35 Burst results for "State University"

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | 3 d ago

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
Michigan State dropping swimming and diving teams

America's Morning News

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Michigan State dropping swimming and diving teams

"Are being felt by Michigan State University athletics, MSU's a dropping swimming and diving teams for men and women after the 2021 season. Officials say the athletic department is facing a financial crisis with a likely revenue shortfall of more than 30 million. MSU says no swimmer or diver will use us will lose their scholarship if they remain a students. The university says dropping the teams will improve the athletic department's long term finances. MSU says it's struggled to recruit swimmers because it had a smaller than regulation pool. Of course, a lot of these Universities are going to be hit by the college football season to revenue that brings AH, of course, those games bring revenue to the universities and a lot of these universities. The powerhouses rely on their basketball and football programs, too.

MSU Michigan State University Football
How Can We Detect Tornadoes Earlier?

BrainStuff

03:13 min | 5 d ago

How Can We Detect Tornadoes Earlier?

"Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Pay Rain Staff. Lauren. Volvo bomb here. In the same way that ultraviolet light and infrared light exists outside the human eye can perceive sound waves exist beyond the frequencies of what humans can hear when those sound waves are higher frequency than what we can here we call them ultrasonic and when they're lower frequency, we call them infrasonic. Several natural sources, including volcanoes, avalanches, quakes, and meteors produce infrasonic waves also called in for sound. Animals like elephants in Wales may communicate with infra sound and man made inventions like wind turbines can generate these sounds to. A detecting infrasonic waves is one of the key ways governments can monitor for nuclear bomb tests. That's because infrasonic waves decay very slowly, and when they're large enough, they can wrap around the globe several times before dissipating. And it turns out the tornadoes can produce unique infrasonic waves even before tornado genesis, which is when the storm forms an hour or more before. Scientists have known about the tornado in for sound connection for several decades but to learn more about this process and to better understand how humans harness this information, a group of scientists is developing a long distance passive way of listening in on tornadoes in doing. So we'd be able to deal with the fact that three fourths of all current tornado warnings are Lawrence and thus too often ignored or not taken seriously. In for sound could represent another source of data to add to our arsenal. One Brian, Bang and Oklahoma state. University mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professor said in a press release discussing this research by monitoring tornadoes from hundreds of miles away we'll be able to decrease false alarm rates and possibly even increase warning times. elbing and his team built special listening devices using microphones sensitive to low frequencies that were then placed inside of containers with noise holes and arranged in triangle for precision measurements. The goal was to separate regular wind noise from Tornado noise? elbing said wind noise is incoherent. So if you average it over a large space, it will sum up to zero. Conversely, Tornado infra sound is coherent meaning waves look over large distances. So the pressure waves ad together and contain information. This new capability could mean that storm chasers trying to gather data about tornadoes would be able to take fewer risks in their research. Imagine drones equipped with special infrasonic microphones, for instance, flying in the vicinity of storms, transmitting data to forecasters and scientists. It could therefore help save lives by giving people earlier warnings about potentially deadly storms in the United

Lawrence Volvo Lauren Aerospace Engineering Professo Wales Oklahoma Brian
Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 5 d ago

Dinosaur Asteroid Hit Worst Case Place

"Sixty, six, million years ago a giant asteroid crashed into earth killing off three quarters of all species including most of the dinosaurs researchers suspect that the impact caused the extinction by kicking up a cloud of dust and tiny droplets called aerosols that plunged the planet into something like a nuclear winter. And these components in the atmosphere drew of Global Cooling and darkness that would've stopped photosynthesis from occurring ultimately shutting down the food chain. Shelby Lyons a recent PhD graduate from Penn State University. But scientists have also found lots of sit in the geologic layers deposited immediately after the asteroid impact and the set may have been part of the killing mechanism to depending on where it came from. Some of the probably came from wildfires that erupted around the planet following the impact but most of these. Would have lingered in the lower atmosphere for only a few weeks and wouldn't have had much of an effect on global climate. But scientists hypothesized that soot may also have come from the very rocks that the asteroid pulverized when it struck if those rocks contain significant amounts of organic matter such as the remains of marine or. It would have burned up on impact sending such shooting up into the stratosphere in that case. So it would have spread around the globe in a matter of hours and stayed there for years and it would have radically altered earth's climate. So lions on her team set out to. The source of the suit they looked at chemicals known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or ages which are another byproduct of combustion. So you can find peaches and neater veggies that you grill. You can find them from the me exhaustive a car. You can also find them in smoke and debris from the wildfires. TODAY OUT WEST PH is are made up a fused rings of carbon atoms think of chicken wire to determine. The origin of the set the researchers looked at the structure and chemistry of the Ph is buried along with it. Specifically, the researchers looked for groups of atoms that stick off the rings like spikes Ph is generated from burning wood don't have many spikes but ph is from burning fossil carbon like what would have been in the target rocks have more Lien's her team found that most of the Ph is deposited after. The impact were spiky, which suggests that set from the rocks hit by the asteroid played a major role in the mass extinction. There was more dust and more sulfate aerosols than soot, but sit is a stronger locker sunlight than either of those two. So a small amount of set Ken drives, large reductions in sunlight. The findings are in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the results suggest that the devastation. Of this very city asteroid impact maybe due in part to a fluke of geography, the space rock smashed into the Gulf of Mexico where the sediments were rich organic matter. They still are the region produces large amounts of today where it had occurred was likely. One of the reasons that led to a major mass extinction. It was kind of the perfect storm or the perfect asteroid impact I guess you could call it.

Shelby Lyons Gulf Of Mexico National Academy Of Sciences Penn State University Lien KEN
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 6 d ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Rural hospitals struggling to handle virus surge

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:08 min | Last week

Rural hospitals struggling to handle virus surge

"Surgeon Corona virus case is underway in the US many hospitals around the country are overwhelmed. College campuses continue to grapple with outbreaks, CBS REPORTER Moola LINKY reports A fall surge of Corona virus cases has arrived, and it's taking a toll on hospitals across the country. In Wisconsin were about one in every five Corona virus tests is coming back positive. State health officials are warning residents to avoid all gatherings large and small, which continue to play a role in spreading the virus. A retirement parties, birthday parties, baby showers, weddings all of those things. That's why we have been encouraging here in recent weeks that people stay home as much as possible. Wisconsin was one of eight states to break its single day record for new Corona virus cases on Thursday. So is Ohio Hospitalizations. There are up nearly 50% in the last two weeks and infections are rising fast in rural and suburban counties. According to Ohio State Dr Matt Excellent, Papa fell for local regional hospitals is to send patients to the referral hospitals such as Ohio State, such as Cleveland Clinic's University of Cincinnati. But if all of these hospitals and all of these cases were coming at once, they won't have that pop off valves available. Colleges and universities continue to grapple with outbreaks. The State University of New York in Oneonta announced its president had resigned to pursue other opportunities. After more than 700 students tested positive for Cove in 19, the school switched all remote classes for the rest of the semester. Another recent spike. It's Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut, forced the campus to temporarily suspend in person classes for some off campus students. Now their goal is to test 50% of their student body every single week, and Gerry McNamara is sacred Heart's director of public safety. We have found that students have been on campus and they don't know they have the virus. And if we don't provide the testing to know that, then we can't react to the quicker we react with the quicker we can stop this.

Ohio Wisconsin United States State University Of New York Sacred Heart University Gerry Mcnamara Ohio State CBS Reporter Cleveland Clinic Dr Matt Excellent University Of Cincinnati Fairfield Oneonta Director Connecticut President Trump Papa
Colleges continue to grapple with rise in coronavirus cases

WBBM Morning News

00:28 sec | Last week

Colleges continue to grapple with rise in coronavirus cases

"And universities continue to grapple with outbreaks. The State University of New York in Oneonta announced its president had resigned to pursue other opportunities. After more than 700 students tested positive for Cove in 19, another recent spike It's Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut, forced the campus. To temporarily suspend in person classes for some off campus students. Now their goal is to test 50% of their student body every single week. The

Sacred Heart University State University Of New York Oneonta Fairfield President Trump Connecticut
Mysterious 'purple heroin’ linked to overdoses in Michigan

John McCulloch

00:22 sec | Last week

Mysterious 'purple heroin’ linked to overdoses in Michigan

"Poison Center at Wayne State University School of Medicine is warning about a drug that is causing overdoses. The drug Purple heroin is linked overdoses in the upper peninsula as well as one in Van Buren County. The Michigan State Police laboratory tested the drug and found fentanyl and morphine in the drug. Teachers. Researchers say that the drug should respond naloxone and an overdose situation, but research is limited.

Wayne State University School Van Buren County Michigan State Police Poison Center Heroin Fentanyl Morphine Naloxone
Coronavirus outbreak still spreading on UW's Greek Row in Seattle

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:00 min | Last week

Coronavirus outbreak still spreading on UW's Greek Row in Seattle

"No no data, data, the the state state health health of profit of profit is reporting is reporting 740 740 new new cases cases of of covert covert 1921 1921 new deaths new deaths and and his comrades, his comrades, Brian Brian Calvert Calvert tells tells us us the the state state is also is also telling telling us us where where these these outbreaks outbreaks are are most most largely largely concentrated concentrated the largest the largest source source of of outbreaks outbreaks for for the most the most recent recent reporting reporting period. period. College College campuses. campuses. One One of the of largest the largest campus campus outbreaks outbreaks can can be found be found along along the the University University of of Washington's Washington's Greek Greek row, row, school school president president Ana Ana Mari Mari Kau Kau say, say, said said earlier earlier this this week week we have we have made made it it clear clear and and we we will will continue continue to to make make it it clear. clear. That That if if they they don't don't get get it, it, and and they they continue continue to to break break the rules the rules party, party, there there will will be be harsher harsher disciplinary disciplinary actions. actions. Among Among the the harsher harsher penalties penalties now now being being discussed discussed at the at the UW UW finds finds suspensions suspensions and and ultimately, ultimately, AH AH fraternity fraternity could could lose lose its its recognition. recognition. As As of of Monday, Monday, 242 242 cases cases of of covert covert 19 19 were were linked linked to the to the UW's UW's Greek Greek row. row. Covert Covert cases cases continue continue to climate. to climate. Washington Washington State State University University is is well well where where 121 121 infections infections have have been been linked linked to Greek to Greek housing. housing. Brian Brian

Uw Uw Ana Ana Mari Mari Kau Kau Washington Washington State St Brian Brian Calvert Calvert Brian Brian Washington President Trump University University Of
Indigenous leaders condemn Portland violence before Indigenous Peoples Day

Native America Calling

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Indigenous leaders condemn Portland violence before Indigenous Peoples Day

"A group of native leaders joined the Mayor of Portland and in indigenous lawmaker Monday in condemning violent protests that toppled statues of Theodore, Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln over the weekend and damaged buildings including a Museum Oregon Live reported lawmaker Tana Sanchez who is Shoshoni Bannock, and you'd called the damage to the Oregon Historical Society as well as downtown businesses and buildings at Portland State University. Obscene. Inappropriate and unconscionable protesters broke windows at the society's building a quilt made by black women to honor contributions by the black community. Ahead of the country's bicentennial was left in the street in the

Oregon Historical Society Shoshoni Bannock Museum Oregon Live Tana Sanchez Portland State University Portland Abraham Lincoln Black Community Roosevelt
Alcohol and Cannabis Use among College Students

WBZ Morning News

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Alcohol and Cannabis Use among College Students

"Booze might surprise you. If you were college age Americans are consuming alcohol compared to 20 years ago, researchers at the University of Michigan and Texas State University say While those young adults are drinking less marijuana in that age group is up. So is the co use of marijuana and alcohol that is

Marijuana Booze University Of Michigan Texas State University
The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

True Crime Brewery

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

"A North Carolina suburb in the early morning of July twenty fifth nineteen eighty-eight. On evonne, Stein awoke to an intruder at her bedside holding a knife and club. Bunny was severely beaten and stabbed, but she somehow managed to stay alive and call for help after the intruder left Leith was not selected. However, he was stabbed and bludgeoned to death when investigators learned that his estate was worth over two million dollars naturally his wife and stepchildren became suspects. Yeah. The amount I've heard varying stories on the amount, but it was around two million dollars. So a considerable amount of money especially in the nineteen eighties her was. The von Stein family lived in the small town of Washington North Carolina. And the rest of the state calls this town little Washington to differentiate it from Washington DC in Washington state. But I guess the people who live there like to call it the original Washington because it is the first town to be named after George Washington. That's an interesting tidbit for you. Can we fact check that I have done that but if we WANNA double check for me so it was the first town as we now yet. Okay. So. Whether you call it little Washington or original Washington the town was virtually destroyed in eighteen, sixty four, and then again in nineteen hundred by some devastating fires, a few homes survived and it was rebuilt and it became a farming and fishing community. So with a population of just over ten thousand pretty small. It's known as a sleepy town, but actually a pretty good place to raise your family low crime. I would imagine ten thousand is Pretty small but not too bad. So yeah probably be a nice place to raise a kid. Yeah, I. Think so. So, lease was born in Queens New York in nineteen forty six to parents who both came from well off German families who it is still a baby. The family moved to North Carolina his father Howard was a graduate of Brown University and he'd been a professional saxophone player before fighting in world. War? Two. After. The war. The Big Band era who is starting to be on its way out? And it was getting hard to find work as a saxophonist. So at this point, he had a wife and a baby boy to support so. Howard decided he needed to find a steady job. He ended up taking one offered by his brother-in-law as a laundry equipment salesman. He and I think he was successful at that. But maybe not at his happiest, right because he was an artist and musician. But he was successful. CONC- that whoever you're good at what you do that you're just not totally in it. Exactly. So lead Smart Marie does it on him she spoiled him and gave him pretty much anything he wanted. But you know he remained respectful and loving and had a good work ethic. By, the time he was in high school, the camel city laundry and cleaners had become one of the most successful laundries in the whole country. and lead stand Howard had become part owner and they were employing over one hundred people. But you know. Lee. had no interest in the laundry business and his dad totally understood that. So li-the never took a part time job that his father offered him at the laundry. He had decided on another career you're lethal is accepted into the school of Engineering at North Carolina State University. He. Was Successful for the first two years. But then in the junior year kind of his motivation and slacked off. He got into partying pretty heavily and he flunked out in nineteen, sixty seven. Now, the problem with this or this time is that the Vietnam War was going on. So guess what happened Oh Leaf He's drafted. Yeah. His parents were pretty frantic and worried about this as you can imagine or you're their only son, their only child. So he was twenty one years old by this time, and fortunately for him, his two years of college helped him get assigned to clerical work. So instead of being sent off to fight a war, he was stationed in office in Germany. Of course, he knew some German. So that came in handy to after his discharge from the army in nineteen seventy lethal returned home and enrolled at Guilford College in Greensboro as a business major. Gilford was a small quaker college. So some faculty and students held weekly silent vigils against the Vietnam War on the federal courthouse lawn. And Leaf was agreeing with them. He didn't think this war should be going on. Your a lot of this at that time didn't think that was a good idea. Shabby. That were absolutely it was the movement. So. Although he had been conservative for most of his life leaked did get some strong opinions against the war and he let his hair grow out to his shoulder started wearing blue jeans and he got a pair of those small round wire rimmed glasses that John

Howard Washington Leaf North Carolina Stein Washington North Carolina George Washington Leith Bunny North Carolina State Universit Marie Queens New York Brown University School Of Engineering Salesman Guilford College Greensboro Lee.
Seattle-based WSU cancels spring break amid COVID-19 outbreak concerns

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

Seattle-based WSU cancels spring break amid COVID-19 outbreak concerns

"College has voted to cut spring break 2021 Como's Brian Calvert reports as news broke that Washington has now surpassed 93,000 code 19 infections, the factually Senate and Washington State University. Voted to amend its 2021 calendar. The reason for eliminating spring break is because of public health concerns proposed, Elizabeth Chilton says W S u student instead will be given extra single days off throughout the spring. Yet why single out spring break the schools Mary Joe Gonzalez majority of the outbreaks, and I'm talking about 99% of them. That happened in the spring. Came back from students who went on spring break, The Senate voted to acts the spring break, meaning the provost. Now it just has to approve it. Gonzaga is considering canceling spring breakers. Well, however, there is still a spring break on the 2021 calendar for the University of Washington. Brian Calvert. Camo

Brian Calvert Senate Washington Washington State University University Of Washington Mary Joe Gonzalez Elizabeth Chilton Provost Gonzaga
From Novice Nurse to Healthcare Hero with Jannel Gooden

The WoMed

05:16 min | 2 weeks ago

From Novice Nurse to Healthcare Hero with Jannel Gooden

"Denial. Welcome to the woman. I have been wanting to get you on here for a while I'm obsessed with you. Know. I am I mean that and like everyone I have on here like I'm like you're such a bad ass I think you're phenomenal but I've actually really with you. I think what you're doing is just so awesome and social media. I some of like your quotes like tweets and stuff at popped up and I was like, Oh, my God God, I've. Seen I heard this is what I need it. and. Like attracts lake. So it you are attracting the amazing people than that means that you have to amazing women yourself. So there you have it. Own, my God, your light and soul. This. Is GonNa be good. I was literally like I was getting ready for this podcast. This is GONNA be awesome. Really really. Awesome. Don't. Don't be nervous. Know I know I get it I when I started this thing I was like only caught. Are They GonNa to like me like what did they say? How do I know what I'm doing? They're going know, I. Don't know what I'd do. which oddly enough is kind of felt as a new Grad nurse. uh-huh uh-huh uh-huh. Very, true. So I want to know a little bit more about you tell me about yourself. How did you get a nursing? Yeah. So I you know the stereotype fell cute because it's not I'm not that nurse that has that like. Really, groundbreaking story where someone inspired them as a child or something. Significant happened in your life that led them there I'm from the Bronx new. York, I've always sort of been around healthcare in some capacity, but very distant from like a provider. So my mom has been a CNA. My entire life on my aunt graduated nursing school in her forties. My grandfather did security in an e d sound like I. Oh yes. By understanding of. There's a hospital in their sick people and I grew up with asthma. So I'm familiar with how the system works, but it wasn't something that I thought I wanted for myself. when I went, I went away to a State University university in New York Long Island and I was like you know anyone who's interested in medicine but like doesn't really know you just do pre-med Cornell whatever like yeah. Yeah, it'll get you there. You'll you'll get land somewhere it'll be fine so I remember. My junior year I think the beginning of my junior year and I remember that my guidance counselor or whoever those people are that like tell you like you're a junior now it's time to clear major and I'm like once a major like like the thing I'm going to graduate with that degree I had no idea what I wanted to declare a major in it, and then I went into a crisis mode which is. Reality kind of set in. So like when you go to college you kind of like step away from the reality of life and grow them in Lebron's Bronx. They're really harsh realities there. So we in college was fun you know. But in that moment I realized while like you need to get a degree, you need to go home and get a job and it needs to be a really good paying job or your life's GonNa. Be Reflection of everything that you've seen growing up. Imagine the crap on me and so I remember calling my mom like Oh my God, what am I gonNa do like I i. don't know what I, WanNa do like I'm at best what was I like nineteen? Maybe I don't know what I wanted to do with my life known. So she tossed around the nursing that was like her like. The mirrors and I'm like, I don't want to become a nurse but why not just try it out. Right, like this is how we started the whole nursing conversation look at me now knee-deep in it like. I'm like all over my head in it but yeah. I gained back home and I went to nursing school in New Rochelle. New. York. A private college I graduated and during my clinicals that's when I fell in love with nursing it was like Clinton. He, of course. Yes it's. A love heeds nurses. I just knew it I knew it. I don't know like something like you know the first couple of rotations are like, Oh, my goodness I'm going to be doing things I am not comfortable with like bodily fluids and I'm such a germ folks. It was really a lot to adjust to I remember someone Amari Like I said of Kernels. One of my like little people might covert might be like my friend whatever news fellow nursing student she was crying because she had to go into either firm to clean a piece in. I. Can't be like. But yes. Impedes clinical wear I belie- fall went off and it clicks I'm like, okay we can do this. We like this.

Bronx Lebron Clinton New Rochelle New York York State University University Wanna
Concerns over food insecurity grow amid COVID-19 pandemic

Symphony Financial Group

05:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Concerns over food insecurity grow amid COVID-19 pandemic

"Has created an economic disaster for millions of families, one that the nation's safety that hasn't been ableto handle. Millions of people have been thrown out of work with no new jobs to be had, and many of the measures designed to help them. Things like supplemental unemployment benefits and eviction moratoriums have run their course. They engaged in a lot of necessary coping strategies and trade off folks. They're making difficult trade off between painter of food and medical care, food and utilities. Food and transportation and helping Jessica Hager is director of health and Nutrition for Feeding America, a nationwide network of more than 200 food banks and the country's second biggest charity, she says Before the pandemic about 35 million Americans or 1/9 of the population lived in households that were food insecure without the resources to get adequate food. Since mid March. It's gotten much worse family's air having to decide whether to pay the rent or buy food. Food banks are crowded. We have projected right now that there'll be 54 Million people are one in six could be sued and secured this beer in 2020. We've also projected that food and security Rachel increase in every single county in the United States in 2020, so this could be a 21 and three adults and one and two Children could experience it in Korea this time again due to that. Economic impact that has been in effect around the pandemic. No individuals whose job individuals relying on their savings to make their way through experts in hunger, No, that family's suffering from food insecurity have a variety of goto strategies to try to stretch scarce food dollars. Hagar says. 55% of food insecure families have used at least three of the strategies are things such as receiving help from friends? Purchasing an expensive unhealthy food, which we, of course know in the long term has an impact on health, telling their personal property where, if possible, which isn't for all, of course, but growing food in their own garden. Anticipate. Families have continue to engage and they trade off in coping strategies while also trying to manage the difficult circumstances of managing the disease and being out of social distance increased normally have even in normal times. Many families go in and out of hunger, depending on economic circumstances. But today a lot of people are gig workers or freelancers whose income is far from consistent. What is certainly common or not unusual for there to be seasonal food insecurity or one coming in and out of the security and that against you Point gig economy. It could be our essential workers who are farmers, and much of their income is based on seasonal rotation of crops. We also know of course, that folks began as they're making tree off. Sometimes their assets are coming in, and they're able to live off those for quite some time. But a situation may come or a health crisis cooker that's unexpected in that put someone in a food insecure state, though it does change depending on a variety of circumstances, and also note that we have a lot of built in inequalities within our structures institution in this country. And so though helpful, maybe doing Well and being able to make ends meet for many years. There may be the circumstances that change the last idiotic cetera. That family made their individual, maybe food insecure for a period of time until they're able to re secure that financial foundation for their life Being food, insecure, even for just a little while, is a major risk factor for poor health. A recent study in the sage journals shows that independent of all other factors, food insecurity, Khun drastically increase the chances of an early death. We found that the drift of the people in America who are secure Eventually have a high chance of dying from any cause of that heart disease. And that is a striking finding good extended dance of death for insecure people After 10 Years of increases, 50%. That's Dr John Dee, scooped on Donny, professor of Public Health at New Mexico State University co author of the study, not a sophisticated multiple models. Adjusting for different types of actors. And yet no matter how much you account for just being food, insecure from a few years after a long duration, profound impact on someone's help. On the train, the heart, the liver, the kidney, and so any cause of death is more prominent in for insecure people essentially being food, insecure challenges your body medical autism, and then you're depending on your supply in the body, putting supplies. And those declining over time and eventually the challenger system so heavily but a liver stops function and people underground Club Gen. Donny says the increase in heart disease death as a result of food insecurity is especially striking 75% greater over 10 years than in people who are not food in secure. The reasons are fairly clear. Cheaper foods are generally less heart healthy. And there are few things more chronically stressful than not knowing where your next meal is coming from when an individual is going through this difficult and very stressful, my nontoxic, stressful experience that if they're making a stray off, perhaps again purchasing, inexpensive and healthy food That can lead to perhaps previously controlled diet related diseases becoming uncontrolled, uncontrolled diseases. Such a society that can lead to complications like kidney disease, identities and nerve damage. Often food insecurity and poor health combined to create a vicious cycle with no way out. If someone enters a cycle of food, insecure or their household is experiencing an unexpected and extensive medical crisis are often forced to engage in the financial coping strategies. And it includes the consumption of cheaper foods often that are hiring calories. But Lauren nutritional value and the reliance on the left healthy food can lead to poor nutrition and chronic diet, really, and diseases. Ensuring these diseases can worsen existing disabilities or other illnesses and results in an inability to work and bring in that previously the cheese income. What's more, the

America Gen. Donny Kidney Disease Heart Disease Jessica Hager Hagar Korea United States Rachel Lauren Dr John Dee Director Khun Professor Of Public Health New Mexico State University
Wichita State investigating men's basketball coach

Ric Edelman

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wichita State investigating men's basketball coach

"Wichita State University is conducting an internal investigation into allegations that men's basketball coach Gregg Marshall mistreated players. The multi platform Sports Network Stadium says the inquiry began after the university learned the network was conducting an investigation in which had interviewed 36 players and former coaches. Wichita State said in a statement Friday that it acknowledges the allegations within its men's basketball program brought forth by media and that the investigation was being handled in an expeditious and deliberate manner. Marshall wrote in a text message Thursday to the athletic, a subscription based sports website that he was fully participating in the process.

Wichita State University Gregg Marshall Sports Network Stadium Basketball
Wichita State investigating men's basketball coach Gregg Marshall for alleged misconduct

Steve and Ted

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wichita State investigating men's basketball coach Gregg Marshall for alleged misconduct

"By the athletic website website claims claims Wichita Wichita State State University University head head men's men's basketball basketball coach coach Gregg Gregg Marshall Marshall is is under under investigation investigation by by the the university university for for his his behavior behavior toward toward current current and and former former players. players. The The article article cites cites unnamed sources that claim allegations including physical and verbal abuse by martial against a player and a staff member. The report claims Marshall punched a now former player and put his hands around the neck of a staff member. No comment from the university.

Gregg Gregg Marshall Marshall Wichita State State University University University Wichita Basketball
Wichita St. looking into coach Marshall's conduct

Fox News Rundown

00:28 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wichita St. looking into coach Marshall's conduct

"A report by the Atlantic website website claims claims Wichita Wichita State State University University head head men's men's basketball basketball coach coach Gregg Gregg Marshall Marshall is is under under investigation investigation by by the the university university for for his his behavior behavior toward toward current current and and former former players. players. The article cites unnamed sources that claim allegations including physical and verbal abuse by martial against a player and a staff member. The report claims Marshall punched, punched a now former player and put his hands around the neck of a staff member. No comment from the university.

Gregg Gregg Marshall Marshall Wichita State State University University University Wichita Basketball
"state university" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

03:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"state university" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"A or a small <Speech_Male> retail store <Speech_Male> gas station. <Speech_Male> It thrust us all into something <Speech_Male> that we weren't expecting. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> now. This <Speech_Male> is the new normal <Speech_Male> and I love what you said. You're <Speech_Male> absolutely right. <Speech_Male> I think a lot of the changes <Speech_Male> that we're going to happen <Speech_Male> ten years from now or just <Speech_Male> now happening six <Speech_Male> months to a year from now, <Speech_Male> which is that's <Speech_Male> the silver lining <Speech_Male> I've seen come from this. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> going. Forward. <Speech_Male> For SFA. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> are what are things going <Speech_Male> to look like? What <Speech_Male> is our again <Speech_Male> our micro <Speech_Male> level and and <Speech_Male> taking it from <SpeakerChange> micro <Speech_Male> now macro <Speech_Male> what's <Speech_Male> SFA's place <Speech_Male> in the world? You see <Speech_Male> the next say five <Speech_Male> to ten years <Speech_Male> under your <Speech_Male> leadership what what <Speech_Male> do you hope to where some of the <Speech_Male> main milestones <Speech_Male> that you want to <Speech_Male> achieve <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> during your tenure here? <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> what? <Speech_Male> I'm going to go <Speech_Male> from a bigger picture <Speech_Male> and then break it <Silence> down. <Speech_Male> Five to ten <Speech_Male> years from now. <Speech_Male> I. Want institutions <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> across the <Speech_Male> country. <Speech_Male> Saying, can <Silence> we come visit? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Stephen F.. Austin <Speech_Male> State University <Speech_Male> because you <Silence> are the model <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> what a regional <Speech_Male> comprehensive institution <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> needs to be. <Speech_Male> My <Speech_Male> vision is that we <Speech_Male> have such strong <Speech_Male> partnerships <Speech_Male> with business industry, <Speech_Male> not for profits, <Speech_Male> not just in <Speech_Male> the region within <Speech_Male> the state. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> My my <Speech_Male> vision is that <Speech_Male> we will have <Speech_Male> a flexible <Speech_Male> educational <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a product <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> will attract people. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Fresh out of high <Speech_Male> school, adult <Speech_Male> learners <Speech_Male> those who can't <Speech_Male> make to campus <Speech_Male> that we have <Speech_Male> a strong continuing <Speech_Male> and professional <Speech_Male> education program <Speech_Male> that works <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> with business industry <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> help develop <Speech_Male> additional skills <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> their workforce. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In that we also. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A thriving <Speech_Male> entrepreneurial <Speech_Male> community <Speech_Male> in this region, <Speech_Male> and on <Speech_Male> top of that, <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> don't know <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> we're going to <Speech_Male> fill <Speech_Male> all <Speech_Male> of the high <Speech_Male> paying jobs <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> are now here <Speech_Male> because of re shoring <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> business <Speech_Male> industry from <Speech_Male> overseas. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> happening along I <Speech_Male> sixty nine. That's <Speech_Male> my vision <Speech_Male> for ten to fifteen <Speech_Male> years <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> I think that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know. <Speech_Male> Along with that <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> I talked a little bit about <Speech_Male> the center for applied, research <Speech_Male> in rural <Speech_Male> innovation. I <Speech_Male> think what we find <Speech_Male> is that there are <Speech_Male> also other <Speech_Male> research parks. <Speech_Male> Along <Speech_Male> sixty-nine. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Building up <Speech_Male> been and <Speech_Male> it's just a thriving <Speech_Male> community <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and you've seen <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> see you can see some <Speech_Male> of that in various <Speech_Male> parts of of <Speech_Male> the country <Speech_Male> where. <Speech_Male> Visit <Speech_Male> Industry have come <Speech_Male> together to form <Speech_Male> research partnerships. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I, I just see <Speech_Male> thriving <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> East Texas I. <Speech_Male> Love It I. Love It. <Speech_Male> Okay. Well, Dr <Speech_Male> Gordon has <Speech_Male> been an absolute <Speech_Male> pleasure. Thank <Speech_Male> you so much. So congratulations <Speech_Male> on your <Speech_Male> one year anniversary <Speech_Male> as the president <Speech_Male> of my beloved. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And and <Speech_Male> and secondly, congratulations <Speech_Male> now being <Speech_Male> Texas Titan. There <Speech_Male> you go. You're not just citizen <Speech_Male> your tight man you're. <Speech_Male> And with <Speech_Male> that shirt <Speech_Male> and a hat. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Won't <Speech_Male> Branch <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Go. There you <Speech_Male> go. With <Speech_Male> Axel Junkies <Speech_Male> Axiom Jack appreciate <Speech_Male> everything you do. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thank. Thanks. <Silence> <Advertisement>

Stephen F Austin Texas State University president East Texas Gordon
"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 3 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Downstream activity so the P.. M. I. Tends to be only upstream yet and It was interesting because we we were. We were rattled a little bit during twenty nineteen, because their numbers and early twenty twenty, their numbers were lower than ours, and we usually always check to make sure that we're kinda been sink in like I, said those guys are Paul. Leave the gentleman that runs the PM is a friend of ours. And and so we always check to see where you know where we are and and we figured out. You know what this is downstream upstream thing. So not only do we look at it by different types of of companies, but we also look at it by sort of position. In supply chain, and if you go to the website, you can actually see a breakdown. For Twenty Twenty and some of the other months you know sort of? You see for the Times what you can kind of tell when we figured out, Hey, wait a minute. The reason why we're than pm I is because we got downstream as well as upstream in there. So so you can, you can really see the differences between folks that are close to the consumer, versus folks that are are backed ways in spite Jane. It's a really interesting thanks. So we deliberately keep the the respondent based diverse in in an. We liked the look what those differences are. You, you have been doing this for two years now, so you have really four years. For years, yeah, so there's four years a Beta and You mentioned that there was some interesting things to to to see maybe twelve months ago, eighteen months ago, so so, so, what were your operations before this whole thing hit? And then, since then, I guess there is a tradition of inflammation in terms of the Marcus, internalizing the full effects of it so. What did we see maybe twelve months before the couvert actually hit the economy. Well, what we what we saw is anything related to. The consumer was great, but that the upstream activity. Was Cooling, so so what that said is, if things would have stayed the same we were, we were headed into I. Don't I don't WanNa? Say That recession word, and on say the R. Word, but but but we were. You could see the growth leveling off upstream. which all economic. That are based just on GDP. Weren't seeing at all, because the consumer was so hot, so that consumers really high, but about a year and a half ago, we really started seeing, and you can see it. You can get onto the website and see the numbers and. Play with them and we're. We always welcome. Comments and sometimes arguments. You know we're. We actually. We actually take into consideration. What What what people who are really. We got some dumb comments directly, but but most of them. You know many things are very. Thoughtful and many companies are using us. To help them plan a little bit because it's surprising. How accurate we we asked for both this month, and then twelve months from now, what do you expect in and it's interesting how accurate! It's an up until the golden time where that's been so disruptive. None of the predictions included that. Interestingly, though while we've been in Kobe there, really is a strong belief you know there's an optimistic belief via logistics managers that that things are GonNa be better than the year, which is which is interesting and I hope they're right about that. So so it it's. It's been a very interesting it's. It's been a very interesting. And, we just started. It has I was thinking about the PM I, and about how logistics component specifically are good. Indicators of the future and the PM I a great job at they don't include all the stuff that we do. And and and so we thought well..

Paul Twenty Twenty Times Jane Marcus
"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"TESTING EQUIPMENT TESTING SUPPLIES for we're in the middle of COVID, nineteen and and and you can really see that it would have been nice to have early warning system so that you knew a coupla months ago. What was going to happen. You know two months later and so logistics managers index is designed really to track. Activity in. Logistics components. Transportation warehousing inventory. And what we do is we ask people? It's real easy to take because we know people are busy and they're not gonNA take something. That's long. So, we asked Gum Literally takes less than five minutes. We asked him. For instance transportation prices. transportation capacity to transportation utilization. Those things go. Up Down or stay the same, and then we assign a number. Wait to each answer so if they said it's going up, we give that hundred. If it's going down. We give it a zero Stan. The saying we give it a fifty. And then we average those together in anything over for each component over fifty. Means that the sort of the crowd. The majority thinks that there's increases there and it's been really interesting. We've been doing this for the past four years in. You can really see what's. What's likely to happen and you don't see it at the last minute as it's at the consumer, but you also see at upstream and and really something the last couple of years while. Last year and a half. And you could really see this before Cova. We're able to see you know. Everybody said we had such a great economy and consumer economy for the last couple of years has been really hot, but upstream. We're starting to see. You, know, a degradation. In in the economy and the upstream economy before you got to throw the retail sector, and if you think about it, you know, look at say for example. What happened to Fed Fedex during twenty nineteen, so they miss their earnings. In both. The third quarter that that ended in late September.

Fed Fedex Cova Stan
"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday is preface deal Rogers who is a professor of business at Arizona State University. He's also the director of the Frontier Economies Logistics Latte. And a CO director of the Internet et supply chain lab at Asu. Data's a leading researcher in the fields, so gruber's logistics, sustainable supply chain, management, sub, eighteen finance, and secondly markets welcome. Nice to be with you. I want to start with. The Logistics Managers Index Lmi that you manage along with a number of colleagues in different universities. I guess it's a combination metric based on the. Managers Betas aspects of logistics. sexists inventory warehousing transportation. Could you describe what what goes into it and how IT SCALP LEAD? Yes, so the logistics managers index it some. it's it's five universities. It's it's it's one old guy me. With a bunch of of younger faculty. and. I suppose they do a ally. They do a lot of the work. I do a little bit, but that's true they they do a lot and really good researchers and most of them. have either been. Students of mine. Or I've been hired him or a mentor in some way, and and have them the the the young professor who works on this Dr Zach, Rogers. From Colorado State and he does a lot of Management of the actual survey and Sahni, he actually In addition to be a young assistant professor of supply chain. He's also my son, so so and and the other guys aren't my son, but like being my son so so we've got Colorado State Rochester Institute of Technology. Stephen Curry all a rutgers university. Dr Shenyang your who I hired Fritz first academic, job. A long time ago, and and Ryan Lemke who? I used to work at University of the battery on Ron still there. And I hired him back in the early nineties I think so so a bunch of my old. My old friends, and and we were thinking you know. GDP Gross Domestic Product. Is a terrible. Measure of the economy is just a really bad measure. How come? Well. It tells you what happened. It doesn't tell you what's GonNa Happen and it tells you in the most micro way. GDP only measures from. The last stop to the consumer. That's the only measurement and you don't see all the vet. Upstream activity in the supply chain that that actually can be an early warning system. both for good things and bad things and we thought for a long time. That the logistics components I. If you measured them, would would be very helpful in understanding both what is happening throughout the whole economy, because it touches on the entire economy, not just the last step on its way to the consumer. And and also It. It tells you what's likely to happen because there's a ripple effect as thing move through the supply chain, clearly seeing that. Happen now as you think about the the PB and and the ventilators and all those supplies that you need in..

director Arizona State University Ron professor of business Colorado Sahni Dr Shenyang researcher gruber Mike professor Ryan Lemke rutgers university assistant professor University of Stephen Curry State Rochester Institute of T
"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"state university" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"state university" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Hey you know what time it is time to grab your board head out into the SIV ideas see. You can't see that sales pipeline starting to curl up over the horizon there and for those of you that liked to Be Able to see things as they're developing. I want you to see this with Mannheim sir today. Welcome at Hinds I got A. I got way. I'M GONNA go with us here. You ready I don't know so I wanNA see if they can make the connection if they can see ahead to where we're going and make a connection between Tina fey the Ohio State University and B. TO B. Marketing. What do those three things have in Common Matt Heinz? Well we're GONNA find Out here in a second. I'm very excited for our guest today. This is long overdue to have our guest today joining us on sales pipeline herniated. But I wanNA thank everyone for joining us. We are GONNA talk about B. Two B. Marketing. We might talk colluded about Tina Fey and I don't think we can avoid talking about the Ohio State University at this point. That's GonNa be a tough one. Because I went to the University of Michigan Michigan so I may be have to check out during that part. Oh my gosh I forgot this terrible so You know this is live for those of you listening to this show podcast speed. You may be listening to this. After a couple of days. You may be listening to this after the Super Bowl. We'll get into that here in a minute as well but for those of you. Listening to this episode live on the Funnel Media Radio Network. Things could get ugly. We got a little Ohio state. We got a little team up north. We'll get into it three week. Sales pipeline radio where featuring some of the best and brightest minds in sales and marketing specifically around B. Two B. Today a very excited to have with US Vice President of Marketing Club Essential Holdings Maryland Cox Maryland. How you doing? I'm good. How are you at where you better before you recognize and I was reminded that our producer is fighting for the wrong team here? Well you know when you went enough you learn. It doesn't bother you as much. That is a fair point. How how many decades has it been and since Since Michigan getting some interference. Here again I I think the Feed is getting cut off your. Yeah as a Husky ski like we have the same thing where people say like I remember. We're we're we're automobiles was the internal combustion..

Tina Fey US Ohio State University University of Michigan Michiga Matt Heinz Mannheim Ohio Michigan Vice President of Marketing Maryland producer
"state university" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

06:29 min | 9 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Unfortunately probably now as young as five or six years old setting you know before before a competition. They're going to be designing strength and conditioning programs for the for so they peak specific date before the actual competition or before before practice. You know. There's there's going to be somebody out there. Somebody like you or somebody like me. Leading the dynamic stretches leading a variety of other warm up activities and yet the individuals that you work with. Don't have that advantage they can't get called out on a fire called hold on a second. We've got fifteen minutes to warm up before we get on the fire trucks right On the one hand you think about Swat team members and things like that but really across the board with first responders. They may not have time to warm up. How do you approach that? And how do you approach. The fact that the standard is type of period is trading that so many personal trainers and strength. Coaches like to adapt isn't really well suited for somebody who is working in a first responder tackle field because they have to have a pretty significant level of fitness. Most of the time. If not all the time they can't that's another today is not a good day for me to chase after you I'm tapering right. Yeah I mean I really a lot of flexible You know so over over the last couple of years you know had some colleagues the talk to you deem at flexible period. So bottom line. There is kind of an overriding writing plan. But the the plan has to be adjustable and recognizing that most of these individuals don't have to be exceptional at anything at any anyone time but they need to be extremely okay at everything so you know they. They've got a decent amount of strain. A decent anonymous durrance parents of cardiovascular fitness Mobility Flexibility. Because as you said before you never know when something bad's going to happen and you know ideal you know everybody's warmed up and ready to go before you know that something bad occurs but we know that's not the case so one of the main things that we just try and do is approach from the standpoint if we build a bigger capacity and we improve your flexibility mobility your your overall strength your your cardiovascular endurance when you get called in that situation that's not exactly perfect. Hopefully you have a greater capacity before you break and you know realistically that that's the best we can really do. And I hate it because you know I had a good friend. You know. Say it not too long you no matter. How Big Yard? You're not GonNa you know. Be Bigger than a bullet. And that's a hard prospect to because we wanted to give people every opportunity to be successful Elba. There's there's there's some things that we can't control and that's tough and that's that's really tough especially from you know with the groups that were with and we developed some. I'm pretty strong relationships in the best world. Now our law enforcement personnel and firefighters. And it's tough because you know what you can do what you can't do. When I think from my perspective you give every opportunity to be successful but in reality it's not in some ways? It's not much different being a string coach because when I was working with our soccer team at the last university all I can do is help them build the capacity and the physical requirements. The thing need to be successful and then after that it's really up to them and they've got to figure out how to transfer that into what they do because they're the experts in their area and you don't mind. My job is to get them ready. Their job is to figure out how to use US. NEW SKILL SETS in their entire. We're talking with Dr J. Dawes from Oklahoma State University. I think a final final question to touch on that. I think a lot of listeners. especially if they're looking at either potentially changing jobs and professions. Or if we've got some students listening is you are. You're involved in the tactical field that I know when you first started out in this field. You're a personal trainer owned a Personal Training Facility for somebody who may be as still mobile or looking for for that right spot. What are some suggestions you can offer or they can gain insight and some education so when a job comes up this area? Maybe not as a researcher. If they're just a bachelor's Lucia master's actually not just if they have a bass a bachelors or masters. They don't WanNa be in a teaching setting. They don't want to reveal research setting but they WANNA work with these first responders intact. Act Glass leads. How do they get the experience to be able to do that? Part one of the best ways is is to try and link up with individuals who are already in that space that are working with the thing about it is I think within those communities. They gotTA know that you're in it for the right purposes and that you're actually actually there's served down because unfortunately I've seen a lot of people. Try to enter into that space. Because it was a way that they could bolster their profile and not really we do the right thing for the people that are trying to serve and quite frankly like these people the best in the world at sniffing out people who don't have intentions so it's a really bad move to somebody who doesn't have their best interests at heart trying to enter that space So I think the one thing is like if you really WanNa were those types of groups one you gotta be genuine No owes tell the truth a lot of times regardless of whether it's popular or not and you know did they diplomatic about it. You don't have to come out with guns. Blazing no unintended The the really the best thing that you can use like link up with people who are well respected in that area and let them kind of help serve as a gateway to introduce you to those folks and start working with them because you know a lot of times if they don't know you like you entrust you. They're not GonNa let you into their environment. Arma frankly that's smart on their part So you can gain credibility the extension that somebody that trust you than that. It goes a long way. Great information from Dr J. Ause Jam WanNa thank you for taking time from your busy schedule talking a little bit about the work of somebody in Academia Menia and more importantly highlighting and kind of explaining to people what it actually means when you work with tactical athletes across the variety variety's of professions. So thank you very much. Thank you sir appreciate.

Elba Dr J. Ause soccer US Oklahoma State University Dr J. Dawes Academia Menia Personal Training Facility researcher
"state university" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

09:20 min | 9 months ago

"state university" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Thanks for tuning again for another episode of the moving to live podcast if you like what you hear. Please leave us some feedback on apple podcasts. Or whatever PODCAST APP you listen to us on if you have an idea for an interview interview drop us a message through any of our social media channels. We're always looking for interesting people in the movement field who understand that move into the lifestyle not just inactivity. Welcome back to another edition of moving to live podcast. We are podcast about movement movement opportunities we interview individuals who are involved in different aspects spects of the movement profession all with the goal to breakdown movement silos along with our sister. PODCAST FIT lab pige. We firmly believe that movement should be treated as a lifestyle L.. Not just an activity today. We've got a guest that we interviewed a little bit over two years ago. Who Really had an interesting story about how he went from a failed baseball player are to a personal trainer to Director of Education in a national organization to a college professor and I one of the things that people often forget when they see that somebody college professor is? It's not typically a nine to five job. It's not something that you just teach the two or three classes that you're assigned to teach it often involves more than that and there's often a variety of reasons why people who are in the teaching profession switch and even move halfway across the country today with Dr J. Dawes who is now at Oklahoma State University versity when we talked to him a little bit over two years ago he was at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. And I'm especially appreciative. Jay Talking to us because I know that not at twelve midnight tonight our last night actually. He was at work collecting data. And we are at about four o'clock clock in the afternoon so I suspect we've got about thirty five or forty minutes before Dr Dos Falls Asleep Jay. Thanks for taking time to talk to moving to live once again. Yeah thanks for having me. Dan Rather than fail baseball player. I prefer to be called aggressively mediocre so aggressively and actually. I'm looking at Doctor Ause. He's hugged a zoom camera and he's got his trophies behind on his office wall in Oklahoma State. There's so many. What are the things that I always like to ask people when I interview them for moving to live whether it's the first time or whether it's the second time is you're stuck in an elevator? You've got your Oklahoma Oklahoma state. T. Shirt on and somebody says you know. So what do you do there. And what's your order. Plague Elevator speech. I'm Dr J. Dawes and I take it from there yeah you it's. It's tough to summarize but in a nutshell I'm assistant professor of exercise are applied exercise science with primary emphasis in research on human human performance optimization for the tactical athlete so once we're short that means is here Oklahoma State I spend about fifty percent of my time time. In a teaching role so I teach courses one undergraduate when Bradford a mentor a handful of PhD. As well as master's students and try to kind of Help Guide them through the research process and But basically helped them can achieve. Their academic goals are Then in addition to that forty I and my job is doing a research in a variety of different areas in about ten percent my time is spent doing service and that service Is really a pretty broad autumn real for a whole variety of things as far as No giving back basically to our department here at the university The university as a whole the College George as well as the community and I know one of the questions I want to get out of the way because I think it's interesting very often when you see articles about college. Professors is there like you just said I teach two classes and they say oh well you know you show twice a week you know you show up twice a week and maybe spend ten minutes beforehand or hand prepping but that's not exactly true. We'll get a little bit more into the teaching. I know that we had to reschedule. This because you said look. I don't WanNa do at seven o'clock in the morning because I'm working midnight tonight. Why were you working at midnight when that's other than people who do shift work not something that you commonly think of when you talk about college professors or even strength coaches? Yeah the I mean in reality. The people that I do a lot of research with our people that were shifts so You know in order to try and help serve them as best. I can accommodate their schedules. Federal's you know. Sometimes you have north towers that you have to accommodate and fortunately it's one of those things where I actually do generally love my job and you know going going in and doing testing for midnight till two thirty a M is actually a joy believe it or not and not that it is something that I actually doing collects at all said and I was kind of a cool story is not too many people. Do you know going at midnight and and do research with people doing cool things so I know you said you're associated are skewing assistant professor. You've socially professor but now nonexistent again so that's a nice way to segue you're at a different institution and and a lot of times. You think somebody gets tenure track job and they say okay. I'm set here for life. And your a different institution. You were tenured. You were an associate a professor which is kind of the middle level assistant associate full professor and from all aspects you know had a pretty sweet gig and you made a decision to pack up with your family and move him a couple of states not halfway across the country but a couple of states away to Oklahoma State University. You know how did how did that come about. What was the decision? Asian that Brought that on yeah. It's one of those things where this position that on now is was my dream job. Twenty years ago as far as from an academic perspective active It was one of those positions that I wanted it but I never thought I would have the opportunity to to get it and so Couple years ago actually approached by a couple of people in the -partment who were my mentors and they said hey you know we we have a position open really like it. Apply and You know at that point in time knows associate professors full tenure position. You know it's it's Kinda hard to think about weighing that out walk away from it but quite honestly a again with the the people that are here on the team that we have and the opportunities state provides is one of those things where you know I always would. I would have always regretted if I hadn't made a job and you know even taking a step back as far as rank is well worth the the opportunity here and getting to work with the team. That's just a phenomenal. A table No it's one of the things we're coming into work everyday working with a team like this. It's you know it's a true collaborative environment. Everybody's rooting pulling for one. Another and system. tastic in there is something to be said for People from Oklahoma I don't know if they're just able here I say that being in Oklahoma obviously a little bit biased. But I think what you also have and said you're at Oklahoma state now and that's where you did. Your Undergrad also correct. No I did not. I did my Masters Ama- PhD State. So I I probably one of those professors I interested in the top one percent actually get go just go back to their alma mater and nt so as far as university goes it's hard to imagine me being more invested That I could possibly be here so and I know one of the other things is that people often think about you know as much as we'd like it to be college professors aren't at the upper echelon of what they bring in money and I know from talking with you when you you were thinking about making the move one of the things that kind of made his attractive is the opportunity for your kids to potentially go to Oklahoma state also. Yeah you know that was one of the major benefits is the the tuition issue here. So you know that that will certainly help out financially in the long run and Also gave me some favor with my father and Aucas Was Oklahoma state as well. Now that pretty much guaranteed him three grandchildren. That will graduate from Oklahoma State He's you know. Give me a little bit extra favor on that. So and of course I know is somebody who went to Auburn University. Where Auburn and Alabama were bitter rivals? My question would be what happens if one of your kids figures out a way that they want to go to Oklahoma the home. well as I said before they can go wherever they want. Their money's going to Oklahoma state. So that's why we're talking with Dr J.. Dawes who is was it Oklahoma state. You mentioned getting the interview that your three main areas of responsibility or teaching research and service and I think a lot of times people think think of college professors. They think that either. They don't do any teaching at all and they do all research or they do all research and a higher adjuncts or temporary faculty faculty to do the teaching but was really never talked about a whole lot as the service that I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit more because you've been at two different institutions what exactly for you specifically constitutes a service and I think one of the things that's important for listeners if they're thinking about going into academia or they don't understand it is you don't get additional money for this. This is part of your responsibility. And it's one of those things if it's anything like the positions that I've been at and currently it's kind of a gray area so you almost have to in some instances use your imagination and not in a negative way but sell it or explain to people who maybe don't understand what your expertise is. Look this. This is.

professor Oklahoma State Oklahoma Oklahoma State University Dr J. Dawes assistant professor baseball Dr J apple Dan Rather Jay Talking University of Colorado Colorad Masters Ama- PhD State Doctor Ause Couple Auburn University university The university Bradford
"state university" Discussed on AMS on the Air

AMS on the Air

06:00 min | 10 months ago

"state university" Discussed on AMS on the Air

"You done any connection with using AI and Amazon rivers yet or is that still something that is sort of in the future for you actually. I don't have a paper on it. You know you're getting the great so we we do have a little work where I have. Previous students have shown that while our weather models aren't very good at predicting these phenomena these atmospheric rivers rivers in the sky Three weeks or four weeks ahead of time which sounds crazy we can actually do that. With observations so in essence the information is in the observations but the climate models in our weather models can't do it yet so this is a great opportunity for data analysis and looking for these patterns in the data we have And so what we're trying to do to link with this area work is say okay. These neural networks great at finding patterns. Maybe they can do even better than the simple statistical tools that were already using and the answer is so so far they can do as well and now we're trying to figure out. Can they do actually better. But then we use these tools of understanding. What the network learn to say? Okay if I can predict an atmospheric river in three weeks with one of these artificial neural networks. How did I do it? Where did where did the information come? From right cool. I could predict that an atmospheric river is going to hit La. You know in in February seventh but as a scientist. I don't think any of US really know how it would do that. And if we could figure out how we might find a tele connection that we've or of some sort we didn't know about before Orlando atmosphere feedback we didn't know existed. And so right now we are using these tools to figure out. Why is it working and if we can figure that out we're going to learn new climate leading? It's super awesome. I have a student. UH-HUH PH student. Kastenmaier goes that's that's her project. So nice stay tuned as a Colorado. And I'm interested. I mean I know you don't get the direct force of it but let us know events or amplified from that. So obviously and I think from my point Atmospheric rivers are not. It's we're going to learn patterns patterns of the climate system and you know it may bring an atmospheric river to the north of the south but that same thinking may end up tying about snow events coming from the Gulf or talks about tornado activity inhale activity in the southeastern spring which we've also shown has similar connections so it opens sort of our eyes is to a lot of possibilities of applications. I'm always interested in how faculty members or research scientists end up sort of in the field that they end up in the topics that they end up in. I know your family has a history of research in science and So how did you end up. I in meteorology atmosphere science science but then that mistake riverport extra tropical circulation part. How did that sort of find your way to you? Or how did you find your way to it. Okay do you want the the long story or the one-sentence story how would it be in the mid three centers. Yes yes so actually. When I was twelve I saw the movie? Contact talked with jodie foster. If this okay this is a great start young and I saw her story by Carl Sagan I believe and they made it into a movie and I saw it and I went into my dad's office. Who's a professor And whatever she does I want to do it and he said that's a physicist it. She was an astrophysicist. uh-huh and I said I don't know how to spell that but that's what I want to be when I grow up so my whole life was training to be Jodie foster and I did get a degree quote. Vote Particle Physics as an Undergrad. So I did do physics with math and I. My emphasis was particle particle physics. And all of my summer research was High Energy Particle Nickel Physics but Abou- Junior Year of college I was at Fermilab in Chicago. Look at a particle accelerator and a small fire broke out and everything ended up being fine but I realized that these people had spend spent millions and millions of dollars and ten years is to build this one thing to study this one part about neutrinos and it could all go up in flames. I realized that is that was. I wanted to ask ten questions a day. The one question every ten years so I that day decided I was going to change. They do but I didn't know what to do. And so actually this is gonna Tom. This is not the typical is stared at thunderstorms out. The window story It's the opposite. Honestly I said what system is so complicated. I will always have a job because we will never understand and I decided to. Earth system was so complex with the atmosphere of the ocean. Space that that it wasn't such a bad thing. Plus climate change was really starting to be talked about and I said this is something I care about and it's complicated. So that's how I ended up in the field. I decided go to Grad School in Atmospheric Science in terms of atmospheric rivers. How'd I get there honestly? It turned into a Starting Talk to my colleague. Eric Maloney who studies tropical dynamics and we said what are some cool problems. We can work on some together. That's great so I. My house was destroyed by Atmospheric River. Anything like that yeah. Well I'm really excited to see the the research that you and your group produced in the coming years You guys have a lot going on a lot of castle go so much fun. Yeah and you're on the ground breaking Part of it the part of it. So if you WANNA if you're here. Ams Twenty Twenty in Boston and you want to Z.. Dr Barnes Talk At ten thirty on Tuesday in the nineteen Conference on artificial intelligence for Environmental Science. If you're not here at Amazon twenty it'd be recorded and you can go online and check it out at or you've already listened to this episode so you have all taste For for what you do Dr Barnes. Thanks so much for joining Pavin..

Atmospheric River Amazon Grad School in Atmospheric Sci jodie foster Ams Twenty Twenty Dr Barnes US Carl Sagan Orlando Environmental Science La Colorado scientist Chicago Kastenmaier Gulf Boston Eric Maloney
"state university" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

11:02 min | 11 months ago

"state university" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"A badge note the rollout of customer three sixty platform The idea of viewing your customer with that three three hundred sixty degree view. I feel like blockchain is the perfect kind of You know piece of this that like I feel like we all you know feel like we know our customers pretty well and you know. They're when they're using our technology or whatever it is her buying our products and we have a pretty good idea but something like botching the fact that it is immutable the fact that it it brings in a layer trust. It really feels like you know to me in this topic topic of identity that we've touched on a little bit that with with blockchain. Were now going to have much more power as as technology leaders as CEOS house to really see. What's going on to see both your own internal employees in your customers? I'm curious in those conversations Adam as you're talking to other. CEO's as you're we're talking to technology leaders. I know that there's a lot of excitement around blockchain and kind of a lot of confusion What are some of those other kind of hesitancy to use it? What are some of the reasons that people are kind of You know not really seeing the value here when it kind of seems like we. We all know that you know ten years from down the line. It's going to be important. But maybe they say hey over the next three years blockchain's not gonna be a priority because we're just gonNA kick the CAN. Yeah sure so. Bill where we're really investing in seeing opportunity in demand from our customers in permission blockchain will we mean by that is it's not completely publicly available not anyone can just access the blockchain Siada dated because when we're talking about the enterprise company data is critical. So that's where there were playing so it's not an open it. therion is a network of companies that were enabling to come together and share information between them or like ASPCA share information between institutions. Also extend that be to see to the end customer to the student which we love your point about customer three sixty were all about enabling you you company institution to get closer to your end customers and so that network effect we feel is really really powerful so one of the big hesitancy to companies in his willingness to participate network with their suppliers vendors and customers partners is sort of they fear asserted. This data will be out there in the wild and so we say hey. Wait a SEC. No no we actually can control who has access to the data and this is one of the really innovative thank salesforce as working working on which is is not just private in this network of companies but it can be opened up this data that data this object that object it can be opened up permanently late to an individual to another company it can be opened up just for a certain amount of time and so that is really powerful and that that gets say sort of relax lacks okay okay okay. Data secure passed it and can only be shared where we wanted to share. I think that's a big thing that sort of you know getting people to to slow roll roll adoption. I think the second thing is incentives so watching is not just about the technology. Let's say we saw the technology and we still have all these challenges of like like you and we're talking about identity and some of the really complex things anytime you're building. Networks and companies are coming together. This is not natural competitors working together the other suppliers and benders working together and it sort of an equal relationship not one dominant sort of dictating however also play into network. So you get to things that are non technical uncall- so you get to governance. WHO has a right to add other network so if at eleven Arizona State or when a partner with other institutions who says Oh that the other university yeah let's let them network or that other up is going to you know have course gonNA consume some of this education? Let's let them into the network so you could say it's all all open but the governance around adding that additional company or security rules or even in a network where there's payments happening between parties. WHO GETS paid eight? How do they get paid to play? Who pays the blockchain who pays for this network that all gets really complicated? And it's non technical helping companies with those things also really really important and also slows adoption because companies have to come together. Really think about this stuff. Do you feel like Your peers and other. CEO's does technology leaders are have some reservations about this and might And might be on the fence about about using blockchain and like why that might be you know an education You know our community of CIO's Are you know as a breed of surely curious about Oh to new technologies and I think you know as a community of practice drawn to education because it's a it wonderful opportunity privilege in many ways to to try and even to fail without the consequences that are important to CEO's in a corporate setting I workout. You're can come at a significant price. Personal ad the organizational and so again I think as I've been sharing the work that we're doing and and actually just a couple of weeks ago we were in Chicago. I the big higher education gathering. And you know we had a standing room only audience. There was a huge huge amount of interest in actually tackling questions like many. Did Adam actually just outlined related to governance and distracts me that I you know. It's such a more interesting problem to solve for and figuring out how to use blockchain supply chain. I'm not saying that's not important. There's not a lot of money to be had there. But the the problem Problem of figuring out how to build out a trusted learner network that involves and supports the privacy that we know You know students have an untitled into rights you under federal law figuring out how they give permission to which organization other individuals for objects in their learning portfolio. How we actually at facilitate overall learner's success rather than barriers to transfer as we talked about earlier in time together other those are things that CIO's and higher education seems to be really interested in and we've made a commitment that here it is to actually get a whole bunch of us together and I don't mean and just the is but also the Department of Education and some important fellow travelers in the corporate world and we of course that includes salesforce to come together to start? Aren't really working on on the network piece of it. Now that we have a series of proof points some of which now we're actually moving into production as soon as general availability or or. The cloud is made known to the public and my favorite my favorite military military commander General Availability Service. It's joke Yeah I you know we. We've actually had an episode on On blockchain for for supply chain and It's quite literally in the name. It's a chain. So what's funny I think is. We've gotten so good at supply chain in and now it's like you know. Obviously it's the next it's A. It's an obvious use case. It's it's the next step for for supply chain to be able to track skews across different from companies and all that stuff is fascinating episode But I'd agree with you that you take something like education where it's so critical and so obvious and to the to the student. They are just perplexed. Like I can tell you you know from the first hand experience of my fiance taking you know whatever testing out of English in high school and then having a PT school be like hey you never took English in college and it's it's like how could you not know that you're like isn't this all connected like how would you not know that those individual things that happened to the student. It's your life and it prevents prevents you from doing from point at Grad School from getting a job from showing a certification It prevents all sorts of things from happening quite literally early due to a technical error. You know these are a lot of times human beings you know that are sitting in front of a computer trying to amazing work. That don't know that you know. Introduction to psychology is the same as foundations of psychology I'm curious love when you're talking about you know down to the individual student. Is this something thing that they're gonNA see. Are They GonNa know that that you have you know blockchain technology that is supporting them in these efforts or is this something that You you know the world goes on and nobody knows nobody is is the wiser although maybe a little bit just from you know it's the normal can like the Internet working. Yeah I mean the the answer is absolutely an. I'll just reflect them. Something shared earlier. Our whole goal is to put the learner at the center of everything. So let me give you a real quick quick use case a lot of students in the country of begin their higher education journey in the community college and the vast majority of them actually aspire to coming coming to universities and many many. Don't finish their two year a degree before the actually apply to a university and then they get to a University of Arizona State University the city and along the journey without knowing Because actually we don't know what they took really before we're not really watching wants them to what they took before they got here and the community college pretty much goodbye when they actually get admitted to. ASU But using the blockchain And with permission of the Learner we can keep deep a sharing of the ledger of the courses that students taking she's year at Asu and actually get her two year degree while she's on the journey here at the issue and whether she finishes issue or actually you know unfortunately perhaps doesn't finish. She's got a credential she. Can you know she exit higher education with an and hopefully it inspires her because she actually does get an a degree while she's here at the finish for your degree And again the the Learner's perspective I really don't think we're ever going to call you know. Watch the magic of blockchain and action working for you It's going to actually part of our engagement work. We have a very successful and Dan Mobile APP environment and for for learners. They're gonNA see a view to what they're taking what the prerequisites are what they've accomplished. What again? What opportunities there are for a job after they take a set of of courses are actually hopefully Through better Machine learning actually be able to provide a tuning Of the course of courses that they need to be taking to be successful in the workplace overtime as we get the workforce community engaged in this the distributed ledger.

CEO Adam CIO ASU blockchain ASPCA Arizona University of Arizona State Un Bill Chicago Department of Education Siada commander Grad School partner
"state university" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"state university" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Was like that in a good response to our. Did you have a background in performing arts. Is that why you went off. If the Hewlett yeah so born and raised in four Texas grew up pretty serious competitive dancer on my life I I tried other sports parts. You know try to be well rounded wasn't for me. I always wanted to be a striker in soccer way too. Slow supplementing the goal. That was way too stressful right. Ah gave him a standing goal and dance. I was probably that kid out there and just be bopping around on board move. A sitting are us not sitting right now. Mike Oh yeah. That's what we do this because that would just complete the chair. So what type of dance. What was your background? A little bit of everything by Jazz Contemporary Tap clogging and we're actually going to a brew house later we'll be doing some clogging there as well a little different wooden shoes. No wooden shoes. Oh sorry just lose taps right yeah a little bit of everything you were also super excited when you were in school you were the cheer captain. Captain Yep there's Google man the final Yup Yup sure leading or is this cheer like like like the PEP squad. Cheer Captain Matt So cheerleading like high high school. Okay HEP squad pets. I don't know I anti competitive cheerleading was the AV squad trust me. There was nothing that I saw that when I met you that makes sense you kind of got that personality to motivate arms really loud or. You're just really loud about. I've been told that as well. There was a story story that I wanted you to tell your working with a patient who who was having a hard time doing any exercise and you eventually convince them to do the exercise after convincing them a long time you got them to do a lunge and a lunch that was a big step forward that Ah yeah very large set for I'll right so the funny part of the story. This is a real stories right so you're demonstrating a lunch for patient. Don't in something went awry. Yes it was probably a little bit more aesthetically pleasing very large lunge went down very loud. God that's not being sound in the middle of that. How are you feeling in that particular moment Did I just hear that. There is is a long pause and then we both may dislike loud enough for the patient here as well. I did not know that allowed pants wearing that day. I'm not sure what happens. A A lot of awkwardness because it was also a male when I was working with. I think I'm gonNA need a minute. Their situation and I think you understand. What's what's happening? So I rent found a jacket and had a tight around my waist for the rest of the day person tonight at least the last patient of the day right but the lesson we wanted to make sure we imparted was always have a backup pair of pants with you at work whether it's in your backpack or on your desk drawer. Yeah Oh he's got to have a backup so talk about why you decided to go and get further education in performing arts. Go back to the serious part of the interview. We'll get off the split pants but I'm sure that happens in performing arts to talk about why you chose to do advance it more school and more time. Why did you decide to do that? So I went through schooling went through all programing felt really confident in who I was and what I wanted to do but I knew I wanted to be better. I knew I wanted to be the best. Something one of my professors always told me it was like. Do you think that you would send your grandma to that person if they needed physical therapy so I wanted to be the person that someone who wants to send their grandparent to and said this is the best person I know. It's going to take care of you and that's going to get the job done so with knowing that there was extra programming that would put special attention on me. That would push me. That would teach me things that would really progress. My clinical reasoning. Not just my hand skills. Not just my people skills but really push wish me to the place. I wanted to be faster. Yeah how long. How long has the program? Oh She's Brooklyn Sixteen months for the residencies in fellowship is a year and we. Where are you in that you're in the six weeks? Wow light at the end of the tunnel off. You gotta be careful though because the tunnel could be a train. We're giving more split pants. Yeah so I'll ask you the same question right so before. You mentioned that that point you wanted you wanted to be the best physical therapists. You could be one someone. Someone would send their grandmother. To what advice would your now self. Give that person before you made that decision. Think of your why. Why are you doing it? Why are you here you know most of? Let's get into the job because you want to help people go into PT School. But then you don't sleep eating right. You're stressed out and you can kind of lose sight of Your Y. Hi My so my wife was to help people and to be the best I could really. I didn't think he would give me a shot. That was one of the last things I had submitted. Was You know I'm going to shoot for Ohio. How does text is grow? Maybe she'll go to Ohio and I got the phone call in February now sitting outside and shorts and tee shirt and the director called me and said Hey. Do you want to come up to to a high for an interview and I go. I guess so. That is a map. We've got Texas not Texas in February and go. Yeah like okay. What's the weather up there? And she was like your need to cut I go. I think I've got sweatshirt and she's like well. I'll bring our you Jackie Jackie. When you go ahead convertible would absolutely you know almost like the flyaways so the dreams are not impossible stuff that you go through is as for a purpose for awhile so just make sure that you're focusing on that and you'll get to where you want to be a great one? Yeah what's your for that. We'll let that that'll be your parting. Shots nailed elder all right. Let's say one more time from work. This is the PT podcast. This live episode is brought to you by new step. The created created the first product of its kind twenty five years ago with the new step recumbent cross trainer which is now a mainstay with physical therapists worldwide. New Step continues its tradition of innovation with the new step transit. The new step transit uses advanced software and hardware to help you get your patients better faster. New Step transit delivers real time. biofeedback for awareness of physical performance and the ability to objectively track goals and progress find out more visit new step dot com. That's N. U. Step Dot com this the PT podcast. What's your to? Our next guest is a third year student. Physical Therapist here at the Ohio State University. She had a career as a professional dancer prior to choosing a career. PT And now as an interest in working with the neurologic population please welcome welcome Kayla Harris for a second. I got super nervous that something was structurally wrong with this building. Uh when I did it got reloaded near like that. The students supporting each other. Welcome to the program. Welcome to the program or those on. This is on right. Okay so I mentioned your incher. Although I don't know if anybody in the room could hear your professional career and professional dance before coming to school Gupta I did so I feel like I'm Kinda GonNa tell Morgan story a little bit here deal but now I grew up dancing. I went to college. Dance for my Undergrad and then I danced professionally for five years after that and then new I wanted to explore movement and I knew kind of way and here I am yeah. That's pretty cool. The chose not to do that. What about those two professions that you've been exposed to in dance and now as a student physical therapist We're of a similarities. Where differences look at question so I think part of the reason that I loved dance so much on the same thing. Like we're GONNA try a bunch of different sports but that kind of sucked at all of them and dancing was like the one thing that I was like. Oh this this is really cool until I always felt like I was athletic and I liked.

Ohio Mike Oh Texas soccer Hewlett Captain Yep Jackie Jackie PT School Captain Matt Google Ohio State University Brooklyn Gupta Kayla Harris Morgan
"state university" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"state university" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"But if you're paying attention if you're not paying attention to the opposite you're not not even paying attention with the patient's name is they pick up on the absolute. What's your football love? The PT Pine Cast. Yes yes the show Joe telling a friend or by leaving review on nineteen or Google. Play all right. We've got a few more student physical therapists coming up to the stage. Now it's here for these ladies man. I gotta get an entourage like that. That's pretty good all right ladies. Introduce yourselves resolves. I'm Kara I'm a third year and I'm from. I lived in Ohio my whole life. I'm from southeastern Ohio. Near West Virginia and I did my Undergrad and athletic training in northeastern Tayo. And then now I'm here now you're here. I'm a second year Owen Owen on. Oh okay that's fine. I'll editor Sal. Okay we're introduce yourself south there. We go I'm kristen. I'm a second year and I'm from chillicothe the Ohio's a little bit smaller watch. They lost more than Columbus. I so we bring you guys up to talk about something that you so you guys take pretty seriously here. The Ohio State University but it's also a national and international initiative. What are you guys really excited about? We're just really excited about service service in general We have our own service committee here at Ohio State and so it's something that's really important to us but then. PT Day of service that international aspect is really really important to be a part of as well so we have our own service events throughout the year but services really a day to schedule a whole bunch of events throughout the week. Yeah yeah there was a bunch of a state students at the national student. Conclave right you guys. We're out there. Show hands there. You go and you guys got to to hear Josh Dangelo Story. What are the guys who founded hip? Dave service I didn't know part of that story. It was really really unique. If you want to go and listen to that episode. This is me pimping my own show in my own show very Meta but it was really great to see the why behind. PTA of service. And the reason I want Josh to tell a story in that format was for students coming in right now there's just kind of always been PD day of service but at one point there wasn't day service he had to create it What about what about service so far here at Ohio state has really really excited you to the point where you're talking about the show? It's really nice to see like the impact even that we can make those short few hours like so far this year we volunteered at a food pantry. We also went and served meals at a Homeless shelter and then we also volunteered at this like local community garden and we just did a lot of stuff like at the garden landscaping. And it's just like a really cool opportunity early and you can tell that. The People are very appreciative. So it just like we build those relationships with them and it makes us wanNA come back and it just kind of makes you feel good. You know you're making an impact. Yeah that's just a just make some noise if you were part of that so decent. How do you guys pick because you guys have done some different initiatives over the years through? Pta Service how do you guys pick gets mainly by feedback from the year before so we tried the farm that we helped out with. Everybody loves that event so we tried to make that happen again this year but also have a couple of community partners like I mentioned earlier that we do Events throughout the year. So we try to coordinate with them as well and then just based on student votes so that you guys done the past I wanted to. How these differ? You guys created holiday cards around Christmas and brought them to residents at Dodd Rehabilitation Hospital title. You guys worked with Donald House charities which is near and dear to my heart and I want to talk about the laundry project. The name kind of confused me but it's really cool. Yeah so the laundry project as an organization where it helps low income families like do their laundry so they have these different events laundromats and people can come in and the laundry project project will pay for their laundry. They'll supply the detergent. They'll help them do it. And like those people a lot of the times like they announced that those events are going to happen but a lot of times. The people like don't realize is it. And so when they come in there and they realize that their lawn is going to be paid for their like really ecstatic about it and so people go like tell their friends and then they'll bring their neighbors and their friends and they'll all get their laundry dining so it's it's a really cool experience. It's a really really good way to set someone up for success right and you guys ever backpack like in Europe breath or go camping for like more than like not glancing. I mean like actual camping where you have to bring your own food and just that feeling of like just living in I mean I did it delivered and dirty clothes when I first saw vanillin like these guys are doing laundry. How does that relate But that's a great way to work in the community. So good on you guys what would you say to someone listening. Or maybe first years who right now are just kind of bright eyed and deer in headlights of why they should get involved with PTA service in the future. Well we have service requirements throughout our program so we have our own student clinic and so it's a great opportunity to to be a part of physical therapy and serving underserved populations in the community as well as having some service learning events but these PTA of service events or something outside of the field of physical therapy so it gives you another opportunity to get out in the community serve with your classmates or with your professors as well. That's always fun to have them there or some other. PT's just from the OSU system in general. So I think just taking that extra minute to invest in the community and just kind of hit on your values and things that are important portent in life in general and just get away from PT schools. Yeah I think I said this top of the show you start to see things that are themes that were not planned talking about values. We're talking about getting getting something from you know doing something and having that resume and I think that was kind of all throughout what all of you and actually brought so good on you guys for doing that. What's your ladies talking about? PD serving the PT. PODCAST is a product of PT Podcast LLC it is hosted and produced by PT PT. podcast CEO Jim McKay and Cbo Sky Donovan from Marymount University we talk PT. Drink beer and recorded this has been another poor from PT PODCAST PD intended for educational purposes. Only no clinical decision making should be based solely on one source care is taken to ensure accuracy factual errors can be present more on the show at Tynecastle DOT com. All right shoulder they brought to you by the Brooks Institute of Higher Learning in Innovator and providing advanced post professional education education brooks. IHL offering continuing education courses in numerous specialty area six PT residency programs and fellowship as well as challenging but rewarding according internships the H. L. Specializes in the translation of information from evidence to patient management. Learn they can do for you to support your professional development at at Brooks. Ihl Dot Org our home on the Internet cast dot COM created by build I build. PT Provides Marketing Services specifically for private practice PT's some website development and hosted inviting content marketing solutions PT clinics across the country tasty with pt can do for you today dot com love the PT. podcast support the show telling a friend or by weaving review on one thousand nine hundred Google play from the makers of this podcast comes a brand new show. It's called N.. P. E. study casts if you're studying for the N. P. T. E. This is the show you need to listen to period. It's available on itunes. Google play spotify and wherever podcast heard short sweet and to the point episode so from Board Certified Clinical specialist and physical therapy professors. On all the topics you need to know to take the N. P. T. study cast available bull now on itunes Google play spotify and more and P. T. E. study cast the number one N._p._R.. PODCAST in the world..

Google Ohio PT Podcast LLC Ohio State PTA Josh Dangelo Ohio State University football Joe Owen Owen Columbus West Virginia spotify N. P. T. P. T. E. IHL chillicothe
"state university" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"state university" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Think Frostburg state university is a small sleepy institution and that's anything but the truth it's a vibrant community is growing what else you don't know about Frostburg state university is how wonderful the students are there great opportunities to get involved to do things that matter and they do just that students get to apply their learning outside the classroom from day one prospered state university one university a world of experiences. so long as you. right. you know you. call me..

Frostburg state university
"state university" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"state university" Discussed on The Playbook

"Student. Student athletes student is first and foremost in <hes> through gene boy who runs our office of student athletics development <hes> and andrea laura alonzo jones down there. They've done a marvelous job. <hes> for years now before i came on board and in advancing the fact that graduation is first and foremost and then certainly in my time here we have stressed that time and time again that <hes> the academic pursuits here are first and foremost we want student athlete to accept that across all sports <hes> graduation is keeping because we're in the business development were in the leadership development business <hes> and if they're not graduating from here we have failed miserably so graduation and graduation rights in in <hes> a._p._r. Academic progress rates and reports for us are critically important to what we're doing so graduation is paramount otherwise we've let these young men and women down and we fail miserably and we shouldn't be right and i my favorite n._c._a. Commercial was the one that said two hundred thirty three thousand student athletes and only so many are going to be professional professional something else and you know part of that tribe and so so are you where you know that professionalism and powers and changes and has great social impact which is important to both which leads me to a question so many people you want to get involved in sports and i try to tell them. Sports is not a profession. It's an industry right so develop skills knowledge and find what you have a passion for for and it's okay to be profitable with that passion. What advice would you give someone that would like to get into college administrator letting director what skills you know. I'm not going to talk about where you go or weapon. Really what skills would you advise him to start developing at a younger age well they have to in my view be willing all in to be a utility player in don't limit your entry point. <hes> be willing literally to relocate <hes> to do whatever you're asked to do. You've got to get in the door because it's an industry where everybody wants to get in but everybody is not willing to do whatever takes in terms of developing skill set and getting started to get in <hes>. They want to narrow down their focus. I want to be an athletic director and a powerful school on the west coast. Is everybody else you know. You've got to be willing to go. Be a i hear administrator at a division three school up in delaware right. If that's what it takes so <hes> <hes> cast a wide net be willing to you essentially sacrifice <hes> some of the comforts of home if you will to get out there and really be able to demonstrate first of all your passion ashen and then your ability <hes> to think outside of the norm outside of the box is the cliche <hes> and be willing to do some different things a lot. The first time entry level folks. Maybe aren't willing to do right and when you don't your entry point it involves something called patients which the older we get the more we get the young we are. It's very difficult i. I'm going to steal that from you. I'll give you credit. That's i love. Don't limit your your point of entry entry point last question all the things things you have been able to achieve both personally with your family and here at the school in n._f._l. And even as a lawyer and agent <hes> what the legacy that you'd like to leave <hes> i you know legacy is a is a is a is a big word and sometimes the concept of it. <hes> is a little bit <hes> a shocking to me <hes> but what i would tell you that <hes> when i leave this earth i really would just like folks to think back and say you know what at guy made a difference th- that that guy made my life for some other folks lives at i'm aware of <hes> just a little bit better <hes>. He just made a difference because he cared. That's that's really what i'd like to leave <hes> in in <hes> when i when i leave from here david that they look pretty cool guy he kind of made a difference. That's all i look to do from what i've heard around. I think that's already happening so you're on the great. I love the fact that not only have you made a difference but you brought into this podcast. The one person that made a huge difference in your life was was your high school football coach. There's no question as we have the same feeling towards mine. Although you know our careers you've been these crazy appearing allow it. I say did anyone out there. That's an entrepreneur teacher mentor. You can change one life and end up you know somehow. Participating and extraordinary lives even though you may not feel what you're doing is extraordinary. It has an extraordinary impact on my <hes> coach parks and he went on a <hes> a what do they call it a reunion with his iwo jima emma colleagues who survived they went back to iwo jima. <hes> and this is years later. I still have a little <hes> sandwich sandwich bag of sand that he brought me back from the beach of iwojima. When he came back he sent me a <music> a bag of san with with a note <hes> reminding me <hes> of all the things we had <hes> done in the times we had spent talking together because he kind of took me on this kind of a surrogate son knowing my story <hes> and i still have it in my <hes> my safe deposit the box and i thought i was back home. Those little baggie of <hes> sand from you a team of from coach luis in a bag. That's awesome well. I really appreciate <music>. You're busy. All pac. Twelve oaks runs in my family but we're trying to make strides graduating kids. I think that's what's most important absolute so i appreciate our pleasure. Don't limit yourself. Be kind to your future self. I'm here with ray anderson. This is dave meltzer with entrepreneur nor the playbook by hope. You enjoyed this week's episode of the playbook as much as me on a personal note. I just wanted to thank everyone for making the playbook such a success. Don't forget get to continue it by sharing. Subscribing and listening to your favorite episodes does dave meltzer with the playbook..

dave meltzer administrator director andrea laura alonzo jones iwo jima younger age ray anderson n._f._l delaware football pac david iwojima luis
"state university" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"state university" Discussed on The Playbook

"Dave meltzer c._e._o.'s sports marketing with with entrepreneurs the playbook and i have i shouldn't say an old friend but a dear friend ray anderson the athletic director of arizona arizona state university the sun devils and we're here right in the conference room ready discuss something that i'm most interested in is ray welcome to the playbook but i wanna know the playbook to become in appalachia director. Dave i tell you man <hes> <hes> i didn't invent it. That's for sure the typical route. Is you know through administration you start sometimes as intern turn you wake up through the ladder but kinda in the same department or certainly in the same <hes> flow path <hes> i wasn't that traditionalist league <hes> and so i ended up here <hes> through security of course most mostly through being an agent then being with team being at the league always spend been a lot of time on campus <hes> because we represented coaches and when you're a evaluating <hes> players you're scouting you're evaluating spent time on campus but never with the intent thought that i'd be an athletic director <hes> at all right but you know i always say to kids when they asked me how to be sports sports agent and said you had to develop the skills and gain the knowledge and have the desire because you know if you don't really want it somebody else really. Does you got that blue playing sports but you went to law school. Why did you go to law school. I went to law school because my my my father who passed away early had planned to be a lawyer as a young boy coming up <hes> through nine years old <hes> once he passed away that began came my focused i wanted to be a lawyer didn't didn't really understand what it meant but learned over time through teachers and others who who schooled me about that <hes> and so i went to law school <hes> with the thought that i'd be a lawyer you're not with the thought that i'd be sports agent <hes> or litigator <hes> or certainly not an athletic director <hes> but i went to law school because it was something something that was kind of ingrained in me as a young boy and you went to some significant schools. I was joking around the first time we interviewed years back. I said it's hard hard for me to give this interview because i've been rejected my favorite squander at stanford. I apologize to be here but they rejected me for undergrad in law school. Actually the thought had a chance for law school but then you out do yourself. <hes> going to stand for you go to harvard law school. I was fortunate <hes> and it all started really with the folks when you're in grade school and junior high and high school in my case <hes> had really taken an interest in me personally <hes> and so just weren't we're not gonna let me falter academically academically and always stressed that so <hes> fortunately i was able to get into stanford <hes> in in do well enough academically to actually apply admitted to harvard law school so i've been very lucky very fortunate. <hes> both great institutions and i'm really glad i went to both of what do you think the advantages you know. All my siblings went to harvard penn columbia. But what do you think the true advantages of graduating from harvard law school competitor like two lane it. Is it a long term effect. Or what do you think the number one advantage of going to school like harmony. Well no disrespect to to we all know the top the perception inception <hes> is that if you're able to go to school like that in graduate <hes> then <hes> people give you a significant benefit of the doubt apt to start to start with is just kind of ingrained in so <hes> you go into literally every situation with probably a competitive edge eh <hes> that is <hes> attached to graduating from a place like harvard or yale or princeton or stanford or <hes> or certainly a sister when you're there though because people have a higher expectation you've ever feel that because as as a boss i've hired kids from the ivy leagues and and i allow that same perception to happen and then i have higher expectations but yet there's still twenty four years old. I think somehow you know myron rolle. Remember meiring your favorite clients at rhodes scholar but i forgot i forgot that he's twenty one so although he's the first client i've ever had to say mr meltzer query and asked me questions that we're really deep. I still forgot that he's twenty one and i think you you know there is looking at my siblings who all went into the schools. They got great advantages the start but there's more pressure on them because people were like oh. That's the harvard kid. He's summa okay well. There are some expectations that go along with the privilege of going to a place like that <hes> and that's just part of the and you have to take take that on and so yes when i left harvard law school and i went to my firm initially <hes> law firm in atlanta georgia. I don't think there's any question that folks looked at me and said hey. That's the the harvard guy you expect a little more in terms of the quality of the work and even worse for us. You married a woman named buffy yeah so you go to stanford harvard law school where mary girl named buffy there. Your expectations are like who is this guy gets like preppy be privy to the to the hill exactly so that <hes> but no those are great opportunities to <hes> get higher education at places that <hes> very frankly people will give you <hes> like i say the benefit of the doubt they'll give you a little more <hes> leeway as a matter of fact but it also comes with expectations dictation. I'm glad i had the opportunity to deal with that. I i am as well. Now you go to law from litigator. What skills do you think you learned the most litigating that help you today as an eighty <hes> preparation <hes> in the <hes> the realization that there's just no substitute for just hard work work in preparation <hes> and so and <hes> a lawyer's role particularly litigator where discovery and research and preparation way saying advance of ever getting in front of arbitrator or panel or jury is absolutely the most important thing you do so <hes> that that translates really into everything. I did my business life but certainly here. <hes> preparation is is key. It's it's vital doing due diligence doing your research getting the appropriate rotate input getting ready and then when you make the case <hes> hopefully you're very prepare <hes> and you're more able to deal with surprises or curve balls etc etc so preparation is absolutely forms now on the administrative side like you said the traditional route is to build that administrative experience understand the culture of the institution and build your reputation within. There's a budgetary side sure that you don't really get get her back. I was litigator myself and you know the reason. I wanted to be illiterate. I didn't want to deal with those details. Afterwards right. I wanted sure other kids that do the research for me. I wanted to speak and how did you develop up those skills because budget huge businesses you for you well along the lines. You get a real appreciation for accounting and finance and law school. You take an accounting course you. You should <hes> part of what i did <hes> to advance my opportunity is at i actually studied financing at one point. I had a series twenty two. I think it was was a license from that. I got back in massachusetts underachiever by taking additional courses and financing in management and investments <hes> but the real trick is to know that you come into place <hes> and you know what you don't know <hes> which means you then look to your finance folks in your internal accountants. <hes> can you give those folks <hes> a lot of responsibility and a lot of runway <hes> to do it right. Keep you informed and then you delegate to people people with the appropriate expertise but never ever just completely delegating in saying you just do it. I'm not interested. I'm always interested in being being briefed <hes> and kept in the loop so when the final decisions are made i'm all over them but in terms of the expertise <hes> in the nuances of finances is an accounting and budget etc leave to the experts are part of my team and you do really great job including one of your latest hires right yet. You hired a friend someone that you had to work with at the n._f._l. Frank came came with ms our chief financial officer for sun devil athletics <hes> <hes> in my years at the n._f._l. Running football operations he was the finance budget leader for my unit for eight years so i certainly we went back to <hes> someone that i knew and trusted <hes> who could come in here and culturally we were seeing. He knew what my expectations were. He could come in here and and get up to speed very quickly on what goes on in a athletic <hes> budget in finance arena not very different very frankly and what goes on at the n._f._l. Pro level so you you go and get really good people around you then you delegate to them. Let them do their job and you know what you you got a chance to be in pretty good. How old were you when i look at you. I think of radical humility and it's something that i had do do my career in my thirties. When i retired tired in was an idiot and didn't humbly tell you right now. I wasn't radically humble so i wrote those two words on my nightstand and i said from today on i'm gonna wake up and pray to god for ten and people can help because that's the way that humility starts for you with all the pride agree harvard stanford in buffy all the pedigree you have you you know to understand which took me later on in life to understand that if i elevate others i elevate myself and lee had this great saying be kind to your future self and it seems to me from her to frank and others around you that you understood that much younger than i did. Where where did the humility come from mm-hmm who helped inspire you well first of all thank you for the compliment radical humility and <hes> album believer that <hes> you are at your best when when you have the best around you in terms of teammates and support group and if you have that you got a chance to be wildly successful because you're not just depending on and yourself you're depending on a team and i learned that early on in that started very frankly with my <hes> freshman high school coach guy named lloyd parks and <hes> who actually when we showed up as real cocky junior hockey to beat everybody and football baseball basketball we come into high school in our football coaches lloyd loyd parks and who is a marine who landed on iwo jima and survived that war and then ended up being coming back and being a meal military marine instruction officer so when we showed up there was lloyd parks all six two of them you know i shaved in grizzled <hes> and wiggins it was a very good example coaches paul wiggins we showed up and he made sure that across the board we understood. You're only as good as all of you. Are there are no stars it is about team and he really drove who've that in us and in me <hes> and i give coach parks and more credit than anybody in my life or driving home that you'd better be humble. <hes> and you better be appreciative of everyone around you because without them. You know what you will die. You will not be successful in that that that drove it it from then on. I was always about okay. What's my team. Look like <hes> everyone's gotta roll <hes> in success <hes> and that's kind of been my marching orders <hes> <hes> and that's why i very frankly i've had some success because it's about the team delegating not micromanaging <hes> and then giving everybody when when it is appropriate. Give everybody the risk but also give everybody the we're awards and what do you in that mary oxy. What do you instill empower to allow them to make decisions. We're not micro. Managers would values that you you know for me. I understand par people value so they can make their own decision. Based on the values is that we have as a collective. What values are the ones that you look at. When you're empowering your associates employees etc the thing we say about around here all the time david music culture is just not important culturally is everything <hes> so we <hes> <hes> we we we said in advance a culture of <hes> teamwork <hes> no selfishness <hes> think through unintended consequences for the good of the group not just for the self <hes> and then core values like you know what <hes> family really does come first <hes> and work life balance really is important <hes> and <hes> communication education and very honest genuine consistent communication is really critical to our way forward and those are really our core core values and we just tried to instill <hes> and then live those not just talking but living by example up and down our chain of command ed at one of the things i noticed different here. I'm blessed to have gone to tons of universities and blessed with friendships like yours but the one thing that stood out when i walk through this office was the one word i don't see often. I see integrity. I see commitment. I see consistency right. I see pursuit any wooden type of of of success s. triangle but very rarely do. I see straight out on the wall graduation because i like to me i went to occidental college because it's the only place to let me play football football but my mom loved it because when i was recruited by saying he goes eight and other places and they talked about their graduation rate with players and my mom went to occidental coach we'd off at at the time very winning coach league said she said well how many players graduate he said seventy percent and she said only seventy percent and he said no no. I'm sorry seventy percent go on to graduate school school. I'm sorry everyone graduates right. That's the feeling and energy expectation i get from. You and we're very proud of that because they are student..

harvard law school harvard stanford football director Dave meltzer c._e._o. harvard penn columbia Frank myron rolle intern harvard stanford appalachia occidental college lloyd parks ray anderson arizona arizona state universi mr meltzer massachusetts atlanta
"state university" Discussed on Move or Improve

Move or Improve

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"state university" Discussed on Move or Improve

"State university and with any luck professionals like like me and and you and a lot of the other people i'm sure you'll be interviewing for your show can continue to help make these concepts the new conventional way of building and living and designing better environments and products a home is considered universally designed if the features of the home are more easily easily usable for all abilities in ages the best features are desirable subtle and not obviously recognized as a special feature of the home so examples are open plan designs lever door handles flush door thresholds and you can think of aging and places a more distilled version of universal design it's become an industry phrase that i've only begrudgingly adopted and that's because there's a lot of power and stigma in the word aging and nobody really likes that word we don't want to remind or that's for right so that's why i try to refrain it with thrive at home because i i think it's absolutely great what you what you call it but yet to do to want to specialize in universal design in aging in place in the first place all right so i during the great recession when the industry the design industry was hurting badly i was working fulltime outside of the industry but i had a strong desire to keep my foot in the design world so in twenty eleven decided to start my own business on the side and i provided general designer decor service for anyone and everyone that would have me but i knew it wasn't really i wasn't living my purpose and i was searching it out and then before long i was approached by someone i had known since childhood who is very intrigued by my portfolio and she and her husband had just bought a new house and she needed help to make it accessible for her wheelchair and this was finally something very different for me and.

State university
"state university" Discussed on Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"state university" Discussed on Lawyer Talk: Off The Record

"I'll bet you if i called my good high school buddy who watch that with me he would remember that too i'll think of his i think it was name oh look it up later maybe anyway we it's a second lawyer we've had on here though that has had a connection between cinema and being a lawyer is on the same way you're referring to yourself and the third per whatever you're the second one i am the on the second lawyer yet i didn't have any movies it said criminal defense i'm here by necessity and lock all right so you saw the movie and you're thinking man that might be my calling and the back of my mind but i didn't know what the hell i want to do when that's twelve thirteen where'd you go to college youngstown state university why state university now youngstown is that trestle yep jim tressel i think we had champion's five championship games i think he went three of them in the nineties were you there when jim tressel was coaching yes part of it yet wow my wife loves him so he was i know how does really happy so he was he loved them up in youngstown if i run for mayor up there i mean it you look his demise there at the end was sort of unfortunate but man just seemed like a top notch guy yep what your graduate high school or graduated eighty nine from high school and i didn't go to college i took some time off went to college in ninety seven and graduated in two thousand so it's kind of a little niece older of a student now here's what we'll get back to you in a second hold on here here's what jeff and i know about bill you can cook with the best of them i mean almost like professional chefs stuff i can cook i can take stuff out of a buy in but he's introduced me to a new world i mean it's it's amazing you bring in these peppers did this all the rage of the courthouse everybody wants are you willing to share the pepper recipe.

youngstown state university jim tressel jeff youngstown