23 Burst results for "Staph"

"staph" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

05:12 min | 7 months ago

"staph" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"And I told him what had happened and he told me to immediately take my husband to the emergency room. Have him admitted start IVs and cultures, which I did. That was Monday Tuesday, the doctor came to check in on my husband told him to be patient is going to take some time to get the cultures back and infectious disease. Doctors came and after four days they decided that my husband has E. Coli. He was in the hospital for four days. Correct front. Okay? No. Now the infectious disease doctor came and told them you know you've got E. Coli and they had a PICC line put in his arm to his chest to administer antibiotics at home. They wanted him to get out of the hospital. Now that they know the cultures say the E. Coli. Um So then, for 28 days, he had to have antibiotics administered through that PICC line at home. They sent nurses the first couple of days. But the co pay on a nurse visited $30 today, so they taught me to do it so I had. I took care of them for the remaining of the 28 days. Anyhow, Here we go. Our individual deductible on our insurance plan is $6500 for the year and I imagine the forties in the hospital with all of that adding up. We're going to we're going toe be above that. So I held the doctor responsible. Right now. It's a question of proving it. That's all based on what you say That's true. And the doctors treating it doesn't necessarily mean that they malpractice tw. Ah, and so Well, you're stuck between a rock and a hard place on this one for a couple of reasons. Number one getting a lawyer to even get involved, even though from what you say it sounds straight out malpractice. But even assuming that it is assuming that you're able to go past that hurdle yet it's malpractice. What is it worth? 29 28 days in the hospital. No, no, no, no 44 days. Yeah, the PICC line at home. That happens all the time. I had a P I had got a staph infection in my spine was Yeah, that was I've never experienced pain like that in my life. I had assist when South right next to my spine and I was in the hospital for I think was in the hospital for a week. On. It was just just horrible, and the PICC line was also at home in that went for 30 days for those people don't know what a PICC line is. It goes into a vein in your arm and then goes all the way up and it that's where the antibiotic is given his inside your body or in your heart or whatever. So so at home, the PICC line is a normal occurrence. And it's just, you know, you prove where to get the whole I That's the problem. Did he get it at the hospital that you get it from the surgical instrument? Did he Did he eat a chipotle E have a burrito? By the way, That's a joke. It's a bad ship. Ole joke trouble with E. Coli and so therefore, before you guys sue me, I just want you to know that parody. That's just me being funny. I should be very careful about that. Because you know, it's very difficult when you accused a national chain of serving crap. Burritos, so it's worth calling a medical malpractice attorney But it would be much better legally if he were really screwed up four days in the hospital. I mean, it's a drag. It's horrible now the possibility of suing in small claims court, but then again Proving it because we need to get a doctor to say That's what happened that he that your husband got the coli infection from something happened the hospital where that then the hospital says No, We don't think so. We had no other no other complaint. We use that tool. We sanitize it. And then you have to prove that that's not the case because it's a presumption of proof is on you. So you know, I think you're just stuck between a rock and a hard place in yours. A perfect argument. Why we need a hat. National health plan because you're stuck. So do you think it's worth investigating? Through a lawyer for malpractice? Well, you call a male, a medical malpractice attorney. You have one? Yeah, it's got a handle on the law dot com. On. We have them and they're there for med mail personal injury. We do have lawyers to do that. But do not be surprised if the lawyer doesn't get involved because here's what happens. The lawyer's going to pull all the lawyer has to pull all of the surgical notes all the entire record of your husband in the hospital, including the procedures, then has to send it to a doctor. And painful and pay for it right now. And those guys charge deviation or something, you know they charge no, not necessarily that and then they charge a couple 100, a couple of $1000 on lawyers dishing out this money, and then you find out really there isn't much there, but I would call it's definitely worth calling. Go to the website Go to handle in law dot com and.

PICC attorney staph
"staph" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:39 min | 9 months ago

"staph" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Dividend and the rest you don't have hardly any yield at all. And then we look at your total portfolio. In the amount of dividends and interest being tossed off is 1.5%. Well, that's $15,000 a year. Not 40 40. So now you gotta sell stuff every month to get your $40,000 a year and to get your monthly paycheck. Well, that's not a good income point now, so there are better ways to do it. And if you want a common sense way to do it, and you want to know how what? What are we talking about? How do we do all this? You know, we talk about that. Some on the TV show actually go through and explain on the TV show how to do this, But I really dig deep for people that come to the retirement course. So you want to know? All the details around has come to the course It's just it's it's too much to go through an owner on the radio show, but we help you get all this. It's It's not like we're tryingto. Obscurity from you. It's just difficult to explain without either a whiteboard or some something that I can refer to visually. Yeah, so we talk. We talk more in detail about the concepts in the course. But you know, if you want your individual situation through, we also come in. Do come see us either in person, or virtually we can do both. And here's how you do that you call or text 205988 Triple 06205988 Triple 06 Call or Text 988 Triple 06 and we're retired with freedom, Tony, let's AH, do a getting to know you segment. We hadn't done one of these in a while, they haven't done. So here's like question. What's the dumbest way you've ever been injured? Who? Dumbest way if you never get injured in a way, that's cool. You know, if you get like a black eye, or you get big things like Oh, what happened? You're like man. Something stupid, you know? Let me think the dumbest thing. Well, it was a dumb way to get hurt, and I did some dumb after two. I was a long time ago, when the kids were young and we're getting ready for school and they go by other school supplies and everything. Our youngest one, we were setting everything up for her. She's proud, like second or third grade's is a really long time ago. She had one of these little mini staplers and I was putting staples in the mini stapler and I was pushed it close. And when I did I stapled my thumb. I remember that in some of them are stapled inside, like in the joint my thumb. And I was like, Oh, that's gonna pull the staples like Wow, that that didn't feel good. But it wasn't a big deal. That thing got so infected and it got so hurt and for so long, And then when I did that was done was I just ignored it. Good thing. It was going to go away its world. Although it might. I couldn't even grip the steering, will you before I went to the doctor, The doctor's yelling at me. Why did you wait so long to get in here? You basically had a staph infection. I did had a staph infection. So you go to the doctor. If you think you can get or you're hurt. I was trying to think of mine, I guess. So my brother and I used to wrestle all the time. And we didn't stop doing it when we got older and became adults and Ah, which that just right? There's dumb. I remember this. I think I don't You know, we're both too old. Do we do well and we're both big right? Like he's 63 £240. I'm 6 to 25 or whatever. So we're both big And we didn't wrestle outside. We wrestled in the house. You two over there, you know, And so we were in the kitchen Wrestlin and he picked me up, like got me A like below my waist, like pick me up in, like, ran with me across the kitchen pile driving was going to body slam me And so I stuck my hand behind me to catch myself in my hand went into the garbage can in the kitchen and there was a broken bottle in there. And remember that goes in there. Kids drove that was in their kitchen while of his weight and my weight on top of that broken. Remember that and and I picked my hand up and I had the bottom of a bottle basically inside. Yes, hanging and so that was the dumbest way to get injured. And then I did a dumb thing afterwards, which was did not go to the hospital to get stitches because I didn't want to. Whatever it was the weekend. I want to spend my Saturday and you're in the emergency room. And so so I didn't get stitches. And it took forever for that thing to hill. So we both have done that. Would you know if we're a lot better retirement planners, then we are no injury getters. But both of those heir a long time ago. So where does that now? Yeah, man was 30 30 years ago. All right. Well, this has been fun, and we hope it's been helpful. Come see us come to the course. Give us a call. 988 Triple 062 of 5988 Triple 06 We will see you next week. What? Tony,.

Tony staph
A Brief History of Staphylococcus Aureus

The Anthropocene Reviewed

09:41 min | 1 year ago

A Brief History of Staphylococcus Aureus

"Years ago. I acquired an infection in my left eye socket caused by the bacteria. Staphylococcus Aureus my vision clouded and then. My eye socket swelled shut and I ended up hospitalized for over a week how I experienced the same infection anytime in history before nineteen forty. I would've likely lost. Not just my I but my life then again I wouldn't have ever lived to acquire orbital so you lights because I would have died of the staph infections I had in childhood. Stella Aureus is not a normal part of the human microbiome but many people perhaps around a third are like me. Nonetheless hosts two colonies of it on our skin or in our nasal passages or in our digestive systems. These colonies are usually harmless but while anyone can get sick with staff those of us who live omitted. Every day are more likely to suffer infections. When I was in the hospital the infectious disease. Doctors made me feel very special. One told me you are colonized by some fascinating Lee. Aggressive Staff He told me I wouldn't believe the petri dishes if I saw them and went on to call my continued existence. A real testament to modern medicine. Which I suppose it is for. People like myself colonized by fascinating. The aggressive bacteria there can be no harkening back wistfully to pass Golden Ages. Because in all those pasts I would be dead in. Nineteen forty one. Boston city hospital reported in eighty two percent fatality rate. For staph infections. I remember as a child hearing phrases like only the strong survive and survival of the fittest and feeling terrified by them. Because I knew I was not fit or strong. I didn't yet know that when humanity protects the frail among us and works to ensure their survival the human project as a whole get stronger failing to understand that has held our species back for Millennia and in fact still does because staff often infects open wounds. It has been especially deadly during war near the beginning of world. War One. The English poet Rupert Brooke Famously wrote if I should die. Think only this of me that there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever. England Brookwood indeed die in the war in the winter of nineteen fifteen but not in some corner of a foreign field but instead on a hospital ship of a bacterial infection by then there were of course. Thousands of doctors treating the war's wounded and ill among them was a seventy one year old. Scottish surgeon Alexander Ogden who decades earlier had discovered and named Staphylococcus Ogden who sported a magnificent moustache throughout his adult. Life was a huge fan of Joseph. Lister WHO's observations about post surgical infection led to the use of carbolic acid and other sterilization techniques these dramatically increased surgical survival rates. In fact after visiting lister and learning from Him Ogden returned to his hospital in Aberdeen and tore down the sign above the operating room that read prepare to meet the God. No would surgery. Be a desperate last ditch effort. It could be safe and clean and survivable. Ogden was so obsessed with listers carbolic acid spray that his students wrote a poem about it. The spray the spray the antiseptic spray. A would shower it morning night and day for every sort of scratch where others would attach a sticking plaster patch. He gave the spray. It's all right but it's no Rupert Brooke. At any rate Ogden had good reason to give the spray. His first wife Mary. Jane had died after childbirth a few years earlier at the age of twenty five. There's no record her cause death but most maternal deaths at the time were caused by postpartum infection often due to staphylococcus aureus and dogs had hundreds of his patients die of post surgical infection so no wonder he was obsessed with antiseptic protocols. Still he wanted to understand not just how to prevent infection but also what precisely was causing it by the late. Eighteen seventies many discoveries were being made by surgeons and researchers about various bacteria and their role in infection but staphylococcus was not identified until Austin lanced a pus filled abscessed leg wound belonging to one James Davidson. Under the microscope. Davidson's abscess was brimming with life. Ogden wrote my delight may be conceived when there were revealed to me beautiful tangles tufts and chains of round organisms in great numbers. Ogden named these tufts and chains staphylococcus from the Greek word for bunches of grapes and they do often look like grape bunches plump and just a little bit oblong and also quite yellowish green. A few years later a German scientist noted that there were in fact several species of staphylococcus and named the one Ogden had found Staphylococcus Aureus or the golden staff but Ogden wasn't content with just seeing the bacteria. Obviously he wrote the first step to be taken was to make sure the organisms found. In Mr Davidson's pus were not there by chance. So he set up a laboratory in the shed behind his house and began trying to grow colonies of staff eventually succeeding by growing them. In the medium of a chicken egg he then injected the bacteria into guinea pigs and wild mice which became violently ill. Ogden also noted that staphylococcus seemed to be quote harmless on the surface despite being quote so deleterious when injected I have also observed this in so far as I am not much bothered by having my skin colonized by Staphylococcus Aureus but find it. Dilatot serious indeed when it starts replicating inside my eye socket. James Davidson by the way went on to live another forty years after his staph infection. Thanks to a thorough deriding and Ogden's liberal use of the spray the spray the antiseptic spray but staphylococcus aureus remained an exceptionally dangerous infection until another Scottish scientist Alexander. Fleming discovered penicillin by accident. Actually one Monday morning in nineteen twenty eight Fleming notice that one of his cultures of Staphylococcus aureus had been contaminated by a fungus penicillin them which seemed to have killed all the STAPH BACTERIA. He remarked allowed. That's funny Fleming. Then used what? He called his mould juice. I wish I were making that up to treat. Couple patients including during his assistance. Sinus infection but mass production of the antibiotic substance secreted by. Penicillin proved very challenging. It wasn't until the late nineteen thirties. That a group of scientists at Oxford began testing their penicillin stocks. I on mice and then in nineteen forty one on a human subject. A policeman named Albert Alexander who'd been cut by shrapnel during a German bombing raid and who was dying of bacterial infections in his case both staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus. The penicillin caused a dramatic improvement in Alexander's condition but the researchers didn't have enough of the drug to save him. The infections returned and Alexander died in April of nineteen forty one. His seven-year-old daughter Sheila ended up in a local orphanage. Scientists began to seek out more productive strains of the mold and eventually found one on a cantaloupe in a Peoria Illinois grocery store that strain eventually became even more productive after being exposed to x rays and ultraviolet radiation. But essentially all penicillin. In the world descends from that mold on that one cantaloupe in Peoria. That's not the astounding thing about the story though the astounding thing is that after scraping off the mold that became the world's supply of penicillin the scientists in question eight the rest of the cantaloupe

Staphylococcus Ogden Staphylococcus Penicillin Stella Aureus Rupert Brooke James Davidson Sinus Infection Albert Alexander Scientist Peoria Boston City Hospital Fleming LEE England Brookwood Peoria Illinois Aberdeen Sheila Joseph Oxford
Brickmaking bacteria and solar cells that turn waste heat into electricity

Science Magazine Podcast

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Brickmaking bacteria and solar cells that turn waste heat into electricity

"Now we have staff writer Robert Service. He's here to tell us about engineered living materials. Things like exponentially replicating living bricks. And instant. Runways. Hi Bob okay. We're talking about engineered living materials. Can you break these terms down for us? It's basically just using organisms mostly microbes to make materials the idea of using organisms to make materials in any form has been around forever. Of course be trees to make word. We use cotton plants to for the continent textiles so in the last couple of decades. There's been many many examples where synthetic biologists have been using genetic engineering tools to tweak the genes of mostly microbes to get them to make all kinds of different molecules. They might be medicines. They might be improved. Production of ethanol probably hundreds of examples. What folks have been doing the last couple of years have now been trying to use some of the same genetic engineering tools to get microbes to make materials so think of things like replacements for bricks would like materials or something like that the metaphor that of coral that use stray was really helpful understanding us so there are organisms that do this all the time. Coral organisms secrete a form of bio cement that makes the coral reef. People are just trying to take advantage of some of that building prowess and put it to use in new ways. And this case engineers are using microbes to build things like rex. So how would that work? What do you do with the bacteria to make it? Grow a brick frio. There is an example Raleigh North Carolina company called Bio Mason. They use bacteria to essentially synthesize calcium carbonate which forms the cement around granules of sand. So you can basically make a bio cement. The reason why you might want to do that is normally when bricks or cement concrete has made. It takes a vast amount of energy to do that. You have to have kilns to hit the brakes to one thousand degrees. You have to fire them for long periods of time by going through a different route with engineered living materials. You can think about doing this at room temperature and therefore potentially reduce your cost quite a bit and your carbon footprint right and your carbon footprint. Yeah Yeah do you have to keep the bacteria alive inside a brick? If the bacteria grow the brick normally the way they do it is they start with sand and some nutrients for the bacteria and water and they formed the slurry and then the bacteria grow than after a few days. They begin to allow the bricks to dry out and as they do then. The bacteria will die. If these cells stay alive these microbes stay alive. Could they keep making bricks now? There is one example that we wrote about a about some researchers at the University of Colorado sort of taking the same idea to another level and they in a way they sort of like create like a sour dough starter in bread-making sour dough. You keep starrer with that has your yeast or whatever and use some of it to make particular love for Brad and then you add a little more the starting material and they get that to reproduce. Just keep doing that. And people keep their starters. I for years and years in the same way. But they're doing is they're getting bricks to reproduce themselves so they again do that. Slurry of the nutrients in the sand and and they make a bricks. They keep it in a state where it's the organisms are still viable and then they divide the bricks into and then they add more nutrients and more sand things like that to make two bricks which happens in a matter of hours and then they can do that generation after generations. You go one to two to four to eight exponential exponential breaks right. So they're they're growing bricks. Yeah what about this runway that you mentioned in your story in this case a group made a very large prototype of a full-scale run by they idea. There is in the military. And you want to set up an expeditionary runway and some hotspot around the world you don't WanNa have to carry all the San and aggregate with you and and everything else you would need to make a runway. You can just use local material bringing in some drums of the bacteria that will do the job and you give it some water and you're off to the races. There's also this idea that you might use living breaks in your walls to purify the air. You could just make surfaces that Harbor Bacteria to get them to do different jobs. You want them to do and one of those jobs. People are considering is to purify the air so get rid of any toxins in the air or contaminants or something like that. We write about a group from China in the US that started with the bacteria called Bacillus idolizes and that act curious secretes a protein. Once outside the body of the bacteria it links up with lots of other members of its own kind and creates a matrix that the bacteria then can live on and they use that to make what is called Biofilm. And there's lots of these biofilms out there in the real world. Bacteria colonize our teeth that way. That's how Schiphol's get colonies on them in this case the folks tweak this protein in order to bind different enzymes and they did two different things one. They bound an enzyme to this matrix. That makes the biofilm that breaks down a toxic compound and then they went on to show that it works. The enzyme remain viable in fact degraded that toxin and then they went one step beyond that no said okay well can we culture mix of bacteria that do more than one chemical job at a time so in this case they did a two step reaction to break down a pesticide and in that case in order to break it down the first bacteria had to do its job with one enzyme to do the first reaction and then a second bacteria had to generate another action to do a second job and that that works. It's the idea that you can create a mix of organisms to detoxify things that could be your environment. We talked about the bill environment. But now we're gonNA talk about the medical world to how might these engineered living materials work in medicine? One way in which that might happen is through the use of these biofilms again so another group that we write about from northeastern university in the US. But they're doing our engineering. A different matrix forming protein and it also helps bacteria form biofilms and in this case. They're getting it to bind the cellular lining of your gut in order to allow the bacteria which they're already many healthy kinds of bacteria that help line the gut. So what they're trying to do is for patients with inflammatory bowel disease in which part of that lining breaks down and can cause painful ulcers there trying to restore that by making a a natural environment conducive for these bacteria to then go in and set up a new biofilm to offer protection for people with the disease so you would introduce. He's engineered bacteria that are really good at making a biofilm correct. You can also engineer bacteria to work inside materials to do other things so we write about another example where researchers at MIT have come up with a way to three D print. Bacterial spores so spores are the doormat form of a of a bacteria and so they put these a three D. Printer. They print them onto a plastic matrix. Under the right conditions. The spores germinate new bacteria. Those bacteria then engineered to synthesize and antibacterial compound which fights microbe called staph aureus which is a dangerous hospital infection so in that case you could have materials designed to sort of perpetually fight off. Hospital acquired infections sell like a self disinfecting surfaces for hospitals. Potentially that's kind of the way it's going. I WanNa just add a little note here at the end about regulation so most of this stuff is probably not gonNA fall to the Food and Drug Administration or the EPA regulate but are there some areas that might need to have some oversight when it comes to engineering engineered living materials the way that most researchers in the field are thinking about it. They're they're trying to keep all this in mind. All other regulatory issues in mind as they begin these experiments if you have for example are making bio cement in which you're using natural organism. There's not really a problems with that from regulators going forward. Because you're not doing anything. Nature doesn't do already. It's really just the question of are you going to be introducing an engineered organism into the environment. And in that case there will certainly be scrutiny from regulators and the FDA is perhaps the example. Where if you're doing something that might have a medical use there's already a very well trodden system. Set up to regulate foods and medicines and drugs so I think people are pretty comfortable with understanding how that regulation is going to roll out but for example. If you WANNA make engineer walls that talks the air. It's less clear how the process it's GonNa unfold to to get some of those technologies approved

Food And Drug Administration United States Engineer BOB North Carolina Staff Writer Robert Service Bio Mason University Of Colorado Brad Schiphol MIT D. Printer China EPA
"staph" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"staph" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Therapy there are these re engineered immune cells called T. cells that went on re engineered are trained to fight the person's cancer okay and I am thrilled every once in awhile there's a story about what's going on in her life and it's amazing and miraculous and it would be hard hearted to say that that and if it to her and her family and the other people who've benefited from car T. R. isn't worth something that would be absurd quite the opposite but the problem with focusing on stories of individuals is that old saw one death is a tragedy in a million is a statistic the seventy thousand deaths from opiates this year the twenty thousand deaths from hospital acquired staph infection each of those is a people too yeah and I feel like you're saying those are maybe deaths that don't get a lot of attention like they they happen but there may be more under the radar than than certain other kinds of afflictions are people who have those afflictions well for a bunch of reasons right one is unless it's a death of a famous person you know with their deaths are not great stories right there's no and interview for example and they're also not great stories because there's no Gee whiz aspect and don't get me wrong the Gee whiz aspects got me to go in medicine in the first place and so my friends at Sloan Kettering are responsible for them some of the men their incredible but a re engineered T. cell put back into somebody the fights cancer that's incredible a person eating the wrong foods for twenty years and dying prematurely from diabetes you know that's the real story.

T. R. Sloan Kettering staph
Pediatric Cancer Close to a Cold War Era Nuclear Energy Testing Site

PODSHIP EARTH

08:25 min | 1 year ago

Pediatric Cancer Close to a Cold War Era Nuclear Energy Testing Site

"This week. We talk about a young girl called grace who contracted an extremely rare form of leukemia. A Mother Melissa bombs did was put into place. Many of us never even think about putting everything on the line in the battle to save. I loved ones on that journey. Melissa began discovering that the potential causes of Greece's Kanter may not be very far from so Melissa's. Maybe start by telling us how you decided to move to this community and where we are well right now now. We're just outside of Seamy Valley. I grew up in thousand oaks which is only about five more miles from where we are right. Now I went to Los Angeles for college and when my husband in an I ready to start a family we were looking for a community that was close enough to Los Angeles for work but it was safe. I checked out all the Megan laws to make sure that that was safe. I checked out all the schools check out all crime. I mean I really did quite a bit of research because we wanted to provide the best that we could for our children so you're so you're looking around for homes. Where did you end up locating well. it was a rather miraculous purchase but our first home was on Fallbrook Avenue Avenue in West Hills thirty miles out from Hollywood or we're very close which is why West Hills was so ideal. It's it's the community for people who can't commute too much wjr but also want to be close to work. It's a fairly affluent area calabasas right down the hills where all the celebrities live and it's a nice well to do comfortable city okay so you'll living this new life and and what happens next well when my daughter was four years old she started bruising using and she is a very active kid she's always been a Alpha female since day one name a Grace Grace Allen and so when she started bruising and I took her to the doctor. They said she's just really active little girl. There's no problem here in. I pointed out like she was. She has little bruises on her forehead red and they said well. I'm sure it's fine and they sent us home. A couple of weeks later call back and I said it doesn't feel right. I got brushed off again. Finally leash she had a giant purple scar down her whole side and I called back the doctor and said this. This can't be normal most doctors. I will never have a cancer patient and so I like to think that's why he didn't move quickly three days later. We were finally informed. That grace had every symptom of leukemia. We ended up at Children's Hospital. Los Angeles where on January twentieth we learned that she had an exceptionally rare form incredibly aggressive aggressive form of leukemia call the positive The Philadelphia Chromosome Ehlo and just as a mom and a family. I mean that's just just going to be a terrifying. I mean Con- imagine getting that news. Your whole life stops and everything crashes. We were impatient immediately for week but when I got home I would not mean to but I would just stop in the middle of an intersection forget that I was driving. I was forget where I was going. It's it's it's more than life changing really. It's hard to describe because a lot of these feelings. I have not allowed myself to process a lot of these memories. I've really worked hard hard to keep them away. Just now coming to a place where I'm starting to feel and remember and it's a hard place to go back to to be honest. It wasn't the first time she was diagnosed. That was the worst for me. The worst day of my life was when she relapsed a year and a half out of treatment that that to me was is a thousand times worse than the first one because we immediately knew that her survival rate on a on a clinical trial the first time was seventy percent survival rate which to everyone else sounds really great until the cancer parents. That's one three out of ten children and they don't tell you up front who those three are going to be so. It's not amazing in but you know it's it's there's hope when she relapsed they would not tell us her survival rate and I think it's because they knew we would lose all hope. We knew immediately that she she would need to have a bone marrow transplant. We knew what type of chemotherapy she would have. We knew she would have radiation. I mean we knew we knew what we how bad it was going to be and I think that's why the second time was so much worse than the first time the first time we were pretty naive and how did grace. How did she react react to two oldest like as a kid. You're going through this really you know and especially adults we know more like how is she coping well. It's it's interesting because I think most people assume that childhood cancer. Is You know some throwing up some discomfort in the worst parts you lose. Your hair turns out losing your child losing their hair. The easiest part of the entire journey everything else is a thousand times worse and fortunately when grace was four years old she still really really looked to my husband and I for approval and so she and because she was at the Children's hospital all the time in all the children in her ward are all bald. That was a comfortable place for her by the time she was in second. Grade is she. She knew that other kids had hair she. She knew you that she was different. She knew right after I mean the minute after we told her that she had relapsed she said am I going to die. She knew everything to and and that's tough on a kid and it was tough on my son who was only two and a half when she was diagnosed and if grace had a fever in the middle of the night we had one hour to get her life saving antibiotics so it was an emergency situation to get straight down to the children's hospital and I couldn't wake him up at three in the morning and say goodbye I but sometimes they'd be gone for three to four weeks inpatient and so he he developed a lot of a lot of his own issues and problems and heartache heartache I mean our whole family was affected. My daughter had the worst of it obviously but I don't think people quite realize the trauma brings to the entire family so because graces his cancer was so aggressive did did she need different or more kinds of treatment. She ended up having ten times. The regular dose of chemotherapy than a standard leukemia child would have and so we we spent longtime impatient because it was so devastating on her body auty. She had all kinds of issues she she couldn't eat anymore. She had sores all throughout her mouth. In fact they said it was one of the worst cases of Mucus. Itis they've ever seen it was all the way every part of your mucous. Lining in her body was covered in canker like source so she was addicted to morphine at that time the chemotherapy be gave her neuropathy where if she touched the ground she would be screaming in pain pancreatitis and blood staph infection all at the same time. When did you start noticing patents that you saw the children's cancer ward we live at the hospital more than a typical leukemia me a patient might so we met a lot of the the other families staying there and grace and I were walking down the hall one day and a mom opens the door and said I know no you from the park. I recognize your daughter. We said you know childhood cancers really rare. That's impossible. I'm sorry I don't believe you and when I went home that weekend. I found out that she was right. She was in the background of the pictures from that day and her daughter now had neuroblastoma which is in cancer more rare than my daughters and eleven months after that day she passed away at two years old and then we met the hammers lease and again in treatment and just casual conversation precision. Oh so where are you guys from and she said Seamew Valley and Simi Valley is not far from my home so that was alarming to me but I I kinda voted off. You know it's fairly populated area her daughter. Hazel also had neuroblastoma and excessively. I believe there's only six hundred cases in America. Every year of NEUROBLASTOMA and Hazel was in treatment. Hazel passed away last March after a six or seven year

Grace Grace Allen Leukemia Los Angeles Melissa Bombs Hazel Thousand Oaks Seamy Valley Children's Hospital Cancer Neuroblastoma Calabasas West Hills Greece Kanter Megan Hammers America
"staph" Discussed on Teen Creeps

Teen Creeps

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"staph" Discussed on Teen Creeps

"Grab that brush with her d._n._a. On so she does and then i guess magically he like they'd been sharing during a brush yes. They were showing the best part of what was going on. Yes she goes to the brash. He like makes her go to the night world and go into a witch shop and talk to melissa yeah. I don't know how you'd their name but melis scene yeah good adna yeah and she's like what houses she part of. I think is circle daybreak. I'm not sure sure if she's even circle daybreak think she just knows about it. I might be circle daylight or whatever the rate up the knighthood warning jackals circle midnight and then their circle parth woman kind of thing oh yeah and good. She's a good way. She's a good rich and so she tells her the ingredients she needs and the which is like oh okay. I guess you're evil yeah and so. She does the spell l. and she's like. I'm only gonna give tanya arash okay and he's like yeah. Yeah yeah rashes fine. We're going to arash guess what he tricks her. She gets fucking flesh eating virus on her arm. She ever a staph infection. Yeah unknowingly unknowingly didn't know she was schedule berries insistent yes so she thought she's just giving her arash. You gilbert. She gave her staff in arm and so like very bad yeah. It gets very bad. They might have to to remove her finger <hes> and so jillian panicked and then also what's her name. It's strep throat or something yeah..

staph jillian melissa gilbert
London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

60-Second Science

01:34 min | 1 year ago

London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you're a Germaphobe navigating the city there are certain certain mandatory rules of engagement use a paper towel to shield your hand as you touch the bathroom door handle lift toilet seat covers with your shoe touch buttons at A._T._M.'s and crosswalks awesome walks in elevators with a knuckle. The back of your hand never a fingertip. I know this because I am that person and a new study in the journal scientific reports somewhat justifies is my behavior because when researchers in London sampled all those kinds of surfaces in public shopping centers and train stations and common areas in hospitals what they found was a whole a lot of antibiotic resistant bacteria lurking there scientists swab sites all over London and ended up with six hundred samples of staphylococcus bacteria of those nearly half were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics like penicillin and Erythromycin and the hospital samples had significantly more drug doug resistant microbes which makes sense because hospitals are a place where they use a lot of antibiotics but if there is a silver lining here it might be how few staph bacteria were multi-drug-resistant drug-resistant in public places a mere forty seven percent because a few years back one in the same scientists swabbed London hotel rooms in found that eighty six percent percent of the staph bacteria. There were multi-drug-resistant which may not help you sleep easy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Staph London Germaphobe Penicillin Erythromycin A._T._M. Sixty Seconds Forty Seven Percent Eighty Six Percent
"staph" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on Science for the People

"And they eventually start to inoculate newborn babies with that microbe to try to prevent that staph aureus eighty eighty one from colonizing, those babies and it worked and it spread hospital the hospital this approach, and it basically from those hospitals got rid of infections. Due to that strain of staph aureus and then a variety of things happened. But one of them was that meth Lucille and became cheap in easy to use as an antibiotic. And so rather than doing this gardening technique hospitals. Just started giving antibiotics. Like they were candy win infections turned up. And at that time. Everybody knew that was a bad plan people. Fleming knew it was a bad plan twenty years earlier people knew it was a bad plan because what was going to happen was that strains of staff would evolved that were resistant to the antibiotics, and then they would be able to do even better than they'd done before. And that's actually what we call Mersa now. Yeah. Not the cylinders ascent. Yep. That's mersa. And so I think that. There's a longer conversation to be had about the ethics of those of that work. But I think one of the things that's interesting is that if we consider the ethics of unoccupied eating newborns with a with a. Beneficial microbes we should also consider the ethics of giving newborns than have staph infections, and then biotic, and how do we think about those two things in the the relative costs and benefits of those two things? And I think it's way more complex at tackle to free them. We tend to think in I think in many ways, we seem to have chosen the wrong road in that moment when my croissant became cheap. As a result, we face lots of problems within abide persistence now yet, so one of the things I that really struck me about that story is these these doctors went hospital to hospital around the country with vials of this good staff to prevent bad staff. And I think I think the strain they chose was five to a something. And they just went around inoculating babies in the nineteen fifties. These some of these kids are alive like I'm sure they're a bunch of. These people are adults. Now, I wonder did they did was there any longitudinal follow up? Do we know how? Well, those patients are doing compared to people who didn't get that inoculation. Yeah. It's it's a great question. The there is launch to follow up. In the sixties seventy is have some of those patients, and it was shown that that many of those patients were able to keep the five to a on. But what happened over the next decades is as far as I know, it's unknown. But would be fascinating. Yeah. In manuka. There might be very different trajectories for those two groups. I mean, I think the the broader experiment we're doing right now that in many ways is more analogous than we'd like to think is the rise in C-section births. Because c section births. Those babies get a very different inoculate of both gut and skin microbes than vaginal birth babies. And so that's essentially an experimental gardening of microbes on two sets of babies gardening with very very different microbes. And there are some longitudinal studies now for for that comparison and people are also talking about doing few experiments smearing babies with like kind of positive microbiomes after C section. So it's kind of like that fad is kind of coming around again. Yeah. And you'd be hard pressed them to. I'll put it the other way. It's not uncommon to meet microbiologists who who've who've stored up feces in the event that they they have a C section to colonize their newborn. That's kind of awesome..

staph Lucille Fleming twenty years
"staph" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

"No. Oh my God. Everyone strap in for my near death experience. Okay. I was in high school, and I was just shaving my kneecaps. I'm shaving my legs. And I got to my kneecaps. Can we that is a struggle though? It's likely, and so I like nicked my knee a little bit. And I was like whatever it was a tiny little tiny tiny tiny. Then I didn't but abandoned on it because I was like, whatever. No big deal. I then went to school the next day. And I was on the song team, which if you don't know what song is it's half. Like cheerleading half dancing. It's like dancing with pom poms, and we were doing our palm routine which involves a lot of like rolling on the ground, and like on your knees. Like, the kind of thing stuff. So didn't think anything of it? And but we also practiced in the same room that the wrestlers practiced in so. Me having a knee cut. Obviously, we're all around on the ground something happened to it. And then it started to get infected. But still me was like, oh, no, it's fine. So I didn't have a band aid. So I just put a painter's tape on it or something that was just like sitting on the crowd was like it's fine ground like a role was sitting there from king of posters or something. So I was like, oh, it's fine. Like, I'll just should cover it. This should be fine. And then it got obviously more infected to the point where I went to the doctor. And then they gave me medicine. They gave me meant the silicon to help with my infection. And they're like, oh, yeah. Like this little help it make go away a couple of weeks later. It is a gaping hole now in my knee. Literally. My knee was eating it. All right. I'm sorry. Warning. Anyways turns out so they thought it was a normal. Staph infection turns out, it was something called Mersa and r s a which is meant this resistance. Definitely. So they gave me medicine that literally wouldn't work. And that's why I got worse. So it it got to the point where I had to while my mom, thank God bless Suzanne crew. She's a nurse. So she would pack my knee everyday, which is basically where they gave me sterile God's strips. And then had I wish you could see my hand motions right now. I had my gaping whole my mom had to weave the sterile gauze in pack my knee with it. And then it got to the point. This is the dumbest thing ever. It got to the point where it because it's a merciless get staff infection wherever you get a cut anywhere else on your body. Then the infection like goes to that for your bloodstream, so shave another parts of my body, which I won't say exactly where Hartsburg don't really wanna mention also got infected. So then I had a pack though area, and it was just like a long long thing. And then I. Sorry. I wasn't expecting this. I know you probably were expecting me tripping on the stairs. Anyways. Then. I remember, my mom told me she did some research, and this can all be cured your Mersa staph infection can be cured by taking hydrogen peroxide and acute tip and.

Hartsburg Staph
Golden Staph 'Superbug' is Invading Australian Communities

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Golden Staph 'Superbug' is Invading Australian Communities

"Golden staff are on the rise in communities in Victoria, and Western Australia. The findings reported in the medical journal of ustralia shows that while visit a Klein in Steph caucus reassess the superbug which courses golden staph infections in hospitals over the past few years. The numbers are on the rise for golden Steph infections acquired outside hospitals between the start of twenty eleven and the end of twenty sixteen the dangerous bloodstream infection increase in the community by eight percent per year in Victoria, and by six percent per year in Western Australia. A new Rutgers study is

Western Australia Victoria Medical Journal Of Ustralia Klein Eight Percent Six Percent
"staph" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"When he was a teenager or staph infection nearly took his life. Few years later. He was alone in the Pacific on a life. Raft praying that has rescuers. Would find him before the enemy did? God answered those prayers. It turned out. He had other plans for George H W Bush. Finance part. I think those brushes with death made him cherish the gift of life. And he vowed deliver every day to the fullest. There was always busy a man in constant motion. Never too busy to share his love of life with those around him. He taught us to love the outdoors. He loved watching dogs Flusher cubby. He loved landing the elusive striper. And west confined to a wheelchair. He seemed happiest sitting in his favorite perch on the back porch. At Walker's point contemplating the majesty of the Atlantic. Horizon see-saw were bright and hopeful. He was a genuinely optimistic man, and that optimism guided his children and made each of us believe that anything was possible. He continually broaden his arises daring decisions. A patriot after high school he put college on hold and became a navy fighter pilot as World War. Two broke out. Like many of his generation he never talked about his service. And kill his time as a public figure forced his hand. We learned of the attack on chichi Jima the mission completed this shoot down. We learned of the death of his crewmates whom he thought about throughout his entire life. And we learned that the rescue. And then another ause decision movies young family from the comforts of the east coast to Texas. He and mama gesture to their surroundings quickly. He's a tolerant man after all he was kind.

George H W Bush staph chichi Jima Raft Pacific navy Texas Walker Atlantic
"staph" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on WTVN

"Just kind of looking over a Johnny's shoulder here right lane as if this is a little while ago was blocked at seventy one north here. The exit to seventy s but it was backed up to Frank road. Johnny suggested the sixty to detour right there other things in the news. When you go to the doctor's office, you probably think twice before this gets taken out and used on you one of the most important and probably one of the most recognizable tools used by healthcare professionals. Apparently is now crawling with bacteria the stethoscope. Yeah. I know right. Yeah. It's it's always being used some germs can cause serious infections. A study put up by the journal, infection control and. Hospital. Epidemiology? I completely put that I'm sure, but they found that the bacteria that's responsible for staph infections was found in quite a few of these stethoscopes that they use for research. You know, what I was thinking though, the next time you have a checkup, and they do without the stethoscope or whatever, they're maybe, you know, they're gonna but the ear thing in your ear canal. Why not just ask? Hey, can you clean that in front of me? Then you're safe, right? Hey, would you mind cleaning? I don't think that's a bad idea. Clean that in front of me, please. If you don't mind, doctor, I just not that they don't trust you. But I don't want to get sick. And I'm at a doctor's office. I realize. We've mentioned yesterday that your Christmas spirit peaks at fourteen what we weren't able to break down though, some of those old holiday traditions. And if you still do that or not some that are considered outdated now. A lot of people don't do these anymore is making a gingerbread house. I know I know Allison's in the other room, and she's like way I do that. You're not alone. Alison, my sons in jail, they request gingerbread houses. So if that's considered out dated it's coming back one. Because Alison does it and my sons that are six and three love gingerbread houses. So no worries. There'll be a spike in gingerbread homes down the road. It's not outdated drinking eggnog confession. I've never had eggnog. That it just doesn't even sound good. I'd yeah. Hanging mistletoe is an now. I don't even think with my wife. I've no, no, no, no never done that. But this is my favorite going door to door singing Christmas carols. I have never done that. But a a real quick story. When I lived in DC with my wife. We we had never experienced anyone knocking on her door and singing Christmas carols. And I was either down the basement working on something. And so the doorbell rang. She goes to the door. And there was this nice group of church Christmas carolers singing in front of her. And he looked at him. And she didn't know what to do. She's she's thinking to herself do I do. I tip them. What do I do? So what does he do? See she smiles and a split second later she closes the door. What I mean to her credit? She had never experienced that before you. Imagine this nice group of church Christmas carolers come to the house. She opens the door wait site. Two seconds slams the door on. I'm.

church Christmas Alison Johnny staph Allison Two seconds
"staph" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Within five years of penicillin being introduced fifty percent of staph aureus, strains that were isolated were resistant, and that number would just continue to climb. My god. Sitting here. Now, seventy years later. It's easy to go. Well, yeah. Of course, antibiotic resistance of look at how you Jost people look at how you you're a sponsor. I can't believe a lack of Uber's I everything your own right? But it's I think it's really worth noting that the threat of resistance had been recognized almost immediately by many people. Really? Oh, yeah. Including Alexander Fleming. Who was the dude who discovered the mold made penicillin? Wow. So in nineteen forty five in his Nobel prize acceptance speech, he said, quote, there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under dose himself and by exposing his microbes nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant. Yes. Right. Like, right. Literally right out. He had already been thinking about this clearly for year. He's like is listened seriously. I knows his great Mel, but we can't mess it up. And then people are like, yeah. Kuwait. Great by ticket price piece. Right. Despite this warning by the mid nineteen fifties. Penicillin resistant staff had become a public health crisis around the globe in Australia women who had just given birth were showing backup at the hospital with their severely sick newborn covered in broken blisters or blue pneumonia, and the mothers were often sick themselves with open weeping abscesses on their breasts dill. Strain of staph causing these infections proved to be both extremely infectious and extremely resistant. Not just a penicillin. But to many of the other antibiotics that had been developed at that point. No, it didn't take long for these outbreaks to appear in the US and thousands of cases and dozens of deaths prompted in emergency meeting of the American Medical cessation. Something had to give better hygienic practices better drugs. And definitely better recordkeeping wasn't a reportable disease. Staph infection was normal. This was something of a rude awakening to hospital physicians everywhere, especially those who had joked infectious disease..

penicillin staph Alexander Fleming Nobel prize American Medical cessation US Kuwait Mel Australia pneumonia fifty percent seventy years five years
"staph" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"And then eight hours later, your barf in all over the place, and it is privileged barf. Ing not diarrhea exhau- interested. Okay. Yeah. Okay. So if you ever have food poisoning barf Gallic super right after you ate something where you're like, I probably shouldn't have eaten that. Probably was my rep Ray, you're not barf in yet. Yet almost that eight hour. So that's a lot that is a lot. And there's one more. This is crazy. Isn't it? Crazy that all of these different things can be caused by the same bacteria. It's bizarre is what it is. So it is. So so interesting to me, but probably the most common thing that people associate with staff infections. I know what I used to associate with staph infections goes a little something like this. I saw a bump. Maybe it was on my. But maybe it was on my arm. I don't know. I just had a bump. I thought it was a pimple. So I tried to pop it. Or maybe I thought it was a bug bite, but it didn't size like that's kind of weird. But it's just like is fine skinny go away. Maybe a spider by maybe definitely a spider by but it wasn't. And then it just didn't go away. And then the next day it was kind of bigger, and it was kind of like leaking an Uzi. And then the no. Next day my entire but was covered in a giant bloody. Plus, the abscessed it was just losing. And it was believing. God did not happen to me, by the way. I'm seeing me. But I'm just saying the Royal me it could have have. Luckily, it hasn't as as as much as I'm willing to say. But that's sort of the classic staph infection and that would be a staff skin infection. Okay. Right. So staff gets into any kind of open wound super common to happen after shaving where you get like infected hair follicles up shaving, your P, seriously, seriously, and yeah, and so that's kind of the prototypical staph infection. His skin infection, you end up with this open, abscesses wound that kind of just doesn't he'll and maybe keeps growing or maybe kind of stays the same size. But just doesn't doesn't he'll put Neo sporran on it. And it just doesn't go away such super common. And that's staph aureus. How crazy it is that staff can infect so much of your body. Right. Like, so many different parts. So one of the questions is how on earth can it actually do that? Right. Like how can infect your lungs and give them on yet? But also give you a skin infection weird like the jack-of-all-trades him. Yeah. It really is. So there's a few different ways, and it manages to do this. And it mostly just centers around if vacating your immune system full stop like it's just kind of really good at that. So one of the things that does is produce exa toxins, which we already talked about..

staph Ray eight hours eight hour
"staph" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"staph" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Of my sixty nine year old clients died maybe somebody who has more medical knowledge than I can figure out the real. Cause of death was, here with the. Symptoms sore elbow then it began swelling no open wound he. Would fall from time to. Time for no apparent reason I diagnosed diagnosed as bursitis then an orthopedic doctor said he had a. Staph infection in the elbow drained Some fluid. From the elbow then, hospitalized him as. Having a staph infection and quarantined him he was put on. High doses of antibiotics intravenous. Drip his condition worsened is eyesight and ability to talk then went they said Attacked his brain then pneumonia set in he then went into. A coma He was dead. Within one and one half weeks Do these? Sound like the symptoms of mad cow to you From complaint. To dead in, one and a half weeks, with those symptoms you tell me I'm, certainly not a doctor but I thought when I read this That I should read it to you and I don't know why of one of. The questions that, somebody wants me to ask, and I think I rather will tonight Is All of this that's happening to us right, now the, environment the diseases that are emerging and spreading like. Wildfire all of this just a simple. Question why is.

Staph pneumonia sixty nine year
Automatic Soap Dispensers Consumption Market Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast 2023 – Market Gazette

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Automatic Soap Dispensers Consumption Market Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast 2023 – Market Gazette

"Jennifer Kushinka in for Gordon. Deal along with Ross a. k., new concerns about those. Hand sanitizer dispensers that have been placed in hospital rooms and hallways for staff visitors and patients to us research shows these alcohol based disinfectants help battle staph infections but other infections caused by bacteria that affect the digestive tract have increased over the. Past ten years or so researchers say they may have, found the cause studies show that several. Strains of these bacteria have begun adjusting to alcohol based hand sanitizers they're. Not resistant to the alcohol at. Least not yet but they're becoming more tolerant of it so the bottom line soap and water should be our number one protection it's eight minutes before the hour Rasa Kaye is here with more of America's First News Jennifer, the director of national intelligence Dan Coats confirms the. Intelligence community.

Jennifer Kushinka Rasa Kaye Dan Coats Ross A. K. Gordon Director America Eight Minutes Ten Years
"staph" Discussed on Coffee Convos with Kail Lowry & Lindsie Chrisley

Coffee Convos with Kail Lowry & Lindsie Chrisley

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on Coffee Convos with Kail Lowry & Lindsie Chrisley

"Totally free again, just text coffee to thirty thirty thirty. Okay, now let's get back to it. So they thought it was dressed her adjusting to the outside life because her white blood cell count was high and everything. But they thought that that was, I guess that happens when they're so premature. And then day five rolled around, and I just said something is not right. I could just tell mom, you know? Yes. And so they looked into it more ensure enough. They found out that she had staph infection. Oh, wow. Yeah. And so they called me. It was like four in the morning. I got a phone call in the doctor says at Mercer or like, yeah, yeah, it was deaf, aloft, a coil while. And then we found out that she is soft human dryness. So it turned into men and drive it. And that's something that they get from the hospital like being born in the hospital or that was something from like, how does how does a baby get that? So too. I think I what I was told is you carry everyone carries staph infection stuff on their skin. Okay. And you know how it was saying they had all these needles and everything in them when they took out her, I think that was her pick line or something like that. Sorry, it was in her belly button and when they took that out. Something got in through her bellybutton cut it. And so I went at four AM. We loaded up just rushed to the hospital and I had a sign, you know, consent for them to truck her spine took a snuggles. Yes, with her spinal fluid, they detested. So we did all that. And at this point they were like, let's just let her rest. Don't really touch her. Just go home and let her beat. So then we got another phone call later that day. And there were like, yes, her spinal fluid was cloudy, which means that they're signs of infection. And I was like, like your worst nightmare. Right?.

staph
"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Oh the after birth let's call it the birth the life after birth yes coined that phrase yeah nobody's ever used that before so perfect i think credit at how to heretic registered trademark so these now mind you i may have misspoken mearlier because tara wet tar tolerate and her fellow hippopotamus goddesses of fertility should not be confused with amit which is a another hippopotamus composite goddess who who became who is responsible for devouring the unjust before they passed into the it's a common mistake and it's a common mistake and you can be forgiven but really people try to up here hypothesis game keep it straight folks she's richard on some versions of the myth did so there was the very big myth of the eye of raw which i'm not going to go into the whole thing of but she so this this is in in various mythological thing but she apparently upon the eye of roz eventual return to egypt ray ray's eventual attorney return from egypt she assumes the form of pot humous assume presumably she's tara tolerant now and and be and begins flooding the nile which demonstrates taro rats primary function as for tilleke goddess and she floods the nile with her dazzling milk hurting today's of the nile so there you go it's a goddess who is she's all about birth and crocodile tales caucus sales and yeah i mean snips snails and crocodile tales that's what birth goddesses are made of yeah it's a fucked up zoo over in the old egypt isn't it like just it's the lightning hot hot massive weird shit but but also wonderful yeah and for that we salute this culture longgone and he'll talk.

amit ray ray attorney egypt milk
"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Worth looking up ta ta w e r e t will get you to some very interesting it sounds like it sounds like when the sid marty croft when they were just doing out of ideas and they've done fucking hr puffins stuff and sigmund the sea monster and she's like what what's left the fucking shop they were out of ideas but not out of psychedelics what happens hits so male hippopotami in ancient egypt were basically manifestations of chaos they were killers really yeah but the ancient egyptians noticed that the females were really very protective of their young and very into their babies and therefore they thought you know what this this is who we need protecting our young so maybe they also thought they were sexy because well big juicy butts now tastes have evolved over time you know remember the during the you know seventy eighteenth century thing rubenesque women were very in vogue right well i don't know i can't speak to the sexual mores of the though sometimes i try i think that maybe that's part i'm just going to say that's what was up i think ruben's himself called called his own women hippopotamus so there you go angeles having big big pendulous breasts was a hippopotamus yes god so anyway when we had female listeners that was the best is that was fun lasted that's over now that's over now now it's just breast talk with comparing women well shoot through the roof that's true ted talk will be a spinoff show ted talk here on the hippo heretic.

marty croft egypt ruben ted
"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"India which is ver nasi and all these people go down and they take the holy dip which is how it was described to me meaning they you know they stand waist deep and then they wash it all over their bodies and in their faces and whatever downstream of where i was there was a crematorium and i was like well thank god that that's downstream of everything and then we paddled upstream and there was another crematory upstream move everybody and i was like jesus christ and they're literally burning people and just dumping that into the river so right and the the incineration is not exactly complete oh no no no no and it's not yet so so yeah there's you in the catholic church you're going to get your your microscopic pu bacteria in the gandhi's you that times a million it's amazing there's any religious people left at all right yeah i don't get it i don't get it there are different traditions of holy water in shia and suni islam and not surprisingly unknown numbers of people have been killed because of the difference between water from the spring and haba and the water of the spring is tar baller oh well i'm i'm strict carballa water like that is i will fight you if you go kaba what does it was the other one kaba yeah i know for fact that carballa water is the shit there's more antioxidants yeah it's got it's got it's basically nature's buca.

India
"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"You know kind of random psychopath you can you can go to youtube and get some of his speeches and he speaks pretty well he's a very educated guy he did kind of have a little bit of a kramer thing going on with his hair that he got moving around like a thing on top of a rooster so he looked a little goofy but but he did speak well even though the populism he was espousing was kind of all over the map right so it he became because of his huge listenership and then his demand to like lindberg and like ford stay out of the war right to remain neutral because mr hitler's up to something that might work out he really was on the radar of fdr and even the vatican basically wanted him to shut the fuck up and well the pope the pope himself intervened to try to tell this guy to tone it down and he wouldn't the the the local the cardinal of whoever was in charge michigan was actually sympathetic to him and refuse to discipline him so as this went on he when when it was decided that the united states would break its arms embargo and its neutrality clause and begin the lend lease program to give material goods to the brits to help them win the war and he inveighed against it you know incredibly then when we started giving material support to britain it became enormously popular he started to get hurt and his his numbers went down.

youtube lindberg mr hitler united states ford michigan britain
"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"staph" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"This the the incoherence of like like with trump right that he's protectionist one day in isolation or a you know an internationalist the next day and now we're having this massive trade war that that penalizes all of our allies including canada will does nothing to to china or cetera et cetera it's just this doesn't make any sense because none of it is kind of an evidence based ideology or an economic theory that has any research to back it up right right so so all those things all these things like a guaranteed income and wealth redistribution certainly sounded good to probably poor farmers trying to make it through the great depression but it was actually communism pie another name right amazing that that i mean this is this is one of the great capabilities of the human brain which is to completely ignore very important data sets in and then and then a spouse conflicting ideas it's an amazing thing that we it's a trick that we humans can do it's very impressive so father coughlin was espousing these these of us in the mid thirties yeah yeah so bernie sanders in his second term oh hey you goodbye half our listeners so among his among his many slogans one was less care for internationalism and more concern for national prosperity rose right off the tongue interestingly enough you know if you if you spend five minutes listening to alex jones and don't blow your brains out as a as a mercy killing or you know if you ever listened to glenn beck's more unhinged chalkboard rants fodder cochran coughlan actually spoke well he he was not totally unhinged.

trump canada coughlin bernie sanders alex jones cochran coughlan china glenn beck five minutes one day