17 Burst results for "State Department Of Human Rights"

"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:30 min | Last month

"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Tuning maybe even a major overall with the police so you feel like policing is better and what they do how they're they're they're overseen and other interactions are consistent with whites and people of color what do you think specifically should change in that area in your city well the great thing about the policies that the work that we've done for the past few years like I said already George Floyd murder in on the pricing because it in just another the next page and a long history of policing in America that has been had had systemic racism and hostility at its root my grandfather could have told you about that story his grandfather credits on your part that story and the truth is I got I grew up getting pulled over either on a roll star athletes students on the during the my local high school I got I got I grew up getting pulled over everything and then the son of a police officer I grew up getting pulled over sometimes so I give respect to a box for some insane reason they clearly had absolutely nothing to do with the way that I was driving and so you know when you have that pattern you know that that that means we have the ability to years ago to start this work as the rest of the country look that same way you know we gotta think rethink our use of force policies well we did that back in two thousand eighteen and the first a hundred day the my ministration with the leadership of our police chief Todd Axtell now we completely rewrote our use of force policies include all the things that we're seeing on Twitter people say that that that need to be a part of those things that we've done immensely read designed our canine unit and the role of the deployment for our canine unit as we see those officers who failed to intervene artifacts tell last year fired five officers for failing to intervene in an assault in progress I think those things are really important and this I think cuts to the core of how we do policing in our community I it's about how we hire I'm of the firm belief that if you have to train someone not that took a knee on someone else's knack for nine minutes they don't belong imagine a gun in the first place so it's about how we hire who we hire where they come from how they know our neighborhood cutting gauger talk it's about it is about how we train them and I think I think Paul officers have gotten really good at de escalation we're not perfect we await the girl getting very good at the escalation it's about how we fire officers so that our officers in our community now when officers betray our public trust they will be held accountable for it and it's about how we're transparent with community so that they don't need it because we don't even think that people are getting away with these types of crimes against our neighbors over and over and over again with impunity last thing here the Merritt St Paul it's in Ramsey county when he got to the loose orders to start you can start on a read a couple graphs eight minority Ramsey county correction officers have filed discrimination charges with the state's department human rights after they were barred from guarding or having any other contact with former Minneapolis police officer their children we just were talking as children arrive all offices color ordered two separate floor and a supervisor told one of them because of the rice they would be a potential liability around children according to a copy of the racial discrimination charges obtained by the Star Tribune when you saw that story how did you react and and how do you react now I wouldn't I would hope that all of our reaction to that story in the plane like that have to be investigated if that's proven to be true and then that is a disgusting example of you know systemic racism on top of that they make racism to tell those that you need to tell most professionals who serve our community day in and day out every single day at their career and they're calling to tell them that they're incapable of doing their job professionally they're incapable of mall of providing customers with respect literally because of the color of their skin that is the problem and so you know that's something I think they need to be needs to be followed through with a completely whoever was responsible everyone who was responsible for issuing are enforcing that that border I need to be held fully accountable and I'll tell you just as I say with the you know the doctors just an apology does not matter we have to know people lose their job over that look I I'm I'm at the city so I don't get to make that decision and as more and more facts come to bear on that and that's certainly something that I'll be watching to see but like I said there has to be accountability if there's no accountability for the active thing well then we're saying our government leaders are culpable there were countless is in manifesting into catchy waiting those same systems they keep predicted the resulting in the negative outcomes in particular for our community the color and more specifically for our bracket lacking around and stuff I always appreciate coming on Melvin thanks so much appreciate it thank the mayor of Saint Paul Melvin Carter Adam rejoins us we wrap up the show in minutes Chad Hartman okay so are you the type of guy the ones look put together but doesn't want to spend hours at the mall finding new clothes so you can look great at the office on the road or even just on the weekend with friends and family.

"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:34 min | Last month

"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Majority Leader Paul Gazelka part of our our conversation last hour we talked about the woman who videotaped officer king of cub foods we just mentioned just finished overrated underrated properly rated all that is available to you radio dot com is the app hit the rewind feature this was an excellent Liz Sawyer story from of the week eight minority Ramsey county correction officers have filed discrimination charges with the state's department human rights after they were barred from guarding or having any other contact with their children he spoke there all officers of color were ordered to a separate floor are you kidding me and a supervisor told one of them because of their race they would be a potential liability around show of one A. Smith is an attorney representing ploys I think they deserve to have employment decisions made based on performance and behavior their main goal is to make sure this never happens again Bravo one hundred percent explaining the actions the jail superintendent Steve like later told supervisors he was informed shopper was arriving ten minutes and made the call to protect and support minority employees hi Karen concerning without the comfort time I made a decision to limit exposure to employees of color to murder suspect who could potentially aggravate their feelings I just I cannot understand the sergeant let me just get this part later that afternoon offices color gathered on the third for the console one another of what what they deem as segregation order summer crying charges say what others were openly complaining whether they should quit contemplate with this quit a union steward complained to top brass prompting the intro of instigation during the interview live explained that he recognized Floyd's death would likely create the queue radicalize trauma for minority staff and felt he had a duty to protect them one individual I was involved in the Pat down it was called off during the Pat down lighten has since apologized I realize that geared in judgment and issued an apology to the affected ploys also when they try to get sheriff Bob Fletcher to comment we're still waiting trip tried multiple times a spokesman right Magnussen initially refused to name lives current position or divulge whether you've been transferred on Saturday magazine said lighten have been removed from his role as jail superintendent he will report to undersheriff bill fanning who's been tapped to run the department the tension division enter the department ministration but several officers were reassigned in the post that day however briefly stands in stark contrast with ritual narrative when writers inquired about a segregation order magazine responded with an email there's no truth to that report in other words Magnussen let's be clear was lying was lying about fifth are you kidding me again in in twenty twenty this is happening if one of the officers involved in this goes to superior and says I don't want to be a part of this that's one thing when you're making this decision and your judging them on their race as opposed to this novel concept we hired them because we think they can do the job and they haven't given us any indication they can't do the job then again this is indefensible Adam when you saw this story and you see it now what grabs you most well yeah the word segregation comes to mind and it's insulting for assuming that these officers wouldn't want be able of what control themselves yeah around him that's insulting and racist do I mean it's it is it's it's a racist decision and yeah I don't blame these officers one bit for the reaction Fletcher still has not commented right I'm not sure when I looked at earlier I don't believe he has commented Janet someone the son of law enforcement officer again let's not forget we just have says this role a magazine was lying when Reuters initially reached out because word spreads out kudos Roy good to know we can rely on you insulting indefensible racists what else you wanna say I mean it's all those things right I mean first of all you cannot have the please lying to the public like that you just can't do that that's you know we're already in a situation where trust has been soul grossly eroded in policing that you just flat out lie like that is unacceptable and there needs to be consequences for that I can't imagine why it's taken this long or still we're still waiting on the sheriff to comment share should absolutely be out front on this condemning this action and excitement well it would it doesn't make you wonder if he somehow okay okay this before it happened he's trying to figure out how much you spend yeah I mean you know it again with no comment for him how do we know and that's that was concerning to me because that part for Magnussen Magnussen same when pressed about the initial stay the magazine claim when I asked that's what I was told that's his only potential defense did someone lie to him yeah and is it lighten or is it maybe Fletcher who lied to him we don't know isn't the shares office looks really really bad not coming out and clearing that up here's another disgusting part of the story so the day after arrested and booked at Ramsey county jail multiple officers reported seen surveillance footage of a white lieutenant who was granted special access guess where Chauvin cell where she sat in the bunk and allowed him to use her cell phone I signifies significant policy violation so the other individuals who were there you've decided they're not qualified for this solely because of their race that's it and then show then then gets interact with another white officer and she gives.

Majority Leader Paul Gazelka officer
"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Through some of the area to AT sixty three degrees at seven thirty one now I'm Steve Sampson with continuing coverage of the death of George Floyd CBS news special report the labor department is about to release unemployment numbers for the month of may economists forecasting around eight point three million more jobs were lost during the pandemic on top of that more than twenty million laid off in April economists Scott brown you're seeing a real loss in wage income and that now leads us to second round effects where because of that loss of income people are likely to spend that spending somebody else's income and so there's a like a chain reaction CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger says there are disparities many are focusing on race and inequality in the labor market of black Americans as of April black workers had an unemployment rate of sixteen point seven percent white workers fourteen point two percent and numbers just in another two point five million have lost jobs during the pandemic Dow futures up three fourteen CBS news special report I'm Deborah Rodriguez lawyers for some of the officials charged in the death of George Floyd or giving some hints as to what their defense will be this is the fireman there are indications that two of the three officers charged with aiding and abetting could be turning on Derek Jarman the officer who placed his knee on George Floyd snack the two were newcomers and had little experience as full time officers in court yesterday lawyers for the two seem to be blaming children for what took place oral gray represents one of the rookie cops Thomas lane he says his client expressed concern about George Floyd training officer should we rolled over twice the third officer charged with aiding and abetting appears to be cooperating with prosecutors the three that were and are in custody this morning Thomas lane J. Tang and toe tau meanwhile Minneapolis city council members today will call for immediate changes to the police department the emergency meeting is scheduled for twelve thirty and comes just days after the state department human rights launched an investigation into policies procedures and practices of the department looking into whether there is a pattern of discriminatory practices against minorities magic of friable join Dave Lee with more on this coming up at seven fifty here in the morning news the Minnesota attorneys county attorneys association has voted to support the process of sending officer involved deaths to the state attorney general's office for review rather than those county attorneys in a press release the organization says they're taking the steps to do the quote deepening mistrust in our criminal justice system following the death of George Floyd as protests continue throughout the country there are more more accounts of police brutality of peaceful protesters one of the latest captured on video from buffalo New York this morning two officers caught shoving a seventy five year old man during a protest near city hall the man had his head causing blood to run from his ears mistaken the hospital said to be okay initially police said the man trapped but once video came out they actually told the truth the cops were suspended that series of events reminiscent of the Floyd killing more police here initially said he died of a medical incident while in police custody and Steve Sampson a new Starkey three WCCO governor today's are gonna be covered nineteen conversation yep I'm sure he'll also talk to us and and we'll get the latest on the situation as far as the any curfew it we don't know of a curfew coming up tonight but anything else going on but yes Scott Colbert nineteen is the headline from the governor's office it's at two o'clock and we do expect some more loosening of restrictions now on what businesses that we don't know yet but that'll be it too of course will bring it to you live here did you hear anything out of the Fargo Moorhead area after he'd he'd sent some additional Minnesota National Guard members up there yesterday have not heard of course they were sent for a precautionary measures because there was some word that maybe some things were gonna go down in Fargo on Chris Minnesota a little too close but we haven't heard anything we haven't heard them engage in any activity have they had any kind of numbers put out as far as a financial impact on the city for the for the year destruction and then and then what kind of costs that is the businesses how many millions of dollars that could be a wee on anything out of there I saw a number yesterday and I can't I don't wanna say because I just saw it in passing but I know it's one of those things where it's it's ongoing in fact I know governor walls is going to be touring both Lake Street and north Minneapolis this morning to kind of get a look but I know they're still kind of tallying this all up and trying to figure out exactly not just how many businesses were were destroyed but also how many are so damaged that they're gonna have trouble coming back so this is an ongoing process and again my cell number yesterday but it off of my head along hello I guess yeah well yeah you're right that's that's probably no that's certainly not a firm number wouldn't think at this point and then Steve there's also store this morning and I bring it up because all eyes John rash about he's our media expert wheels look for our Friday conversations with him at a ten but Twitter I she has blocked a trump campaign video tribute to George Floyd which is an interesting move and that is getting some buzz obviously social circles social media circles soul as John about that coming up at eight ten as you mention the Meryl Jonas's half hour and then Mike Max is done just a.

Steve Sampson George Floyd CBS
"state department human rights" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

06:41 min | 2 months ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"This CNN breaking news. Welcome to the lead I'm jake tapper and we begin with breaking news in our national lead just moments ago, the governor of Minnesota announced a new investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department, saying the State Department Human Rights Will Launch Civil Rights investigations looking into the practices of the department for the last decade after the killing of George Floyd The unarmed black man by Minneapolis police officer just eight days ago. In addition to that right now, friends and family of Floyd are leading a march, a massive crowd to city hall and Houston George Floyd's hometown in honor of his memory. It is another day of protest today. Another day of a nation on edge in Los, Angeles protests are underway as curfews are set to begin shortly and right now protesters are already gathering outside the White House at times chanting I can't breathe George Floyd's last words. This comes as president. Trump once again is encouraging law. Law enforcement to use aggressive tactics and calling for military action, saying New York City was lost to looters last night. The president, insisting he has no issue with peaceful protests, but that was assuredly not the case, at least in fact, if not rhetoric hours ago in the nation's capital, when peaceful protesters last night gathering in Lafayette Park across from the White House were tear gassed, and brutally pushed back by shield bearing law enforcement officers, deploying Flash, BANGS and rubber bullets peaceful protesters I again. All of which so president trump could walk across the street and have his photo taken in front of Saint John's Church holding a Bible book, He did not open or read from in a moment. We're going to talk to a priest who was forced to flee from Saint John's yesterday so president trump could stage his photo op at first. Let's go to CNN's Miguel Marquez. WHO's live for us in Saint Paul Minnesota and Miguel? You're at a protest at the State Capitol building. Tell us more. We were here last night there about two or three hundred protesters and I gotTa tell you we're in a five minutes of silence right now. I'm GONNA show you. Take this off. I'M GONNA. Show you how big this crowd is! It is ad. Massive thousands and thousands of people have showed up if if the president thought his photo op yesterday. was going to have an effect. This is the result. Now eight days after the brutal killing of George Floyd still no word on the fate of the other three officers involved in his death, who either helped, hold him down or stood by watching him die. Where everybody that we are looking very carefully, it holding everybody accountable. Who Fail to do their duty as the country grapples with a searing pain of another innocent life ended by police action protests turned violent in many places around the country. Monday some against police in Las Vegas police officer is on life support after being shot in the head during protests on the Strip. At least four police officers were shot in Saint Louis. Their injuries are believed to be non-life-threatening. Some coward fired shots. And and now we have four and hospital thankfully and thank God. Make some sense out of this and a graphic video coming out of the Bronx. and. NYPD sergeants suffered serious injuries. After looters. A black car hit him and took off. That officer survived attack on a police officer is an attack on all of us pure and simple that attack amid absolute chaos in the heart of Manhattan the historic macy's side of the Thanksgiving Day. Parade ransacked police overwhelmed by angry protesters and opportunistic Lueders, sparking this reaction from the governor. It was a disgrace and eleven pm. Curfew in the city that never sleeps considered too late by many today. The mayor changed it to eight PM. We saw stuff last night that we will not accept. And we can fight back and we will fight back, but this afternoon a different scene peaceful demonstrators marching in the big apple towards NYPD headquarters, also today, celebrities and activists using social media for blackout Tuesday posting blank black images to their profiles, but some activists say while well-intentioned Hash tagging these posts black lives matters drowns out critical updates from people on the ground. This young protester, telling us after decades of empty talk of change. This moment feels different. Everybody's tired and everybody's ready for change. White people black people out here. If you look, this is not just black people in this movement, we have white black Asian. Hispanic native everybody is sick of the racism within this system. Gals Marquez brought us that piece, but right now where he is in Saint Paul, they are having a moment of silence, so we are going to. Respect that thank you so much for that report. Miguel has now, let's go. To New York City the curfew in new. York City is going to start earlier at eight PM tonight than it did last night, which was eleven pm. That's of course. After that night of chaos and looting unfolded yesterday as detailed in Miguel's P., seven hundred people were arrested in New York City last night, and at least six New York police officers were injured Luder smashing store fronts across Manhattan Governor Cuomo, putting the blame on his fellow Democrat New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and the NYPD Cuomo saying that they failed to do their jobs. I am disappointed and outraged at what happened. In New York City last night, the NYPD in the mayor. Did Not do the job a mayor. Underestimates the scope of the problem and the police in New York City. Were not effective at doing their job last night. Period it was a disgrace. Harsh words from Governor Cuomo CNN's Shimon Peres is in New, York and Shimon. You've been walking with protesters since this afternoon. Tell us about what you're seeing. What the experiences like!.

New York City Miguel Marquez George Floyd president NYPD officer CNN Minneapolis Police Department White House Trump Governor Cuomo CNN jake tapper Manhattan York City Saint Louis Minneapolis Governor Cuomo Saint Paul Minnesota Minnesota Los
"state department human rights" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Americans who have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition stands in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses JDS is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence of the DMV routinely communicate with ice threw out a two thousand fifteen of two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents in the NBA agents some commending the DMV agents in calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target market assist members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver Kluge cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he came about because our he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I tell immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are three hi I understand that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy and technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly US citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help the spare Reza photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the foyer documents Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you notice Martin to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite them with their families but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMB is are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab to study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document she is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have petitioned Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including two government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds a ten pairs are the shining are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comedy tension with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist loose Charbonneau of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about Cuman rights in North Korea but as soon as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the U. S. government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s top human rights official who says she was appalled by the conditions of migrants detained after crossing the U. S. southern border Michele Kellerman NPR news the state department you're listening to All.

ninety nine percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:22 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KCRW

"Crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition scans in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that my Grint dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses JDS is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence the DMV routinely communicate with ice throughout two thousand fifteen to two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents Indian V. agents some commending the DMV agents in calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target migrate assist members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and were applying for driver privilege cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing and in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up on this yeah we can talk about he gave Alcazar he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I tell immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are the hi I understand that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy and technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help us parodies of photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the foyer documents Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you now it is important to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite with them with their families up but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMB is are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab to study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says that citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document he is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have petitioned Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including to government agencies so we're seeing very powerful and cities at odds as in pairs are the shining are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comet attention with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist luchar but no of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about you man writes in North Korea but it soon as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the U. S. government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s top human rights official who says she was appalled by the conditions of migrants detained after crossing the U. S. southern border Michele Kellerman NPR news the state department you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR.

ninety nine percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Americans who have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition stands in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses JDS is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and her mom we have a great deal of evidence the DMV routinely communicate with ice threw out a two thousand fifteen to two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents in the NBA agents some commending the DMV agents in calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target my could assist members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver proves cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have driver's licenses the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing and in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he came about because our he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I tell immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are the hi Anderson and that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy and technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically health disparities of photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the for a document to Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you notice Martin to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite them with their families but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMV's are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab to study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document she is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have to dish and Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including two government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds as in pairs are these haunting are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comedy tension with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights or title to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on an alien a bull right sits led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist lose sharp and of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about you mean rights in North Korea but as soon as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the U. S. government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s.

ninety nine percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now dedicate a unit to monitoring the broker to arrange for the purchases of medallions and it will publish a watchlist of brokers that it will tell potential medallion purchasers what violations each has received the blasier's as lenders who are not regulated by the city our even bigger problem we've done a full review on the one area we regulate which is the brokers we should demand of the state and federal government that they do an equivalent review of the lenders driver representatives say the city could do more by offering a bailout to owner operator saddled with debt Lazio says the city cannot afford that and the mayor of Mount Vernon New York has pleaded guilty to stealing campaign funds as part of a plea deal with the state attorney general's office Richard Thomas admitted to feeling about thirteen thousand dollars from his two thousand fifteen campaign committee and filing false disclosure reports he's been sentenced to pay a thirteen thousand dollar fine and to a one year conditional discharge during which he cannot seek or accept public office Thomas has also agreed to resign at the end of September tonight we're looking at a low around sixty nine degrees right now seventy seven degrees partly cloudy at seven oh six support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot org from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro millions of Americans who have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition stands in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses J. D. as is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence the DMV routinely communicate with ice throughout two thousand fifteen of two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents in the NBA agents some commending the DMV agents and calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos with other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target market us as members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver proves cards I guess we get special attention from the envy at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he came about because our he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I tell immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are three hi I understand that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy in technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help us resolve photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches to ice well according to the for a document to Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you notice Martin to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite them with their families up but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMV's are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab did a study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document he is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest tech companies like Google and Microsoft have to dish and Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including to government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds as in pairs are the shining are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comet attention with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist luchar Urbano of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about Uman rights in North Korea but if you in as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass Robert Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the US government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s top human rights official who says she was appalled by the conditions.

thirteen thousand dollars thirteen thousand dollar seventy seven degrees ninety nine percent sixty nine degrees one year
"state department human rights" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:06 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KCRW

"Time are wrong time to stand up for what you believe then so I totally support that whether you agree with what she says politically or not if you believe there are injustices every time is the right time to stand up for that and the crowd in reading roared its approval when repeat scored on a penalty kick that gave the U. S. the first two goals Sunday as the Americans blanketed the Netherlands support for NPR comes from of the Walton family foundation were opportunity takes root more information is available and what the family foundation dot org score like a by the way was to nothing for failed to mention that force kind of an important detail right now in Santa Monica sixty nine degrees for a six year KCRW thanks for being with us from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro millions of Americans who have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition stands in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses J. D. as is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence to the DMV routinely communicate with ice threw out a two thousand fifteen to two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents in the NBA agents some commending the DMV agents in calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target Michael just as members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the light next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver privilege cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he came about because our he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I tell immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are the hi I understand that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy in technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help us Reza photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the foyer documents Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you notice pourtant to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite with them with their families up but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMB is are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab to study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says that citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document he is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have petitioned Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including to government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds as in pairs are the shining are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comet attention with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it its focus heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist luchar Urbano of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about you man writes in North Korea but it soon as president trump what you're getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the U. S. government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s top human rights official who says she was appalled by the conditions of migrants detained after crossing the U. S. southern border Michele Kellerman NPR news the state department you're listening to All Things Considered.

ninety nine percent sixty nine degrees six year
"state department human rights" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro millions of Americans who have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition scans in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses JDS is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence to the DMV routinely communicate with ice throughout two thousand fifteen to two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents Indian V. agents some commending the DMV agents in calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as alleged in a complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target Michael just as members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver privilege cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DM B. to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing and in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he gave Alcazar he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I told immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums how is denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee there are the hi I understand that in the past ice has gone to DMV offices and just asked for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy and technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help us para Reza photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the for a document to Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they're doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do you notice pourtant to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite them with their families but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMB is are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab did a study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males so failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather dislodge seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document he is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have petitioned Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including to government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds as in pairs are the shining are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims that come in detention with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist Lou sharp and of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about you man writes in North Korea but as soon as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the U. S. government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s top human rights official who says she was appalled by the conditions of migrants detained after crossing the U. S. southern border Michele Kelemen NPR news the state department you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news.

Audie Cornish ari Shapiro ninety nine percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:58 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have never committed a crime have their faces in government databases that's because they have driver's licenses and today we're learning that federal law enforcement agencies have regularly been accessing those DMV databases for facial recognition stands in a moment we'll hear about the broader issues this raises first we're going to look at one specific case late last year an activist group in Vermont called migrant justice filed a lawsuit alleging that migrant dairy farm workers in the state were being targeted for deportation after they got driver's licenses J. D. as is an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont he's representing migrant justice in this lawsuit and joins us now welcome thank you for having me what evidence do you have that ice is using DMV information to assist with deportations and remote we have a great deal of evidence to the DMV routinely communicate with ice threw out a two thousand fifteen to two thousand eighteen we have emails between ice agents in the NBA agents some commending the DMV agents and calling them honorary ice agents so they were sharing a good deal of information particularly about migrant justice numbers but also a whole host of other individuals and it's not just photos it's other information beyond that photos applications for licenses licenses themselves car registration materials the works and they were being selective with what they passed on in one document your lawsuit on covered a state worker passed along what he described as south of the border names to ice that's right as a listener complaint we believe that ice not we use the DMV in order to target Michael just as members and more specifically and more broadly I guess I should say the let next community so people who came in and we're applying for driver proves cards I guess we get special attention from DMV at the time and a lot of those people would then be forwarded on to immigration officials we should have laws vary from state to state in Vermont undocumented immigrants are allowed to have a driver's license as the flow of information from the DMV to ice seem very informal is there supposed to be any kind of oversight for the sort of information sharing well we would like to see over say for the information sharing and in fact we asked for it for a number of years we went to the legislature we spoke with the envy officials but unfortunately we were not able to get the response that we needed to in order to protect immigrant communities from being constantly in fear when they were going to get a license that they would be then targeted by ice can you tell us a specific story about an immigrant who got caught up in this yeah we can talk about he came about because our he's my justice leader he has been outspoken he's received numerous honors from various national organizations for his activism after being pulled over by ice he was told that they got the information through DMV and through other sources we went back and looked at our records and saw that the DMV gave his car registration license and photo two federal immigration officials and that that information was actually use as the justification to arrest him we know of course that his activism played a key role in that as well if an undocumented immigrant came to you today and said I could really use a driver's license in Vermont should I go apply for one what would you tell them I tell them what I told immigrants now that you know it does come with some risk of that it's an important thing to get if you want to drive legally but it also does come with the risk that the information could eventually end up in the hands of ice were fighting to stop that right now so stay tuned we hope to get a good resolution to our lawsuit but the issue is still pending JTS thank you for speaking with us today thank you so much he's an attorney with the ACLU of Vermont representing migrant justice in its lawsuit against ice the department of homeland security and the Vermont DMV NPR reached out to all three for comment DHS and the Vermont DMV said they don't comment on pending litigation ice told us they don't comment on investigative techniques but they point out that acting director Matthew albums has denied a previous claim that the agency targets individuals based on their advocacy now we're going to look more broadly at what's been revealed today about ice turning to DMV offices for help with facial recognition that is using driver's license photographs and algorithms to identify people suspected of being in the country legally now this collaboration was on earth by a team at Georgetown University in here to brief us as an art the Shawnee either Aarthi hi I understand that in the past eyes has gone to DMV offices and just ask for records on immigrants we just heard about the case in Vermont that alleges that much what exactly is new here so what wasn't covered is that ice agents while looking for undocumented people ended up having extraordinary access to the state records of American citizens lawyers at Georgetown sent our privacy and technology have been submitting freedom of information lawsuits to DMB there around the country trying to learn what they can about how each state does or doesn't collaborate with ice three states Utah Washington and Vermont handed over documents showing that ice was not just reaching out to them with targeted searches ice agents were not just saying Hey here's a specific person we want their full name and date of birth can you share what you've got on them instead ice was saying Hey we've got a high resolution picture of somebody who entered the U. S. on a visa we believe this person overstayed can you take this picture run it through your database which includes many if not mostly U. S. citizens and give us the faces that match this one basically help the spare Reza photos to license photos these requests happen from twenty fifteen to twenty seventeen and I understand according to the Georgetown findings these three states to do it right out handover facial recognition matches size well according to the for a document to Utah and Vermont did and with Washington it's unclear when we reached out to their DMV the spokesperson did not confirm or deny the agency told The Washington Post which first reported this that they just respond to court orders as you mention NPR also reached out to ice and I'd add that ice the I. spokesperson said that that what they doing is consistent with what other law enforcement agencies do now it is important to point out facial recognition has done plenty of good in this world to to help find missing children and reunite them with their families up but in this instance activists have raised concerns they say there is a bait and switch going on not every state let's undocumented immigrants got a license these three states are among those that do their signaling to undocumented people it is safe to come here and apply for your driver's license but then the DMV's are turning around and handing files over to deportation officers what about the reliability of the technology itself is facial recognition far enough along that we can be counting on it in this way well last year the MIT media lab to study it found that leading software was accurate ninety nine percent of the time when it came to identifying the gender of white males the failure in only one out of a hundred but with darker skinned women it failed to identify them as women one out of three times so that is a huge disparity algarrobo Doria one of the George town lawyers he called the ice DMB tag teaming a dragnet and he says that citizens of color are particularly vulnerable here this is him the question that people need to ask themselves in the states is not am I and documented but rather is a flawed seeks recognition algorithm I think that I look like someone who's a document she is not alone in his concerns a San Francisco recently banned the use of facial recognition by police and city agencies the company that's the largest maker of police body cameras says it's not going to sell facial recognition tech for now because it's just not reliable enough experts from some of the biggest companies like Google and Microsoft have petitioned Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tack for that same reason though Amazon Amazon is still selling it including to government agencies so we're seeing very powerful entities at odds as in pairs are these haunting are the thank you thank you secretary of state Mike Pompeii is reviewing the role of human rights in American foreign policy he says he wants to get back to what he calls the basics activists worry about what this may mean for L. G. B. T. people and reproductive rights for women NPR's Michele Kelemen reports secretary Bombay says he wants a foreign policy that takes seriously America's founding ideas of individual liberty and constitutional government so he says it's time to see how the state department's human rights agenda fits into that as human rights claims are proliferated some claims the comet attention with one another provoking questions in clashes about which rights are entitled to gain respect he didn't give any examples as he announced his commission on unalienable rights it's led by is Harvard mentor law professor Mary Ann Glendon basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights violators Glendon is a former US ambassador to the Vatican and a long time opponent of abortion rights she's also written in opposition to the equal status for same sex marriage the conservative family Research Council welcome the new commission saying it will help protect religious freedom which it says is the foundation for all other human rights a former obamacare a state department official robber Shinseki now with human rights first is worried about the make up of the commission pointing out that his former colleagues in the department are not part of it it took it's heavily on scholars and primarily on scholars from a religious background and a conservative religious background another activist loose Charbonneau of Human Rights Watch says there are already examples of the U. S. changing its approach earlier this year the trump administration threatened to veto a U. N. security council resolution condemning sexual violence in conflict because there was a mention of the need for maternal health follow up in the event of rape the resolution was then stripped of any mention of reproductive rights and Charbonneau says the trump administration is selective on human rights overall at the U. N. for a while they were talking about you man writes in North Korea but as soon as president trump was getting into a dialogue with Kim Jong un the leader of North Korea all of a sudden human rights dropped off the agenda he says the trump administration often blasts Iran's poor human rights record but give Saudi Arabia a pass robber Shinseki with human rights first says he'd like to see the new commission look at how the administration is undermining US credibility on this issue that runs the gamut from president trump saying that a free and independent press is the enemy of the people to complementing murderous dictators to obscuring the US government's role in separating migrant children from their parents and keeping them in squalid conditions that was the topic of a report out today by the U. N.'s.

ninety nine percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Think last year eighteen thousand eight hundred and fourteen people were killed by terrorism numbers reduction? That's the third year that the death toll has fallen in succession since two thousand fifteen that horrible toll has fallen by fallen by forty four percent. No one's ever going to say only eighteen thousand eight hundred and fourteen people were killed at the trend is however interesting Steve Kilali compiled, what is called the global terror index. The obviously there are still very dangerous places Afganistan Iraq, Nigeria Somalia, Syria, which recorded more than a thousand deaths in twenty seventy but what behind the decrease his Steve Kelly. Well, put it in one sentence. It's the demoss Basel. So as it's lost its territorial, control, Iraq and Syria. It's found it much harder to actually launch attacks with that. It's lost its revenue, which means heavens got the money. To play the foreigners as much as what they could before. And also found break up large amounts of the group and were they did sedan by fifty two percent. Awesome. Still the most deadly grew into seventeen the house, the nature of the attacks changed is that the sort of thing that's revealed by the statistics as well. Well, there hasn't been much change in the nature of the attacks. Other than maybe in Afghanistan, we've found the Taliban shifted tactics away from civilians towards more military in place think that's a sign of just the increase Cape operational capabilities. Ability of the organiz. What are the broader patterns? We talk more about the statistics. And also the methodology if we have time as well. But the broader patterns do they lead to reliable conclusions? I mean starts are one thing. But do people on the ground to expert to analyze this kind of thing? Would they look at your statistics and go? Yeah. That tells a story we recognize it will it depends which area are actually looking at this one's that. Which just always astounds me, always astounds me. And that's the ninety nine percent of all their through terrorism. Either happened in a conflict zone or in countries, which practice state terrorists have state care being extrajudicial killings torture imprisonment without trial. When you get that strong that does lead to some very concrete conclusions give us some conclusions. Then well the conclusions as one. Than Star Wars unless you really have to that'd be the first one. So we can see Afghanistan running for seventeen years, and we can see the aftermath of Iraq is still settling them starting to settle down. Now, but still in very very bad, shake, the second thing is not support strongly states, which are terrorizing their citizens this raises. The question of the methodology because there are many areas where deaths are caused by government action governments will often turn around and say, it's the terrorists we're fighting against you know, we're talking about we're talking about Syria Myanmar to use another example, how do you take account of that when you're trying to assess statistics, look, that's an excellent question. So one of the caveats on the research, we do the exit terrorism done by non state actors. So the we look at the global terrorism index in terms of let's say we look at it from global pace, which you can measure the global peace index. That's one measure in that index is another major state terror. So in this case drilling down and just looking at non state actors and part of that is driven by the database, which we do to actually do the analysis in count would the picture be very different. If you did balance it for state terror. However, we define that. Well, it gets more difficult because you've got a different ways of being out to follow and in coverage. So the way you looking at state terror what you'd be doing is looking at reports which compare the US State Department Human Rights Watch and mistreated national you count them up to build up an appropriate measure, the sets very very different approach than when you look at the terrorism where you're looking at news media and coverage the various the worst, we still see a trend if we adjusted it that way with the trend still be the same fewer deaths. Well, this is this is quite fascinating. So we're looking at state sponsored terrorism. We look at the last decade twenty six percent of the country's impro-. Proved rather than to teary righted, which means in some ways the world is actually becoming slightly more civilised. It's interesting. I mean, the statistics can be misleading also very revealing as well a huge increase. I mean, we said the largest falls in Iraq and Syria, and people might be thinking where are the increases in your stats show, Egypt and Somalia places like Somalia Ninety-three percent increase? But that's because part from background of tax is also a horrible so-called spectacular. Same thing in Angola, Angola, season enormous increase in deaths because of one attack so the statistics that is the way that you can express the stats or balanced them for the kind of the base that they going from what you've got to look at it. I think Malia nature to go one. So you've got one attack in Somali Mogadishu with the bombing met by accident a quarter petrol-tanker which exploded in a market killing five hundred ninety seven people. So that causes big spot. Took the spark air, basically be the same. As what it was before some doing statistical analysis, you can take the outlaws when you look at one thing that you do mention something to look forward. Look at in the future is far right terror as well, which doesn't usually come into the narrative, your stats are picking that up as well. Is this a spike is this something from a low base, the number of firearms terrorists disa- small in comparison seven hundred in two thousand seventeen from fifty nine attacks, but we can certainly seen increasing trained coming up almost zero advice from forty four to five years ago. Steve caladiums, founder of the institute for economics and peace which compiles the global terrorism index that he was talking about. You're listening to Newsday on the BBC World Service now today in Washington DC. A funeral service will be held for former president George H W Bush the forty first man to hold office in the White House was often considered clumsy with words. And lacking in emotion in public and private. However, he was a voracious letter writer and rather than a right and auto biography, he decided to publish a companion of his correspondence entitled all the best New York Times. Journalists Michael Tackett has studied the book and spoke about the personal image the letters page of the former president in public George Bush was known as someone who didn't speak. Wells didn't seem very self assured. And always said, I'm not one year likes to talk about my emotions in private in his letters. He was the exact opposite. He was all about his emotions he was all about expressing himself and actually many times quite eloquently. So it's interesting that he suppressed that in his public life. He wrote about all manner of things he wrote about war and peace. He wrote about his own experience in war, including a very long letter telling his parents when his plane had been shot down. And you lost two of his crew. You know, he he tried to reassure them that he was okay. At the same time. He was coming to grips with the fact that some of his crew members died. You know, you really felt for them and for their families. He also wrote lighter hearted letters like one to Katherine Hepburn about winning the Oscar, and he said something like, you know, you're you're the cat's meow list or something like that. It was funny. There's no question. You know, he had sort of dual tracks in his thinking, but he looked out for his country. But he was always looking out for his son because you was sort of unique in knowing exactly what is son was going through their kind of burdens that that office imposes remember that only John Adams and John Quincy Adams. Had the same experience in American history were father and son were both elected president. Michael target New York Times journalists on that book all the best about the public and the personal figure of the late president, George H W Bush the forty first president of the United States yet. Here's this big long piece by Nick Bryant, one of our America correspondence about the historical judgment on Bush. The first check it out online. Very interesting nineteen minutes past the hour. The office investigating Russian collusion in the US election as recommended that the former national security adviser, Michael Flynn should be spared a jail sentence because of his cooperation with the inquiry and soon NAMI warnings in the western Pacific after shallow earthquake struck to the east of New Caledonia. Matthew Kenyon sport. You can never relax in the English Premier League. According to Manchester City bus Guardiola after his side's two one win over what for them five points. Clear at the top of the table, at least until tonight. What I pulled a goal back with five minutes to go. And it was a nervous end to the game for city. It's never over at two nil. According to Guardiola never pulled played Burnley tonight also tonight Manchester United against arsenal. Which could be rather. Interesting with the run that small are on a moment touch at Old Trafford. Elsewhere Ivory Coast football federation says neither it nor the country's government of. Been informed of plans by the confederation. Of African football announced by the federation's president in an interview this week. They will have to delay hosting the Africa Cup of nations from twenty twenty one to twenty twenty three to make way for Cameroon who were asked to host of twenty nine teen. They say no one has been told this is happening and Kenya's world marathon record holder Elliott kick Kobe told the BBC that winning the w male athlete of the year award was even better than setting that new global Mark in Berlin this year, the female award went to Columbia, Stella jumper Kettering, Ibar, Gwen and congratulations to both of those. Thank you, Matthew. It's never over at two nil. It is over a half past those who are better. Hurry on in business news with Philip Hampshire. Asia's largest drugs maker has secured shareholder approval for fifty nine billion takeover of an Irish drugmaker. It could be Japan's largest ever corporate acquisition was talking about Matthew Phillips here. So Philip this would make them together. If they put the two together one of the biggest drugmakers in the world one of the ten biggest drugmakers currently in the top twenty European or North American. I think he's pretty reasonable to say you probably haven't heard of to Kida as a company if you've got a type two diabetes, though, there's a much better chance you've heard them because they make a medication could act toss which is the world's best-selling talk to diabetes medication. And when they linked together with sharp pharmaceuticals. We again, these things are a little bit tricky tricky because unlike say, Pfizer Johnson and Johnson Shire pharmaceuticals also not a household name. But they make a product called the events, and that is one of the world's best-selling ADHD drugs, for instance. So if you cook very specific disorders within your household, the chances, are you are aware and familiar with these particular brand names they're hoping to link together primarily because. Both of them have a specialism one of the big areas that pharmaceutical companies pushing into is rare diseases and disorders because obviously if they're very diseases other companies aren't gonna try and chase you into that field. But if they're so specialized of what they do what are the benefits of bringing the two together cost-cutting effectively the benefit by being able to push together the marketing teams by being able to push together some of their jokes as part of the agreement in order to buy one another route they have had to talk to the European Union there. No monopolies oligopoly takeover concerns. They are having to jettison one of their gastrointestinal drugs in order to proceed with the deal. Nonetheless, Shara pharmaceutical shareholders aren't going to be voting on.

president Iraq Syria George H W Bush Somalia Afghanistan New York Times BBC Steve Kilali demoss Basel Steve Kelly Afganistan US State Department Angola Philip Hampshire Taliban ADHD Somali Mogadishu European Union
"state department human rights" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"And hunter, but he also covered up the crimes of its murderous battalion three sixteen during Negra Ponte's tenure in Honduras. US officials who worked under him said that the State Department human rights reports on the country were drafted to read more like Norway's than anything reflecting the actual reality in Honduras, Negra Ponte's predecessor in that country ambassador. Jack bins told the New York Times that Negroponte had discouraged reporting to Washington of duck Sion's torture and killings by notorious Honduran military units. Saying quote, I think Negroponte was complicit in abuses. I. I think he tried to put a lid on reporting abuses. And I think he was untrue to congress about those activities were you aware of this of the gist of this battalion in your when you're down there. Ambassador. Tanner is I. Responded in a. Written question. With regard to the so-called battalion three sixteen. I wear nece of the thing systems of the battalion by that name, and we can get into this because I'm not trying to. Fancy with my use of words here now. But my Negra Ponte was asked about the death squad in front of the Senate in two thousand and one during his confirmation hearing for UN ambassador, but I asked the CIA about battalion three sixteen and was given a memorandum by the agency at that time which advised me that that battalion. Was created in the beginning. Of nineteen Eighty-four either late nineteen Eighty-three or the beginning of nineteen eighty four which is well into my tenure in Honduras and that. To the best of the agency's knowledge at that time. No. There had been no substantiation of any human rights, systemic human rights violations being carried out by that unit. John Negroponte would later serve in the George W Bush administration running operations in Iraq that came to be known as the Salvador option despite Negra Pontes, bloody history. Hillary Clinton bragged about receiving his endorsement when she ran for president in two thousand sixteen John Negroponte former veteran diplomat served under so in every publican administrations as well as the Clinton administration has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president Negroponte wrote this about Hillary Clinton will put it up on the screen. She will bring to the presidency. This skill experience in Wisden that is needed in a president and commander in chief. Having myself served in numerous diplomatic national security positions starting in one thousand nine hundred sixty I am convinced second. Jerry Clinton has the leadership qualities that far and away qualify. Her best to be our next president among the crimes committed by US-backed Honduran forces during Negra Ponte's tenure was the murder of a US Jesuit priest named father James squad. Lupe Carney, father Carney was a liberal theology. Revolutionary who spent eighteen years living with the compassi knows and the poor of Honduras. The US backed forces waged a smear campaign against father Carney, who was a World War Two veteran claiming that he was a communist the most basic need demand has to fulfill his food. And of course, when valley like this is could produce enough food. They say all Central America is is producing vegetable oil for castle and Cooke company. I mean that's terrible crime to send. And that's why we Christians those Ratnam. Erica, we want to change that rebel against that. So call us communist kill us. We have to try to do something about it. In nineteen Eighty-three. Father Carney was murdered by US-backed death-squad. We still do not know the truth of what happened to him. But there are many sources who say he was captured alive tortured, and then thrown from a helicopter into the jungle. Here is democratic Senator Tom Harkin speaking on the Senate floor opposing Negra Pontes nomination as Bush's UNM Basseterre in two thousand one Mr. Negra Panni showed a callous disregard for human rights abuses, throughout his tenure as US ambassador to Honduras between nineteen eighty one and nineteen eighty five during which time, I traveled to Honduras and fact went out to one of the contra camps with the ambassador at that time, and quite frankly in my conversations at that time in Honduras. And with the later revelations of what was going on with Italian three sixteen was supervised and basically trained by our CIA and our military personnel. Well, a lot of these things came to light it became clear to me that. That during my trip there that I was misled and quite frankly, not giving the correct information that I sought. Secondly, I believe that Mr. Negroponte knowingly misinformed, the US State Department about gross human rights violation on Doris and throughout Central America..

Negra Ponte Honduras John Negroponte US Hillary Clinton battalion father Carney Negra Pontes president US State Department Mr. Negra Panni CIA Senate Jerry Clinton hunter New York Times Senator Tom Harkin Jack bins Clinton administration
"state department human rights" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"States is going to buy deals if they are strong deals and if they do what they promised to do this means if the president can have a deal that strong enough in order to meet the ratification requirements of the us senate for treaty that i'm sure he's going to go for it if not we're not gonna play the diplomatic game in which we put lipstick on a pig and pretend it's not a pig one of the things you've lived in iran you've worked in iran you've studied iranian culture what is the deal because i remember as a little boy growing up iran was israel's one friend in the middle east what is the basic iranian gripe against the only jewish state in the middle east well here we've got a separate a little bit like i mean it's not the basic iranian gripe it's the basic rights of the islamic republic's leading is homeless any ron it doesn't matter what ninety percent of the people think because islamic revolution guard corps defends the supreme leader and the supreme leader is vehemently antisemitic he's only antichristian if you go back to many of the state department human rights reports going back well over a decade you've got a situation in which the iran in take out christian pastors and kill them and the fact that matters this is ideological now more broadly speaking what i always worry about is some people look at terrorism as motivated by grievance other people recognize that it's often motivated by our state department in our diplomatic corps often wants to see the terrorism is rooted in grievance because of its rudin grievance you can come up with some deal to resolve it and if you if you're simply rewarding iranian intransigence ronnie in bad behavior you're not going to solve the problem the problem is ideological case and it has everything to do with the leadership of the islamic republic michael ruben ruben american enterprise institute thank you for your clarity and your enlightenment he's speaking to us from the shores of the galilee and the city of tiberius we're going to be moving over to jerusalem to get another perspective from my brother the one and only jonathon med a leading israeli political commentator and business leader coming up.

president iran israel ron michael ruben senate middle east jerusalem jonathon med ninety percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Leader is vehemently antisemitic he's currently antichristian if you go back to many of the state department human rights reports going back well over a decade you've got a situation in which the iran inns takeout christian pastors and kill them and the fact that matters this is ideological now more broadly speaking what i always worry about is some people look at terrorism as motivated by grievance other people recognize that it's often motivated by ideology our state department in our diplomatic corps often want to see the terrorism is rooted in grievance because of ingredients you can come up with some deal to resolve it and if you if you're simply rewarding iranian and transgender ski ronnie and bad behavior you're not going to solve the problem the problem is ideological case and it has everything to do with the ship of the islamic republic michael american enterprise institute thank you for your clarity and your enlightenment he's speaking to us from the shores of the galilee and the city of tiberius we're going to be moving over to jerusalem to get another perspective from my brother the one and only jonathon med bed a leading israeli political commentator and business leader coming up eleven seventy the answer let's get real if you're big mother's day surprise consists of one wellcrafted text message need to go back to the drawing board asap moms deserve.

iran jerusalem
"state department human rights" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I remember as a little boy growing up iran was israel's one friend in the middle east what is the basic iranian gripe against the only jewish state in the middle east well here we've got a separate a little bit mike i mean it's not the basic iranian gripe it's the basic rights of the islamic republic's leading ayatollah any ron it doesn't matter what ninety percent of the people think because islamic revolutionary guard corps defense the supreme leader in the supreme leader is vehemently anti semitic he's dearly antichristian if you go back to many of the state department human rights reports going back well over a decade you've got a situation in which the iranians take out christian pastors and kill them and the fact that matters this is ideological now more broadly speaking what i always worry about is some people look at terrorism is motivated at grievance other people recognize that it's often motivated by ideology our state department in our diplomatic corps often want to see the terrorism is rooted in grievance because of grievance you can come up with some deal to resolve it and if you if you're simply rewarding iranian and transient ski ronnie and ed behavior you're not going to solve the problem the problem is audio case and it has everything to do with the islamic republic michael ruben american enterprise institute thank you for your clarity and your enlightenment he's speaking to us from the shores of the galilee and the tiberius we're going to be moving over to jerusalem to get another perspective of from my brother the one and only jonathon medved a leading israeli political commentator and business leader coming up.

iran israel ron american enterprise institute middle east ski michael ruben jerusalem jonathon medved ninety percent
"state department human rights" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"state department human rights" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"New stadiums seven twenty eight last raiders from the through that would or worse under becomes that and then arrested for allegedly making threats would least eight jewish institutions appeared before a federal judge in st louis one thompson was charged with cyber stocking as authority say the threats were made just near the name of former girlfriend new jersey governor chris christie addressed the rise in anti semitism before the jewish community center it is not good enough for us this than silently and wait for someone in authority to do something about it we need to do something about it president trump slam cena minority leader chuck schumer in a tweet calling him a total have a pred and posted a photo of schumer and russian president who didn't in new york back in two thousand three or spun in jim a cost this is schumer fired back shurmur spotted he's willing to talk about his contact with prudent under wrote asking the president would you when your team some members of the trump administration have been under fire over contacts made with russia during to twenty sixteen election and are become sack the state department human rights report fines free expression is on the decline around the world is correspondent johnstone list according to the annual human rights report the us as basic freedoms of expression and free association are declining worldwide making it harder for those who oppose their government's to organize in protest the report does not say which countries are the words defenders or which are the best but instead highlights specific problems uncertain countries photo.

thompson chris christie chuck schumer new york president russia human rights st louis cena pred