35 Burst results for "Station W. Y P. R"

3 female journalists in Afghanistan are killed

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 17 hrs ago

3 female journalists in Afghanistan are killed

"Someone shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning state. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, One of the women was shot nods for he. Me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and Even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported her cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan as Isis been responsible for other attacks like this Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much for an anxiety and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things too. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war. Sharing power and those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people. Might be critical of the negotiations or critical. The Taliban, who frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular when they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Taliban Kabul Canada China Afghan Government United States
Baseless 2020 Conspiracies Complicate Ohio Effort To Buy Voting Machines

Morning Edition

03:38 min | 19 hrs ago

Baseless 2020 Conspiracies Complicate Ohio Effort To Buy Voting Machines

"President Trump's effort to overturn a Democratic election failed. But the departure from reality at the heart of that effort persists. Ah, favorite conspiracy theory of the president's allies involved voting machines changing votes. The evidence free claim was disproven in places like Georgia that recounted ballots on paper. But the false tale about Dominion voting machines persists affecting politics in a county in Ohio, Here's Nick Costello of Our member station Wcpo an idea stream Stark County is home to Canton, Ohio. It voted twice for Barack Obama and twice in landslides for Donald Trump. Last December, the bipartisan Stark County Board of Elections voted unanimously to replace its aging voting machines with new ones from Dominion voting systems. Since then, the county's three top elected officials, all of whom are Republican, say they've been getting an earful. The board of Commissioners has received hundreds of communications from concerned citizens. This is Commissioner Bill Smith, speaking at a public hearing about the purchase this response from the public as far exceeded the response any of us have ever received on any topic. Come before our board During this two hour hearing In early February, Smith pushed the board of Elections director to address voters fears that Dominion machines are not secure. They just want to make sure that it's valid counted so You're We're going with the one with the cloud right now. Okay over its head, a clouded not based in fact, but created by Trump and allies such as Rudy Giuliani. At least one conservative group has tried to keep stirring the opposition to start counties Dominion purchase. The county's top elections official is Geoff Matthews. He's also the chairman of the local Republican Party. On top of that he runs the board that tests in certifies voting machines statewide. At the meeting, Matthew's defended Dominion. And the integrity of the 2020 election, refusing to recognize that this election was safe, secure inaccurate can be viewed as nothing less than attacking the peaceful transfer of power. Some of the claims made about Dominion voting systems are beyond absurd and require one to suspend all critical thought. In the weeks since that meeting, the county's commissioners have yet to approve the more than $6 million contract, but a decision could come this month. Neither they nor Matthews responded to interview requests. Election officials here want to replace their machines before the fall. The particular Dominion voting machine that the county board wants to buy is a touch screen with a paper audit trail. It was used in 11 Ohio counties last year, according to the Ohio secretary of state's office. Trump won all of those counties. Postelection audits found the results in nine of those counties to be 100% accurate. The minuscule discrepancies in the other two counties were not attributed to the machines. Our hope is that we continue to have a really honest and open conversation about fax. Versus fiction case. Stimpson is a spokeswoman for Dominion voting Systems. She says the company has been available to answer local officials. Questions, sending a sales rep to meetings were showing up to do the hard work of cutting through disinformation and at the most granular levels in Stark County were also Very much supported by the Ohio secretary of State's office. The other way Dominion is trying to cut through the disinformation is in the courts. The company has filed massive defamation lawsuits against Giuliani and other Trump allies about their false

President Trump Nick Costello Bipartisan Stark County Board Dominion Voting Systems Ohio Commissioner Bill Smith Stark County Dominion Purchase Geoff Matthews Donald Trump Board Of Commissioners Canton Barack Obama Georgia Rudy Giuliani Republican Party Smith
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 19 hrs ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Someone shot and killed three Afghan journalists yesterday, all three women worked at a TV station. Assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning state. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, one of the women were shot. And as for he me she was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported our cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much fear and anxiety, and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things toe. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war by sharing power. And those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people who might be critical of the negotiations or critical of the Taliban, who, frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular. When they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the chaos, do

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Taliban Kabul Canada Afghan Government China United States
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 19 hrs ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. Oh, One of the women was shot nods for he. Me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother had women hate me. He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should being opposed by conservative relatives and even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. He supported your cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now, Isis says they killed channels and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. But they're likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much real anxiety, and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The phrase civil society is occurring to me when you talk about the kind of people who are being targeted people who make it possible to have an open debate about things too. Learn what's going on. Um, I'd like to know, though. If this has anything to do with the wider political situation in the country, the United States had been trying to get all troops out. Right, so we can say that they do appear to be related because of the American withdrawal of troops in Afghanistan is part of a deal with the Taliban. But another part of that deal is that the Taliban has to sit down with the Afghan government to negotiate an end to this war. Sharing power and those assassinations that we're talking about began shortly after those talks began in September. Now we're talking about civil society. We're talking about silencing people who might be critical of the negotiations or critical. The Taliban, who frankly want to re impose restrictions on women in particular when they get back into power. It's important to say here that the Taliban deny responsibility, but activists say that doesn't mean they're innocent. It could be a local commanders acting with a wink and a nod. It could be their sympathizers. Or it could be local actors with vendettas taking advantage of the chaos, do

Afghanistan Malala Jalalabad Islamabad Shana NPR Isis Steve Taliban Kabul Canada Afghan Government United States
ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

Morning Edition

01:55 min | 21 hrs ago

ISIS claims killing of 3 female journalists in Afghanistan

"Shot and killed three Afghan journalists Yesterday. All three women work to the TV station assassins have targeted other journalists and human rights activists. So why NPR's d idea is in Islamabad. She's covered Afghanistan for years. Good morning. Good morning, ST. All right. Suppose I should say good afternoon to you on your side of the world. What happened? Well, this happened in the eastern city of Jalalabad and these women were shot dead as they left work. Two of the women were killed together and the third was separately hunted down. No. One of the women was shot Naz for he me She was just 21. I managed to find her brother. How do women hate me? He lives in Canada. And he says Shana's fought to get an education and toe work should be opposed by conservative relatives and Even the broader community around her, but that her parents backed her up. They supported her cause because she was the one fighting for a change. Now Isis says they killed China's and the other women because they work for a pro government outlet. They'll likely also killed because they were women working in public, and that's something widely disapproved off in conservative parts of Afghanistan. Has Isis been responsible for other attacks like this? Yeah. In December. They in fact killed a female presenter. Malala may want who worked at the same station. But most of these killings nobody's claimed responsibility for them. And that's causing so much for an anxiety and it's worth thinking about who's being killed here. These are people who can influence society people like media workers, human rights activists. Even judicial workers and clerics. Just this morning, a religious leader was killed in Kabul. And This is you know, I said, it spread fear. But what does that mean? It means people are shutting up. They're staying home. They're trying to leave the country and that means that local communities and even the international community. Is less likely to know what's happening across Afghanistan. The

Jalalabad Afghanistan Islamabad NAZ NPR Shana Malala Isis Canada China Kabul
$20K reward offered for information in Chicago shooting of  11 year old girl

WGN Programming

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

$20K reward offered for information in Chicago shooting of 11 year old girl

"In last night's Gunfight between 2 19 year olds on Chicago's South Side and and 11 11 year year Old Old Girl Girl remains remains hospitalized hospitalized in in critical critical Condition. Condition. WGN's WGN's Julien Julien Cruz, Cruz, the the 11 11 year year old old hit hit in in the the face face with with one one of of the the bullets, bullets, the the bullet bullet traveling traveling to to her lungs, according to the family, leaving her paralyzed while the gunman fled the scene community activist Andrew Holmes to the shooter. It might not be long before you are apprehended. Already Know two detectives have that put it already. But I'm gonna ask you turn yourself in. It happened 127th Street outside a gas station in the city's west Pullman neighborhood. Mother's asking that her name be withheld. My Aniston daughter, 11 years old was shot in cold blood. One of the shooters his hospitalized it advocate Christ with a gunshot wound. Anyone with information is asked to submit it at CPD tip dot com. The city of

WGN Julien Julien Cruz Andrew Holmes Cruz Chicago Aniston Cold Blood
Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

Let's Talk About Digital Identity

04:09 min | 1 d ago

Germanys digital identity landscape with Verimis Roland Adrian

"Hi roland oscar. Nice looking with you on and really happy to hear what is going on in germany in terms of identity in or ever seen related to that and happy to know more about very me very baheren hearing berry meal ready for the last year. San diego need to hear more details. What are the are building offering today so. Please tell us your journey how. You became the managing director very me. Yeah thanks you can. The many thanks for the invitation. Let's here and talk to you a little bit about the markets in germany. So yeah what was my journey becoming managing director of very me. Actually my journey professional. Johnny started twenty five years ago. When i started my career in consulting. Then some stations cashed out which is a department store group. And then i founded multi-platinum loyalty scheme together with start at telecom and from there. I moved to payback. Which actually is janis leading multi partner loyalty scheme. They are quite some markets worldwide than india mexico italy. Us and from all the travel. I got introduced to lose tons of course and became the ceo of lufthansa mice and more during that time. Actually i realized that the future is more. And more about seamless customer experience. Because if you look at lofton's in many cases the real loyalty benefits that you can get there. They actually translate into a real seamless customer. Experience that you get you look at all the tracks for security and immigration priority boarding presort seating in the plane actually the customers tend to reward benefits in their experience much more then any loyalty currency and so at the moment where then lufthansa invested into very me idea for me. It was very clear that this would be an exciting next step for me personally. So i decided to switch over to meet to be the ceo of me and push forward at digital identity to provide seamless customer experience for the users and i can induce that lufthansa is one of the funders organization behind very me. But let's more place for the ones who are not familiar with very still bear me does. In fact lufthansa there's actually one of the investors and we have altogether thirty very large companies in germany that invested into the very idea and a lot smaller companies are really known brand. Names such as liens deutsche. Bahn dot eubanks lufthansa dodger taylor com dime la some song fox button so all very large companies that invested into very me to establish of wallet of digital identities so that was the driving force and i think when we will talk about the market later on we will see that it was a very good moment to invest into such platform because the market urgently requires the platform and there's pretty much empty space currently in germany. And what we provide as bury me as this one click digital experience for very fight identification was in a pop. Misuse cases and at the core of it on is an identity platform. Of course that matches all the regulatory requirements for our anti money laundering or either substantial. And this comes along with the solution for strong customer syndication because the critical part of such a platform is not the identification of customer itself. Actually the critical part is the reuse. And that means the access to the digital identity

Lufthansa Roland Oscar Germany Janis Berry Lofton San Diego Johnny Italy Mexico India Deutsche United States LA
Farfetch Founder José Neves Unpacks His Newest Partnership with Alibaba and Richemont

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:11 min | 1 d ago

Farfetch Founder José Neves Unpacks His Newest Partnership with Alibaba and Richemont

"Stick investment was theme seven in this year's report on the state of fashion 2021 it offered a prediction that companies will begin maneuvering for the post pandemic reality to grow market share and expand their capabilities. But in fact it is already happening. The recent landmark deal with far fetch alibaba richemont and carrying is a case in point. I it brings together two rival luxury goods groups respond carrying who both invested in farfetched. But there's also added interests because riche mont is also the owner bucs neta portait group a major rival too far fetch. Now i'm joined by josie neva's founder and chief executive of farfetched. Who's in some paolo today. As well as mike evans president of alibaba who joins us mexico in this their first joint conversation. They'll help us to understand the anatomy of this megadeal and what it portends for the global luxury e commerce space. Welcome to you. Both josie and mike josie. I wanted to start with you. I you know this is a deal that really took the industry by surprise. Some of our reporters kind of dropped the mic on slack and other places like where did this deal come from. So in the first instance can you just give us a sense of the genesis of this megadeal. How did it happen sure Think the channels of the deal was compensation which you i will never forget about the station with daniel jank and the conversation just understand the chinese online luxury market In both electric pavilion was doing private. China was doing and we ended up staying for a long time much longer than what we expected and what what was clear was while three things first. We think as tech businesses we add technology bathrooms not retailers. And and we really are at the service of the best brands and the best relates to really enable them. We're here to enable industries and that ito's was very very striking because we're not here to replace physical rebuilt for example firefights spotted with physical retail. That's that's what we did since they when we continue to have. We started the future new retail. Very much believe in in how we reinvent the magic Physical retail and. It's the same with alibaba. actually so they. they add enabling tens of thousands of physical retailers in china knocking luxury but in other countries with went single platform. So that was when the second walls china and how combined shining. Fox's we could have a win win proposition for consumers and also for brands and retailers in that in that market and said when whilst the global nature of this deal that we should really join forces to create this vision of luxury new retail new retail his alibaba strategy out mentors retail whilst fash strategy luxury new retail is the combination of

Alibaba Richemont Riche Mont Neta Portait Josie Neva Mike Josie Alibaba Daniel Jank Mike Evans Paolo Josie Mexico China United States FOX
We must end ‘deadly addiction’ to coal for planet’s sake, urges Guterres

UN News

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

We must end ‘deadly addiction’ to coal for planet’s sake, urges Guterres

"The world's major polluters have not been bold enough in their pledges to cut emissions. Un secretary general antonio guitarist said on tuesday but he's insisted that they're still a fighting chance to hold back global warming if fossil fuel power stations are phased out in an appeal to governments private companies and local authorities to end our deadly addiction to call the un chief reiterated the urgent need to reduce emissions by forty five percent this decade highlighting three key measures mr guitarist called on countries to cancel all global coal projects in the pipeline and in particular the thirty-seven wealthy countries of the organization for economic cooperation and development. We cd who should commit to phasing out coal by twenty thirty the un chief also called for an end to the international financing of coal plants and investors to shift to renewable energy projects. This transition could happen coal plant by coal plant. If necessary misty guitarist insisted in comments at the powering past coal summit hosted by the uk and canada

Antonio Guitarist UN Organization For Economic Coop UK Canada
Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

John Williams

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

"Has been hospitalized after she was shot in the face at a West Pullman gas station. Last night, the Andrea Dyer was sitting in the back seat of a car gas station on West 127 straight around 11 o'clock when the shooting began, Police say a 19 year old man was leaving the gas station store one another man started firing. In his direction. The 19 year old man was shot in the groin, then returned fire. The suspect also hit the Andrea in the face. She was taken to Comber Children's Hospital in extremely critical condition. Her family is asking anyone with information to come forward.

West Pullman Gas Station Andrea Dyer Gas Station Store Comber Children's Hospital Andrea
Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

Bob Sirott

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Chicago gas station shooting injures 11-year-old girl, 19-year-old man

"And a man our wounded following a shooting at a gas station on Chicago's Far south side. Police say the man was leaving the gas station last night in the 100 block of West 127th. When someone shot him. The man returned fire. Ah, girl who was sitting in the backseat of vehicle parked at a gas pump was hit by a stray bullet. The 11 year old has been identified as nigh. Andrea Dire. Her godmother is denouncing the gun violence. No one is they put the guns down. I'm not going to stay. Put it! Get rid of it. There's no reason I'm old school. I used them hands. You don't find the person go upto. Yes, Stanley killing these kids. Y'all Stanley, killing these kids now and I get to see what it feels like a 19 year old man was taken to Christ Hospital. The young girl is that Comber Children's Hospital. Police say the victims are unrelated. Faulty

Andrea Dire Chicago Nigh Stanley Christ Hospital Comber Children's Hospital
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 1 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Los Angeles Sees Spike In Coronavirus Cases

Pivot

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

Los Angeles Sees Spike In Coronavirus Cases

"Did you see los angeles The the the town by town look at southern california and During this massive wave this massive spike in cases. Malibu pretty much untouched. Hollywood pretty much untouched. Look at selena's county carmel. They can't find an infection. Then you go in inland to salinas. And it's it's raining the lettuce pickers salinas and and so You know it's thing where it's like people who say well. I really barely know anybody kobe. Nineteen the memo but the people who pick your food and driver to this station in handed to the those are the people that are getting sick and dying and you may not know their first names but they're part of your life

Salinas Malibu Southern California Selena Los Angeles Carmel Hollywood Kobe
Lady Bird Johnson's daily audio diaries make it to podcast

podnews

03:05 min | 2 d ago

Lady Bird Johnson's daily audio diaries make it to podcast

"The latest from our daily newsletter at port news dot net today jacqueline bouvier kennedy names. Goodbye and believe in it. Her shining gift for women's history month from abc news in the us in plain sight listens to more than one hundred and twenty three hours of audio diaries. From claudia altair ladybird johnson including new revelations about lyndon b johnson's presidency first two episodes drops. Yesterday the tech lab released two dates to its version. Two point one. Podcast measurement get lines for public comment in december and january. However news can reveal today that over the entire seventy four days. The public feedback email address given didn't actually work. Email silently bounced with us unknown era. The described this as unfortunate but would neither confirm nor deny that it's received no feedback at all to this address as a consequence the updated document including ip. Six measurement was only publicly announced in two tweets and by editing. An existing post on its website wasn't flagged as a new item. The ib tells us it's extending public comments as a consequence but haven't responded to our follow up questions over the weekend to tell us and hugh the new dates if you need more out of your hosting provider. It's time to fully commit to another one says brian barletta in sounds profitable this week sponsored by putting off move to a better podcast. Host will hurt your long term strategy. He argues you should subscribe. It's it sounds profitable dot com squad. Cast has taken its new video and audio platform out of beta version. Three point five of the products includes a number of fixes and enhancements k. Q. e. d. radio station in san francisco in california in the us. He's working with google to make better news audio transcripts which may also improve automatic transcripts for podcasts to sound a podcast management of monetization platform has raised two point. One five million dollars in a seed round. That's four million dollars. They've raised in the past fourteen. Months charitable have announced custom attribution windows across all their and tribulation products their announcement blog post explains the current defaults in y. You might wants to change them. The london international awards have extended the fifty percent discount for entries including their podcast category. Cnn audio and cnn and a spaniel have launched a new weekly podcast with chief. International correspondent jose levy. Meanwhile fox news audio is to expand. Its podcast lineup. With five original programs an import cons news. The financial times has relaunched tectonic. The tech podcast. It's been revamped into a series of deep dives into the promises and perils of our digital age twenty-first-century football the complete guide. So far is another new release from the crowd network. The uk podcast patricia and sounds profitable. This week has me as a guest talking about. Rss us a agents.

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Claudia Altair Ladybird Johnso Lyndon B Johnson Brian Barletta Abc News Hugh United States Cnn Audio Radio Station Jose Levy San Francisco California Google CNN Fox News London Football
Interview With Caroline Gorski Of Rolls Royce

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:10 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Caroline Gorski Of Rolls Royce

"Caroline I think we're gonna be diving into the topic of logistics today. And i think what people think about applying ai. Logistics are often thinking about tracking where trucks are tracking our inventory levels. But for you folks who've worked on some ai. Applications leveraging nlp for logistics and supply chain purposes obviously rolls royce of massive industrial organization. You have a lot of supply chain needs. Can you go a little bit into what the problem was. What you guys have kinda built to help your cause. They're sure dan absolutely so. Yeah i mean just a little bit of context rolls royce overseas a hundred year old company and as a result we are also company that manufactures highly complex and very high value physical things and as a result. We have a very complicated supply chain structure. We also have certain parts of our supply chain where there are very few companies around the world who can actually make what we need from all supply chain so they're all points in our supply chain weather arrow some quite quite high levels of risk in terms of sourcing strategy. Because we don't have an infinite number of supplies you cannot and on top of that we have or certainly did have a real challenge with the presence of what can really only be described described as incredibly dumb unstructured data across our supply chain so information held in pediatrics information on contracting terms on supply standards or capabilities or even designs on top of that an awful lot of our supply. Chain information is either engineering drawings or it's mathematical notation tabulated information and those are three categories off of data which is very hard for existing kind of simplistic optical character recognition tools to actually extract reliably. So over the last couple of years we've been working to develop a natural language processing computer vision capability that she allows us to extract intelligence from all of those kind of dumb unstructured data sources. So that we can use not intelligence to be much more adaptive much more flexible much more responsive in managing risk across supply chain and clearly given the challenges that we faced in some of our markets globalization being one of them over the last twelve months with the covid nineteen pandemic having that increased capability for managing supply chain risk flexibly being able to understand using machine intelligence to actually understand induce scenario modeling across ask supply chain that has helped to support our business in making very significant financial savings in terms of its response to the pandemic but also broadly in terms of ensuring businesses fit for purpose as we become out to the pandemic in terms of managing complex supply. Chain starches for the future hansard. There's so many ways that this can come into place we we've done a lot of One of the sectors where we do our ai. Opportunity landscape research. Every year is chain. Logistics looking at everything in terms of matching loads two vehicles for for transportation to inventory prediction an and arrival times and whatnot. Nlp in this space is interesting is novel and i can imagine so many ways that it might be leveraged can imagine you reading news and information about your various suppliers. Maybe it's the weather in the area. Maybe it's something about them. Having a bad quarter whatever the case may be and i can see that maybe being factored into what production volumes you think they may be able to do or what arrival times you might be able to expect or i could even say a system that just puts the most important news in front of a human analyst who can put it in broader context. Because of course there's so much context for that dumb data to actually speak to business needs on how specifically is nlp sort of working here. And what's maybe an example of where this is starting to be able to inform our processes inform our prediction. Or whatever it's doing yeah. I you're absolutely spots on that donna. Interestingly some of these cases or those areas that you've just mentioned there are exactly where we want to take capability next cohort of the work that we've been doing for rolls royce as a global entity in the first phase of development of this capability. We have been working with those tricky types of data that exists in manufacturing and engineering supply chain unstructured data sets. So those would let me give you an example much of what we communicate while supplies is communicated through drawings engineering drawings. So these these two d drawings which then need to be rendered into three day geometry's in order to be able to understand way to no debate able to understand how much waste material might be generated from from making components. Nfl which the supplier that component of will reimburse us for of course because they charge us for the bulk weight of the material and then the machine material they reinvest because they resell out secondary market so for us to understand for example you know how much is something away how much we're gonna cost to ship and transport How much rebate should we be guessing from from the waste material. That's been resolved by the supplier on. We need to be able to render a to d draw ring into its three d geometry now most of the during dumped exist in cat they only exist to droids so using a combination of competition and alpay. The nlp helps to extract the numerical information. That geometrical information is written around the drawing and the computer vision helps to manage the actual rendering of the drawing itself. You can actually turn your community station into three d rendering virtually and that of and allows you to couch might understand always questions about white about pricings about costing about justice about waste material might be generated for manufacturing

Royce Caroline DAN Donna NFL
Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

The Voicebot Podcast

04:43 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

"Yulia gif bain. Welcome to the voice. Podcast hey breath how are you. I've really i'm really good. It's great to finally get on the bike. We've been talking about this for at least two months. So i'm happy that we're able to arrange the the funny thing is in the interim we seem to have spent a lot of time on clubhouse together so maybe we could have just done this year like two weeks ago. Yeah yeah spending a lotta time there all right so i think there's a there's a lot of story to be told here because you've you've been in the industry for a while but i think there's an interesting i that i wanted to start with. I wanna talk about speak to it. Maybe maybe your journey in voice day. I started before that. Because i i know that you study computational linguistics as an undergraduate but what i draw you to the idea of of using speech technology and actually building an assistant. Yeah so i would say like initially it was not about speech was about like chat bots and chat right so i started to work on some like chat bots dick like question answering systems back university as you mentioned yelich. All i was doing the computational linguistics relatively randomly so i was like interested in an internship in it company and the a guy who was like my manager there. He was a computational linguists so He had some interesting like thanks for us to do to research. Soviet play with chad bots. So i remember. I think like i published my first article question answering systems back in two thousand towards southern three and then later maybe in two thousand seven i was also working on the project related to chat bots. We created a platform where users could create their own chat bots like mostly for fun Trades they're like our cars teach them to Like teach them different things And then place them to like blogs Social networks websites and see how they shot to like their friends read logs and and Correct them so and later Like when the star to speak to There was this kind of state where got relatively good quality of speech recognition. Then mostly available. Either roy door or some commercial solutions like like from nuance. You've got a mobile devices that our full enough and Kevin good interfaces such as like iphones and androids and There was like this tendency of Api's of like web services so mehan co-founders. We basically thought that if we combine all of this right open api is and and smartphones and voice. We could get A voice personal assistant. That will understand what you are asking about support station and then like connect to a those. Api's and get an answer for you or like have an action Down for you. So this is how this idea of speak to appeared and what year the little. Yeah the end of two thousand ten and to ten okay. So that's around the same time that the siri app. I came out and ios correct. Yes yes yes frankly. We didn't know about siri when we started to sing about the same main difference was that we started with. Hr bought right so we'll just because of our experience chat bots before idea was that won't i. We create a bot that you can talk to about anything and it supports conversation just question answer and then starts like injection different services to you know. Let's add the weather. Let's add local storage and so on but initially we would say you know you can just talk to talk to it Speak to about anything and by the way to also help like multiple different requests

Yulia Gif Bain Chad Bots Mehan Co ROY Kevin Siri
How to build a successful value-driven membership model

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:29 min | 5 d ago

How to build a successful value-driven membership model

"Read many stories about news innovators in europe and the united states. But what is it like to lounge digital bone outlet in the global south. What are those challenges and opportunities for funders who take the plunge in those countries. Our guest today is one of those founders. He's name is tiny gut. He was editor chief. John one of argentina's newspapers and in two thousand seventeen. He laughed to find rhodesian one of the most innovative examples of digital newspapers in the global south today china will talk about membership human journalism and social empathy and how to measure success of audience participation chine- welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you very much thirty for this invitation for having here. I'm regulatory audience of this podcast. So pleasure and a privilege to be thanks. Thank you so much. So i want to start with a personal question. What did you do. Why did you leave a good secure job at an established newspaper to lounge a small new startup. that's a person in question and to make the long story short. I would say i when i was twenty seven year. Old longtime ago any flow very particular path. Down there are a decider graphic. satoru Decided rector innovation director and finally eighteen chief and twenty one is at the company and for years eight chief. I decided to step down And i would say sort of to change the nature of of my challenges. Of course it was a big and beautiful challenge to lead that talented newsroom of almost two hundred people And we work and we do have a lot of fun and success in bringing into the twenty first century Great media brand Born in the nineteenth century But on the other hand today i feel that is also an enormous and also beautiful challenge to create a new media bencher from scratch So to bringing a small but also very talented team That by building this this new media we are trying to answer some essential questions to to our craft journalism and also to me. So how can we acknowledge the the media fatigue And media avoidance phenomenon for example. Or or how can we cover the most pressing social issues we face as society and covered in a different way and probably the most interesting question. A how does this. But equally experience of the twenty first century people's participation can affect journalism. So i would say that the coral of of We are trying to hook like the broadcast. One way or the model per line that was born with us media And he's one of the challenges. Our industry spacey facing. I'm sorry it wasn't short. The the answer but i have two more things to say. There is almost no secure job now. Our industry I think everything is at risk An acknowledging daddy. I think it's a good thing on the other hand. I believe that in the end. I guess That why i step down being there to of great media. Well i guess it has to do a lot with a very personal calling on that I read a sentence which i found very very interesting. What you said. Human journalists can rebuild social empathy. Can you explain to us what it means Yes we believe that the problems we are facing us society. The challenges are very complex and of course Demands complex many times complex solutions and we are not going to find those solutions without an open dialogue between institution politicians and citizens So pariah station. For example. it's it's it's almost the name of the social conversation today at is preventing us to find those solutions. An in-depth sense. i believe. Journalism has an important role in terms of showing Other words helping us understand other opinions For amd we'd take this very seriously advocates axiom. So we been trying sort of new full matz that help how to help us our own To have more empathy with different lives people that lives in a different way of thinking in a different way than myself So it has to do with how we build a more robust set citizenship. That helps that public dialogue to evolve and on find real solutions. Gus dose dilutes might should have at the end semaine back in personal and institutional decisions

Satoru Argentina Europe United States China John Matz
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

05:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"People who watched the film more than the subject matter. That's where your story is. That's how you know you have something worth making but how you make it and that you don't need all the money and all the technology and all the things in the world to make your story work and be powerful and be the you know the grand jury. Dramatic choice is sundance High honor the very very high honor and he got him. The deals to get this film distributed worldwide And if you just pay attention to sound design and just performances and setting telling it's it's it's those things amplify what you're trying to do that they give it those rhythmic beats That are very very important. So i i have in the beginning of the episode. I joke about like the director of that. Have the most I'm most jealous. A lot of the things that he's done are all the things i've wanted to do like i wanna have. The independently made very powerful film. And then all of a sudden still owns like hey man how about you do the next rocky movie and also here the writing like rights to it rocky movies he can take it on forever and then you can down to a superhero movie. So like if you're not in awe of that than i don't know why you'd be like the only other person close to that is like i mean even close to that but the person that would probably be the original is probably patty jenkins who did an indie movie. Ghana can award performance out of it. Then did one woman announced doing star wars so like she's broken those barriers. Like first female do this. I don't do that and it's like wow and then kugler is like making our in film at a level where black people can feel proud of it but it's also not just cannon fodder. It's not just like well. Here's your pop moving walkaway something that's important in talks about something And this thing now. I'm about like i'm like i never to take away anything from like the entertainment value of art. Philmont's up like this film. This is why it can be and it doesn't take two hundred million dollars to make it. That's what i'm saying so I i enjoy not only like two hundred thousand for the whole thing hundred. Okay wow nine. Hundred thousand so. They got two hundred thousand in grants. That's what it was and octavia produced. It and she went her salary force. Whatever he did too. But i just wanted to talk about octavia you know ryan kugler had to sit down with. Some of our funding fell through and she went. Well don't pay me. let's just. Let's just make this movie move to make. I think i really respect. And that's the thing you you don't get that if you're trying to like well let's just make a fun movie about the holidays where it's like. Well let's talk about something important. Let's talk about something that people are still talking about four years later so you know you don't get that out of your normal genres so with that we'll go onto our next two segments of the show which are gonna be our brief synopsis and our production. And i didn't ask who's going to do that before we started recording. So i'm gonna ask the the host now who wants to debris schnauzers. I'll do production okay. Nevermind josh's got it okay. Josh got the brief synopsis. So give it to us. Josh all right brief synopsis though he wants spent time in san quentin twenty two year. Old black man. Oscar grant played by michael. B jordan is now trying hard to live a clean life and support. His girlfriend played by melanie and young. Daughter arianna neil Flashbacks reveal the last day and oscar's life in which he accompanied his family and friends to san francisco to.

ryan kugler michael two hundred million dollars two hundred thousand Hundred thousand patty jenkins san francisco Josh melanie oscar two segments nine hundred josh Oscar first female arianna neil twenty two year four years later one woman
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Whenever i see things happening in social media like really terrible stories like this and some of this hit home for me because i have a friend who went through not the same thing a kind of different sub section of it So some of it hit home and it was a tough watch. Whenever i see videos like the one that it starts out with. I see what this film is in those few moments of time so it was hard to see all of those things in my head and then have to watch them knowing what's coming to like the whole film about perspective and it's hard to have the perspective before you watch the perspective to hard watch. That's it for me She didn't like the movie. So i'm gonna go next and i'm pretty sure corey suggested this film on our docket and i said are you sure you sure baby because it's it's not. It's not like healing adjustment. It's not easy it's not. I'm gonna go watch a movie today that no. It's this tough so let me go back to two thousand thirteen for me and this is probably like Probably in may twenty thirteen because this is probably the reason why i remember this because in two thousand thirteen that summer i became single and i remember going to the theater to watch this film before it came out worldwide and so like studying film production in theory at sacramento state university Watching a movie that comes out early. That had just won at sundance was important. Felt like i was becoming part of the film community more and more And it hits even closer that you know the professors that were excited about it. We're excited because ryan kugler writer and director of the film had taken the classes. I'm taking So there was this little bit of a like. Oh i'm walking the same steps. He was walking so I watched this film like sometime in the summer. Or like may april ish of twenty thirteen so before came out worldwide and i sat in the theater. It was at the domes. if you're from sacramento. I'm talking about and sacramento. You'll made from sack stay. You know rang. Kugler made this film and won at sundance and blah blah. And i was like cool cool and You know you send the theater and watch the watch the film and you don't realize that like this up because rank luger's here with us today and he's going do a qna afterwards. and so. My professor dr. Promo on curated this. Qna shadow talked about some things. And he's again and then you'll be able and then run cooler will be in the lobby and then you can take a picture with them or you can ask him a thing and They had these little cards. And i think probably posted on my instagram. Once or twice or something like that but Carter like made a sex data had his picture on it. And i remember meeting. I'll talk more about that later. But the film and the theater. There's a lot to take away. Especially if you are someone who wants to say john costing dabble in film filmmaking. And there's a lot of good lessons to learn and there's a lot of wonderful very simple things..

ryan kugler Kugler may twenty thirteen twice rank luger today may april ish Once Carter instagram corey john costing dr. single sacramento Promo two thousand thirteen sacramento state university twenty thirteen cooler
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:25 min | 3 weeks ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Comedy me. I think it'll be also be katryn. Yeah i thought a long time about this last night like a way longer than i should have i always right. I guess is down before if i can and then i'll since i go last i i feel like i do have the burden of adjusting. Possibly a little bit. However i don't have a solid answer for this. I thought for a good hour and a half and i just went. I'm going to go to bed. Screw it so figured it out. You mean the whole my whole last year balance. I'm going go. i'm gonna go with josh. Because while so no no votes on thomas core. That's word on show isn't that crazy spoke loudly. So if you wanna be loud sort of our episodes you could. You could take part in polls if you join the nomination and and if you get it right guess what tom. The guests that gator grumpier Ron kugler grump. We got in. We're busy tough topical so yeah during the nomination you can take place if you get it right. If you correctly gonna shout out on our show the nomination of spoken and it. It didn't speak that loudly because it did have. It did have some votes across the board. But the Consensus generally that. It's going to be caitlyn the end of the episode when we do reveal our scores. It's gonna be me and tom josh than caitlyn. So let's get into the complete spoiler of that guests segment with our next which is going to be our initial reactions in our first impressions and for drama sake. I'm going to go last. Yes yes yes go i. I'll start it started off. I had seen. I talked about this in our digital green room. A little bit. I had seen clips of this Prior but never the entire film. I knew about the event. It was based on Not at the time. I was in new york at the time of the event However in the years following. I did learn about it i got. I'm from the bay area myself. Yeah my sister. Lives in in in oakland and so i was aware of what was based on before going in and i down hot. Damn i think we didn't episode recently where we answered a question of what something I don't think this exact wording but you struggle with suggesting to people. And i wouldn't necessarily say i would struggle with suggesting this movie to people but it reminded me of the same kind of feeling i got when i watched blue. Valentine where it was like. I think this is an important film. I think everyone needs to see this once. It's probably not something. I'm going to just like pop in but i don't think much much like valentine. I don't think the experience of watching it as something. I'm going to lose with time like with a lot of other movies. I vaguely recall. Oh i think. I saw this like i'm going to remember where i was what i was doing. And the visceral reactions. I had while watching it..

new york Ron kugler tom josh katryn josh thomas core last year oakland valentine last night first impressions Valentine caitlyn tom hour and a half blue
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

05:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"And you don't realize oh. We're actually following this up because ryan cougars here with us today. And he's going to do a qa nerd on what's up everyone. Welcome to nerd on. The podcast didn't deserve all those inert are welcome. Yeah you are. Yeah you like that. is that better. Okay let's go to a mile a minute except for that was the best one. You've done their entire career. Has been built up to this Let's get into it sometimes. Film transcends the medium allowing us to recount significant moments in history. Like being a fly on the wall in someone else's day today we dive deep into my favorite person to be jealous. Those debut feature film fruitvale station. But let's get right into it. Let's introduced to host. I am tom and caitlyn. I'm corey and i am josh. And this episode is brought to you in part by the members of the nerd on nation that is powered by patriarch as a member of the nerd on nation. You do get fun perks like you get early access to these episodes you get bonus episodes that nobody else. Here's their exclusive to you and you get access to secret channels on our discord server. That only you have access to and you can talk with us and other members of the nerd on nation directly You get what we. Call the nerd on nudge on our other weekly show than heard on update where we answer your questions. I but yeah do check it out. It does allow us to grow. It allows us to grade content like recently we upgraded our cameras. What say quality. Check it out nerd. On dot tv backslash patriae on and join that nerd on nation and also check out that discord that i was mentioning nerd on dot. Tv backslash discord It's a really fun conversation over there. And it's growing by the week It's triple digits now of members so it's pretty fun over there So do check that out and a huge shutout to our partners Odisea and apogee apogee have equipped with these microphones the height mike They are an incredibly versatile. Microphone that i cannot recommend enough. You can use them on your iphone. Ipad your mac your pc. We use it for everything that we do. And so i highly suggest it I know that some of you have been reaching out to us to see. What is we use so height mic. Check it out and check out. Odyssey headphones We use their lcd they're comfortable. They sound yummy. Check them out there. Wonderful company Great people to work with and lots of fun stuff coming in the future so check them out odyssey headphones. They've got these. They've got their gaming headset. The penrose and the moebius which is dope but all of their products are quality. So check them out odyssey and that that my friends is the housekeeping wet us. Get into this episode. this this episode this. This episode baby was february. We had to do it to them. We're talking about black artists in black films and black Black art particularly on but We're gonna go into our our two segments of the and you know. I mean this is one one one film. It is though that means at the end of the episode. We're going to rate it so that us to our first segment. Everyone which is.

caitlyn february iphone tom josh Ipad Odisea two segments first segment corey mac today ryan Odyssey one apogee odyssey dot. Tv fruitvale station a mile a minute
Orgues de Flandre

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Orgues de Flandre

"Take a walk down the avenue differently in Paris nineteen foundational, and you'll be met with surroundings that you wouldn't associate with your typical Parisian beautiful. In place of much dourthouse, manny and architecture is something a little more modern a little more stay. In fact, emerged from one of the avenues, many metro stations and more likely to feel like you're in Berlin as opposed to the French capital. One set of buildings that personifies the unique Milange of architecture the hawking set of towers that instantly noticeable for their striking angular shapes.

Paris Berlin
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Your Transformation Station

Your Transformation Station

04:14 min | 6 months ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Your Transformation Station

"Page. Yeah, that sounds great. Welcome back to your transformation station the third time. Welcome, this is your weekly uplift. We're going to focus on some intense mind-boggling. nonsense No, we're not. We're actually going to look into some really interesting stuff. I don't understand. My microphone is now quieter than normal. So we're just going to do that here together as one big happy family. Yes. References, I'm trying to talk to it won't let me do it. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to wow, that definitely piqued our can't talk that loud song ladies and gentlemen. Let's turn that down here. Ladies and gentlemen. Yeah, it's still testing testing testing. Oh, there we go. We are peaking outage and ladies and gentlemen. Wow, that really made a difference. Let's turn it down just to hear ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to your transformation. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to your transformation station. This is your one and only Greg favazza such a wonderful day to be back here on the microphone into everybody who is listening out there. I appreciate you. How about this? How about you guys leave a review? Now my God, this microphone keeps moving on me for those that have been listening tuning in. I appreciate you guys. Wow, you're added you just took my nice warm and welcome. Thank you. Leave a review for those little dudes out there. Hey little dude. What are you doing? You little dude? Hey little dude, but be sure to check out check out the Facebook page our Facebook page. Also Twitter Instagram YouTube and what else we doing? All I know is I need to get closer to his microphone. I need to get a crescent wrench and tighten this little bad boy cuz it just won't stay up. It's that's happening. all right well we're going to take a quick break so I can tighten this microphone but it will feel like only a split second thoughts we're looking into as essentialism god dammit the most satisfying noise right now that's on my mind is just hearing this listen It definitely Beats. Digital reading by a long shot. I'm just that guy. I need to have that book in my hand. I just need to have it. It's something about holding. It makes me ten times more engaged than actually reading up a screen. Welcome back to your transformation station for those that have subscribed to the show. Leave a review You've been listening to your transformation station green discovering your true identity and purpose on this planet. We hope you enjoyed the show and we hope you've gotten some useful and practical information join us quickly on Monday for the yts challenge and bi-weekly on Wednesday for the exclusive interviews at 8 p.m. Central Time. In the meantime connect with us on Facebook and Instagram at yts. The podcast will be back soon until then this huge transformation station signing off..

Facebook Greg favazza
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on The Leviathan Chronicles

The Leviathan Chronicles

03:26 min | 7 months ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on The Leviathan Chronicles

"On the last morning team rose early at first light, and began a final percent sterling, even more energetic than yesterday, and at one point Centrum found himself having trouble keeping up by early afternoon, the humid cloudy out of the jungle appeared to lighten and haze, that permeated the forest in every direction dissipated slightly as the group hiked further, they could see a clearing up ahead, and the sounds of the jungle creatures suddenly thought Louder Resin. When the group reached, the clearing may look down and realize that they were standing on the lip of a massive sinkhole, stretching for diameters, two hundred meters before them was titanic Sutculer hold on the jungle. Caused by the ceiling flaps of colossal underground cave, the sinkhole descended approximately three hundred meters down a long steep limestone and shale cliffs. Spell! While the sinkhole was amazing, the impressive from a geological perspective it was not remotely as astonishing. The hundred meter, high stone temple, that Saturday spot and the toll squat temple was constructed in a style reminiscent of Trivedi in architecture, similar to Ankle Watson Cambodia with its soaring Gigante spirals in heavy stern Pele's, the structure was largely grown by MOSS, fines and trees, making to splendid perfectly with the surrounding jungle and narrow steep path, was visible winding around the perimeter with tight switchback, leading down to the sinkhole flow. We ever get down into that. While Rebecca Sunshine gazed open mouths at the hidden temporary nestled in the some value, the Congo wit Roberts moved. Decide quietly to San closer to Jason. Jason Certainly. And our plan is finally going to begin. We've made it to visits. This is where the..

Jason Centrum Ankle Watson Cambodia Trivedi Rebecca Sunshine Roberts San
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

05:02 min | 10 months ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"In eighteen. Ninety seven response to Virginia O'Hanlon a New York Sun editor named Francis Church stated without a doubt that yes. Virginia there is a Santa Claus fans of classic Christmas films. No those words all too well however it was another line. In Virginia's original letter that encapsulated the public's belief in the media if you see it in the sun it is so is before Cable News and Am Radio. Turn everyone into skeptics. People had faith in what they read and listen to if it came from the mouth or pen of a trusted journalist it must have been true and then in one thousand nine hundred thirty eight. All Hell broke loose on October thirtieth the day before Halloween a radio broadcast went out all across America. When it did it caused a panic from coast to coast and everywhere in between the first bulletins came in from an observatory in Chicago where it was reported that explosions had been spotted on the surface of Mars. Minutes later and earthquake was felt twenty miles. Outside of Princeton New Jersey originally thought to be a meteorite. A later update revealed another impact not far from Trenton. It was clear that New Jersey was under attack. Onlookers and police watched as the top of the unidentified object came off. Something emerged from inside. It's wide black. Is Reflecting back at the crowd Could be heard getting louder and louder as the creature extended its long snake like tentacles. Suddenly a fire engulf the officers approaching the craft more explosions followed then. Reports of the dead started coming in forty people had been found burned to the bone in a nearby field. The United States military had been dispatched to several counties in New Jersey. As martial law was declared throughout the states one hour later the broadcaster came back to announce what you most likely already know that everyone had been listening to a dramatization. The Classic H. G. Wells Scifi Story. The War of the worlds presented by Orson Welles. The aftermath of the broadcast is widely known and still debated today despite the sensationalist headlines from newspapers. Like the New York. Times it's unclear. Just how much of the country truly panicked during the program but it was enough to force the police to actually visit the station to shut things down pageboys and CBS employees had to hold them back as wells continued to push the envelope meanwhile CBS which board was overrun with calls from Midwestern towns where riots had broken out mobs had flooded the streets in the town of concrete Washington. The phone lines were so overloaded that they shorted out causing town wide blackout. That probably didn't help to calm their fears. The story of wells presentation isn't that unknown. It's a cautionary tale meant to symbolize that. We need to vet information instead of taking at face. Value However America's response to the war of the worlds was only the tip of the iceberg because the broadcast was recreated six years later in Chile. It had been rewritten to fit the new setting of course but all the telltale signs were still there reports of explosions death and mass hysteria except unlike in America where Menfolk suspected they were listening to a work of fiction. Chileans had no idea. The governor really thought aliens had invaded. He was so scared. He organized the Chilean military to fight them off. Then in nineteen forty nine. The show was changed again for an Ecuadorian audience. The only difference in this case was that the riots didn't start until after the broadcast was over upon learning that the whole thing had been a hoax locals burned down both the radio station and the newspaper building. Twenty people lost their lives that day in over three hundred fifty thousand dollars in damage was reported among those arrested for the crimes. Were three of the broadcasters themselves who had caused the panic in the first place today as so much of the news. That's reported has shifted toward entertainment. It's more and more difficult to spot the fiction amongst the fact conspiracy theorists want us to believe that everything is a massive plots or cover up. Run by the world's elite. The rest of us are left searching through it all for the truth like searching for needles in a haystack. I know we often lament that. Our world just isn't what it used to be but some things haven't changed after all that old bit of advice is still as relevant as it's ever been don't believe everything you hear. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on Apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast DOT COM. The show was created by me. Aaron Monkey in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called. Lor which is a podcast book series and Television. Show and you can learn.

Princeton New Jersey Virginia America New York H. G. Wells United States CBS Chile Orson Welles earthquake Francis Church Trenton Chicago editor Am Radio Aaron Monkey
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We're both very similar in size and capabilities and so they looked at using those modules in together with the US shuttle in the Mir space station. Then we started talking about doing flights of cosmonauts on the US shuttle and astronauts on the Mir and that happened The first two cosmonauts were Surrogate Creek Eleven Vladimir Titov came to work here in the US and we train them for some of the early space hab missions and so we worked very closely with them. norm staggered in. Bonnie Dunbar became our first astronauts to go to work with the Russians over in Russia. They were trained as COBB cosmonauts to go up on the Mir space station and almost as soon as that got started. We started talking about a series of docking missions. With the mirror the initial docking mission would bring a space lab module up to the Mir so that we could actually use it to do the The Human Life Science Studies on the first astronaut to be returning on the shuttle which became nap norm. Fagor D- In nineteen ninety five but then we started talking about an additional six to ten docking missions with Mir which became a whole series of shuttle. Mir flights We started with. Sts Seventy one in ninety five. And I think the last flight was an SDS ninety one in nineteen ninety eight where we still talking in the background about another space station. You did mention space station freedom in the early nineties but the shuttle Mir was was through in the nineties. How was that what was going on in the background for planning for the future. Well the the Freedom Space Station got started in Nineteen eighty-four and originally the plan was that we were going to have it in orbit operating by the five hundredth anniversary of Columbus in nineteen ninety two above by nineteen ninety ninety one. We were really that far along with the Freedom Space Station. We started talking with the Russians. The Russians had had plans for a much larger space station and so we started discussing with the Russians ideas of may be their space station could join our space station and we would have one large international space station which is exactly what happened even before that we started working with them on the mirror and the US essentially bought and paid for two of the modules. That would go up to Mir the last two modules on Mir coach Peralta Inspector and so they were launched in one thousand nine hundred ninety five and nineteen ninety six and we actually test a lot of the International Space Station hardware on those two modules We were responsible for a lot of the Electrical Power Systems. The computer systems the stowage and logistic systems. A lot of that was actually tested out. I on Mir and is still in use on the ISS on the International Space Station today When the Russians joined the program we were still using the freedom hardware. Pretty much the The modules the nodes The whole structure of the space station today is pretty much. What was initially envisioned for the Freedom Space Station starting in the Mid Nineteen Eighties But when the Russians joined the program we renamed at the International Space Station and by that time in nineteen ninety three or thereabouts. We'd already been working for quite a long time with the Japanese and European so they were fully invested in the program and In one thousand nine hundred ninety eight of course. We launched the very first module of the International Space Station which was one of those Almaz military modules at the Russians had developed starting in the late nineteen sixties and So the F. G. B. Which was the first module of the space station was very important very critical in terms of saving us a lot of money because it provided the electrical power the guidance and Control Systems Propulsion Systems. A lot of things that the US no longer had to develop for the International Space Station. So where does the story of the spy on the International Space Station go from there? We're launching Zarya F G B in in ninety eight. How do we more from collaborating you talk about there was already a strong foundation of collaboration The the end of Mir and the rise of the construction of space station going forward. Well we were talking. Some of US would have liked to have seen our modules that we had designed and built for mere continue on to the International Space Station and so some of US actually tried to talk the program manager at that time Randy Brinkley into Having the Mir and the International Space Station in a CO cleaner orbits and so we would be able to visit from one to the other carryover hardware modules but The program manager was not too enthusiastic about that and so The Specter in pro two modules really did not get the kind of use that they might have had otherwise does remodels. You worked goes where modules. I was the lead. Us manager on Priroda and so we barely began to use them quite honestly In the meantime The US wanted to focus fully on the International Space Station so we began to do that in nineteen ninety eight. We were very dependent on the core module. The base block What would become on the International Space Station the service module of the International Space Station because that was our initial habitation quarters provided the life support equipment and the Russians had very limited capability to produce these modules? They basically only had one set of workers and they had been working for twenty five years by this time and so they would build one module and then they would go on to the next module so the Gbi was in work until it launched and then they got started really on the service module and outfitting in finishing. So we knew it wasn't going to be ready for immediate launch and it wasn't until about two thousand and That was when we sent the first crew up to take take up life on the International Space Station. The Mir in the meantime reentered in two thousand and one burned up in the atmosphere As it did so and I had enjoyed as I say if a fifteen plus year lifespan when it was only originally intended to last for about five years the Russians did not let Mir die that easily they wanted to go back but Quite honestly without the support of the US and the shuttle they really could not do both programs together and so they did. Let me or die There were a lot of choice to it as it reentered and then they turn their full attention to the International Space Station. All right well Gary. I think that's a. That's a good place to end this discussion for now. What we did was. We talked about a brief history of space stations up to just the beginning of the International Space Station on a really believe that we should split this into another part and just talk space station and the progression of that because right now we're still at nine hundred ninety eight We talked about Mir de orbiting in in two thousand and one really give the International Space Station. The Justice deserves Gary Kip mark. Thank you so much going through this really brief but fascinating discussion about space stations. Let's continue this. Let's keep going. I enjoyed doing it anytime. Only bring your. Hey thanks for sticking around fascinating conversation. We had with Dr Gary Kit Marker today about early space stations kind of ran out of time. We're GONNA make this a two parter This will just be focusing on the early space stations tune in next week Because we'll come back with Dr Gary. Kit macher talk on the International Space Station and then afterwards what's to come If you like this podcast we are. We just kicked off a collection of our International Space Station. episodes some of our favorites throughout the two years that we've been doing podcasts. You can go to NASA dot gov slash podcast to find us. Houston we have a podcast. There's a little tab over to the side called H Webb space station episodes H. W. H. AP Space Station episodes. Just go there and you can see our whole collection. We got this one coming out. And then the next Gary Kit Mugger episode to come. If you want to know more about the international space station NASA dot Gov slash I s s if you like social media the ISS is there to facebook twitter and instagram just search international space station. Use the HASHTAG. Ask NASA on your favorite platform to submit an idea for the show and make sure to mention it's for Houston. We have a podcast. A quick plug for our student listeners. Out there research in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station is still as important as ever and to celebrate twenty years of continuous.

International Space Station Freedom Space Station Mir US W. H. AP Space Mir de orbiting Dr Gary Bonnie Dunbar Russia COBB Gary Kit NASA Vladimir Titov Dr Gary Kit Marker Gary Kip mark Control Systems Propulsion Sys Electrical Power Systems program manager
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Mir Space Station really didn't happen until the nineteen ninety s at the same time on the NASA side in the. Us We were trying to build the space shuttle and right from the very beginning the shuttle was intended to be a an assembly and servicing vehicle for a space station The first shuttle of course was ready for launch in nineteen eighty one and although the NASA management was trying to get congressional and presidential support for Space Station The president Kept deferring it and Jimmy. Carter was not a big fan of the space program. They felt lucky that they kept the shuttle going Ronald Reagan. They thought was More amenable to supporting a space station but even he did not come across with support early on and So we flew the first number of shuttle flights at the same time the European Space Agency came in and said we would like to work cooperatively with the US and help to develop our own European space program. How about if we build you a space laboratory that would go inside the space shuttle and that became the European Space Agency spacelab? So they started working on the space lab in the late nineteen seventies and it flew. I think on the first The FIRST FLIGHT WAS ON S. Nine in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. I believe if I recall correctly and We flew a number of flights with the space lab. Other people came along with similar ideas. there was a commercial group called the Spacehab which we think today about the commercialization of space Going full speed ahead with SPACEX and Boeing in the CS T. One hundred and so on but really the first big manned Commercial Space Program was spacehab that launched for the first time on sts fifty seven And that was a commercially owned module There were others. Who were less successful for instance Max v j? After he retired from NASA wanted to build a small space station that he called the industrial space facility and he was never successful with that There were a lot of ideas that were carried on into other programs but the ISF never actually happened. So I guess. Space lab was are kind of inbetween cooperative way of having some way to work and live in space and figure out how that works and then moving forward to Mir. That was a way to work cooperatively with Russia but sort of the same thing the the shuttle docked to the Mir space station and then we had astronauts and cosmonauts living in working on that there were a whole series of spacelab flights Europeans working together with the US On the shuttle some of the SPACELAB flights were Basically operated and managed by the European Space Agency others were operated by NASA. Some were operated by a specific countries Japan or Germany and there were a whole series of them The Europeans especially were working very closely with the Russians. They had a number of their own French and European cosmonauts who flew on the space stations and then later on the Mir space station and then in nineteen ninety one The US started looking at the space station freedom. In how could we do things cooperatively with the Russians One of the first things we looked at was Could we use any of the Russian hardware for our freedom space station and we thought about using the saw us as an emergency rescue vehicle and the first group of American of NASA managers went over to Russia and they saw not only do they have the Soyuz spaceship they have an airlock and docking module that they had built and designed for their Buran shuttle and the branch shuttle and the US shuttle was. We're both very similar in size and capabilities and so they looked at using those modules in together with the US shuttle in the Mir space station. Then we started talking about doing flights of cosmonauts on the US shuttle and astronauts on the Mir and that happened The first two cosmonauts were Surrogate Creek Eleven Vladimir Titov came to work here in the US and we train them for some of the early space hab missions and so we worked very closely with them. norm staggered in. Bonnie Dunbar became our first astronauts to go to work with the Russians over in Russia. They were trained as COBB cosmonauts to go up on the Mir space station and almost as soon as that got started. We started talking about a series of docking missions. With the mirror the initial docking mission would bring a space lab module up to the Mir so that we could actually use it to do the The Human Life Science Studies on the first astronaut to be returning on the shuttle which became nap norm. Fagor D- In nineteen ninety five but then we started talking about an additional six to ten docking missions with Mir which became a whole series of shuttle. Mir flights We started with. Sts Seventy one in ninety five. And I think the last flight was an SDS ninety one in nineteen ninety eight where we still talking in the background about another space station. You did mention space station freedom in the early nineties but the shuttle Mir was was through in the nineties. How was that what was going on in the background for planning for the future. Well the the Freedom Space Station got started in Nineteen eighty-four and originally the plan was that we were going to have it in orbit operating by the five hundredth anniversary of Columbus in nineteen ninety two above by nineteen ninety ninety one. We were really that far along with the Freedom Space Station. We started talking with the Russians. The Russians had had plans for a much larger space station and so we started discussing with the Russians ideas of may be their space station could join our space station and we would have one large international space station which is exactly what happened even before that we started working with them on the mirror and the US essentially bought and paid for two of the modules. That would go up to Mir the last two modules on Mir coach Peralta Inspector and so they were launched in one thousand nine hundred ninety five and nineteen ninety six and we actually test a lot of the International Space Station hardware on those two modules We were responsible for a lot of the Electrical Power Systems. The computer systems the stowage and logistic systems. A lot of that was actually tested out. I on Mir and is still in use on the ISS on the International Space Station today When the Russians joined the program we were still using the freedom hardware. Pretty much the The modules the nodes The whole structure of the space station today is pretty much. What was initially envisioned for the Freedom Space Station starting in the Mid Nineteen Eighties But when the Russians joined the program we renamed at the International Space Station and by that time in nineteen ninety three or thereabouts. We'd already been working for quite a long time with the Japanese and European so they were fully invested in the program and In one thousand nine hundred ninety eight of course. We launched the very first module of the International Space Station which was one of those Almaz military modules at the Russians had developed starting in the late nineteen sixties and So the F. G. B. Which was the first module of the space station was very important very critical in terms of saving us a lot of money because it provided the electrical power the guidance and Control Systems Propulsion Systems. A lot of things that the US no longer had to develop for the International Space Station. So where does the story of the spy on the International Space Station go from there? We're launching Zarya F G B in in ninety eight. How do we more from collaborating you talk about there was already a strong foundation of collaboration The the end of Mir and the rise of the construction of space station going forward. Well we were talking. Some of US would have liked to have seen our modules that we had designed and built for mere continue on to the International Space Station and so some of US actually tried to talk the program manager at that time Randy Brinkley into Having the Mir and the International Space Station in a CO cleaner orbits and so we would be able to visit from one to the other carryover hardware modules but The program manager was not too enthusiastic about that and so The Specter in pro two modules really did not get the kind of use that they might have had otherwise does remodels. You worked goes where modules. I was the lead. Us manager on Priroda and so we barely began to use them quite honestly In the meantime The US wanted to focus fully on the International Space Station so we began to do that in nineteen ninety eight. We were very dependent on the core module. The base block What would become on the International Space Station the service module of the International Space Station because that was our initial habitation quarters provided the life support equipment and the Russians had very limited capability to produce these modules? They basically only had one set of workers and they had been working for twenty five years by this time and so they would build one module and then they would go on to the next module so the Gbi was in work until it launched and then they got started really on the service module and outfitting in finishing. So we knew it wasn't going to be ready for immediate launch and it wasn't until about two thousand and That was when we sent the first crew up to take take up life on the International Space Station. The Mir in the meantime reentered in two thousand and one burned up in the atmosphere As it did so and I had enjoyed as I say if a fifteen plus year lifespan when it was only originally intended to last for about five years the Russians did not let Mir die that easily they wanted to go back but Quite honestly without the support of the US and the shuttle they really could not do both programs together and so they did. Let me or die There were a lot of choice to it as re entered and then they turn their full attention to the International Space Station. All right well Gary. I think that's a. That's a good place to end this discussion for now. What we did was. We talked about a brief history of space stations up to just the beginning of the International Space Station on a really believe that we should split this into another part and just talk space station and the progression of that because right now we're still at nine hundred ninety eight We talked about Mir de orbiting in in two thousand and one really give the International Space Station. The Justice deserves Gary Kip mark. Thank you so much going through this really brief but fascinating discussion about space stations. Let's continue this. Let's keep going. I enjoyed doing it anytime..

International Space Station Mir Space Station Freedom Space Station Mir US European Space Agency Space Station NASA Mir de orbiting Russia Ronald Reagan Carter Bonnie Dunbar ISF SPACEX Jimmy president
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:11 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"What could we do with the Apollo hardware? Could we build a space station? Could we build long-term basis on the Moon And ultimately out of that came the. Skylab program the Russians unsuccessful with they A large moon rocket had to focus on the smaller space stations which they called salute. I one went up and seventy one and they had a series of about eight of them between then and nineteen eighty-six not all of them successfully made them made it into orbit. I think Out of a total there were about four or five that were successful in the later stages of that on solid six solid seven they would launch up not just the main core of the space station but they would send up an additional module or two that would dock to it that would allow them to expand the space station. Skylab on the US side went up as one large space station basically folded up and unfolded once it reached orbit The astronauts went up an Apollo capsule. The it was sent up essentially loaded with all of these supplies. They would need for three missions. The last mission on Skylab four which was the third crew of astronauts Stayed for almost three months They extended the mission in order to observe comment that had been discovered earlier that year. Comic Hotek The astronauts got down to rationing food bars and some of the astronauts said that was the most difficult part of the flight was the pack that they had nothing to eat for the last several weeks. In the meantime the Soviets were launching these salute. Space Stations with these large resupply modules. They had been designing a follow on module. Actually part of the Almaz Program and these follow on modules. Were supposed to carry up. Space Capsule called a key K S. That look very much like an Apollo in American Apollo ship They took the Apollo ship off and they sent them up unmanned and they perfected this idea of unmanned rendezvous and docking. So they were ahead of us in that way also and So the first modular space stations were sal six and seven in the early nineteen eighties and then they decided will mirror would be the true modular space station. They were all launched by the smaller Proton rocket and They were composed of a central module. That was based on their civilian space station. The True Salad and series of additional modules were based on their military space station the Almaz and so Mir Had the main core module the base block. They would call it and in time they would add for additional large modules. Actually five if you include Quant to which was module designed to go up on their space shuttle and the docking module. That would actually go up on an American shuttle. So a lot of the lessons about constructing and operating a modular space station was learned on salad. And then maybe perfected or enhanced in some way on Mir It was I I wouldn't say it was perfected. Mirror had a lot of problems because it was only supposed to last for five years and instead they kept it going for about fifteen years and so a lot of the systems were breaking down. One of the problems at the Russians did have was the lack of a logistics capability they had intended for the Baronne space shuttle the Russian space shuttle to service the space station and after its first flight. They cancelled the Braun program. And so they had very little capability to return. Anything to the ground 'til the US started flying space shuttles there But they did perfect the idea of these modules coming in Operating truly independently on their own autonomously and then when the US got involved with the Russians in the Nineteen Ninety S. We actually worked with them. Developed a lot of their integration processes and developed a lot of the hardware that we use even today on the ISS. So I want to back up for a second to Skylab because I do I do feel like it is a different concept. What we're talking about with salute with with Mir. You said it was. It was one big element. It was a it was spun from this Idea to reuse Apollo hardware for something and. They came up with this large station. You talked about three crews living on living on Skylab what did Skylab show the United States in terms of living and working in space because at the time these missions that last one you said was three months that that was the longest we've ever been living and working in space. So what did that show us about? How the Skylab actually grew out of a program that I was thought about in the mid nineteen fifties by one of the German Engineers Craft. Erica who worked for the US Air Force on the atlas ICBM missile and As one of the ideas of what else could we do with the Atlas Craft? Erica thought about If we could launch these missiles into orbit around the earth we could evacuate them. Fill THEM WITH AIR. And then people could live on board as and it would be the first base station That was not followed too seriously but then in one thousand nine hundred sixty one in London England they were putting on home show and the British asked the US McDonnell Company which was building mercury and Gemini Space Ships. Can you design us a space station to put on exhibit in our home show in London and they thought about the idea of a second stage of a Saturn rocket being used as a space station and That was actually built in full scale and on display in London in nineteen sixty Verner von Braun comes along and initially the Apollo program was going to launch a series of Apollo Command service modules and lunar modules on smaller Saturn. One or uprated Saturn one rockets. And so they were building a lot of these rockets When the Apollo fire occurred in nineteen sixty seven and Apollo was already running behind schedule The associated administrator for spaceflight decided we could not afford to launch all these earlier Apollo ships we would just go directly to using the Saturn five rocket and test out the command service and lunar modules together. This left a lot of these smaller. Saturn one rockets available and von Braun started thinking about using the evacuated upper stage of the Saturn rocket as a space station. Actually they didn't call it space station. It was going to be They termed it an orbital workshop and a lot of the early ideas were not for space station at all. They were simply going to open up. A hatch and astronauts would be able to go in and essentially be able to do an EVA inside of this upper stage Von Braun and George Miller. Who was the associate administrator? Da Dove into the water tank at the Marshall Space Center and actually tried to unbolt the hatch on one of these Saturn upper stages and they were unsuccessful and they said there was no way you'd ever be able to get it open and orb about that time in nineteen sixty seven or sixty eight The Apollo program even though they had not flown the first mission yet was already being cut back. They had decided to To cancel several of the Apollo missions. Were they were going to go to Apollo twenty-five and they were only GonNa do Apollo Twenty at that point and so- Miller decided well we will use the last Saturn five rocket to launch a space station so they basically took one of the Saturn Moon. Rockets decided it would be used the integrated around this upper stage. The second stage stage of Saturn one third stage of a Saturn five There were a lot of studies at this time by Robert Gill Ruth. Who is the director here at the Johnson Space Center at the manned spacecraft Center What could we do with space station? And they decided they needed to enlist the support scientists and so they went off off after scientists who were doing astronomical work in solar observations they went after Earth Observation. Scientists are earth resources and so here at the manned spacecraft center we started up some new projects To actually incorporate science into the program we already had a pretty active life. Sciences Program Studying Human Beings In orbit space so Between these three themes of astronomy astronomical observations Earth Observations and Human Life Sciences. These were the main themes of the. Skylab program and so they built a large solar observatory They had a large package of Earth observation experiments and they had a lot of life. Science experiments all focused on human beings. the one problem with the Skylab was it was going to be launched as a single unit fully loaded and so that somewhat limited lifetime in its ability to be extended. Some people were thinking as the space shuttle was coming along later in the nineteen seventies while we just save the Skylab and it could become a space station but the people who actually manage the Skylab Kenny calling connect. Who was the program manager Bob Thompson? Who developed a lot of the ideas had the systems were never designed for an extended capability so they never thought seriously about extending Skylab at all And as it turned out the shuttle was ready to late in so skylab because of solar flares had reentered the earth's atmosphere early in nineteen seventy nine and there is a backup Skylab but by that time they had shut down all the Saturn rocket activity and so that backup Skylab is on display today at the Smithsonian up in Washington DC right. I've seen it so no you. You mentioned the shuttle that was that was what we're looking forward to. That shuttle eventually came online in the eighties and I know there's a story of it being integrated with Mir in terms of its story with space station in terms of Early story at least As well as something called Spacelab in nineteen seventy five we first. We flew the first mission with the Russians called. Esdp APOLLO Soyuz test project in which we talked the last Apollo capsule the last American Apollo with the Russian Soyuz And we had a lot of thoughts about launching space shuttles to dock with a salad space station but because of the Cold War That really never took off and We kind of went our separate ways for a long time until the Soviet Union fell At the beginning of the nineteen nineties and then we were looking at ways to work cooperatively with the Russians helped shore up the Russian space program in order to support their science and technical organizations. And so we although there were had been thoughts earlier about docking shuttle with a salad and later on. Mir Space Station really didn't happen until the nineteen ninety s at the same time on the NASA side in the. Us We were trying to build the space shuttle and right from the very beginning the shuttle was intended to be a an assembly and servicing vehicle for a space station The first shuttle of course was ready for launch in nineteen eighty one and although the NASA management was trying to get congressional and presidential support for Space Station The president Kept deferring it and Jimmy. Carter was not a big fan of the space program. They felt lucky that they kept the shuttle going Ronald Reagan. They thought was More amenable to supporting a space station but even he did not come across with support early on and So we flew the first number of shuttle flights at the same time the European Space Agency came in and said we would like to work cooperatively with the US and help to develop our own European space program. How about if we build you a space laboratory that would go inside the space shuttle and that became the European Space Agency spacelab? So they started working on the space lab in the late nineteen seventies and it flew. I think on the first The FIRST FLIGHT WAS ON S. Nine in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. I believe if I recall correctly and We flew a number of flights with the space lab. Other people came along with similar ideas. there was a commercial group called the Spacehab which we think today about the commercialization of space Going full speed ahead with SPACEX and Boeing in the CS T. One hundred and so on but really the first big manned Commercial Space Program was spacehab that launched for the first time on sts fifty seven And that was a commercially owned module There were others. Who were less successful for instance Max v j? After he retired from NASA wanted to build a small space station that he called the industrial space facility and he was never successful with that There were a lot of ideas that were carried on into other programs but the ISF never actually happened. So I guess. Space lab was are kind of inbetween cooperative way of having some way to work and live in space and figure out how that works and then moving forward to Mir. That was a way to work cooperatively with Russia but sort of the same thing the the shuttle docked to the Mir space station and then we had astronauts and cosmonauts living in working on that there were a whole series of spacelab flights Europeans working together with the US On the shuttle some of the SPACELAB flights were Basically operated and managed by the European Space Agency others were operated by NASA. Some were operated by a specific countries Japan or Germany and there were a whole series of them The Europeans especially were working very closely with the Russians. They had a number of their own French and European cosmonauts who flew on the space stations and then later on the Mir space station and then in nineteen ninety one The US started looking at the space station freedom. In how could we do things cooperatively with the Russians One of the first things we looked at was Could we use any of the Russian hardware for our freedom space station and we thought about using the saw us as an emergency rescue vehicle and the first group of American of NASA managers went over to Russia and they saw not only do they have the Soyuz spaceship they have an airlock and docking module that they had built and designed for their Buran shuttle and the branch shuttle and the US shuttle was..

Mir Space Station European Space Agency United States Apollo Space Station Marshall Space Center Johnson Space Center NASA Mir Nineteen Ninety Rockets London Verner von Braun Apollo missions Almaz Program manned spacecraft Center
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Oh Wow so How long did salute continue on and then winded? We really start thinking about taking some of the Apollo hardware and going ahead with Skylab we were thinking about a skylab all through the nineteen sixties we had a program wasn't really a program it was a study called Apollo applications that we were looking at. What could we do with the Apollo hardware? Could we build a space station? Could we build long-term basis on the Moon And ultimately out of that came the. Skylab program the Russians unsuccessful with they A large moon rocket had to focus on the smaller space stations which they called salute. I one went up and seventy one and they had a series of about eight of them between then and nineteen eighty-six not all of them successfully made them made it into orbit. I think Out of a total there were about four or five that were successful in the later stages of that on solid six solid seven they would launch up not just the main core of the space station but they would send up an additional module or two that would dock to it that would allow them to expand the space station. Skylab on the US side went up as one large space station basically folded up and unfolded once it reached orbit The astronauts went up an Apollo capsule. The it was sent up essentially loaded with all of these supplies. They would need for three missions. The last mission on Skylab four which was the third crew of astronauts Stayed for almost three months They extended the mission in order to observe comment that had been discovered earlier that year. Comic Hotek The astronauts got down to rationing food bars and some of the astronauts said that was the most difficult part of the flight was the pack that they had nothing to eat for the last several weeks. In the meantime the Soviets were launching these salute. Space Stations with these large resupply modules. They had been designing a follow on module. Actually part of the Almaz Program and these follow on modules. Were supposed to carry up. Space Capsule called a key K S. That look very much like an Apollo in American Apollo ship They took the Apollo ship off and they sent them up unmanned and they perfected this idea of unmanned rendezvous and docking. So they were ahead of us in that way also and So the first modular space stations were sal six and seven in the early nineteen eighties and then they decided will mirror would be the true modular space station. They were all launched by the smaller Proton rocket and They were composed of a central module. That was based on their civilian space station. The True Salad and series of additional modules were based on their military space station the Almaz and so Mir Had the main core module the base block. They would call it and in time they would add for additional large modules. Actually five if you include Quant to which was module designed to go up on their space shuttle and the docking module. That would actually go up on an American shuttle. So a lot of the lessons about constructing and operating a modular space station was learned on salad. And then maybe perfected or enhanced in some way on Mir It was I I wouldn't say it was perfected. Mirror had a lot of problems because it was only supposed to last for five years and instead they kept it going for about fifteen years and so a lot of the systems were breaking down. One of the problems at the Russians did have was the lack of a logistics capability they had intended for the Baronne space shuttle the Russian space shuttle to service the space station and after its first flight. They cancelled the Braun program. And so they had very little capability to return. Anything to the ground 'til the US started flying space shuttles there But they did perfect the idea of these modules coming in Operating truly independently on their own autonomously and then when the US got involved with the Russians in the Nineteen Ninety S. We actually worked with them. Developed a lot of their integration processes and developed a lot of the hardware that we use even today on the ISS. So I want to back up for a second to Skylab because I do I do feel like it is a different concept. What we're talking about with salute with with Mir. You said it was. It was one big element. It was a it was spun from this Idea to reuse Apollo hardware for something and. They came up with this large station. You talked about three crews living on living on Skylab what did Skylab show the United States in terms of living and working in space because at the time these missions that last one you said was three months that that was the longest we've ever been living and working in space. So what did that show us about? How the Skylab actually grew out of a program that I was thought about in the mid nineteen fifties by one of the German Engineers Craft. Erica who worked for the US Air Force on the atlas ICBM missile and As one of the ideas of what else could we do with the Atlas Craft? Erica thought about If we could launch these missiles into orbit around the earth we could evacuate them. Fill THEM WITH AIR. And then people could live on board as and it would be the first base station That was not followed too seriously but then in one thousand nine hundred sixty one in London England they were putting on home show and the British asked the US McDonnell Company which was building mercury and Gemini Space Ships. Can you design us a space station to put on exhibit in our home show in London and they thought about the idea of a second stage of a Saturn rocket being used as a space station and That was actually built in full scale and on display in London in nineteen sixty Verner von Braun comes along and initially the Apollo program was going to launch a series of Apollo Command service modules and lunar modules on smaller Saturn. One or uprated Saturn one rockets. And so they were building a lot of these rockets When the Apollo fire occurred in nineteen sixty seven and Apollo was already running behind schedule The associated administrator for spaceflight decided we could not afford to launch all these earlier Apollo ships we would just go directly to using the Saturn five rocket and test out the command service and lunar modules together. This left a lot of these smaller. Saturn one rockets available and von Braun started thinking about using the evacuated upper stage of the Saturn rocket as a space station. Actually they didn't call it space station. It was going to be They termed it an orbital workshop and a lot of the early ideas were not for space station at all. They were simply going to open up. A hatch and astronauts would be able to go in and essentially be able to do an EVA inside of this upper stage Von Braun and George Miller. Who was the associate administrator? Da Dove into the water tank at the Marshall Space Center and actually tried to unbolt the hatch on one of these Saturn upper stages and they were unsuccessful and they said there was no way you'd ever be able to get it open and orb about that time in nineteen sixty seven or sixty eight The Apollo program even though they had not flown the first mission yet was already being cut back. They had decided to To cancel several of the Apollo missions. Were they were going to go to Apollo twenty-five and they were only GonNa do Apollo Twenty at that point and so- Miller decided well we will use the last Saturn five rocket to launch a space station so they basically took one of the Saturn Moon. Rockets decided it would be used the integrated around this upper stage. The second stage stage of Saturn one third stage of a Saturn five There were a lot of studies at this time by Robert Gill Ruth. Who is the director here at the Johnson Space Center at the manned spacecraft Center What could we do with space station? And they decided they needed to enlist the support scientists and so they went off off after scientists who were doing astronomical work in solar observations they went after Earth Observation. Scientists are earth resources and so here at the manned spacecraft center we started up some new projects To actually incorporate science into the program we already had a pretty active life. Sciences Program Studying Human Beings In orbit space so Between these three themes of astronomy astronomical observations Earth Observations and Human Life Sciences. These were the main themes of the. Skylab program and so they built a large solar observatory They had a large package of Earth observation experiments and they had a lot of life. Science experiments all focused on human beings. the one problem with the Skylab was it was going to be launched as a single unit fully loaded and so that somewhat limited lifetime in its ability to be extended. Some people were thinking as the space shuttle was coming along later in the nineteen seventies while we just save the Skylab and it could become a space station but the people who actually manage the Skylab Kenny calling connect. Who was the program manager Bob Thompson? Who developed a lot of the ideas had the systems were never designed for an extended capability so they never thought seriously about extending Skylab at all And as it turned out the shuttle was ready to late in so skylab because of solar flares had reentered the earth's atmosphere early in nineteen seventy nine and there is a backup Skylab but by that time they had shut down all the Saturn rocket activity and so that backup Skylab is on display today at the Smithsonian up in Washington DC right. I've seen it so no you. You mentioned the shuttle that was that was what we're looking forward to. That shuttle eventually came online in the eighties and I know there's a story of it being integrated with Mir in terms of its story with space station in terms of Early story at least As well as something called Spacelab in nineteen seventy five we first. We flew the first mission with the Russians called. Esdp APOLLO Soyuz test project in which we talked the last Apollo capsule the last American Apollo with the Russian Soyuz And we had a lot of thoughts about launching space shuttles to dock with a salad space station but because of the Cold War That really never took off and We kind of went our separate ways for a long time until the Soviet Union fell At the beginning of the nineteen nineties and then we were looking at ways to work cooperatively with the Russians helped shore up the Russian space program in order to support their science and technical organizations. And so we although there were had been thoughts earlier about docking shuttle with a salad and later on..

Apollo Marshall Space Center United States Johnson Space Center Verner von Braun Rockets Apollo missions Mir Nineteen Ninety manned spacecraft Center Apollo Command Almaz Program George Miller London program manager US Air Force
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:40 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"War Two knew that this would be a very powerful tool if he could have reconnaissance satellites his concern. Was that the Russians the Soviet Union And was very concerned that the US was flying over their territory without permission and so Verner von Braun in about nineteen fifty. Six was actually had a rocket and was capable of launching the first satellite and he was told to stand down. Do not launch a satellite and that was because Eisenhower wanted the Soviets to show the idea of free overflight that satellites would be passing over the nations of the earth with basically unlimited Capability and I talked to Von Braun about this one time as a matter of fact when I was a college student Von Braun came to give a lecture and I asked him you know. He had been very disappointed in fifty six about not launching the first satellite and he told me well in the end it worked out well because there was a space race and he thought that because of this we made to the Moon in his lifetime which was a a major objective was so they had the technology but it was more of a strategic idea to wait veteran. Okay and let the Soviets at first so then that catapults us into the space race. Obviously we all know that. Sputnik launched And from there it wasn't too long later than NASA was formed Next thing you know. We're entering some of the first human spaceflight programs Napa National Advisory Committee for nautical. I didn't become NASA until Nineteen Fifty. And so they had been studying vehicles. That could fly higher and faster. They had out a whole series of explains beginning in the late. Nineteen forties in cooperation with the military Beginning with chuck yeager in the bell x one and then The two vehicles that could fly even faster and they were the x fifteen was on the drawing board it would eventually make it to six times the speed of sound and could actually reach space but in a ballistic trajectory They were looking at. How could you send a person into orbit and so people like Max v J here at the manned spacecraft center before it became Johnson Space Center was looking at the idea of a small capsule that could carry a person In some ways the Russians were further along than we were They had They're great designer. Sergei Korolev and he once he had the first ballistic missile being tested in the mid nineteen fifties knew. He was capable of launching a satellite and their first satellite He was able to get their polit bureau to support the idea that this could be a reconnaissance satellite or by changing out the pod that would carry the cameras. He could send up what he euphemistically called biological samples which he was really thinking would be a human being and they were developing that first satellite. That verse first sophisticated satellite when they decided the Americans were getting a little bit too far along with our vanguard project that was supposed to launch the first satellite and then with von Braun capable of launching a satellite on his redstone rocket which became the Jupiter C. And so they said we. We need to advance a little bit faster. And so they came up with the idea of what they called. Simple satellite which became sputnik one and so in nineteen fifty seven They I launched the first successful ballistic missile and the very next launch was the first satellite called Sputnik One We were a little bit delayed. I we were aiming to launch a satellite on the vanguard which was a totally new rocket civilian rocket being developed by the US Navy We were not too successful with that. First one blew up on the launchpad in early December shortly after the sputnik launch in October and sold von Braun was called in at that point in toll. Can you get your missile that he'd been sitting on for two years by this time? Ready and launch a satellite. He said Yeah I can do it. And the next couple of months and so in January thirty first nineteen fifty eight. He launched the first American satellite explorer. One explore okay so skipping ahead and and making the space race itself a little bit briefer. You already mentioned that it was. It was kind of a competition of technological prowess. Almost you know we had to be the first. But it was the Soviet Union to put the first man in space I believe the Soviet Union had the first war. Bit The first spacewalk. They had a lot of. I think it was Kennedy. Who made that declaration to skip ahead and shoot for the moon? Which is how that started or NASA had been studying the idea of sending on lunar flight. Although initially it was just a flight around the Moon Beginning in the late nineteen fifties The US army was competing with NASA. The military was competing. No one was sure at this point. Who would be in charge of the space program and so the US army actually led by Von Braun? Who worked for the? Us Army at that time had a project of very top secret called project horizon and it was GonNa put a moon base and they would be using space stations in orbit around the Earth as a resupply depot. So they would actually store fuel there they would fuel the different spaceships as they would take off from the Moon. So this is another Recurring idea about space station being used future trips to the moon in the later the planet's In nineteen fifty eight Nasr's formed the civilian space program is basically turned over to NASA Von Braun is turned over to NASA and he becomes the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama And of course the manned spacecraft center is formed here in Houston Which becomes the Johnson Space Center after the death of Lyndon Johnson so The Johnson Space Center starts looking. At what should we do next and in nineteen sixty one? Shortly after he is elected President Kennedy asked his vice president Lyndon Johnson. What should the? Us Do what goal should we Proce- pursue what can we beat the Russians at and? They studied a number of options. One of them was a moon. Landing and other one was space station and because the Russians had these very large rockets. He's lapore large ballistic missiles the The agreement was well the Russians if they really wanted to could launch space stations today in order to get to the moon. They're going to need an even bigger rock that rocket that they don't have and so it was at that point in early nineteen sixty one that Kennedy decided we would try to go to the moon and we would do it. He announced before the end of the nineteen sixties. Actually the initial date was in nineteen sixty seven. They thought they could do it. and so that is what started us on a On Project Apollo in the first moon landing The Russians were also Got Into the moon landing phase although there was a lot of disagreement over this in the mid nineteen sixties. A lot of people wondered where the Russians really competing to go to the moon. But we know now that They were they were building a large moon rocket along the lines of the Saturn five the US moon rock There was called the n. One For those of us who have gone to Baikonour and traveled around that area there are remnants of an ones all over the place And you may have seen some of them that are used as storage sheds and and children's sandboxes and so on but they were developing them and they attempted to launch it several times all all of which were unsuccessful. It was a pretty complex vehicle. Had A lot of engines on the first stage. One of the problems was they could never get all the engines to work simultaneously now. They're n one rocket not only was going to be used to launch their moon ship but they were also going to use it to launch a very large space station. And they were thinking right through the nineteen sixties about the idea of a space station They had lots of designs for them. But they really were not Catapulted I guess into the Space Station Race until we were successful landing on the moon at that point. They decided well if the Americans are successful landing on the moon. Maybe we better be successful at launching the first space station They were thinking about different kinds of space stations. One of them was a military space station. Called the Almaz They were the only ones thinking about military space stations we in the US The US Air Force was pursuing a program called manned orbiting laboratory and so we were going to try and launch a space station in the mid to late nineteen sixties and their Almaz was going to compete with that The mole manned orbiting laboratory was cancelled the same week is the Apollo Eleven Moon Landing July nineteen sixty nine and favor of a NASA project which became called Skylab and SCO Skylab became our first space station when we announced that we would have Skylab in orbit in one thousand nine hundred seventy three or four the Russians decided. We'd better have our space station in orbit a little bit earlier Almaz was not ready at that. The N one rocket was not working and so they came up with the idea of a small modular space station Based in part on the Soyuz spaceship and actually use Soyuz Systems you saw use solar panels and so that became their first base station solid one which was launched in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. And what did they do on? Sell it one The first flight was unsuccessful and was not able to dock properly with the seller but the second mission up there By a Soyuz was successful So three cosmonauts lived on board for just about a month and because the US had been publicizing the moon landings by this time. The Russians decided they would publicize this Crew living on board the space station so they actually had a special series of TV programs. Every evening the crew would broadcast images down to Russia and So they consider that a great Success until on the last day when the Soyuz reentered There was a valve the inadvertently opened a loud all the error to escape and the spacecraft landed as it should but all the cosmonauts were found dead inside. That's right it was shortly after that they introduced the pressurized Socal suits are because of the earlier spacecraft the low such as the Voskan they had stopped wearing pressure suits regularly In the mid nineteen sixties Before that they had to wear pressure suits because the cosmonauts had to bail out of the spacecraft they did not land inside they landed on a separate parachute. So the I saw uses. Were launched without pressure suits and after the These for solid one Depressurization they did have to add. Pressure suits thoroughly spacecraft. Lands with shoots had to jump out of the spacecraft while it was falling well the The early spacecraft was very heavy and it also was designed around this idea of a photographic pod being deployed separately and so the capability was there to To a checkout cosmonaut. So on their first space craft the Vostok's The cosmonauts would always eject out and land separately on Vasco one. We were getting ready in nineteen sixty four to send the first two man. Crews up the Soviets decided wealthy. Us IS GONNA launch two man. Crews they would end up for three man crew and they took the Vostok spaceship which was only designed for one person. They basically stripped the interior out. There was not enough space for space suits and so a lot of the Russian engineers by the way posed the idea but they went ahead They put three cosmonauts on board but in order to make a soft landing. They had a last minute rocket that would slow them down so they used a parachute but then a rocket retro rocket would slow them down at the very last second They use the same approach on Vasco. Chiu which was the first spacewalk by Alexi. Lay Off nineteen sixty five. There were supposed to be several more vaas cod missions but they were all cancelled in favor of Soyuz by that time. Oh Wow so How long did salute continue on and then winded? We really start thinking about taking some of the Apollo hardware and going ahead with Skylab we were thinking about a skylab all through the nineteen sixties we had a program wasn't really a program it was a study called Apollo applications that we were looking at..

US Verner von Braun NASA Johnson Space Center Nineteen Fifty President Kennedy Soviet Union And Marshall Space Flight Center Apollo Eleven Moon Landing Us Army Soviet Union Lyndon Johnson Sergei Korolev Napa National Advisory Committ chuck yeager Eisenhower US Air Force Soyuz Systems
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:16 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"War Two knew that this would be a very powerful tool if he could have reconnaissance satellites his concern. Was that the Russians the Soviet Union And was very concerned that the US was flying over their territory without permission and so Verner von Braun in about nineteen fifty. Six was actually had a rocket and was capable of launching the first satellite and he was told to stand down. Do not launch a satellite and that was because Eisenhower wanted the Soviets to show the idea of free overflight that satellites would be passing over the nations of the earth with basically unlimited Capability and I talked Ambron about this one time. As a matter of fact when I was a college student Von Braun came to give a lecture and I asked him you know. He had been very disappointed in fifty six about not launching the first satellite and he told me well in the end it worked out well because there was a space race and he thought that because of this we made to the Moon in his lifetime which was a a major objective was so they had the technology but it was more of a strategic idea to wait veteran. Okay and let the Soviets at first so then that catapults us into the space race. Obviously we all know that. Sputnik launched And from there it wasn't too long later than NASA was formed Next thing you know. We're entering some of the first human spaceflight programs Napa National Advisory Committee for nautical. I didn't become NASA until Nineteen Fifty. And so they had been studying vehicles. That could fly higher and faster. They had out a whole series of explains beginning in the late. Nineteen forties in cooperation with the military Beginning with chuck yeager in the bell x one and then The two vehicles that could fly even faster and they were the x fifteen was on the drawing board it would eventually make it to six times the speed of sound and could actually reach space but in a ballistic trajectory They were looking at. How could you send a person into orbit and so people like Max v J here at the manned spacecraft center before it became Johnson Space Center was looking at the idea of a small capsule that could carry a person In some ways the Russians were further along than we were They had They're great designer. Sergei Korolev and he once he had the first ballistic missile being tested in the mid nineteen fifties knew. He was capable of launching a satellite and their first satellite He was able to get their polit bureau to support the idea that this could be a reconnaissance satellite or by changing out the pod that would carry the cameras. He could send up what he euphemistically called biological samples which he was really thinking would be a human being and they were developing that first satellite. That verse first sophisticated satellite when they decided the Americans were getting a little bit too far along with our vanguard project that was supposed to launch the first satellite and then with von Braun capable of launching a satellite on his redstone rocket which became the Jupiter C. And so they said we. We need to advance a little bit faster. And so they came up with the idea of what they called. Simple satellite which became sputnik one and so in nineteen fifty seven They I launched the first successful ballistic missile and the very next launch was the first satellite called Sputnik One We were a little bit delayed. I we were aiming to launch a satellite on the vanguard which was a totally new rocket civilian rocket being developed by the US Navy We were not too successful with that. First one blew up on the launchpad in early December shortly after the sputnik launch in October and sold von Braun was called in at that point in toll. Can you get your missile that he'd been sitting on for two years by this time? Ready and launch a satellite. He said Yeah I can do it. And the next couple of months and so in January thirty first nineteen fifty eight. He launched the first American satellite explorer. One explore okay so skipping ahead and and making the space race itself a little bit briefer. You already mentioned that it was. It was kind of a competition of technological prowess. Almost you know we had to be the first. But it was the Soviet Union to put the first man in space I believe the Soviet Union had the first war. Bit The first spacewalk. They had a lot of. I think it was Kennedy. Who made that declaration to skip ahead and shoot for the moon? Which is how that started or NASA had been studying the idea of sending on lunar flight. Although initially it was just a flight around the Moon Beginning in the late nineteen fifties The US army was competing with NASA. The military was competing. No one was sure at this point. Who would be in charge of the space program and so the US army actually led by Von Braun? Who worked for the? Us Army at that time had a project of very top secret called project horizon and it was GonNa put a moon base and they would be using space stations in orbit around the Earth as a resupply depot. So they would actually store fuel there they would fuel the different spaceships as they would take off from the Moon. So this is another Recurring idea about space station being used future trips to the moon in the later the planet's In nineteen fifty eight Nasr's formed the civilian space program is basically turned over to NASA Von Braun is turned over to NASA and he becomes the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama And of course the manned spacecraft center is formed here in Houston Which becomes the Johnson Space Center after the death of Lyndon Johnson so The Johnson Space Center starts looking. At what should we do next and in nineteen sixty one? Shortly after he is elected President Kennedy asked his vice president Lyndon Johnson. What should the? Us Do what goal should we Proce- pursue what can we beat the Russians at and? They studied a number of options. One of them was a moon. Landing and other one was space station and because the Russians had these very large rockets. He's lapore large ballistic missiles the The agreement was well the Russians if they really wanted to could launch space stations today in order to get to the moon. They're going to need an even bigger rock that rocket that they don't have and so it was at that point in early nineteen sixty one that Kennedy decided we would try to go to the moon and we would do it. He announced before the end of the nineteen sixties. Actually the initial date was in nineteen sixty seven. They thought they could do it. and so that is what started us on a On Project Apollo in the first moon landing The Russians were also Got Into the moon landing phase although there was a lot of disagreement over this in the mid nineteen sixties. A lot of people wondered where the Russians really competing to go to the moon. But we know now that They were they were building a large moon rocket along the lines of the Saturn five the US moon rock There was called the n. One For those of us who have gone to Baikonour and traveled around that area there are remnants of an ones all over the place And you may have seen some of them that are used as storage sheds and and children's sandboxes and so on but they were developing them and they attempted to launch it several times all all of which were unsuccessful. It was a pretty complex vehicle. Had A lot of engines on the first stage. One of the problems was they could never get all the engines to work simultaneously now. They're n one rocket not only was going to be used to launch their moon ship but they were also going to use it to launch a very large space station. And they were thinking right through the nineteen sixties about the idea of a space station They had lots of designs for them. But they really were not Catapulted I guess into the Space Station Race until we were successful landing on the moon at that point. They decided well if the Americans are successful landing on the moon. Maybe we better be successful at launching the first space station They were thinking about different kinds of space stations. One of them was a military space station. Called the Almaz They were the only ones thinking about military space stations we in the US The US Air Force was pursuing a program called manned orbiting laboratory and so we were going to try and launch a space station in the mid to late nineteen sixties and their Almaz was going to compete with that The mole manned orbiting laboratory was cancelled the same week is the Apollo Eleven Moon Landing July nineteen sixty nine and favor of a NASA project which became called Skylab and SCO Skylab became our first space station when we announced that we would have Skylab in orbit in one thousand nine hundred seventy three or four the Russians decided. We'd better have our space station in orbit a little bit earlier Almaz was not ready at that. The N one rocket was not working and so they came up with the idea of a small modular space station Based in part on the Soyuz spaceship and actually use Soyuz Systems you saw use solar panels and so that became their first base station solid one which was launched in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. And what did they do on? Sell it one The first flight was unsuccessful and was not able to dock properly with the seller but the second mission up there By a Soyuz was successful So three cosmonauts lived on board for just about a month and because the US had been publicizing the moon landings by this time. The Russians decided they would publicize this Crew living on board the space station so they actually had a special series of TV programs. Every evening the crew would broadcast images down to Russia and So they consider that a great Success until on the last day when the Soyuz reentered There was a valve the inadvertently opened a loud all the error to escape and the spacecraft landed as it should but all the cosmonauts were found dead inside. That's right it was shortly after that they introduced the pressurized Socal suits are because of the earlier spacecraft the low such as the Voskan they had stopped wearing pressure suits regularly In the mid nineteen sixties Before that they had to wear pressure suits because the cosmonauts had to bail out of the spacecraft they did not land inside they landed on a separate parachute. So the I saw uses. Were launched without pressure suits and after the These for solid one Depressurization they did have to add. Pressure suits thoroughly spacecraft. Lands with shoots had to jump out of the spacecraft while it was falling well the The early spacecraft was very heavy and it also was designed around this idea of a photographic pod being deployed separately and so the capability was there to To a checkout cosmonaut. So on their first space craft the Vostok's The cosmonauts would always eject out and land separately on Vasco one. We were getting ready in nineteen sixty four to send the first two man. Crews up the Soviets decided wealthy. Us IS GONNA launch two man. Crews they would end up for three man crew and they took the Vostok spaceship which was only designed for one person. They basically stripped the interior out. There was not enough space for space suits and so a lot of the Russian engineers by the way posed the idea but they went ahead They put three cosmonauts on board but in order to make a soft landing. They had a last minute rocket that would slow them down so they used a parachute but then a rocket retro rocket would slow them down at the very last second They use the same approach on Vasco. Chiu which was the first spacewalk by Alexi. Lay Off nineteen sixty five. There were supposed to be several more vaas cod missions but they were all cancelled in favor of Soyuz by that time..

US Verner von Braun NASA Johnson Space Center Nineteen Fifty President Kennedy Soviet Union And Marshall Space Flight Center Apollo Eleven Moon Landing Us Army Soviet Union Lyndon Johnson Sergei Korolev Napa National Advisory Committ chuck yeager Eisenhower Ambron Soyuz Systems US Air Force
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

16:09 min | 1 year ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's brought us more of an understanding about the universe about the effects of gravity about the benefits that research can bring to all of humankind. The International Space Station has taught us what humans are truly capable of and inspired so many more to do and pursue great things all because in the pursuit of human space exploration space stations have held an important status in its history and generations of space explorers before us and even early thinkers new. This pursuit was so important. So today we're taking a journey through history and the history of space stations coming on the podcast. Today is Dr Gary Kit Macher Communications and education mission manager in the International Space Station program. Kim Mockeries worked at NASA for thirty five years and has written several books about space. Stations including Nasr's reference guide to the ISS and he's also taught several courses about space station spaceflight and space commercialization at Mit Sloan School of Management and the University of Houston. So here we go from concept on paper to space stations of history with Gary Kit. Macher enjoy five county mark. You have to ask Gary Kit.

International Space Station Macher Communications Gary Kit Dr Gary Kit Nasr Mit Sloan School of Management Kim Mockeries ISS NASA University of Houston
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"From wypr npr rex it's out of the blocks i aaron hankun i'm wendell patrick and we've got something really special few this week something you could almost call liga secret lost episode of out of the blocks yet this is in episode full of great stories from folks in baltimore's station north neighbor that's right around a radio station wypr actually and this is a neighbor that also includes mike a the maryland institute college of art and mike is actually how this episode came to be originally there was a group of students they're a couple of years ago 2014 and they were curatorial practice major said they were actually studying how to put together art exhibitions any way they were fans of out of the blocks and coincidentally around that time they were putting together an exhibition called locally sourced it was a showcase of work by artists who were all from the neighborhood and so these mike is students asked us if we would do with special edition of out of the blocks to run on the sound system in the gallery as part of their exhibition an episode that would feature the voices of folks from all around station north which we thought sound did like an awesome idea so we took him up on the invitation and it was a really cool final result they had a great opening really successful run wendell took beautiful photo portriats of every one we interviewed and those were up on wall yet there were paintings and sculptures and handmade dolls in a giant mural ends on the sound system there was this custommade episode of out of the blocks play which unless you happen to be that exhibition back 2014 you've probably never gotten a chance to here until now from the 2014 micha exhibition locally sourced here's out of the blocks station north.

wendell patrick baltimore mike maryland institute college of
"station w. y p. r" Discussed on The Leviathan Chronicles

The Leviathan Chronicles

07:45 min | 8 years ago

"station w. y p. r" Discussed on The Leviathan Chronicles

"The story this fall. The strikeforce mission has failed off to mcallen also led a small strikeforce out of Leviathan to obtain the location of a black door safes. A trap was triggered decimating the facility mcallen and her team were heavily injured in the teams tracker and Tactical Gregor Againsy is still unconscious. In Japan tally has been granted freedom by the Yakuza. Gangsters the captured he an Oberlin after being betrayed by fish Freddie. He is convinced Kazunori. Tanaka the CEO of nine cats, who industries and secret head of the Yakuza this. He knows the location of Tacoma's missing son who is being held by Jason. Sterling Tanaka gave tally his freedom and seventy two hours. Hours to find his son, and bring him back to Japan if he fails to NOCCO execute Oberlin. Sin Clan, but back in New York City. A long-awaited showdown is about to take place with Robinson section have joined forces. They've set up a rendezvous point with Jason Sterling who has now become mutated and perverted since establishing an unstable cerebral connection with two enforces. That were burned alive in Mumbai leaving his body stronger, his mind, Kina and his skin, scarlet shade of Red. Sunshine has agreed to help doe number twelve find the so accion aliens using a device. He has hidden in New York, and now chapter thirty five the station. BINGHAMTON NEW YORK. The Black Gulfstream six fifty jet landed on the remote gross estrogen near the catskill mountains. OF UPSTATE NEW YORK. No lights were visible on me interior and the plane moved go strike into the open doors of the concealed hand wants the hangar. Bay Doors Shut secure. The interior floodlights in the hangar popped on, and the hatch door of the jet was released feels nice to be back on us. Soil was not not to be under attack. Need to get you to a doctor wet I. have some I'll be fine session. Our door has facilities that. You don't the intelligence in Mumbai shows that the door lock burn notice is in full effect, and that you when your compatriot Jason Sterling are now wanted men with almost all major intelligence and law enforcement agencies. You'd be lucky to by tylenol. At a Walgreen Jarlee. The slender pilot of mentions private plane exit. The cockpit walked towards the two men. She removed her headset, allowing dark black heads. Heads full downtown. Admit back sensual looked at her closely, and could see deep circles under her eyes jolly, that was tremendous, flying back in the Paul I'm just glad you made the upgrades to the engines in the venting ports, I suggested operator signature has been substantially diminished, and the speed got us here ninety minutes early. You're blank. Check on jolly. You know that you can for anything. Not Anything. You need to get some rest on jolly. Come on. We need to get to New York. Session wits and honestly walked to the bottom of the jetway. Sanctions Dot Green. Aston Martin DB S was partly the Boston and a dark skinned Gadhafi man, exiting the calm, he nodded swiftly dissension, and then walked up the jetway to enter the Black Mark Lane, which walked over to the cards, places bag in the trunk on Jolly State close to sanction. Do you trust this man mansion? No but I need help to keep our people well then. Do you trust me with my life? You know then just me when I tell you that. This man is not your. Your part now he'll use you all use him on Joey. He's just waiting for an opening, so he can betray you I can sense it. You know we rely on you in. India and immortals aren't supposed to die. Pilots or supposed to work in shifts haven't arrested in twenty four hour. I'm better than your other pilots. Even with no sleep and others rely on me to keep you safe. doubtedly pressed, be careful ascension, or will Anshan. Yes, you know I eat a prey. I've raised my two boys well and now. I fight for a leader I believe in. Don't understand, life can still have meaning section. That's what you don't understand trying to say on I'm telling you to save yourself before you try to save all the others. This new redemption in Mata. I need to go, but if you need. Good luck with your partnership. Call me when you need me or I will send. You took a few steps towards the COP and join twitter inside. I like your taste in cars don't even know. Sensual participate down and sped the car down the gravel driveway on Brits have to. The car picked up speed. Ascension activated the exterior night fishing on the windshield while arming the radar jamming and police frequency monitors looks at his wristwatch. It read full gear. We have less than eighteen hours to rendezvous with Jason Sterling at the station. You confirm that his picked up. Rebecca kinderman Hazar in custody unharmed for now the leader of my doors uneasy with this partnership I sincerely hope for your sake and Rebecca's that you can locate the aliens. Threats we're not threats. They're facts. City bs reached the town of Harriman and then continued to streak south on the New York State through towards Manhattan. Sunshine had the cow cruising one hundred ten miles per hour. The catskill mountains with full passive and active radar detection, but as they grew closer to the suburbs of New York. He brought the speed down to a reasonable seventeen. The congestion on the road was great at even at this early hour, the morning and getting into an accidental, having to deal with law enforcement at this point would be calamitous at best the Aston Cross, the George Washington Bridge made its way down the westside highway, turning off of fifty seventh. Street censure drove through the morning congestion towards Columbus. Circle where he parked in the Driveway Mandarin Oriental Hotel. Checking name, please see more sigler. Sick we don't want another like last time. Won't be any problem I assure you like last just the room place of course the oriental suite on the fifty second floor. Thank you. Walked to the back of the elegant lobby and road, the gleaming glass elevators up fifty stories to the enormous, sweet overlooked all of central park, and Fifth Avenue a Thick Black Velvet Sofa with leopard print pillows encompassed most of the space beside the floor to ceiling windows, while the far wall was dominated by built in bookshelves constructed of Polished Mukasa would. Nice digs. Thanks, I. Hope you enjoy it. What about you now have fifteen hours until we rendezvous at the station and to get some preparations in order, I'll come with. You know you were partners. CENSH- and that was the deal. Do us a collaborate on finding the aliens and freeing them I. Don't need you tagging along my personal errands. You're going to Sutton Manor I. Am and you don't want black door to know where it is. Are you going GonNa give me every black door access code so I. Can Snoop freely through all your files from years of clandestine operations. Operations always know your current location. Identify all your potential targets. We have a partnership, not a merger an I always keep my into the bargain. We're going to find aliens, but I need to take care of some arrangements I to make sure that happens so that the device I've hidden can work properly so in the meantime enjoy the wet bar on the left and watch the sunrise over the skyline I'll be back in a few hours. tweak make a rendezvous, and what and don't try to follow me with or have someone follow me. We're trying. Track me, you understand. That would be violation of our. Partnership. Be Back in a few hours and don't be late censh- turned left quickly, taking the elevator down with exiting through the Jason. Shopping knocked the hotel street level. He walks through Thomas. Pink in the williams-sonoma store to assure he wasn't being followed before entering the subway station at Columbus, circle and taking the downtown express trade to Fourteenth Street. He waits until the doors were about to close before jumping and taking the low to train back uptown to twenty eighth street with Sunshine Ram back to street level and a cab. He had the taxi drop often fifty seventh street and First Avenue.

Jason Sterling New York City Sterling Tanaka mcallen Mumbai strikeforce Oberlin Japan Columbus Tacoma Rebecca kinderman Hazar Kazunori CEO Gregor Againsy Sunshine Aston Martin BINGHAMTON williams-sonoma twitter Jolly State