something to look out for something. Yeah. There's that thinks two of the most served nominations is McCarthy for best actress and Richard E grant supporting actor I was worried she was gonna get squeezed out. So I was very happy. She got nominated again, I say all the time even if they don't win nominations important because it still puts a spotlight on that person for that a little bit of time in that role and people watch people see it, by the way, I do want to say the sag awards were this past weekend. I just want to recap those quick is true. You did mention something very important that Glenn Close. Basically has it all locked up for best? Actress standing before it's by a male and a leading role into around Malik bohemian rhapsody female, I went to Glenn Close. So basically if lady Gaga or live you Coleman don't win at the BAFTA 's they're not gonna win. It's over the the sag awards, the major indicator for the Oscars and anyone who wins a sag and BAFTA. That's it. You're gonna win best act. Gives us Sehgal were to Brian May's old ask nuts drag. All over the fucking Academy Awards her. There was a clip. I'm not sure if you guys re tweeted it from the main account, but it was a clip from bohemian rhapsody Felix. Felix quote, tweeted and said, no, actually, I think this clip has the perfect amount of cuts in it. If you watch the clip there's like a cut every two seconds. It's the scene where what's his face? Little finger is is is talking to to the boys. Our boys Queen we know in love who just met each other five minutes ago when the movie and it's about family. It's Brian main is friends, actually. Yeah. The good time gang. Robbie malik. We're not sure on male male is definitely not done yet. But you gotta think it's leaning towards Romney Malik though. Again, the comments about Bryan singer knocking to help his cause Mercia Ali one for green book that category seems pretty much wrapped up for him. Emily bought one for quiet place, which is very significant because only for the second time in the history of the Oscars and sag awards did somebody when a sag award who was not nominated for an Oscar. The last one was yoursel before Beezer donation who should have been nominated for that one. That was the Oscar so white year Emily blunt one for quiet place, which I mean this category is why the fuck open. No one really knows what's going to happen in this one. And then outstanding performance by cast in a major motion picture want the Black Panther, which was pretty significant there. It's a bit of a different award. Invest picture. It's not a major indicator for the Oscars. But it just shows that there is maybe no favorite in this. But we will get to that. I do think is the favorite. I will say my won't complaint won't complaint. Best. Stunt. Let me see what's what's the name of the award outstanding action performance by a stunt ensemble and a comedy or tell emotion picture not to mention impossible. It was Black Panther, which is fine. There are a lot of stunts pay. Wasn't a mission impossible the base CGI. Emily CGI, Tom Cruise win this award on his own literate. Yeah. Literally on his own doing the helicopter stunt should be easily layer, wait, maybe because it stunt on samba. If the seat count will. Yes to they didn't they hit cut him in two. Yeah. There has to be a whole stunt and Somboon. I mean, there's other people doing stunts in the movie Rebecca, yes, instead got hit by a fucking car out for same thing. Tom Cruise the joke. Dies -ment, his leg jumping from. What the fuck is ridiculous. Yeah. That was a bit of a bummer. Yeah. I think the last bohemian rhapsody thing, which I think we never mentioned was on the goal ever won golden glove, Bryan, singer, Instagram ING, like sob- reading it. And then Brett Ratner in the comments like, hey, guess Queen like, yeah. To scumbags you. Do. Yeah. Br bride singer who stinks and then Brett Ratner who stinks even basically as much or more. It's like all right. Get the fuck outta here. Yeah. Make your own social media platform. There were some really good. We'll get in our top ten list. There are some very good movies this year. Very good. It just was not as good as last year as we're going into these top ten reviews, and I'm getting caught up like I had to there are a lot. I left off my top ten list last year. And it was so top heavy. There are three movies that I could see go either way that I could get sitter winning best picture, and the fact that we have book. Lord. Help me. I'm not going back to the old meet no more than wraps reds. But the fact that we go through another award show we have bohemian rhapsody at the top will never not his me off. And I just have to get it out of my chest. So non even top thirty for me. I knew you would bring it up. Yeah. It's not it's in the seventy for me somewhere along there. City. It's a number eighty. Yeah. Let's actually it's probably much much worse than me. Go. Check my mind trill. There were nine movies outside of my top ten last year that I could have legitimately put my top ten this year was only three there. Only three that. I said those could have been top ten for me bohemian from us eighty three. Oh, hell it's next to the Grinch white point, Rick. Dennis thieves Chappaquiddick. Uncle jrue. So good company. Good Oscar company next up a movie that is very good incredibly snubbed did not get a best picture nominee. It didn't get a picture nomination at the authors Beale street, right? No absolutely fucking crime. Yeah. If Beale street could talk at early nineteen seventies Harlem daughter and wife to be Tisch vividly recalls. The passion respect and trust. That have connected her and her artist fiance Alonzo hunt who goes by the nickname funny friends since childhood that voted couple dream of future gather, but their plans oiled when he's arrested for crime. He did not commit Bill. Street is an incredible movie. I gave it a ninety four out of a hundred emotional, powerful, gut wrenching tackle, social commentary issues family issues. Berry Jenkins is really fucking good at directing so writing too in data major movie after moonlight. He adapt this off a novel, which is apparently very good. I wouldn't know. I don't really read. It's just I mean, I'm becoming. I'm sure we're talking about the score. And we'll talk about a little more. But damn this is this was an incredibly well made movie and beyond the word great. This was one of the best movies. A year ends down. The street was everything that people have talked about and more and should have been nominated for best pick. Forget was Barry Jenkins nominated for best director. No, that's that's that's bullshit. 'cause Barry Jenkins is incredible. Like, you're saying Bill street could talk probably the number one for the year for me. Me the second is. A quiet place in Emily blunt. Okay. But this movie was was very emotional very well done superbly acted. I mean, I think you can make a case for anyone anyone the top or actors or actresses in this movie having a nomination point even winning the nomination. I loved it. I don't I don't know. If it made my top top ten list, you'll have to tune in to find out, folks. Regina king, Stephen James. They were great and Brian Tyree. Henry he's been he's been off. Here's lately. Great. Great movies. Yeah. Yeah. I thought I was one of those movies where it's beyond being incredibly. Whoa. Shop at berry. Jinx Koby will scripted. I can't even imagine trying to adapt a script off a book from James Baldwin who's one of the most like influential incredible writers of the twentieth century and berry just does it. He just did it, and it was fucking incredible. Such a great movie. It was very very great acting. I thank you said true. I can't pick out a poor performance out of anybody in the entire thing. And it was not even a lot of huge names. Early. Like, Stephen James is bigger eighty Regina king too. But like outside of they don't in Henry like not a ton. And it was great felt super it felt so legitimate. Like, I didn't know point. I was like, oh, this set piece looks out of place. This looks like it shouldn't be here. Like it felt it looked Gators. Exactly where it said, it was it was fucking gorgeous moving like, you said, it was gonna mention I have to mention the score easily my favorite score of the incredible the dollar store. Oscars didn't even fucking nominate it which is probably the favorite at the Oscars fucking batch shit. Yeah. Do you not nominate that it the trailer alone with that score? Like, maybe nearly hero. Like it was insane. E one thing I do want to say about Barry Jenkins is I I love how with moonlight in this movie. I wouldn't say moonlight was non linear. But it did have did have a very interesting structure in the time jumps in their three separate chapters. If I'm remembering correctly, this movie was kind of non linear, and he pulled the pulled it off. Really? Well, like, I find out that I find that like when when movies do that like, I don't always enjoy it because I'm always kind of just trying to catch up or whatever. But I think Barry Jenkins does it really. Well. Yeah. And you know, what I that's really good point. I think that part of what he does is. He's very patient in the way, he tows a plot. And that kind of draws you win and makes them more emotionally invade motion investing because you wanna see what happened either before the whatever part, you started or what's going to happen after I think he's really good at that patient's, storytelling. Yeah. Everything the way he frames everything that color palette the way the movie, look, hops. And it's just it's a gorgeous looking movie with a gut punch gritty tough story line. And the elements of the story. I it's it's a tough movie to get through. It's tough. It's tough story to get the movies very easy to get there. It's incredibly well made. But it's tough story to real story in a like a lot of these movies that we're talking about actually it has a lot of commentary that Israel today, but also family commentary as well like on a smaller scale, not just socially. There's commentary on family in beliefs within family and connections different family. There was really interesting, and you know, things aren't great in this movie for the characters, but then there's even a bit of I guess kind of hope within the ashes at the end. So it really hit so many elements like I said, the the one where for this one is a motion to very emotional movie. Your what movie you were you're gonna see after this one you're going to see the upside after seeing Beale street. Like an hour after you'll street, and I was like, yeah. I think I'm gonna take a break. Yeah. Pass never mind. This is a movie that reminds me I can't make movies like, oh, yeah. If you're me also reminds you the Jenkins Jenkins's thirty nine and he's just five years older than I am. And I'm funding. I'm sitting here. I can see in my webcam stream stream on the Skype. I'm sitting here laid back in my chair. I can see my man boobs. I can see my belly. I can just see everything talking on a podcast about movies. And he's he's just out there just as less two movies have been phenomenal. It's a crime that he he wasn't nominated for this one. And I just like you gotta be excited about like some of these younger directors, and like what they're gonna do next. And you think about how much Spielberg's done in the last forty years and someone someone like bear Jenkins who's thirty nine already has to phenomenal movies under his belt. What what he's going to do going forward. Oscar winner in what should've at least been an Oscar nominee nominee least. Yeah. So it's it's really cool to more. We wanna focus on before some kind of quick hitters, and we wanna get into our top ten Ken, Jack. I'll kinda let you take the lead on. On this and I'll make my quick comments. But I know you love this one the favorite. Oh, yeah. The favorite I gave this one in ninety out of one hundred. I don't think I loved it as much as as other people, and I say that while still giving it a ninety because I know some people love this like best movie the year loved it. It's a wild fucking movie. I'll say this handed off to you this. I thought this would I I saw the trailer. I'm like fucking sane phantom threat eight it fucking phantom threat. Pretentious bullshit. It's not that at all complete breath, the fresh air the way, they did this. They took a a period royals type piece, and they made it something way different. I loved it. Yep. Same as same exact sentiment where I saw the trailer. And I was like me some weird period piece bullshit that I'm gonna hate and God damn like you're saying breath of fresh air, it I think has some of the best in the year between the fish islands, which I would hate in any other movie, but in this tastic by your goes, and the and the roving cameras great, it was great, it felt authentic, set pieces and everything great. But then the script. Was so modernized. And so real feeling and quick and funny that it just blew me away the chemistry between the three main actress in this Olivia Colman, Emma stone, and Richard is fucking awesome. They ruled and I wish if I I wish I could nominate all three of them for their own separate categories and give them on a word because they were fucking great was well paced. I love the payoff at the ending. And it was just it was, and it's all very real story for the most part. It's very lightly dramatized in slightly modernized in the script to make it funnier. And I think one that's not I wanna put on it nNcholas Holt extremely impactful supporting role that I think did not get enough love. Yeah. So funny, it it's pretty crazy. This movie copied Robin Hood with a old style movie with futures feel what how did they do that? Incredible. Yes. So so we liked the favorite. Yeah. I gave it an eighty five. I liked it a lot. I thought it was my second favorite dark comedy of the year. There are many. There are many are comedies here. There are many. I thought this. Did very well, Libya Coleman, Emma stone. Rachel weiss. Vice our you pronounce it were all fantastic in this movie. I really love nNcholas whole. I mean, this was right up. My alley. I don't think it's like like Jeff was saying I didn't love it as much as I love it. But I completely understand why some people love it, it just tickles your fancy bone that way. That's how it was about lady bird last year. It just some movies just like resonate with me. So I understand that you've resonated with you because you grew up in that same time period is lady bird resonated with me because I simply want to be the Queen of England so fit. Yeah. Yeah. I thought you're gonna say I grew up in this time period. Laughed. I laughed because I thought you would hurt he said it, maybe I'm from thirty rock. So the favourite really good. We I mean, that's a must see as well. I think top twenty at least for everybody the favorite again. I gave it a ninety eighty five Ken, Jack. I think it's your up tents or not going to say, I'm not saying scores because I wanna give women. No, no score. Yeah. That came for me at number twenty twenty two hundred. I hide the fuck and sheet whatever, I know, it's number twenty. How do you guys feel about Joe Alwin Taylor's was boyfriend? Yeah. Just. Cool something else this year. Yes, he was in boy east. Boy, raced not great Mary Queen of Scots to which I think we have to shout out Mary Queen of Scots is both that and I man being okay. Maybe I man I I miss a lot better. But I'm trying to say is this time last year these were movies for this year. And they're nowhere to be found. We're not doing that this year member. We're just cats. There's no promises for Oscars. We just love cats and game and cats, we should know Star Wars has a hundred. Did you see the commitment yet? True. That do the last two I seriously think we did blackout next month right then because it's literally jokes that we've made before like, yeah, they make all about cats the last two, and they make a lot of jokes. And pretty sure we've said before like eights accepted straight out of our brain. What you know? They can have it. Yeah. It can have their show their money the money. They're much funnier. I think that's one of the one of if not maybe the best or actually I'll say this the best comedy series produced. Next up last up. And then we're it will will hit a couple of quick ones Roma. Here's a tough movie to talk about very hard movie to talk about bio fons quarter on it is a masterpiece. I will call it a masterpiece in that sense. I gave it a ninety three out of one hundred. I don't. It's tough because I can't give anything blow at least ninety because it's just you watch it and you're like holy shit. This is incredible filmmaking like this not that Beale street again. I mean, I rated Beale street higher. But like in terms of just the filmmaking. Not that built Beale street is worse. But this one especially I'm like, I could never I can never think about something like that part of it's because it's a very personal movie for funds of Koran set in Mexico City or like around Mexico City. I believe. It's definitely a personal emotional story for him who did important movie to him very meaningful. It's another brutal story about class and hardship. And I it's like it's a bunch of anecdotes little stories than the movie at falls one story line. But it's little elements small parts of a movie our story there piece together for the movie it's in black and white again, it's gorgeous even just the fucking trailer. I watched the trailer again because I didn't have time to go back in like watch clips of the movie today. Just I wanted to get a sense of how it looks again. It just really is one of the best Lookie movies of the year. I gave it a ninety three out of one hundred it tackles like I said a ton of social again like a lot of loose. We've talked about. I don't connect with it as well. Could be reason. Why I I mean, I'm not Mexican I don't I know there's probably a lot more of a connection for someone like phones or Koran site kind of fact that in there as well. But again like in terms of film making it is incredible. And it probably is. Right now, the leader for best picture. I would say it's it's got a slight lead also released on Netflix, which is really cool, which is which is the phones or core and has very good take on that about it. Doesn't matter where movies are released make something you of make something creative and release it wherever can be released for people to see. And he's like somebody argue with him at the Golden Globes. Like does it matter to you like, we're truly he goes? No, he goes who would have put this. In theater theaters did show Rome goes who would have put this black and white movie said Mexico where were they have put this? He goes, I put it somewhere. Everyone can see it. And that's a fucking genius. I totally you really is even though I don't love gravity. Assessable source for so many people to that like this impactful for a lot of people that are lower class, and Netflix something that's acceptable to them again. This guy's a fucking genius Roma. Was again, it's very hard movie to talk about I don't know if I could talk much more about it than I just did. I I really don't I agree with you. It's gorgeous. I think that thing that's really cool is that? Like, I loved I loved the settings. I loved seeing more of that side of Mexico. I thought it was really cool, and what's cool. I think is some the three of the best directors in the game right now all are from Mexico. And I think like just in terms of like, you know, the arts there and the heritage in the culture, and like what goes into the arts. They all have some of the most beautiful filmmaking say what you want about shape of water, but Kiama dill Toro's genius. I mean is the Maga feedback set up in Toronto Blue quirk lukewarm on Birdman, but he still is making the best movies around. So it's really cool to see these three guys kill it. And also bring their perspective in their heritage to the movies and give us that on Netflix platform, which I think just expanded to wider audience. I think is really really neat. Yeah. He's a shoe in for director. It would be an absolute stunner. He doesn't win the Oscar which again will be five six. Best directors all come from Mexico. And it's it's the three guys that Trojans mentioned. Yeah. I would be totally stone. If he doesn't win best director at also, I would bet my Bank that it wins best cinematography. And that's maybe my most beloved thing about this. Movie's cinematography was insane. There is some of the most stoning long takes of ever seen in any movie ever that he pulls off in this movie. And he's the master of that if you've ever seen children men, which is like under rated best movies of all time. He's regretting that as well. The they're just great, and it's great portrait of like a very complicated family relationship. And again, like you're saying like a relationship between lower class and higher class, and like the serving class, and like, especially like that time period is very complicated. I would say like seventies eighties, especially in like a more developing country like Mexico was at the time. I think it was awesome. Naked karate guy kinda funny at first but fuck that guy. Oh, yeah. Real dickhead real piece of shit real huge asshole. Fuck that guy. But the big time Miami may issue with it is like you Jeff I just didn't connect with it in that same visceral. Level. So to me it was almost like an dunno. If this is like a good analogy. But it's almost like watching like Wolfgang puck make me souffle. And like it's watching someone just put together this masterclass at their art and everything, but I just don't like souffle like, I don't know. I don't connect with what you're giving me. But I respect and admire and holy just in love with your crafting, it if that makes them extends to you guys. Yep. Yep. It's it's very deserving of any recognition nomination gets without question. Okay. So a couple movies is not going to touch on because they could be in top ten. So there's no point in touching on them twice the first reformed with Ethan Hawke shocking movie. Very surprising movie, many twists and turns first reform the pastor of a small church and upstate New York spirals out of control after a soul shaking encounter with an unstable environmental activists and his pregnant wife quickly on this one Ethan Hawke big snub in the Oscar, you just know the whole movie in general, probably my personal most underrated of the year. Yeah. I reformed again. Too early our buddy, Adnan Virk his favorite movie the year this movie completely overlook yet. Definitely too early. Ethan Hawke that guy's in heaters. Yeah. What the fuck that guy's only in could movies. Yeah. I or form that's a must see leave. No trace. That's another one. We've actually touched down. I think a while back leave no trace a father and daughter live a per. Perfect but mysterious existence enforce park of beautiful nature. Reserve near Portland Oregon rarely making contact with the world. But when a small mistake tips them off to thirties, they're sent to sent on it increasingly Radic journey in search of a place to call their home. Ben, foster, great Thompson MacKenzie and her debut. Great. It's a very real grounded simple movie, but but touching on a scale of like father daughter, and again, it has it has one more raw movies of the year. Yeah. Touches on a lot to touches on that father daughter relationship touches on PTSD of returning veterans touches on a lot of different elements. And I think it's a movie something we talk about a lot in this podcast is how movies use the the absence of sound to be meaningful and this movie mastered. It absolute great job as using ambient noise in nature to and facial expression to convey, meaning where words aren't there? Somebody actually mentioned me like this reminds me of winter's bone. Yeah. Because demographic thing it was Debra Granik first movie since winter's bone. She does great job and her return their mid-nineties. We actually talked to the mid nineties cast awhile back we love mid-nineties. That's another Rome movie that's raw as hell. Also, another movie sent Oakland. There's a lot of movies in Oakland this year and mid-nineties was. It was fun. It was a really good time. There's a monologue that I wanna point out between the Cal. The Kelsey Smith. Yes. I wanna and Sony soldier the main character talking about family, and how everyone has something going on with their family or their friends their relationships that you know, they need an out. That's why they have these this friendship group. They need something to get away from love that mid ninety fun. We always say it's really hard to make a coming of age film without it feeling like Hilo, Phil kids, and like, yeah, he nailed it. They totally nailed it folks folks who to the nineties, and it didn't at any point feel like it was out of touch. It was cool Dayton is debut debut. Ferretti director Jona hills are boy Jona hill. Yep. Two more Paddington to delightful, delightful tro. That's there you do Paddington was the look I was the shit talker extraordinaire for Mr. Paddington bear and beautiful. Yeah. You know? And this is this is a great movie. What's it run to me? It was still at one hundred leave trait leave no traces at one hundred percent Leo traits that one hundred two hundred eighty three reviews is insane. But totally in foster underrated. He's a nice guy only in heaters, and he's very recognized as being a great actor yet still underrated. Yep. Panic twos. Two hundred and twenty honor percent, actually, wait two hundred twenty hundred percent. That means leave no trace exa planet. That's the best way to move rotten tomatoes because that one oh two hundred eight two hundred twenty or thirty eight okay did foster yet nominated best supporting for high water. I feel like that. No, not you know, he definitely didn't know hell or high water is one of my favorite moves. The last twenty years. I've been doing these ranking incredible third act. Just Taylor shared and foster made for each other. We're that weird. I darkness go perfect. Yep. Yep. No, they're Oakland movie in an alternate. Reality of present-day, Oakland, California. Sorry to bother you telemarketer cashes green played by the key. Stanfield awesome finds himself. Also in this one is. Store. What test Thompson, I'm just bad with names finds himself in a universe. Or what why do? They put weird words and synopsis damn you boots Riley discovers the magical key that leads to material glory as Green's career begins to take off his friends and co workers organize a protest against corporate. Oppression cash assume falls under the spell of Steve lift a cocaine starting CO who offers his salary beyond his while streams, there's a lot of crazy shit in here. There's racial commentary. There's commentary on class. There's a whole capital of the whole thing that goes in with like viral videos and viral vents and marketing, it's just this is a it's the craziest fucking movie of twenty eighteen this movie is funky sick. It's very artistic very cool boots rallied at something. Really awesome. Again. I think we mentioned it lasts going his Twitter. He talks about why this movie wasn't nominated. They didn't really big campaign for it to get nominated. But this is a this is a must see this is something. So. Oh, unique so different. So out there Wilmot work for everybody in some shit doesn't land in this movie. But it gets the point across which is crazy because it is such a wild movie. Keith Stanfield great. It's this is such a cool movie. I had such a good time seem as it is not going to go. How you expect? And I don't want us any more on that this go watch it. That's the only thing. I want to say about it. If you haven't seen it yet. Go watch. And it's awesome on Hulu. Yeah. Still on Hulu. Yes. And then last leased this one actually has a connection the barstool, and that is bodied progressive graduate student is also in Oakland because he goes, I think it's close because he goes to Berkeley, all these movies and Oakland blind spotting also and Oakland replying spotting later up aggressive graduate student. Find success sparks outrage when his interest in battle rap as a thesis subject turns into a competitive session Calum worthy. He plays a grad student. It's a crazy satirical over the top offensive. But in a way that is entertaining. It's produced by Eminem. A battle rap movie. Very funny. Very good movie. Again, crazy kind of out there. Like, I said over the top. It's different. It's unique not like eight mile. It's got a much more comedy twist, but Roan Adam for own barstools Ona's in this movie. Stars movie. It's one of my favorite moves of the year. Top thirty for me. Really good had a great time with it under the radar not a big release. But I think people should go and check out bodied. I loved it. Top top thirty for me top forty for me top forty thirty five unit. Eighty seven out of one hundred really liked body won't say much more. Because it's and I don't want to give away to wanna give anything to funny way. But it's a very funny. Same started bother. You was a no spoiler section. We did a good job spoiling anything here except for the cat shit. And can you that part? I mean got bro. Very very gross. Okay. Here we go top ten movies of twenty eighteen where we're cooking right now. We're making good time top ten movies were not going to skip from ten to five. We're not going to do that. We're going to go one by one. We will like if we touch in the movie someone else's said, we will we're not gonna all have a monologue on each one. But let's start it out, Ken, Jack, number ten minute. Number ten is a Starbucks. Let me say best movies years number not favorite. We'll say favor of the best Kendra favored at the end. Yeah. My number ten is a star is born. I think it was just phenomenally done especially for directory debut for Bradley Cooper. And also a star in it to degree chop trying addiction. We talked about a ton in our view it. I don't wanna like over Pete. What have you had already said at times? I just think it's something that may did a very good job displaying. Dick, look at addiction, which I really appreciate it. Yep. Stars born that'll be on everyone's list. I believe true Balans. I'm actually doing favorite because I have not seen as many movies as you guys. And therefore, I don't feel like I can give a definitive best list. So I hope the audience is comfortable with that. They probably won't give a shit. They'll be like, oh, you're on a podcast. You said you're gonna give your top two or three at the end though. Yeah. So I I sure will Jeffrey ten is love Simon. That came out came out the star the year one of my favorites because it was just a very delightful rom com coming of age tight movie had a great cast. It was a very fun story. It was well played. It was relatable in some aspects. You never felt like the teenagers suffered from that nodal syndrome. They all just felt like fallible teenagers. And so that's why I loved it Simon Simon very different. It's an LGBTQ coming of age movie has some great actors young actors in it and actresses came on number twenty six on my list, eighty nine one hundred I really liked good LGBTQ coming of age moves between this boy race. And also a. Cameron poster miseducation it's better than much better than boy race. Yeah. Which is crazy look at all these these movies that make good commentary on a subject in the one that doesn't is the one nominee, for example. How about that? How about that? Number ten for me. We can't check. You just mentioned it another Oakland movie that we blind spotting. Let me just read this knobs as quick on blind spotting if you if you haven't heard of it Colin must make it through his final three days of probation for a chance at beginning. A new beginning his Oakland, California neighborhood his bond with volatile best friend soon gets tested on Collins. He's a police officer shoot a suspect in the back during a chase through the streets thing soon, come to a head when the buddies attend a party at the upscale home of a young and wealthy tech entrepreneur this movie that description makes it sound like it's a Beale street type thing very brutal. There's another movie on my Lissette, actually has a similar synopsis, but this one actually has a lot of humor in it. I it's a much different feeling movie. Very different stylistic movie in terms of look than a lot of movies on my list. Awesome. Looking movie has a polished grit to it almost I love the blinds blunt blind spotting. It was great. And it takes on every form of societal problem. Not just race and police relations takes on everything. Again, friendship family class. Really good movie blind spotting one of the most underrated moves the year. Unheralded not really talked about blinds comes in ninety four out of one hundred for me number ten on my list number ten on the audiences list. Here we go. Audience's list folks, leave no trace great pick the audience gives leave no trace headed not right? The scores down apologize to oversight on my part. Leave. No trace number ten for the audience, Ken Jak number nine my number nine. And remember most of the times, I read his movies are kind of make it a it's respective to their own John rays and everything like that. My number nine is crazy, rich Asians. I think as far as you go with rom coms. It's like a perfect rom com. It is it is entirely perfect to John rate. Some it's a movie where especially because of how many companies have come come out. I would say in the last like ten years, which is very very slowly dwindling because they're so formulaic, and this one is still in some sense formulae. But it makes it work. It's awesome. That you really feel the chemistry between the characters. It's well developed plot. It's funny. It makes you laugh it makes you said there's some great cinematography and especially the wedding sequence. It is just an awesome movie. And if you haven't that's another one where you have you haven't seen it yet. You really fucking missing out stuffy, go see it. Pretty sure streaming at least somewhere now. Yeah. That's my number time. Yeah. Crazy reg- Asians culturally important to yes, very cultural Asian Americans. Tasted in general, it to some I I would say some cliche things, but it was in such a different setting a different style that it didn't matter. I wanna go to Singapore now. Yeah. It's fucking look sick. Get rich. Get rich came in at number twenty two my list eighty nine out of one hundred Trebol number nine number nine for me is a simple favor. This was a ride of a movie after all the shitting we'd done Paul the-the for the last year on the coast. It was nice to see the man turn out something that was so easy to watch magnetic performances by both Kendrick and Blake lively of very funny, very dark another dark comedy. Although wasn't as dark as some of the other ones we've been talking about still wasn't that dark comedy category. And Kim Jack has mentioned many times Blake lively head that drip game on drip, drip, big say, but dominate how the kids say it drift. But I here's a drip ESPN response to like NBA players walking out of their walk into the locker room. They say, drip, drip. So I assume that's just what everyone's saying these days. Yeah. Right. That's what they do say. Also, Andrew rannells. I love Andrew so good. He was so good to Tam. So fucking funny. Oh, gee, book of Mormon still. Yes. That's very high said he should play Billy McFarland in the citrical fire fest movie that was my suggestion on that one simple favor was number nineteen on my list. Ninety out of one hundred favorite eleven duly. Grunt does not love simple favor. Grunk are good boy. But. Say it again, what about sporting dog? Non you have to say what our dog probably liked it. They're like what was it? Like the highlights magazine that had the good kid. What was it like do for gallant and doofus something like that? Gallant is Spartan dog doofus is still a crime. You gotta sound off and free talks smart dog. We need to know what you think. What was what was the cartoon family and highlights shit? I don't remember too long. I think it was a gallon Kufa's. Now there was like a family family circus. Oh, fuck that's gonna piss me off damn someone's listening yelling at its goo- yet goofy. And gallant. There. Anything more disappointing than highlights magazine when you're a kid and the doctor's office video game magazine or some shit. You're like twelve still seeing the pediatrician in the last years, you're pediatrics I went to game stop a couple of weeks ago to get a canoe controller and the guy in front of me was buying subscription game. Former which I I didn't know people did that anymore. But I used to be the magazine would want when I was kid now that magazine was to oh that was owned by the corporate video game chills that was owned by Funke land. And. They just yeah. I prefer to eat Monsanto. Yeah. Monsanto they put round up on the pages and fucking you just throw it away and just hit Carol the crops perfect. It was called timber toes. Yes. Highlights video game. That sounds awful. What? Yeah. There's a highlight PC game. Wow. Didn't back when CD roms first came out. What do book still exist or Wikipedia just fucking destroyed their business? Is still around. Oh, my kid just print out the zebra page on Wikipedia. But like we're not getting a fucking sue books subscription. The commercial they'd be like here special TV offer. Order one gets seventy zoo books for free. All right. Good pick a simple favor number nine for me. Ninety four out of one hundred there's a bunch of movies rated ninety four to one hundred metric works. The hate you give very similar blind spotting in terms of what happens to set the movie up star Carter is constantly switching between two worlds. The poor mostly black neighborhood where she lives and the wealthy mostly white prep school that she attends the uneasy balance between these worlds as soon shatter when she witnesses the fatal shooting of child at best friend at the hands of police officer facing pressure from all sides of the community star must find her voice and decide to stand up for what's right? This is not funny like blind spotting. It's there are some charming elements grounded because it is in a sense, a a younger coming of age, but a much different way than it's not like lady bird or eighth grade. The hate you give is another powerful movie gripping from start to finish unimportant movie to as a lot of really great things about present day. So. Social issues and class issues. Her living in you know, a neighborhood that is not as affluent as the neighborhood where she attends school. Very interesting angle mandala Stemberg, I think is her name. She is great in the lead role. I love the hit you give Russell Hornsby. What a performance a hit. You give is a very good movie might be on the list coming up someone leave it at that. But a very easy top ten for me. Number nine on the year. The hate you give audience number nine ready. No god. When we get the top five guys guests between air it down. Number nine is the favorite favorite comes in at number nine for the audience number assuming number eight, Ken, Jack. My number eight is move. We talked about a couple of minutes. Go up line spotting just a really great movie. I think that when I when I started right? So Rafael Kosovo's character we thought that was gonna get old really quick. But then the more they develop him over and over again, his chemistry with V digs was great. And part of that is because they were childhood friends in real life. And this is sort of their passion project that they've been trying to get done for a long. Time. And there's some really powerful commentary about reysen police in America. Like, you said the whole thing quarter get sent to set off by police shooting. And it was just incredible really well done really well paced in really satisfying ending. I would say like very not feel good, but very conclusive to the story ending which I appreciate. Yup. The blind spotting like I said before with mine, it was my number ten one of the better movies of the year. That is not talked about basically whatsoever. Trill number eight. Number eight is hereditary which is a surprise inclusion for me. But I did think it was the best horror movie of the year in a year that Billy may know, quite place in this one. This was better than a quiet place. Even though I liked quiet place a lot. I just love the psychological aspect of this and Toni Collette was amazing. And I think yeah. Like, I wouldn't put it in the best movie of the year sort of category. And it has gotten me to think about stop signs a little more. But I did think it was a great movie, and it was really freaky movie, and it did its job and had a great performance. So it it's up there for one of my favorites of the year thirty one for me eighty one hundred I guess, that's my top horror movies. Well, predatory was creepy and scary in a different way. Yes. It was not what was the best horror movie last year where we say it was it was was that probably our consensus top Lucy. I forget what horror was last year. Happy day the horror movie at sorts more satire now. Yeah. You're right off. I wonder what would speed so many. That were terrible. I think was there. There's a get out. Oh, more like suspense, then horror. Yeah. I guess. Whore elements horror elements, but like when I think or I think hereditary, you know, what I mean, like her Peretti Terry's more of a in this like blunt house university, I think higher brow horror movies, when they're eighteen is making the movie, I think, I don't know if hereditary bomb house, but it feels good to him. I think yeah, I think hereditary is more pure horror than some of the other films. But it was great. All right. So hereditary number eight number eight for me. Here's a movie that feels like came out last year that would be a Nile Asian annihilate comes in ninety four one hundred incredible scifi movie, it is one beautiful look at just the visuals. This movie are incredible great acting by the entire cast from Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Tessa Thompson. Gina Rodriguez Oscar Isaac and this movie for a bit an eyelash in this movie. Makes you fucking thing. You'll think about this movie for a long time after you see it and anything this thought provoke. Thing. That's also well done and not contrived in a way. That's like being forced down your throat and obnoxious is going to get a great score for me. I thought this was wonderfully made I know a lot of people hate this movie. But also a lot of people love it. It's a very polarizing movie in that sense because there's some shit. You're like what the fuck also some of the scariest shit in any movie this year that the demon animals? Yeah. It just they're fucked cut cut into that guy with the recorded footage. It is man this movie, it makes you think you know, doesn't represent cancer. What those represented life? What does it represent? I've talked to some people in the offs about it. No, one can really agree movie. Makes you think it's gonna be on my list. It's gonna be high up there because that's just great filmmaking. Great writing I love the night elation ninety four one hundred for me. Number eight. We've already talked about this one from the audience the hate you give audience rank that at number eight Kendrick number seven number seven you to sit at a night Latian. This is one where after we came out of the theater with it. I didn't like it very. Much. And then every watched it and I loved it. I liked it way way. More than on my initial watch. I think the pacing of it was awesome, the special effects fucking credible. And I think in the nation for completely snuffed in the Oscars. Dammit rish going for fix especially for the for the ending ten minutes silver twin? Yeah. Silver, twin alone. Right. And the whatever I thing was funding. Sick. Annihilation steamed twins. Yes. The dancing alien mean guy. Enjoyed a ton of the performances. Great Natalie Portman was awesome. Jennifer, Jason Leigh was awesome. Tess thompson. Awesome. Gino Enriquez, pretty sure cancelled. So I'm not going to comment on her role in the rest of them. I think bended long, and I had like five minutes of screen time total, but they were pretty fun. And I I did like that. That's fucking first of all the bear. Maybe the scariest moment are the entirety. Last year. More scary than anything hereditary different amid to me, and the what do you call Dowa gator to the alligator great white shark combo do. Yeah. Yeah. Where they shot the gun at that time, right? They found the rifle, and they just lit it up. Right. They'll had rifles at this point the. Yeah. But it. Yeah. But it is long time ago when hallway February say March February going up on a year that credibility everything in my life is like free baby post baby, and this is pre baby. So it feels like years ago anything review before we came the barstools crazy to me. But that's where it like upgrades on my list, but upgrade so that I know I do that we review that while we were here. Really we wrote. Yeah. Yeah. Crazy. Fucking love them. Trebol number seven black klansman another dark comedy. This one was. I think it was carried by some of the performances, John David Washington, obviously and Adam driver as well. And then also an underrated toper Grace's. The buck David Duke in some of the best scenes in the movie were just him getting owned at the end. But it was a very very clever movie. It was very very. I was I just enjoyed it from start from start to end. I forget what I rated it. But I did watch it again. And I think I liked it more on the second watching because I just like I knew what to expect this time because I didn't really know what to expect going into. And I just I just enjoyed it. The start Donnette -ness of some of the phone conversations really came through. I think that's where the darker elements of the comedy came out. How are you gonna show this cast members not set out blacklist, Tom? He doesn't have fun. Go up. That's true. That's how much we respect you view. Funchal puppy. Can't again. Again. Black klansman number seven for your pick. Number seven for me. If kills me, I I really wanna put this in my top five but power for power. When I start thinking about what's better in terms of elements in a movie, I just couldn't put it above the other two movies ranked ninety four above it. Number seven. And I'm not gonna talk much about it because it will be coming up. Very soon. Spiderman into the spider verse seven for me ninety four out of a hundred still top ten which is fucking crazy. Freight would have expected that right crazy. But I mean is a legitimate. No bullshit top ten movie, by the way, Infinity wars number fourteen on my list, ninety three to one hundred I oh, great movie. But it's not my top ten Spiderman into the spider versus these second com. Movie ever made behind the dark Knight, am I pigeon. My homeboy L'Opinion number seven for the audience number seven, the death of Stalin should have been higher stolen number seven. I I thought it would be higher. Updated the scores in an actually drop down a little bit because of some movies released in the fall. The death Staal was number one for the audience for very long time that came to early to that was the first big heater of this yet feeling that came out on January first that's another one longtime ago incredible movie curious that we talk more about it. I've watched it like ten times. It's so funny. Kendrick number six. My number six's if you'll streak at talk we already touched on a ton just of absolute masterclass in filmmaking. It's fucking awesome. Love you. Barry jenkins. Come on the pod. We will have you on any day of the week. Drones. Number six. I also have feel streak at talk on their beautiful film. I just like it's it's hard to find a movie that just make you really really fall in love at the director in Barry Jenkins has done that twice in really feel something feel feel something and you do throughout he just has he has his own signature, and it's not as like glaring. Okay. Lazy like James Cameron right James Cameron movie. But like, this is just real dramatic is storytelling his crate the way he sync with sequences his movies just both like with the structure of moonlight. And I've only seen moonlight Beale street could talk. I know he I think he had one or two before that immediately. I haven't seen that. But, but this is just a beautiful movie Beale street was tied for this spot and broke the tie. So it's coming up soon for me stars born comes in at number six ninety four hundred one hundred stars born I'd actually did lower to tick ever seeing it again. But I mean, that's just because when I have something above ninety. I kind of rank them. Adjusting to other things I've seen notches here. But in the past, but of stars born is still great. And I know it's going to be another list here probably soon, but the acting is great. I love Gaga performance. Bradley Cooper is incredible knocking win the Oscar, but is very deserving of if you were to win and Sam Elliott, I thought had the best supporting actor nomination earth performance of the year. Well, written well directed in the music is just incredible. And the story is great. You mentioned that to Kentucky. It's very real. I keep saying a motion belies moves very emotional motion story that has a message that is not talked about in a very proper way in many movies. And they they did it in bread. The did it with a lot of very fine. Yeah. And this is the third remake of a movie too. Yeah. That's something to think about as well, this is the third time this movie's been made, and they made it better than both of those times combined times, it truly like, it's fucking awesome. And I think we talked about how they didn't handle it perfectly. Right. But for a movie that this is about as mass market as you can get we talk about normies all the time. Like, this is something your mom, and your wife or your girlfriend or your your your husband or whatever can watch. And you know, they're going to like it it just it fits all tastes. And I think as much as you can in that movie. Putting in a character who is somewhat realistic in his portrayal of alcoholism, and depression and anxiety is is a big. Big moment. I want oversell it. I know you can make arguments say, well, it wasn't perfect. I know that. But I mean, you're not seeing this out of like any other big big movie like this and some people make this argument against it. Like, it's a remake of remake. Okay. Really? Okay. It's. Well, like what the fuck does. That matter a good movies a good movie. Like like, that's why gives a shit reboots, shaming culture. I don't like like just let them make whatever they want care. Yeah. Is good. It's good. Yeah. I think like, okay. We're not your movie guide. Jeff and Kim, Jack. You're more of a movie guy than I am. But one thing I've been steadfast when I've talked about movies on this pod. And I've had to talk about them publicly is not you can you can think of movies better. Which is why I'm doing a favorite list, but also enjoy another movie more. So like stars born, I probably enjoyed more than can you ever forgive me. But that's probably better story. So like, if you're looking for a fresh story, that's not all that goes into a movie, there's like the songs and the acting and the charisma the lead actors, and how the movie made you feel in the stars born just hit on all of that. Let's go to top five. Now, Ken J. Oh, excuse me. Number six the audience. Number six eighth grade eighth grade comes six Kendrick number five top five number five favorite. We mentioned before. I just think it was absolutely masterfully shot using fish. I in a movie nowadays. I I would never two million years. They could works at does the girl. Beautiful roving camera shots mazing chemistry. Like oh. Mentioned before not. So I don't know where pee myself too much. Just great something where I didn't expect anything going into it and just came out so satisfied with how great it was very much. So tro bonds number five. Can you ever? Forgive me. Help put it on here. I look again you go back to my scores. Very inconsistent. I'll admit that. I I rate movies in the moment. But when I think about this movie, and I think about like, I said I like the myopic story. I like the the best of the year performance from Melissa McCarthy assure to get snubbed it was a great movie a great story. So that's why I got it. Number five. Now one thing I did want to dress. Okay, in this was a hard choice for me is I had to balance this movie out with some more. If I'm talking about my favorites, m I fall out did not make my lips. Oh, favorite me. I think so I enjoyed some of these movies more. Okay. I okay. Hey, hey, that's it's personal opinion. Okay. And it's it's tough. It's tough. Because I think like that was just that. Can you forgive me just so fresh, and if I did have to put in my fallout in there like I would probably slot at top five. But it just like I was thinking about some of these other movies, and it was just hard to slot them. And that's the thing when I was saying like, yeah. Maybe like like we had like less that would fit in this list. But in terms of being top heavy like just like, I don't feel like the Greg great movies or their mission impossible fall less than like less than sort of. What do you call it a simple favor? I think it's a different like, and I think yeah. Like, I think just in terms of. It's hard for me to quantify. You have owned me. You put me on the wheel logic in you trap me with facts. I agree with that. We're not gonna lift shame Nola shaming. My list is about feelings. Fuck your facts, by the way, the I all these rankings in one massive excel spreadsheet, and this is this ranking with these these incredibly. Well-made movies like Beale street or Roma or black Clinton the favor. It's right below list with like topa, Chico and Dunkin frozen CHAI just funny paired together, jiggle. Jiggle. How did we not joke? Tabuchi? Oh. Number five for me ninety four out of a hundred already said it talked about it enough Beale street feel streak at talk massive Oscar snub number five for me on my list, number five of the audience. All right. It's guessing time number five audience who can get the most correct? I'm gonna keep guessing fall until I hit mission. Imposs-? What was what was the movie John show searching searching, I'm but that a great fuck and movie, urging was no it's green book audiences green book at number five. Number four, Ken, Jack. I never four his death of stone. And we talked about a minute ago. It is fucking credible. My favorite, I think pobably favorite overall comedy of this year. One of the best are comedies. I've seen in a really long time. Such an I think they're choice of who's the guy agnosio something the guy who does veep, right? Yes. It's the guy who does eve I forget his name. But it is the guy who does. So the choice of him to let everyone do their own native accents, pick whatever they want fucking great just having Shemi doing weird Brooklyn accent. And having Jason ISAACs to is cockney. Accent is. General dukov like, it's fucking awesome. It is so good very well pace Michael Palin cracking up from start to finish the way that they pasted or kind of like formed it all around like their relationship with actual death. Stone was just so funny so got infighting if you haven't seen it you have to it is like a start to finish like laugh out loud. Funny movie. Our new chief? Guess stolen, spill son. Yes, don't fill Rupert friend. I will not go down. I will not go down. They spits on himself. So funny number four number four stars born. I. I was surprised Bradley Cooper did not get nominated for best director. Shame to this is. I think argued the exact opposite point. I you said I don't think it'll be in consideration for best actor now I went back and actually watch this again some parts weaken. And I think I have to revise to agree with Ken Jack on his assessment that Bradley Cooper, probably about more brought more to the film just in terms of acting than lady Gaga portrayal was mazing as we talk about him, portraying a character dealing with alcoholism and mental health issues. I mean, that's a tough thing to balance in this in this type of movie, I lady Gaga still was great. I'm not shocked. She's not getting any awards for best. Actress come to think of it. But I didn't think this movie I thought this movie would be nominated for lie. I didn't necessarily think it would win. I just am surprised. Bradley Cooper, didn't get in for best director, and in terms of talking about movie musicals somewhat of a movie musical. I would rather watch this one hundred times then. Watch another fucking movie bio pic? Yep. Yep. One hundred percent on that agreed on that. Number four for me. It's way stars porn has been on three list. Now number four for me. Ninety five out of one hundred I one two clips in ninety five Mark will be black klansman. Great louis. From Spike Lee deserves any nomination at gets probably for me number two behind Roma. What I think the favorite twin best picture is. I think black Clinton might surprise John. David Washington, Adam driver, maybe the best duo in any movie this year. Great chemistry. Very funny. Also important says a great message Spike Lee, tone, down the Spike Lee 'isms, I don't tip particularly like a lot of Spike Lee movies. But this just a great movie, funny script witty script and a story. That's very engaging and not just funny at times. But also again, like I said powerful and shows you things that are just kind of shocking from back in the period said, but also either no doesn't punches and something that everyone needs to see number four for the audience can Jack what your guests say fall out again, actually falls can be number one. I'm gonna say. Shoot some of the bigger. Oscar, I must say quiet place. I'm gonna say Infinity war tough mission impossible fall. If it any more did not make the top ten list for the audience. Really? I just assume that he would not. Yeah. You missed it. That was that was that was my moment. You kept saying. All right. He's gonna get it. Next time. Number three. My number three's eighth grade Beaubourg director debut fucking genius absolute genius. It was great coming of age movies. As far as they go. Like, we've had a lot of really good ones in the last few years. And I think this stands out as being when they're really captures the age we are in right now in what it's like for kids to be growing up in the social media sort of sphere. It was very tough thing to do. I think Elsie Fisher should have absolutely been nominated for best actress because she fucking killed it. And I think that was like her debut as well. Right. Yeah. And she fucking nailed it. Absolutely. Nailed it. And it's really just especially the remember the opening part where she's just doing the the blog at the end goal. Yeah. Hoochie coochie. It makes you feel so uncomfortable and so viscerally like just like uneasy. It's perfect you being able to capture that is so hard, and he nailed it and afraid to play the dad too. But oh, her relationship with their dad was just come out and say, this is my third one. So we don't have to stop talking about it. I this is what I love with lady bird is movies that are not afraid to portray the teenager as a relatable shithead. Yes. Exactly. Perfect kid with like a shitty parent. They're like Schutte kid that's just by going through shit as like a normal teenagers. Do go coming of age and like their parents just trying to do their best. And she was a shithead because that that was the environment that she was in like, you know, the pressures of like look eighth grade seventh grade eighth grade where some of the worst years of my life. Okay. Like, I'm moved during those years. I was overweight. I'm an introvert. I didn't particular make friends, and I think some of that's the. Yeah. I'm a Leo actually. What I relate to this. Because it's it's like she's trying to fit in. Because this is what her middle school is trying to do to her. So it's not like she's a shithead because she's she's a bad person. You just see like the pressure that puts on someone that in the fact that you get others like her on Instagram or whatever listen to the headphones on with their dad shit like that. I would definitely would have done if I would have had a portable music player at that time. So completely get it. I thought this was great the only bad thing. And I'm sure this will be a hot take. I didn't love the music in this movie. I thought musically music was overused. I thought it was like trying to force someone to listen to playlist in your car on a road trip and get them to like your songs. 'cause there's a lot of music, and there is a lot of music that wasn't as so in my type of music, but I didn't really take anything away from the score because artistically at worked with the movie it just felt like there's a transition to new scene, and then a really loud. Type of song. Like, Bo Burnham probably likes it. I never would have heard of there's one the first song that she plays when she has her phone out. Right. Like, whatever song was can't will never be a place. Tom ahead. But I I won't stood out to me for a while. After the movie like I just kept long here. Now, I actually like that soundtrack log, it's a really great movie. And it got totally snubbed really upset about that very snubbed number three for me ninety five out of a hundred the death of Stalin funniest movie the year best comedy of the year. That's dark comedy of the year, the deaths stolen was a was it was a masterclass in comedy. It was just fucking great. You want to call us it it. We say mean start to finish it shocked the beginning and you're just like holy shit. And it's a it's a wild ride. It lands every joke. Hilarious one of the best comedies. I've ever seen. Honestly. And I it's it's great. You're. Like, he's the choices. It makes the speed to the way it hits everything. So quickly is what keeps it going gate again? That's by love veep. If you love you should like movie. I don't see why you wouldn't. But I have seen somebody forgot who was told me they love they didn't love this movie death stone. It was number one for longtime my list, it would be I it'll be might one of my top three favorite movies Kendrick going to our favorites. But that's what comes at number three number three for the audience guests. We got a quick s shoot spider verse best movie the year, number three. Say black Landsman. Yeah. No. We haven't said again ten I'm guess by clansman like client is not in their top ten Romans number three. I was surprised too. Yep. Promo. I get it. Desktop pop up in like, my I'm doing it reverse to remind the audience, I'm doing ten favorite, and I'm doing what I consider to be three best. That's definitely my three best. What we talked about wasn't one of my favorites. Because you know, I just like other movies more. But I think to deny the artistic vision of it, and how was filmed and the way it looks like God, just great movie in what you guys might talk about that. So all shut the fuck up Ken, Jack, number two. My number two is can you ever? Forgive me. Yes. Big moments here. Yes. Loved kinnear. Forgive me. My best friend Richie grant pulled off a helmet for supporting actor McCarthy really shocked us all and again, this is something where you shouldn't be interested in it like it's fucking literary forgery of like like authors personal correspondence and the an investigation into it. That's not fucking interesting. And yet in this totally is it draws you in a captures you, and it really just like lead you along at tire path with her for she's playing this really shitty annoying person. And you're rooting for the entire time. Yup. Fucking loved it. It was so quick and sarcho. Oh, no, go ahead. I'm on the pre workouts wearing all. If I'm being very interrupt. I apologize. Okay. So this is bad example. But have you guys ever listen to the Dan Carlin hardcore history? I it's vaguely it's it's just like it's a four hour podcast on a very specific topic of history and all is him and Mike telling a story and most podcasts are like us where it's just a group of guys making jokes in a lot of times that can be entertaining. But we cover a wide variety of subjects in sometimes something that just focuses. So in depth on something very specific can be a lot more entertaining than something that covers a lot of ground, maybe a bad analogy. But that's how I felt with can you ever? Forgive me in the screenplay of it was based off of the just so specific about something. I never thought I really care about until you watch the whole movie about it. And you never would have read the book. I would never would have read the book. Now, I want to read the book after after watching the movie, so maybe back in Paris in. But that's how I feel about those types of things I've loved really specific myopic things and getting into detail with them. I think some times it's it's just the way to go rolling. The number two. Over me. Okay. Death stolen. Now. He's there is. It's. It's a very tricky thing to do something that is this funny around something so brutal inhuman in world history. And it is kind of like, I don't know if this is a bad way to put it, but it kind of makes the absurdity of evilness like even more absurd when put into a comedic sort of framework, and that's why I really liked it is because they took it and you get these bumbling fucking idiots like doing all this evil shit. And that's why it was funny. I don't know how historically accurate was. But I do think in a lot of aspects of history. You don't always have the smartest people at the top doing horrible horrendous shit like I don't necessarily think the smartest people in the world. Like, you know, one hundred of AD doing like brutal shit, where the smartest people ever exist. They just like maybe have stumbled in some shit. And I think that's what it was like funny about this movie. It was just such like a fucking brutal movie and carried out, but he's bumbling. Knuckleheads. Yeah. No. So like nonchalant about people getting shot in the face. It was awesome about that. That's weird it, and that's like into historical context. And I don't want to go to Joe Rogan on us. But we think about how Smalley we think about how small E R in the world and how small ER in the universe. And I think somehow highlighting how nonchalant like murders are or mass murders are in these types of things like just highlights how evil people are not viewing human life as being significant. It's just in a wider scale so very insignificant. And that's what like is is the absurdity of it. And the humor comes out of that. Yup. Deficit on again. Number three a mind Ken, Jack at number four audience number seven. I mean at this point we've talked about all year long, if you seen death Stalin. I mean, what are you doing? Gotta do run go. See it not run. It's probably in your home. I watched it on a plane. Ooh. Number two for me ninety six out of one hundred the I mean, this it's it's not the best I've ever seen because I have wedding one or two above it. Top three action movie I've ever seen in my entire life number two ninety six hundred mission impossible fall out, and this is this this more. So than the avengers the Black Panthers the world, this is a type of movie that deserves to get recognition awards. I'm sorry laugh say what you want. It has a script that works a story that creative fun very easy to get through. Well, paced make sense action. That is incredible. And let's be honest actions element of a movie, you know, I mean dialogue, you know, something like phantom thread or something like Steve Jobs that I love can Aaron Sorkin dialogues imported guess what action is important for said. John r-. And this is some of the best shot action ever. Yes. Ever Christopher MacQuarie had one of the top five acting jobs of the year. He was never gonna get nominate which is a crime, but he directed. Maybe the best action scenes I've ever seen. I mean, it's just it's an incredible looking movie if you do the jump cut if you do the quick cuts close up zoom slow motion shit and your movies quit and go watch Christopher Corey does mission impossible fall on it. Just doesn't do anything really wrong. And like, it's you know, me and like Troglio say, I'm the film guy. But like push comes the show. I look at this compared to everything else. And I watched one hundred times I'm like I can't lower the score. Is this movie is that fucking incredible it hits every single beat be only one little thing might be Henry Cavill little wooden. That'd be that'd be. But even then I mean, this movie for the John roots in in. What is trying to do fucking nail? It is such a good movie. I can watch it over and over again, obviously will be top three favorite mission impossible lose the tiebreaker because it was technically tied for the highest rated movie of the year. I saw mission impossible's number two. Yeah. Audience number two. I just wanna say one thing on mission impossible. I again, it may be could've made my favorite lists that feel badly thing out now now now now all these old feelings are coming up getting very emotional about it. This is a trill it's snow with an action movie. I think we've found they're getting out of the two thousand or the Bourne movies were were very popular. And I thought very good. But it was shaky Cam bullshit bunch of shaky Cam, you transition something, and I feel like just mastering the basics and not going cheap on the basics. But but spending a lot of money on the basics with maybe practical effects. Maybe great stunts executing the stunts over and over like, the halo jump being very clear what the action showing very clear shots of it, very wide shots of it closing down pairs. I mean, that's a very basic concept, but who fucking closes down the Arctic trill like Bakori. Did it looks fantastic. This is a it's a fucking fake movie. It's a fake story. And you're still. On the when he is running through are they in? I forget where they are running seniors in London one that where he's running across the top of that building euros favorite building. We end up at right? Right. Right. Yeah. The tape motor fuck did you not put this in your top? Your your heart is racing watching him run. He jerusalem. Hyped up right now, he's working this movie. He didn't put it in his top ten the pre workout. We're not. I think this is. I think I think I made a mistake. I I think I liked this more than the stars born. I don't know. We'll give you a chance to redo it for the graphic. We tweet up tomorrow. Because I I can't I won't be able to listen. Okay. Feel my remorse. They need to feel. Audience number two. What's read their listening for audiences leave no trace, the favorite the hate? You. Give death of Stalin eighth grade. Green book mission impossible Roma. Feel like Bill street didn't make it for them. But I'll say Beale street, I'm gonna go Beale street. Still no one's gotta right stars. Which should be enjoyed by redder. I underscore. Enjoy underscore taffy. Who I think is Bradley Cooper from a lot of stars. Which is very fair about Bradley Cooper's ready to account amazing about this list is just the. The validity of this list by collecting the ratings throughout the year and putting them into order is way better than any lists. That has been a specific boat for anything that the audience is done. This is a really good listener audience. Yeah. Very good list. And like, I think because we do tweet it out, but it, but the vote for the movies doesn't get re tweeted as much as like the what's your favorite blank. So I think there's a more legit like people are thinking about it. I also do go through and I ended some of these because some people put zero just to fuck with us. So I do have to go do that sometimes, but it's been very consistent people voting. So we'll get we preach you that voting is always in the descriptions that there's and rice, I'm just getting food or bojangles. Okay. Is always the audience here. Loving two hours. Right. Coming up. The voting is always in the description. Always that's where you should vote. I know people ask on read it just scroll down, and you can vote. I try to put them in as quick as I possibly. I'm actually I'm going to start putting them in as the month begins just easier that way number one can Jack best movie of the year, and you take a wild. Guess I mean, it's not on your list yet. So it's mission impossible. All right. Your true get down with yet. No shit. Honey. It's of course, it's mission impossible. It's only will give a rating on here because it's definitive number one. The rest of them to go through my decimals to differentiate it from my list, but it's ninety seven out of one hundred fucking awesome. What a great film like a quintessential blockbuster. Maybe one of my favorite summer blockbusters in the last decade is incredible. Christopher Corey you. You you hit a bunch of points on this Christopher Corey what a great job transitioning. This franchise from mission impossible for whatever from being that shaky Cam shit to being all sick. He hates shaky Cam. I remember with eights also hates what's what's on your TV? With the smoothing motion motion. Yeah, he hates that shit. And he he made this movie just feel so real because he hates the CJ aspect. He made it all like these really real stunts Tom Cruise going up in these helicopters doing real inverted dive bullshit like apparently that one scene where he added that like going like a cone circle and the upper like he's like, yeah. I almost actually died doing that. And then what's actually died doing the party falls off the rope on the helicopter, and like, I know it's the same bullshit lie like end all villain thing. Every time. It's like, oh, they have three nukes. It's to it's just like every other spy movie, but know, it's fucking sick. It's so cool the doing awesome chasing's they're doing like motorcycle. Chasing Arctic Trump, you were saying the doing helicopter chases doing fistfights in fucking bathroom and a club in Paris. It is so cool that halo dive alone is probably my favorite action. Sequences seen in forever is awesome greats. When one thing is far as going investment of the year. I think it is the best at all of its respective categories out of any movie this. Yes. Like action one hundred one hundred out of the scores for for an action. John John one hundred acting hundred one hundred legs there. They put the mission of possible fem- throughout like little ways. Really? Yeah. Again, people talk about daring movies and doing things I mean, the action in the stunts their daring, and he goes out there. And he does things that that are incredible. At this movie mean it's a fuck of love it should suck. Right. It's like it's all the returning condition. Buffalo six mission impossible six it's returning villain in the Nathan, the whatever lane not lethal lane the villain. What are you doing here? Whatever something. So I'm gonna lane right. Yes. It's a returning villains. Six episode. Six version franchise. It's the same thing. It's your mission shoot choose to accept it should suck it. Good a romance to romantic subplots say love triangle, but kind of a love triangle, we're gonna Ferguson what a boss to. She's probably going to mention take the rain fucking ruled. When you think about go ahead. Go ahead. I didn't have anything. Good to say, you think about clapping movies this year theaters, clapping and cheering you think about vendors Infinity, which is probably the most clapping I've ever heard the movie, but you wanted to get involved because you're like it's fucking thorn Condit mission impossible follow. I did not expect applauded the whole movie the entire I'm Mexican Donnie was with us like just like fuck. Yeah. Let's when when they do the wolf Blitzer reveal in the beginning. It's incredible smoking. Everyone of those turns I was cheering the ball in one like, oh like all of them. I was like fuck. Yeah. Let's do it. Like, it's it's it's so great. It's such an immersive experience. I went to see it three times. In theaters. That's I'm ex regular should be movie. Yeah. To me. It was my second favorite clapping movie. I was fifty shades freed. Knew gonna say. Little tease top ten worst movie that you're next week. I'm sure that'll be up there for someone MacQuarie also said he wants a direct to Taylor swift music video. Oh, that'd be right. Yeah. Hayler switch should be an M. I seven. Replace Vanessa Kirby, Vanessa Kirby rule to she was very sick. And she should be a minor bit. I think that'd be about make her back into command focused on cats. Her Joey Joey Bosa was your second in command of that movie. Yeah. It can't it can't divert her from bombo Rena can't seem as good to the part where they like has the vision of how that high strike of. Right. So I'm lane. Oh, my God moves so good. Fuck you trill. How do you not put this in your top ten I over fought it? I thought too hard about my list when I do stuff five hours ahead of time. Let's get to your tier redemption, your validation number one, which I know what you're number one is because you gave it one hundred out of one hundred. Oh, yeah. Well, it's a movie that I think was was in production. People didn't know what to think it had some changes up front some changing director, and that's bohemian rats. No it's spider verse into the spider verse. I don't think this is I don't think this tells the best story of the year. I don't think it a has the best acting performances of the year. But I do think this is the most creatively put together animated movie I've ever seen and that's enough for me to put a number one my favorite movie of the year list. I again, I give it one hundred one hundred. I think on the only one to get the hundreds on this podcast, given one two thousand seventeen. Lady bird Twenty-eight for this movie. Have you given out one hundreds? No, these safe. Here's the high. No, go ahead troth, then I just that's it like this and bohemian rhapsody cut number one movies of the year for me the highest rating given out fuck you owe the highest rating I've given out second is the ninety six the highest rating, I gave Bladerunner twenty forty nine and ninety nine. All right number. That's true. It's fucking credible. Pick spy versus amazing number one for me. This is like this is crazy because this is just onto a new year after this like if I just this is like Christmas, you're like, okay. Gift number one. For me is the best script of the year. The best acting for the best performances with the script and displaying something real achieving what the director wanted to make it was a debut ninety six out of a hundred number one movie of the year from us eighth grade. Tro, you aided out perfectly. It shows a teenager who's a shithead it's not your average coming of age movie and felt like almost a prequel to lady bird in a sense of a lot of movies. That are real that. I said Bill street the hate you give this one. And maybe it's because I can relate to it. I don't know. But this movie is real in every sense the word down to the intricate conversations they're having at like in the the the mall food court when they're like talking about the kid who died in the school. But they're like with Kim was dick. Yeah. Like real shitty. Stupid middle school and high school kids it simple. Yes. But it really isn't like for burn the put that onscreen. We talked about it like coming of age have such how do you do fellow kids field because boredom is younger and he has like he goes through rings. I'd like to putting Zayed's in their of growing up as a teenager and older perfectly. Well, like just so well done perfect to t- nailed it. Again, the conversations the discussions, the teachers everything he did was nailed, and I'm just so impressed by what Bowe Burnham did not just because today Butte because anyone's able to put together a movie like this that isn't it doesn't feel fake. It doesn't feel forced like you're basically looking at somebody go through eighth grade. And that was most impressive about it to me. And I know that simple and people have said to me when I talked about this move with your like, but it's just like there's somebody going through eighth grade. I'm like, that's what's impressive about it. That's what you're watching. It's awkward. It's weird. It's hard together. There is some scenes or I was leaning out of the side of my fucking Jerry theater of like. I need to almost need to leave. But that was so perfect about it. The vacuums able to write and actors capture that realism of what it's like to having Zaidi, and what it's like to go through those types of things as a kid growing up learning lessons day by day. I mean, that's incredible film making this movie was such a fucking Oscar snub, and it embarrassing that they didn't ominous it that this is the type shit. They should be nominating. Like, these are the type of things that are from young directors young actors that are different twists on existing genres. I'm not gonna mention the movie I want to mention, but like, let's let's give things to different genres that bring new twist that bring new writers new directors and eighth grade for me was it's ninety six out of one hundred. It's number one movie of the year for me. It wins the list it wins the year. You want to talk about movies that barely made the cut before go onto door number one for the audience. Yeah. Oh, guess yet. I have no idea after mission possibles gone. I'm sure it's really obvious. But at this point area obvious. No vendors is not on their own. They didn't make their list. That's right. Ninth grade diverse. It's spider. Audience number one was spider versa. Tick above a star is born so ninety six out of one hundred from the audience or spider verse. Movie knocking more bugs quickly. I'm gonna read the top ten really quickly. My top ten ten to one blind spotting hate you. Give an eyelash in spider versus stars born Beale street, black klansman, the death of Stalin mission impossible. Follow eighth grade tro bonds, tuft and favorite movies love Simon of simple favor. Hereditary black klansman Beale street, can you ever? Forgive me stars. For an eighth grade. Death of Stalin spider verse Ken, Jak, top ten. Best movies stars born crazy, rich Asians blind, spotting annihilation Beale street. The favourite death of stolen eighth grade. Can you ever forgive me mission impossible audience top ten best movies leave no trace the favorite to hate? You give the death of Stalin eighth grade. Green book mission Apostol Roma stars mourn, spiders, for those wondering vendors and finito came in at number twelve just ahead of black klansman there behind those that the two billion dollar marvel movies of the year avengers Infinity war and Black Panther were not on a list. Now, I agree with both of those. I don't think. I've loved adventures affinity was going to be on your list. Don't forget billion dollar movie crossed the threshold. Yes. Highest grossing movie, look adventures, Finnity war and Black Panther, culturally were leaps and bounds. Above what it meant to the popular. Black Panther specially. But even it vendors say fencers. David, David Finney. But of injures Infinity war introduced characters that became memes like Dana's and snapping finger. You know, no one ever talked about really unless you're comic book fan before that. Now, he's thinking he's in probably top ten villain list. We look at going out in the next twenty years. We'll see what happens in in game. What Black Panther met for movie making? And what it meant for inclusion thought was phenomenal. The cast was excellent. It definitely was a one of the better movies of the year. Didn't make my list that doesn't mean it doesn't deserve to be on anyone's list. I liked them both. They just I don't think they want our list. This didn't come even close to the list, but still shut out to blockers. Okay. Yeah. Hell, yeah. Best pure comedy of the year for me because of Stalin is not a pure comedy. Dark comedy. I would say blockers for me, my twenty three eleven if you haven't I've been posting. I'm barstool sports dot com. Twenty-three eleven the favor a simple favor creed to sorry about you leave no trace Paddington to Kenya. Ever. Forgive me us, be vendors Infinity work, can you ever forgive me Roma and green book, I would say the only three that could crack the top ten for me would have been green book, can you ever forgive me in Roma maybe to a little less, but those just kinda missed out favorites for me number one favourite, obviously Infinity war number two mission impossible fallout barely behind that. Obviously. I had it ranked better. But favorite. I mean, the fucking the marvel guy like I asked me favorite number three favor for me tougher. I'd probably say death of Stalin private maybe creed to right behind that. Yeah. Yeah. I think if I had to put in my top ten mission impossible, fallout Infinity ward, death style and the favorite spider verse which I really wanted to put my top ten best. But it was retaken, but those competitors stars boring eighth grade leave no trace, I. Formed which we said he got snubbed ton crazy, rich Asians, simple, simple favor. Which was a great movie. I respect you putting in your top ten favorite show. The only Arbel mentions are really one of throughout their Mandy Mandy what about field fucking credible experience. That was that was just John wake on on LSD shrooms and quail in anything. You can think of what an experience that was if you haven't had a chance to watch that yet Colette was up there too. That's when I watched recently where I was really blown away by how much I enjoyed it. I fucking was really enthralled with a very weird story top favorite for me as well. Mummy. A here we go again. Yeah. That's that's other top fifty s great has to be up there yet upgrades up there for me, searching hereditary and a quiet place bodied as I mentioned, Mandy blockers. You were never really hear totally tag, which I liked up until the end. When added any off. If that doesn't have that ending that my best comedy of the year. If it doesn't have that fucking what's down asset ending was game night this year to get wasn't. That was Jesse Plemmons probably movie. Yeah. Best best like, supporting comedian. He'll be up for a gospel for supporting best thick thick boy. Oh boy. So that's it. That was fun. That's our first full year of movies. True. Let me get my top three best top ten favourite my top three best. I think it feels no particular order Beale street could talk can you ever? Forgive me. An eighth grade. Those are the best movies in terms of grading them from artistic perspective. It was hard to leave Rome off that list. Just so beautiful. But I get combined it with what I liked. I know we're going to do worse. But like what sticks out is a disappointment. Like that you like, I know we talked about I would say I man, and I really I man at eighty nine one hundred. Yeah. Because I thought it would be a ninety nine out of hundred. Yep. I think I think Mary Queen of Scots I man and into smaller extent incredible to I felt was a little bit disappointing. I dropped it down after eighty five. Does for me was definitely up there. I thought that was going to be like a world ender, and it just wasn't really there. Yeah. I man problem disappointing. I liked vice a little pointing to and I gave nine out of one hundred and I love the vice. But again, I thought ninety nine hundred hundred I thought this is going to be the territory of when I was playing together my list. Vice didn't even cross my mind. I this is the first time I've thought about vice today vice a lot, and if you wanna see it again, it's just that's one where I don't want to appointing. It's just one that's like, so polarizing, right? Could never seen a getting the hype would've debris deserved. I think when that was a great favorite though. I would say bad times Oriole. Maybe I expected a little more from if it was like half an hour. Yeah. It was just wait flashbacks for so weird so long. But I mean, it did love that movie a lot so long bottom. Ten first of all we're reviewing serenity with Matthew mcconaughey and Ann Hathaway next week very excited because that could be the worst movie of twenty nineteen we'll and we will be doing our bottom. Ten the bottom. Ten ready determine for myself in the audience. I'm seeing Ken chills. Very excited. Very similar very bottom. Ten I don't wanna spoil it. But number one's going to be home. Some lots. For me with a bullet. We'll see you know in my number one. There's there's two or three screeners. I'm giving you that that may make your bottom. There's a couple of you have to suffer through. So we'll see. But I I hope the Watsons your bottom. I mean, that's obvious. I than peace, my friend who bones input mission impossible and top of list. And he didn't even have a hair, and it's brick. That was real. The movie. But again, thanks for voting. Thanks for listening. The two thousand eighteen movie season is almost wrapped for us. That's that's crazy. It's always crazy reveal the number one. It's like damn all that work this fucking spreadsheet and graphics, and then you restart with all five movies that are coming out and chain, basically. So again next week serenity we're going to be reviewing that go see apparently a fucking bat shit crazy movie at very excited to talk about that anything else in watching miss Mazel. Mrs mazel. This is the only thing I wanna say Zachary Levi's in it is a very fucking large, man. We talked about six foot four, but he is Bill Bill like brick shit house in this movie. He could beat the shit out of me yet. Avi. Well, we knew that before you watch Mazel anyway. So but seeing him in comparison with Rachel Brosnahan. Or However, I don't know how Saturday she isn't it? Yeah. Good. He's just he's towers over everybody in that show. Unbelievable. Very large, man. That's right. We determined. He was six three the only shouts Sam watching them. Rekondo tidying definitely watch that. It's very calming. Very great. And I want docked me or marry me one of those two things. Little Freudian slip on that one. But yeah, let's do it. All right. That's that's it. One of those guys replies. Marie condos Twitter posts with Murray. I want you to run over with me run over me with the car and stuff me into some rebar condo, come to Brazil. Thank you the audience here. Yeah. Big cheers. They've been waiting here for two hours and twenty minutes. Thanks to Ellen the generous. Thank you to bojangles for hosting us. Here we have one more live Super Bowl show that we're going to be prerecorded prerecorded for the Super Bowl. So we won't have any thoughts in the big game. Anything we can save Super Bowl at the big game, though could get sued here again. Thank you to everyone. We have an Adam LeVine performance coming up trill. Do the thing have a good week at the book. Take it away Ellen plays. Welcome Aroon five. No, no, no, no. So so so so. No, no, no, no, no. Nobody. So so so so. I don't wanna know where. Thank you. No. In. From this. This someone. Even just the. So. No. On b. Coming to one another.

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