17 Burst results for "Stargate Magazine"

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Five thirty five. Stargate tuned, twenty second. When we gaze into the night sky, it's like looking at a projection on a giant dome. We see two dimensional pictures with no perception of depth even astronomers have a hard time plotting that third dimension a difficulty that can skew their understanding of how stars work consider the coathanger a pattern of ten stars. That looks like an upside down coathanger. It's in the constellation pecu- l- the FOX for decades. Astronomers thought those stars formed, a cluster a cluster stars are all the same age and same distance and they formed from the same ingredients. But some of it stars are small and light, while others are big and heavy seeing how the different weight classes have evolved helps us to honors understand how all-stars age, but a study in nineteen seventy found that only a few of the coathanger stars were related and a later one which used a satellite. To plot the distances to stars with great precision found that none of them were related just happened to line up in the same direction, so plotting, the third dimension rob the coathanger of some of its scientific value. But none of its beauty. The coathanger is a great target from unoccupied sweep them from the bright star out hair, which is low in the east at nightfall toward even brighter Vega far too. It's upper left, the coathanger is about a third of the way along that line, a beautiful grouping. That's not really a group at all. We have more sky watching tips, and much more about the universe in Stargate magazine subscription information at Stargate dot org for the McDonald, observatory, I'm sandy wood. Here's a program from our archives. Today in northern Venezuela. The village of Korea bay is celebrating its version of the DEA dishonor chain John's day festival, which draws from European and African roots. Jim, that's and this is the pulse of the planet. David Gus is an associate professor of anthropology at Tufts University tells us that the celebration of DNA dishonest centers around the veneration of an icon, representing the state, this is a three day festival in which from the beginning when the same is brought out of the church, people are playing drums singing, dancing drinking for three days and three nights. Nonstop, it's very transcendent trance-like behavior. It is extremely, intense at the end of the three days when the drums stop. They're still regaining your years. Itself is about a three foot tall figure out Astor covered very beautiful. Rosy cheeks, and it is pretty much adolescent child really big straw hat. And the same is dance to throughout the entire festival, and people are paying the same back for promise that they made during the year. They said, if this Saint would grant them good health would grant them good. Harvest the same do all sorts of things that they were asking for then they would repay the state during the festival by burning candles. Same dancing to the Saint the entire night paying for this event tab, and all sorts of ways in which pay the price. So during the festival, people going up to the same continuously often leaving money kissing Dutch missing or on the dishonor future programs. Additional funding for. Repulsive. The planet has been provided by the National Science Foundation. I'm that's. Here..

Saint Stargate Stargate magazine Korea bay National Science Foundation Venezuela associate professor of anthrop FOX David Gus Astor Jim McDonald DEA Tufts University John three days twenty second three foot three day
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Starting june. Sixteenth. The solar system serves up a couple of beautiful pairings just after sunset this evening. One of them disappears with the twilight, but the other will be on magnificent display all night long. The planets mercury and Mars are quite low in the west northwest, a half hour after the sun drops from view. Mercury is bright. So it's a fairly easy target. Although you need a clear horizon to spot it Mars is only a few percent is bright as mercury, but it's only a degree or so to the upper left of mercury, which can help you pick it out. Mercury and Mars will vanish by the time this guy gets fully dark as they follow the sun below the horizon as that happens, though. The other pair will be climbing skyward in the southeast. The full moon and the planet shooter, which looks like a brilliant star to the upper right of the moon both worlds align opposite the sun right now. So they're in view all night. Their past as quite low in the south, though. So they won't climb very high in this guy that path is known as the ecliptic technically it's the sun's path, but the moon and planets take quite close to the clip tick. So they outline the sun's annual migration across the sky. Mercury and Mars, for example, are near the western edge of the constellation. Gemini, just where the sun will stand in a few weeks and the mood on Jupiter are in southern Ophiuchus the sun's home in the first half of she Cimber. We have more sky watching tips, and much more about the universe in Stargate magazine subscription information at Stargate dot org for the McDonald, observatory,.

Stargate magazine Ophiuchus McDonald, observatory
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the upper seventies inland. Started may eleven. The first quarter moon huddles close to the heart of a lion tonight. Regulus the brightest star of Leo stands to the left of the moon at nightfall and even closer to the moon at first light tomorrow. The star will stand to the right of the moon tomorrow night. Today. The moon is about a quarter of a million miles from earth. But that hasn't always been the case when the moon was born not long after earth was it was only a fraction of its current distance. And in the remote future it'll be much farther. That's thanks to the tides. The moon's gravity tugs at the oceans creating bulges in the water. These bulges follow the moon across the sky as they slosh into the land the bulges slow earth's rotation by tiny amount to keep the books balanced on the overall motion of the earth moon system. The moon must move a little faster in its orbit that causes it to move farther from earth by about an inch and a half per year. Over tens of billions of years things would reach a point where the same side of earth would always face the moon just as the same side of the moon, always faces earth, the moon would stop moving away. Then and the system would stay lot the evolution of the sun complicates that picture though. In a couple of billion years. The sun will be so bright that it'll boil away earth. Oceans, no oceans, no tides locking earth and the moon in closer configuration, we have sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org for the university of Texas at Austin McDonald, observatory.

Stargate magazine Leo Austin McDonald university of Texas billion years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sunday may eleventh. The first quarter moon huddles close to the heart of a lion tonight. Regulus the brightest star of Leo stands to the left of the moon at nightfall and even closer to the moon at first light tomorrow. The star will stand to the right of the moon tomorrow night today, the moon is about a quarter of a million miles from earth. But that hasn't always been the case when the moon was born not long after earth was it was only a fraction of its current distance. And in the remote future it'll be much farther. That's thanks to the tides. The moon's gravity tugs at the oceans creating bulges in the water. These bulges follow the moon across the sky as they slosh into the land the bulges slow earth's rotation by tiny amount to keep the books balanced on the overall motion of the earth moon system. The moon must move a little faster in its orbit that causes it to move farther from earth by about an inch and a half per year. Over tens of billions of years things would reach a point where the same side of earth would always face the moon just as the same side of the moon, always faces earth, the moon would stop moving away. Then and the system would stay luck the evolution of the sun complicates that picture though. In a couple of billion years. The sun will be so bright that it'll boil away earth. Oceans, no oceans, no tides locking earth and the moon in a closer configuration, we have sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org for the university of Texas at Austin McDonald,.

Stargate magazine Leo Austin McDonald university of Texas billion years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To weekend addition from NPR news, it's K Q E weedy public radio at five thirty five. Sunday may eleven. The first quarter moon huddles close to the heart of a lion tonight. Regulus the brightest star of Leo stands to the left of the moon at nightfall and even closer to the moon at first light tomorrow. The star will stand to the right of the moon tomorrow night today, the moon is about a quarter of a million miles from earth. But that hasn't always been the case when the moon was born not long after earth was it was only a fraction of its current distance. And in the remote future it'll be much farther. That's thanks to the tides. The moon's gravity tugs at the oceans creating bulges in the water. These bulges follow the moon across the sky as they slosh into the land the bulges slow earth's rotation by tiny amount to keep the books balanced on the overall motion of the earth moon system. The moon must move a little faster in its orbit that causes it to move farther from earth by about an inch and a half per year. Over tens of billions of years things would reach a point where the same side of earth would always face the moon just as the same side of the moon, always faces earth, the moon would stop moving away. Then and the system would stay lot the evolution of the sun complicates that picture though. In a couple of billion years. The sun will be so bright that it'll boil away earth. Oceans, no oceans, no tides locking earth and the moon in closer configuration, we have sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org for the university of Texas at Austin McDonald, observatory.

Stargate magazine NPR Leo Austin McDonald university of Texas billion years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stories may ten. Rucks are portals to the past. They tell us how and when they formed and what the air and oceans were like at the time they preserve evidence of ancient life. They can even tell us if they were exposed to radiation, the decay of uranium, for example, can bore thin tunnels in the rock and one team of scientists wants to look for traces of something else. Dark matter dark matter appears to account for about eighty five percent of all the matter in the universe yet. So far, it's never been detected. We know it's there only because it exerts gravitational pull on the visible matter around it, it appears to keep the galaxies in clusters from flying away from each other. For example, the leading theory says that dark matter consists of some new type of subatomic particle which should pass through earth in Torrance, but extensive efforts to catch them haven't yielded, even a single confirmed particle. A team from Sweden and the US has suggested looking for signs of dark matter in ancient rocks. The idea is that dark matter. Particles could have left trucks in the rocks. No more than a few millions of an inch alone. One groups defined such tracks a quarter century ago. But saw no trace of them. The new group wants to use the more sensitive microscopic technology. That's available today. The scientists would examine bits of rock drilled from deep below the surface rocks that might contain evidence of dark matter. You can find more astronomy news in Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org for the university of Texas at Austin McDonald.

Stargate magazine Torrance Austin McDonald university of Texas Sweden US eighty five percent
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Moon sets not long after sunset providing dark skies for the Shooting Stars the meteors can streak across any part of the sky, but they all appear to rain into this guy from near the star eight aquaria, hence, the showers. Name all meteor showers are named for the constellation that contain their radiant the point at which the media's entered the atmosphere most showers, use only the name of the constellation. But if you constellations. Host more than one shower. Those showers are named for the star. That's closest to the radiant at the time. This scheme was devised. The source of meteor showers was unknown today, though, we know that showers come from streamers of debris shed by comments or asteroids had this been known earlier than perhaps the showers would be named for their parent bodies in this case comet Halley, but Halley spawns to showers. So this one would be the spring heads with the other in October known as the fall halyards you can find much more about media showers in Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org for the university of Texas at Austin McDonald observatory I'm sandy wood. Coming up on the next segment of weaken addition here on K, Q E D public radio. We're gonna learn about the African American graveyard on the grounds of the Kentucky Derby, which is being run later on today. Weather wise today here in the bay area. Fifty three degrees now in San Francisco Fifty-seven, concord, fifty degrees in Santa Rosa, fifty six and San Jose, sixty two degrees in Oakland. We do expect sunshine in full force by noon today, some sunshine already here and then temperatures ranging up to the low seventies tomorrow. More clouds, we do have some sunshine temperatures and we have a slight chance of showers Monday late night Sunday late night into early Monday morning. I'm Barbara Klein with these headlines National Transportation Safety board. Investigators are going to north Florida to determine what caused a plane travelling from Cuba to end up in a river with one hundred forty three people onboard it slid into shallow waters, everyone was rescued Russian state. News outlets say foreign minister, Sarah they laugh off will hold talks with his Venezuelan counterpart tomorrow Laver office due to meet with secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, Monday to discuss the Venezuelan crisis. Thailand has begun three days of coronation celebrations for the country's new king Maha JIRA long corn he was crowned today after a two year mourning period for his father who sat on the throne for seven decades. I'm Barbara Klein NPR news. Support for NPR comes from the Wallace foundation, fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality arts for everyone.

Barbara Klein Halley NPR Stargate magazine Austin McDonald observatory San Francisco Mike Pompeo Kentucky Derby Transportation Safety board Thailand Wallace foundation university of Texas north Florida San Jose Santa Rosa Laver Cuba Oakland
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Changes the Starshine steadily night after night century after century occasionally, though, a bright new star peers and explosion known as a Nova or supernova if our eyes could see deeper into the sky and wave links other than visible light. We'd see outbursts all the time. Thousands of them every night. Astronomers have discovered many classes of these transient events flashes that lasts anywhere from a fraction of a second two months or years. The list includes gamma-ray bursts, the death of a massive star that briefly outshines everything else in the universe. It. Also includes the mergers of stellar corpses. Known as neutron stars the destruction of stars by black holes intense flares from normal stars and many others. The most recent class of transient is fast radio bursts. These objects. Emit flashes of radio waves that can last for less than thousands of a second in that time though, they can outshine hundreds of galaxies as big as the Milky Way. Astronomers have seen a few dozen of these events most of them pop off just once but a couple have repeated themselves that means they can't be produced by stellar explosions because there'd be nothing left to flash again. They may be highly magnetic neutron stars or other exotic objects perhaps near supermassive black holes objects that flicker from across the universe. More tomorrow. We have sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate.

Stargate magazine Stargate two months
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Big more than a hundred times the diameter of earth yet. It's a mere dot compared to a star that huddled close to the moon tonight. That star is almost a thousand times the diameter of the sun one of the giants of the galaxy. If it took the sun's place, it would extend most of the way out to Jupiter engulfing earth, and the other inner planets Antares is the leading light of Scorpius is to the lower right of the moon as they climb into view after midnight, the brilliant planet Jupiter rises to their lower left. More about that tomorrow Antares consists of two stars the lesser one is still a monster many times this is in mass of the sun yet, it's hidden by the glow of the main star known as Antares a estimates of the size and mass of Antares a very, but it's probably about fifteen times the mass of the sun that great weight. Leases its core revving up the nuclear reactions that power the star and making the core specially hot radiation from the hot core pushes on the surrounding guess inflating Antares to super giant proportions. That size makes it especially bright about ten thousand times brighter than the sun at visible wavelengths. But the surface of Antares is cooler than the sun cooler stars emit much of their energy in the infrared when you add that to the visible light Antares is at least sixty thousand times the sun's brilliance a giant display from a giant star. We have more sky watching tips and much more in Stargate magazine, subscription information at.

Antares Stargate magazine
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reliable Meteo shower is building up this weekend. It should hit its peak in the wee hours of Monday or Tuesday. Unfortunately, though, the Gibbs moon will get in the way it's clear will overpower all but the brightest meteoric the lives are one of the most reliable of all media showers. The earliest report comes from twenty seven hundred years ago in ancient China where a scribe reported that media fell like rain most years the Lord's produce, no more than twenty or so meteors per hour. But the shower has produced a few outbursts, the most intense was recorded in eighteen o three along the east coast, a group of sky watchers in Albany, New York said that stars seem to fall from every point in the heavens as far as our site could extend another observer in Portsmouth New Hampshire counted. One hundred sixty seven meteors in ten or fifteen minutes. After that he gave up counting and just enjoyed the show. One of the most extensive reports came from Richmond Virginia much of the town had been roused by a fire alarm in the wee hours of the morning. The blaze was quickly extinguished, but the skies data blaze for a couple of hours. The local paper said it looked like a show of skyrockets. It alarmed many and astonished every person who beheld it alas there won't be nearly as much to behold this year, even so if you can find a dark safe sky watching spot, you might see a few bright lights through the moonlight. We have more sky watching tips and much more in Stargate magazine, subscription information at.

Gibbs moon Portsmouth New Hampshire Stargate magazine Richmond Virginia China New York Albany twenty seven hundred years fifteen minutes
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Starting March nine. Ryan is a big constellation with a big story. This story is so big in fact, that it incorporates several other constellations some of them surround the hunter while another is on the opposite side of the sky a separation designed to keep to mortal enemies, apart Orion is high in the south as night falls. The bright, orange star Beetlejuice marks his shoulder and blue white Rygiel is his foot. His three star belt stands between them in mythology Orion was one of the major celebrities of his day. He was strong, handsome and a great hunter two of his hunting dogs. Follow him across the sky, Kanus major and Kansas minor. They're pursuing leap is the rabbit which balanced below Orion feet, but Orion celebrity eventually went to his head and it cost him his life. There are different versions of his demise. But they end the same way one says that. Orion boasted that he could kill any animal on earth that didn't sit well with the earth. Goddess who sent a giant scorpion after him scorpion. That stung him to death. Another version of the story says he was pursuing the goddess Diana to vigorously, so her brother Apollo dispatched the scorpion to protect her either way, Orion met his fate. Threw the scorpion sting the God's place both of them in this stars. But halfway around the sky from each other so Orion dominates the winter sky while his mortal enemy the scorpion rules. The knights of summer. We have more sky watching tips and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate.

Orion Stargate magazine Ryan Stargate Kansas Diana Apollo
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stargate February twenty third. The star Alford has a barium problem. High levels of the elements show up in this star. But the normal explanation for why a star has so much of it. Doesn't seem to apply. Alford is the brightest star of the constellation hydra. The water snake it's low in the east southeast as the sky gets dark. It's far to the lower left of serious, the brightest star in the night sky Alvar is several times as massive as the sun dozens of times wider and hundreds of times brighter. And even though it's young. It's already nearing the end of its life. Astronomers have measured the chemical composition of Alford surface layers among other things they found fairly high levels of barium the element is produced slowly as a byproduct of the nuclear reactions the take place in a star's core. Most stars with high levels of it have dead companions the exposed cores at once normal. Stars as those stars died. They expelled their outer layers of gas some of the gas fell onto their companions polluting. Their surfaces Alvar, though, doesn't appear to have such a companion. Astronomers have loved for a wiggle and alford's allies caused by companions gravitational pull. But they've come up empty that suggests that the various found in Alford must have been made in the stars core and found its way to the surface, creating a minor mystery for astronomers to solve more about hydra tomorrow, and we have more sky watching tips and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at start eight dot org for the McDonald observatory.

Alford sky Alvar Stargate magazine Alvar McDonald observatory
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stargate January twenty six. The twins. Gemini, climb high across the evening sky at this time of year, politics and caster are well up in the east at nightfall with castor standing a little above its brighter. Twin politics is an orange giant and old beloved star. That's about thirty five light years from earth. It has at least one planet the world at least three times as massive as Jupiter. The giant of our own solar system caster is about half again as far as politics, and it consists of six known stars all of them are related. They were born from a single giant cloud of gas and dust probably about two hundred million years ago, the sex is split into three pairs of twins two sets are more fraternals than identical one star. In each pair is a good bit bigger, brighter and heavier than the sun both of their companions are smaller fainter and less massive than the sun. The stars in these. Payers are so close together that they orbit each other in just a few days with so little space between them there's no way for telescopes to see them as individual stars instead special instruments separate the bar codes of the stars as they orbit each other providing details on each star. The third set of twins is identical each star is smaller and less massive than the sun and much fainter. And while the other two sets of twins are close to each other. These stars are so far away that it takes them thousands of years to orbit the others. We have more sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org. I'm sandy.

Stargate magazine two hundred million years thirty five light years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Across the evening sky at this time of year, politics and caster are well up in the east at nightfall with castor standing a little above its brighter. Twin politics is an orange giant an old beloved star. That's about thirty five light years from earth. It has at least one planet a world at least three times as massive as Jupiter. The giant of our own solar system caster is about half again as far as politics, and it consists of six known stars all of them are related. They were born from a single giant cloud of gas and dust probably about two hundred million years ago, the sex is split into three pairs of twins two sets are more fraternal than identical one-star in each pair is a good bit bigger, brighter and heavier than the sun both of their companions are smaller fainter and less massive than the sun. The stars. In these pair. These are so close together that they orbit each other in just a few days with so little space between them there's no way for telescopes to see them as individual stars instead special instruments separate the bar codes of the stars as they orbit each other providing details on each star. The third set of twins is identical each star is smaller and less massive than the sun and much fainter. And while the other two sets of twins are close to each other. These stars are so far away that it takes them thousands of years to orbit the others. We have more sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org. I'm.

Stargate magazine two hundred million years thirty five light years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Across the evening sky at this time of year, politics and caster are well up in the east at nightfall with castor standing a little above its brighter. Twin politics is an orange giant and old below did star. That's about thirty five light years from earth. It has at least one planet the world at least three times as massive as Jupiter. The giants of our own solar system caster is about half again as far as politics, and it consists of six known stars all of them are related. They were born from a single giant cloud of gas and dust probably about two hundred million years ago, the sex is split into three pairs of twins two sets are more fraternals. An identical one star in each pair is a good bit bigger, brighter and heavier than the sun both of their companions are smaller fainter and less massive than the sun. The stars in these. Payers are so close together that they orbit each other in just a few days with so little space between them there's no way for telescopes to see them as individual stars instead special instruments separate the barcodes of the stars as they orbit each other providing details on each star. The third set of twins is identical each star is smaller and less massive than the sun and much fainter. And while the other two sets of twins are close to each other. These stars are so far away that it takes them. Thousands of years to orbit the authors, we have more sky watching tips, astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org. I'm.

Stargate magazine two hundred million years thirty five light years
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stargate January twenty fifth. As missions to the moon. Go clementine was small sheep and low key yet as accomplishments were big and long lasting. It's maps of the lunar surface are still some of the best around and scientists have worked long and hard to expand on its discovery of frozen water at the moon's polls clementine was launched twenty five years ago today, it was designed by the defense department to test sensors batteries and other technologies it was targeted for the moon with a follow up trip to an asteroid clementine arrived at the moon a few weeks later during more than two months in orbit. It took almost a million pictures of the lunar surface in multiple wavelengths. Those images produced the first map of the entire lunar surface. And they revealed the composition of the surface the probe also measured the elevations of the surface and by tracking its radio waves scientists measured the moon. Lumpy gravity. Clementine also balanced radio waves off the polls a radio telescope on earth measured the reflected waves, which revealed is hidden inside craters. Clementine left orbit in may of nineteen ninety four and headed for an asteroid. But a faulty thruster drained away it's fuel bringing its mission to an end and its first target has a bright companion the next couple of nights. The star spiker is to the lower right of the moon as they climb into view after midnight tonight and closer to the upper right of the moon tomorrow night, we have more sky. Watching tips astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at Stargate dot org..

Clementine Stargate magazine twenty five years twenty fifth two months
"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"stargate magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"January twentieth. In a bit of a coincidence. A total lunar eclipse will shine through American skies for the second January in a row, the entire eclipse will be visible from all of North America with Hawaii saying most of the action as well lunar eclipses occur when the full moon passes through earth's long shadow, but the moon's orbit is tilted a bit with respect to earth's orbit around the sun. So during most months the full moon passes a bit above or below the shadow when the geometry is just right though, the moon plunges through the shadow darkening its surface. It doesn't turn completely dark though. Instead sunlight filtering through earth's atmosphere. Casts a deep orange or red glow? The color shows up easily and photographs but win an eclipse is viewed live the intensity of the color depends on the viewer's, color vision, weather, conditions, and other factors. This clips gets underway at. Nine thirty four PM central time tonight. That's when the lunar disk first touches the edge of earth's dark inner shadow known as the umbrella. The early portion of the eclipse is only partial as the moon moves more deeply into the shadow. It will take about an hour to become fully immersed in the shadow, creating the total eclipse, the moon will remain fully eclipsed for an hour. It will exit the Umbro about an hour after that allowing the full moon to return to its full glory. Tomorrow. A bright busy star system. We have more sky. Watching tips astronomy news and much more about the universe. In Stargate magazine, subscription information at start eight dot org. I'm.

Umbro Stargate magazine North America Hawaii