18 Burst results for "Stannis"

MLB postseason to be played at bubble sites

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

MLB postseason to be played at bubble sites

"Announcing that postseason games will be played at bubble sites with first round matchups being played at the home stadium of the higher seeds. American League Divisional. Siri's will take place in Saint Diego and at Dodger Stadium. With the championship series being played just in San Diego. The national playoffs will occur in Houston and in Arlington or the World Series play just at Globe Life Park in Arlington. Playoff teams will be kept in transitional hotels to quarantine. But players getting tested daily The New York Yankees making a key move as they have activated outfielder Giancarlo Stanton after 32 games of the strained hamstring on the season. Stannis hit three home runs with seven R B eyes in 14 games on the

Dodger Stadium New York Yankees American League Divisional Arlington Giancarlo Stanton San Diego Saint Diego Siri Globe Life Park Stannis Houston
"stannis" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on WTVN

"Sitting health officials fell. The curfew was needed to combat the increase in cases and child living crowns and how often people are endures, taking off masks around each other to eat and drink. But Governor DeWine also mentioned in his briefing today. That he's planning on talking more about bars and restaurants come Thursday. Really any decision that he makes on Thursday could undercut this ruling Once ABC Sixes. Alexis Meow Burger Franklin County Judge Marks. Iran approved the request made by several local businesses on the City Council pants. The regulation on Monday another hearing on the order scheduled for mid August. From the city schools will begin the new school year with all virtual learning. Superintendent Doctor to Lisa Dixon says teachers will be prepared prior to September 8th. Our teachers and staff will participate in training. For a new curriculum. Teachers would be in contact with their students on a frequent and regular basis. Pairs were received information next month from the school principal and the interim, We're providing answers to the most frequently asked question. The move applies to all grade levels for the first quarter. That's from September 8 through October 27th. Franklin County Health officials recommend the move for all school districts, with Hannah Jefferson and Southwestern City schools. Also moving toe all online Learning to start the new year. Governor Mike DeWine used his press conference Tuesday to issue an order for county fairs across the state All affairs that will be starting on July 31st and after all fair starting on July 31st and after will be AH, Junior fair. He says. That means only four H and FF a livestock shows will be allowed with no midway's rides or grandstand events. Hardest racing will be allowed, but with no Spectators. The wines of several Corona virus cases were traced back to recent county fairs. Ohio House going to vote tomorrow on removing Larry Householder as speaker Following his arrest on federal racketeering charges last week, Majority Republicans met in closed door session Tuesday to hammer out the plans. The House needs a simple majority to strip householder of his leadership role, though he would remain a state. Rep. There's renewed optimism in the search for a Corona virus cure. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Cesar says it could have an FDA approved vaccine this year. My journeys vaccine test is showing promise. Seven of eight primates injected with the vaccine showed no detectable virus and their lungs just two days after exposure to the company is now in the critical final phase of human trials, with pharmaceutical giant Pfizer hot on its heels. Clock is ticking, though, especially in places like Florida, which had its deadliest 24 hours yet 191 lives lost a report from the White House Corona virus task forces, urging it in 20 other places dubbed Outbreak Red Zones to put more restrictions in place. Alex Push a ABC News Washington, Ohio State announced for the 2020 football season Ohio Stadium would operated on Ly 20% capacity. Hands who attend games will be required to wear official coverings and there will be limited concessions. No tailgating in the parking lots in no skull sessions of ST John Arena because of the circumstances affecting seeding season ticket holders are being given an opportunity to opt out this year without losing consecutive years of purchase. Stannis Radio 6 10 W TVN sports After going through, you know a group play. The crew, eliminated in their knockout round match of the MLS is back tournament they fall to Minnesota in penalty kicks. Good night for the Indians, who sweep a doubleheader, fromthe white socks and improved to form one. The Reds are one in four losing to the Cubs. As you've heard Ohio State to allow fans in Ohio Stadium this fall had only 20% capacity. But guys continue team activity Workouts. Camp starts in nine days, The Bangles agree to terms on a contract with number one pick Joe Burrow and what you public. Joey Bosa signed a five year, $135 million extension with the Chargers. From the Central hunter Dealer. Sports Desk map Recordings Radio 6 10 W tvn. I'm Scott Jennings stay connected. The Columbus and Central Ohio on the hour, 30 minutes passed and his news breaks sunny, hot human again today with a high of 90 mostly clear 67..

Governor Mike DeWine Larry Householder Ohio Ohio House Ohio Stadium Alexis Meow Burger Franklin Franklin County ABC Southwestern City schools Lisa Dixon County Judge Iran Joey Bosa Joe Burrow Columbus Central hunter Dealer Superintendent Chargers Scott Jennings principal
"stannis" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"We lost in the stock market yesterday we lost that because they're playing politics with their lives the word issue we're told the president and secretary Mnuchin yesterday we're going to get a deal done today but I hope the president doesn't care about these issues it'll be a terrible precedent you can check out more but Brian Kilmeade has to say he's coming up next after the news phones are breaking news after weeks of speculation Japan is agreeing to postpone the twenty twenty Olympic Games it'll be a featured the following year and twenty twenty one travelers coming in Florida from New York to New Jersey required to self isolate for two weeks or face possible jail time governor Stannis is executive order took effect overnight doesn't explain how will be enforced but specifies up to sixty days in jail and a five hundred dollar fine this guy arrived from New York just before it took effect last night I completely understand why the self us leave two weeks I don't think anyone else so and risk the life of someone and was checking out the seniors only shopping hours this morning at one Publix this listener has a comment yes on the seniors shopping I know everyone's trying to do the right thing I was at Publix this morning at six forty five got in line and by the time I had been in the store for fifteen minutes it was shoulder to shoulder and people were talking and taking their time and I am not sure that this is a good idea it just makes people go in massive amounts at one time yeah we've checked out the seniors only shop will keep you updated on this all morning long nine oh three here it is ninety six point five W. DPO.

president Mnuchin Brian Kilmeade Japan Florida New York New Jersey Publix secretary governor Stannis executive
"stannis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on KCRW

"And make it like a like mom in black and strong but she also earned a spot in TV history singing and co writing the theme song to another well known television comedy the Jeffersons born in Philadelphia and raised in Brooklyn what started a career during the nineteen sixties in Broadway shows like golden boy in a raisin in the sun before long she joined the soap opera love life becoming the first black woman cast as a regular on a daytime serial she joined good times after executive producer Norman Lear Sarna stage show costar Bennett at Stannis who play Thelma Evans said to Bob was every bit as entertaining offstage as she was on screen he was the kind of person that would always make us smile make it happy I remember in the states used to come out with different characters and make us laugh he was funny like that and you know she was the team that you know if you had all the the best clothes in the world and yet at least thing do while released albums as a singer and co founded the pan African Film Festival which is currently underway in Los Angeles she also appeared in several films and TV shows like Malaysia and Charlie's angels full throttle earning two Emmys for her work on the animated show the PJ then they do what died in her sleep at age seventy four she is survived by three children Eric deggans NPR's this is NPR news I'm on on the on to the point digital technology is being weaponized by the trump campaign to spread this information what else does it to overwhelm people with so much confusing content all up there and there's no way to sort out what's true and what's not so I won't even bother if it works for Republicans Democrats do it too that's our to the point podcast coming up.

Philadelphia Brooklyn Bennett Stannis Thelma Evans Bob Los Angeles Malaysia Charlie executive producer Norman Lear Eric deggans NPR NPR
"stannis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me he's what's down to get a closer look and the turtles actually not doing much just sitting in the sunshine he watches a turtle do nothing for why alas okay let's go the board is a little doesn't get up title Stannis intently as a turtle all right boy so stay a turtle let's get the moving all let's start to get a little bit annoyed which is a step away before that thing inside asked me a question where you going where you gotta be right now what is more important than that turtle the last we don't need to run the latch full stack going anywhere I don't even have cell service no one's going to be upset if you take a little time so we take a little time this boy and I enough time to get a real good look at this turtle no naturais no lines no bears just to turn off the screen in the sunshine we look when the boys size at this turtle has been properly looked after he stands up bronze top speed for the log look at those for a while to AS some right make sure some feeling up their necks that others Russia behind the once and for all other still not moving at all and there is no place else I'm supposed to be you know where I have to go and when we look back today that story telling can you saw we.

Stannis Russia
"stannis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Blood I have two kids one's my blood ones not my book I couldn't care less pledge mothers might not might my motto or is the great rabbi once said Losh most in my most favorite stories all right there was a lot on the basis of one call all righty let's see here and there's so many good calls today holy crow J. Kim K. met cranberry Pennsylvania is there really a city cranberry yes Stannis asked me where it is I know what you're gonna say mir mir blueberry or something it's just south of the city the whole I love you your if you are a serious listed with this book this is sort of an insult huge what I yes Waller's it's a great thing I yes call as I see a Babe of the city I've ever heard of a goal and where is it anything but doesn't city I've never heard of it's totally useless so I knew I knew what I was anticipating that with you all right this is the famous Jake of cranberry go ahead and I just wanted to let you know that I eight eight eight in trying to do what you do are restoring order and selling some kind of Judeo Christian athletes in our country I have no idea maybe a week before Christmas and thank god for Amazon they sent me to boxes of your markets what I did was had my daughter we've got a nice little note here and put them in a gift bag and as we went places I handed them out to everybody I know they're looking at me like I'm weird well I I got to admit I'm I'm dying I joined them if well what white light weight you are a Catholic who gave that jahmal because to fellow Catholics to strangers to everybody everybody it's much you I have listened Dennis it comes from your story you when your son being I don't know somewhere in Alabama bless your soul I will tell the story I know I mean bless.

Losh J. Kim K. Pennsylvania Stannis Waller Amazon Dennis Alabama jahmal
"stannis" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Thanks very things the things are changing right things are change the trick is though and this is definitely where giants fans want to know are these changes going to be for the better okay Stannis aiming for the better nope but if you are going to as you want to if you're gonna lose my lose of players like that was is that what this yes I yes I think that there is a good amount of money wants to watch players they like loose I know you want to watch your players on your team win this actually the ones you like those buyers of you really like him you are out you want to watch the loser but we all know that fans because they can't control anything familiarity is very important to them and loyalty is very important to them even if that lawyer is not returned to them also or today want to see guys that they know when they like on their team even as our lives leading hard and if they happen to lose well at least I saw my guy that I know that I'm familiar with and I have good memories of your day at a White House saw him I know is I would have to have that I'm just telling you what I think a lot of fans that they don't even think that they think that an all season they were the season starts and players that we live in the there are a lot of why is he still here get out of this address I've always just trade him why is he still around it's spread Joe's time hit before there was eighty five yeah I know kettle corn poppers big there was eighty four now time.

Stannis White House Joe
"stannis" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"New England Patriots acting as a New England Patriots do it is a team team predisposed to all kinds of elaborate cheating but there you go they do when a lot so I guess look the other way because I take a look at the drive give me what's going on well there's some candy that continues to get the worst of it right now traffic wise we had this crash in Olympia south on I five year Pacific it's actually only blocking the one that left wing now better than three lanes so is given the fact that as you head away from G. villains main gate plus we also have the Saxon sell five at Marvin road still blocking the two right lanes so our travel time from Tacoma to Olympia's around seventy five minutes really not good right now we have a crash in Olympia rest stop vehicles rather self and five forty first it's stuck in the center lane hi everyone forty or king Stannis alternating pass an accident at Miller bay road lots of traffic building across both of our floating bridges but earlier instant east ninety if not bigger tunnel that's cleared as self on poor by this really rugged leaving Kirkland from eighty fifth all the way up to Canada hill and then again all around south center tiger radio real time traffic fine I don't care I'll eat anything from anywhere really don't care so I would call the face the nation host Margaret Brennan to ask his impeachment somehow less divisive now no full weeks entertain we are Cairo radio ninety seven three after and all policy from State Farm gets you collision coverage and this radio ad from State Farm gets you coverage of this beloved ninety six.

New England Patriots Tacoma Olympia Canada hill Margaret Brennan State Farm king Stannis Miller bay Kirkland Cairo
"stannis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"stannis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was I figured five hundred miles would do the trick yeah the loan to and a producer by the name of Scott Hendricks found you and he said that he signed you because you have the voice of a base that cuts like a tenor absolutely Sir what what exactly does that mean hello he be met me at the baggage claim at the airport sure who really yeah I was introduced to him at baggage claim to airport and and he was just my speaking voice she was like can you saying like little bit you know and I invited him to come out here me saying a little club was planned out so and I didn't expect him to come out but he did you know you came out that weekend and I did but the first Slipknot turned round put my guitar down Stannis and take a break and he walked up on stage and he said I'll give you a record deal I was like okay simple yeah so I guess your voice has pretty much always been like this for what we want your you know well as in adults if you're talking to this guy in your twenties when he moved to Nashville he comments on your voice your voice is already has this yes strolling in base in a gospel quartet when I was seventeen yeah and what do you do to maintain it was considerate you don't know that's how I got it right a maintain it with cable just put down the drinking and get on stage that storm up no USB member of the grand Ole Opry in two thousand and three the Opry of course is a big deal.

producer Scott Hendricks Stannis Nashville
"stannis" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Now here's the point with the Virginia from all these different poses a slight difference trains of for everything and the fleas ticks aunt was a we have the. I like playing. I've seen the light the mistake that I made on our our noble for asking them to do doesn't. I didn't do that that's my guess our system the in line he caresses everyday. technique the fundamentals of the following focus on what that learning process once you start to understand what the mistakes for. this one is straight to Clinton is the death of stars to the likely thing that like. you know you could have made that you can get on the phone. what you do. the focus on your job and. the games easier than everyone plays and everyone's having fun everyone's flying around and just making please so the folks on our job with with with your job we have to do it the first line is you know. Cargill horse here because the universities to play but I look at the group of thing my goodness is this thing matures. your this group you're part of a special group or down the road so we can and this is truly was and they were all starting young and just like me thrown into the fire we learn by Stannis interest but we all help each other will focus on what we can see in like related to the line we are we all going to get better we can't play the whole game not everyone we have to service to people and you have to like millions on the what to do. the first leaders. the physical ones just thought the world over. what do you what do starting right now. when when football's also known if you want to do. online so master in the area. because of my love. I love sports I love being around the three most floors in my school about five inches. this is the competition is this and as loving competitive wistful always your best for. it was basketball and the football. congratulations. for family we can't afford to fail. with the kickoff twelve thirty the coverage has a record of your deposed brewing company back next Wednesday over do it this is called a football player feline Gee college..

football Cargill Virginia Clinton Stannis basketball football. five inches
"stannis" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"This Serra fox news president trump insisting he did nothing wrong on the phone call with the leader of Ukraine when they asked him to look into vice president Joe Biden president trying to turn the tables there was with Biden and that was with the senators. and they threatened they said you do this you do that we're not going to give you votes that's that's the real deal so we have a an honest group of people that have been maligned president referring to a report that several democratic senators push the top prosecutor in Europe Ukraine to not close for investigations seen as critical to then special counsel Robert Muller is Russia investigation Biden has denied any wrongdoing related to his son's dealings in Ukraine while he was vice president the contents of the complaint now being reviewed by key lawmaker house intelligence committee chairman Democrat Adam Schiff says the contents of that complaint require follow up sessions with witnesses the complaint to start the focus at least partially on a July phone call between president trump in Ukraine's president the acting director of national intelligence will testify in a public hearing for the house committee tomorrow boxes Jared hell print on Capitol Hill democratic senator and twenty twenty presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren if Congress does not hold this man accountable then he will break the law again and again and again it is time for impeachment now Lawrence speaking at a forum in New Hampshire a judge ruling prosecutors have enough evidence for a Colorado teenager who we tried for a school shooting in a Denver suburb that killed one of his classmates and injured eight others nineteen year old that an Eriksson could face over forty criminal charges including murder and attempted murder in connection with the may seventh attack on Stannis school highlands ranch America's.

Eriksson Stannis Denver Colorado special counsel Europe Joe Biden president Serra fox America murder Ukraine New Hampshire Lawrence Congress Elizabeth Warren senator
"stannis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A perspective next good morning it's officially summer and Debbie Duncan is going all in on a concoction she says is summer in a glass what to summer tastes like I thought I'd have to dig deep for my answer because many of the foods I remember from my nineteen fifties and sixties childhood summers came out of a can or freezer pouch peaches green beans even corn to be honest those flavors kind of blended together so did the taste of cherries when they swam with other bits of so called for in a syrupy sauce poured out of a cannon called fruit cocktail my mid century space age suburban family did not eat seasonally or locally but we did have a station wagon one of my dad's favorite things to do after dinner on summer evenings was drive my brothers and me to the new southern California drugstore save on for ice cream cones five cents for one scoop ten for two I had a feeling mom didn't approve of dad eating ice cream but when he was out with us he in doubt Stannis favorite flavor chocolate chip I always ordered strawberry two scoops of cream is strawberry ice cream melting over sugar con I forgotten about that glorious taste of summer until a couple of weeks ago when I tested a recipe for something called strawberry milk cut farmers market strawberries up into a blender and. sprinkle with sugar stir them a few times over the next hour until nice and be temporary until Smith at good whole milk and buttermilk start let the mixture steep in the fridge overnight and my goodness the result is summer in a glass it's two scoops of circa nineteen sixty five save on strawberry ice cream eaten on a warm summer evening in the rear facing seat of the station wagon minus the con I've gone gluten free it sent out early healthier than its nineteen sixties version this buttermilk I make it for myself I make it for my family I will make you for anyone who comes to my kitchen for as long as strawberry season lasts strawberry milk takes me back while also providing comfort and I and most people I.

Debbie Duncan Smith California Stannis milk
"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

How I Built It

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

"You don't wanna make the argument that you could put people out of work but if you're making savings for employees or the bottom line for your like your employment budget you can take that money and put it into <hes> you know more education for your employees so that they can do like you said things that you know better engage the mind for more value add work the last thing we want to do as a firm as reduce jobs jobs. We want to improve jobs yeah. Absolutely that's fantastic well. That's that's incredibly interesting and so you were you. Were ahead out of your time but now i mean places like d._c. Metro are using your ecosystem. <hes> what are your plans for the future. You know what's kind of the next step in this smart lighting ecosystem so so i've got to answer to your question what our plans for the future as it relates to limelight. I'm late we <hes> we successfully <hes> sold lime late to the world leader in lighting control which is lutron allows also now they currently own limelight and what's great about that is <hes> they have hundreds and hundreds of sales people globally <hes> and thousands of employees and they're all motivated and incented to incorporate limelight <hes> parking structure lighting and and flat lot lighting and outdoor parking space lighting control into any job they bid so so imagine twist think having a side business with three or four employees <hes> commissioning these systems in nearly every state in the country including hawaii so so we're doing that as a really small team over a period of seven or eight years and now there's this industry leader who owns it and has breadth and depth in reach that we could <hes> we could never rival and so you'll see more limelight it capable garages and flat lots in the very near future because of that so we don't we personally don't have plans for limelight lutron has plans lands for limelight and we're really excited about <hes> about that process but the the real question for us is what's next you know what's <hes> what's limelight eighty two point. Oh and i don't mean literally a lighting control system. I mean how can we add value with iot and innovation to an an industry that <hes> wasn't asking for. It may not think it's ready for it but could benefit dramatically from it. That's that's great great. <hes> and it's really cool to see that you you know you kinda successfully moved to this business to someone who it sounds like will absolutely be able to take really he good care of it and now you are moving on to solve the next problem which is <hes> more to your core business right. Because you solve problems you help your clients solve problems yeah yeah our core business is <hes> our insatiable curiosity to find problems that deserve to be solved and then a systematic approach combined with <hes> you know analytical rigor and imagination <hes> to to solve them in in unique ways. I mean we always say that. There's no problem when we can't solve the the real. Question is which ones deserve to be solved great. That's awesome so maybe maybe based on that last statement you just made. I have to ask you my favorite question. Which is do you have any trade secrets for us and <hes> you know of course not industry secrets but got some good piece of advice. Maybe based on what you just said about figuring out what the the good ideas are the ones worth pursuing yeah. Yes sort of lessons uh-huh learned i can i can share some lessons learned <hes> first of all <hes> the power of a great team is <hes> is fundamental to solving any problem and building anything worthy of <hes> of notice so <hes>. We have a pretty unique team that we've very intentionally designed resigned nurtured over time and two thirds of our staff are deep technologists and one third are <hes> skilled industrial designers so you take that unique skill set set and that was strategic two decades ago we we merged what was typically thought of as two separate companies and we put them together co located in one space. He's not my department. <hes> we sort of see people every other person so the tech people are mixed in with designers and the mechanical engineers and the electronic traffic engineers and and we actually shift that space <hes> every six months. Everybody moved out every six months and again. It's not by department is just we're just moving people all the time because we want them to pick up this adjacent knowledge that happens in a highly collaborative space we have no walls in our space <hes> and and the other lesson learned that i share with you and i i think it's an incredibly difficult to put a price tag on it but we know it adds that's value and that is <hes> nurturing collaboration in any conceivable way so in our spaces we have i've every every wall a white board <hes> whether it's a brick wall with a giant <hes> fifteen foot long personalized whiteboard attached to it or if it's dry wall it gets marker board paint on it so every square inch of our space is the place where you and i are a client's an and i are whoever we can just stop and instead of waving our hands and using words just we just hit it and we start building these low resolution prototypes on the wall and you know this was done unless couch cave paintings thousands of years ago and it and it it it continues now the faster you can get to an illustration and get away from people sitting in chairs and stuffy rooms and using only words and a little bit of body language to communicate complicated ideas. We have no tolerance culturally no patience or tolerance for that at all <hes> everything is dynamic and it's we're standing. We're not sitting all of our conference. Rooms are stand up conference rooms got rid of sitdown conference rooms half a decade ago and and we're just as a firm whatever we can do to foster to take down walls and to foster collaboration to accelerate innovation will do it. We're shameless shameless about it. Wow that's that's incredible. I mean i love the <hes> you know not breaking up your employees by department because you're right eight people. <hes> people can learn a lot from each other from other industries. That's the big value of a co working space and as you were describing what you what you have it made me think a lot about co working spaces in general yes yeah. There's there's tremendous opportunity in co working spaces. No walls halls fifteen foot live plants lots of sun coming in through skylights ceiling fans everywhere ubiquitous music playing throughout the space which acts is a more sophisticated version of noise cancellation than any kind of a waterfall hissing snack drop and all those things that they they make it a pleasant space to work in and and they just are naturally conducive to people's imaginations and creativity yeah. That's that's fantastic antastic <hes> well gordon. I wanna i wanna thank you for your time today. <hes> where can people find you twist dot com and <hes> twisting is two words with <hes>. There's only one middle t between the two words that's the common mistake <laughter> yeah go to our website. Check us out <hes> there's as a wide range of case studies that you can look at projects that we worked on in the past. You can see the kind of customers that we serve <hes> and even some explanation of the processes that we use all awesome well. I will be sure to link that and several things that we talked about in the show today gordon. Thanks so much for joining.

lutron hawaii fifteen foot six months eight years two decades
"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

How I Built It

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

"Pay only when it goes live. Thanks so much to pantheon for their support port of this episode and this season of how i built it. Let's get to the title question here <hes> because you know you say you're giving this these lights. It's a brain in an eye and how did you build it. Let's talk a little bit about the hardware side of it <hes> and what kind of sensors you put in it and and then the software like neural network like cidre because they're all talking to each other yeah we call that a mesh network so there is a daisy chain communication asian pattern and <hes> and it and it doesn't have to connect to anyone's i._t. System what we've also learned in creating these <hes> innovative iot infrastructure. You're safe for a wide range of of clients is that nobody wants no i._t. Organization wants any of our products to connect to their i._t. They want this battle star galactica firewall if you will between i know i know that you're a trekkie and stuff so you know what i'm talking about right yeah yeah yeah exactly exactly so so we create these environments and they communicate with the outside world cellular early so there's a cellular gateway so whether it's five thousand i'm sorry two hundred desks per floor in <hes> a campus building for a large organization that is service service by herman miller <hes> you know those desks will all talk to each other and then they will talk to the outside world via cellular network and each level of that building has its two hundred desks and they're all talking outside that way so i refer to that as a as a mesh network communicating with the outside world via gateway so in this case the way we started in the way we re after after working on this system for over eight years very the different business models we started selling light fixtures with embedded radios wow wow and we and we and this was at a time when l._e._d.'s adi's were becoming more popular but there is still very costly. They were still somewhat unreliable but it was it was obvious and inevitable that the l._e._d. The <hes> salami was approaching us was was going land is gonna hit the beach but it wasn't very it wasn't ready yet so we launched with sealed fluorescent light fixtures with this brain and eyeball and everything embedded into them and and what seemed like the blink of an eye <hes> l._e._d.'s adi's became reliable. They became cost effective. They <hes> they they they. They just landed a little faster than everybody thought they would and so we shifted to only supporting <hes> l._e._d. Light fixtures and we shifted from creating our own to allowing every manufacturer all all the large scale manufacturers like philips and <hes> hubble and others cre- to use our brain and our lighting control system and sort sort of <hes> bolted on or build it in to their sophisticated l._e._d. Luminaires that we're going into parking structures so that our business model completely clearly shifted from being a fixture <hes> an ecosystem provider to just being <hes> an ecosystem provider and we sold the the radio module to the fixture companies. Wow so that sounds really interesting. I feel like you know there's there's some <hes> <hes> some analogous things between <hes> that shift that you made a similar shift that i made with selling my online courses which was i was really <music> only going to focus on creating these one off course sales and then i realized that <hes> most of most of what <hes> can make money he is of course licensing so generalized the course material i- licensing licensed to larger organizations who then provide it as a free service to their air customers or their employees so it's interesting to see kind of that shift based on where the market is going and how you can work with other strategic partners partners to to evolve your business model bingo we we call it in a network sale and we used to have to own all and we had all these big large heavy physical products that were shipping out the door and we're arranging for their manufacturing shipping and and overnight we worshiping really small modules goals to manufacturers and they would attach them themselves in their own factories it completely shifted our business model and instead of just having one light fixture we had access to everybody's is best the best greatest pun intended that's great and then and then you could focus on right what what you do best right which is work on this ecosystem yeah and and what we learn through this whole process is that we were way ahead of our time. The people in the you know the shocker. The a parking structure industry is not the most <hes> early adopter technology centric business model on the planet. These are big vending machines and instead of bags of potato chips. You have s._u._v.'s and sedans and so forth and and they really weren't thinking about how technologies other other than capturing your cash via your credit card at the front door. They weren't thinking about how technology could revolutionize their business so there is a lot <hes> <hes> education required. We i say we it wasn't me it was a business partner. Bob has been to every trade show around parking working in north america and beyond many many times proselytizing the benefits before it actually caught traction. Wow that's it's so what what was it like then breaking into <hes> this <hes> you know probably an industry that is very slow to move on and things that don't that don't directly affect their bottom line is in a super obvious way. I mean right like capturing credit cards. Yes we can collect money any more easily <hes> so so because i mean being ahead of your time can almost be a death knell sometimes for technology companies right if yes too far ahead so what was it like you know getting traction and breaking into that industry. It was really really hard. Frankly it was incredibly difficult. We'd we'd show at these trade. Shows and people would walk over <hes> sales people for parking structure equipment would walk over and say boy. This looks really need and everything but you know people aren't asking asking for this yet into which we would say well sometimes you can't you know that old henry ford quotas if you asked if he asked people what they wanted to say a faster her horse sometimes you gotta leave you gotta explain the art of the possible and open people's eyes and one thing that i was at the top of our list at the beginning of this process that we thought would resonate with people was energy savings. We proved that we could save an enormous amount of energy and that translates literally into dollars into the pockets of the people who own these structures so we thought that was the number one compelling selling proposition for the system and and it's it's very important important but what we learned over time was the maintenance story was equal equally compelling and in some cases more compelling so imagine how maintenance used to work in like let's say you own ten parking structures and every day you had to roll the truck and pay pay human beings to drive through your instructors to look for lights that were out. That's how it used to work now. The way that works is someone gets a text message and it tells them exactly where in what building and what fixture is and they just put one in their truck and then go and swap it up life. It's it's a revolutionary idea and then you translate that into one of our largest jobs which was <hes> all of the parking structures that feed into the washington d._c. Metro train lines so we're everybody parks their car and gets on a train and goes in and d._c. There are <hes> dozens of parking structures fourteen thousand lighting fixtures in those parking structures every single one of them has our lighting control system in it so fourteen thousand radios and they're always assessing the health of every light fixture and they're reporting out their status breath that helps phillips so that or obtain that job wow yeah right because that makes a lot of sense right if you <hes> and with the cost savings aspect i mean i don't know the scale is like but <hes> you know if you say you know you could save ten percent or forty percent or whatever <hes> in in your electric bill every month versus. Hey we are going to make your employees more efficient that you know i i feel like that is a a really good story to tell and clearly it is it is and you were actually pretty accurate with a forty percent. I mean that is the type of savings that we're looking at. It's it's sometimes larger larger sometimes a little bit smaller but it's in that zone but then when you think of a human being and the cost of an employee i mean not to say i'm not trying to get rid of employees. He's or anything there's there's a lot of cost associated with gainfully employing a human being <hes>. There's there's you can just imagine all of them. So if so if you were traditionally hiring three people to do that job and now you can get by with a half a person who's being deployed in a more useful way for a human being some you know engaging their minds and their hands and so forth and not just driving a car around looking at lighting fixtures it gets it gets really exciting duro absolutely and then i mean yeah right like you said i mean you know you.

philips herman miller north america partner s._u._v. washington Bob l._e._d. phillips forty percent eight years ten percent
"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

How I Built It

15:10 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

"One hundreds and occasionally <hes> we try to connect with a v._c. Funded <hes> organization or a university <hes> tech outpost <hes> once per year just <hes> it's it's not necessarily a money making venture as much as it is it stretches us helps us grow keeps us connected with a different audience but larger organizations have done this before and they're your systems and teams and and <hes> <hes> expense accounts i can bear the burden gotcha so so you work with individual inventors. You said to kind of help of bring their stuff to market. I think that's really interesting right because i'm i'm in the software where fields <hes> and it's easy for me to say like on a friday like oh. I have this idea for some piece of software and if i decide i'm going to work through the weekend. I have have a copy of my idea by monday right not really the case in in in in the work that you do right. No no. It's a <hes> <hes> a lot of our work is hardware intensive and software intensive and really deep. You is really complex user experiences. In in fact there is a project that we did <hes> a couple of years ago where we had one guy full time with the support of our team cracking the code for an algorithm that would discern between the four different strokes that a competitive swimmer would do in a pool so the goal was to have these wrist worn sensors determined without pressing buttons whether they're doing one of the four different strokes that swimmers do that took so you think about that and the ninety fifth percentile male fifth percentile all female <hes> and everything in between and that data set was so vast. It took a year to figure out reliably who is doing what oh wow. That's yeah that's incredible. You know i think about that stuff with things like the apple watch for example and like you know detecting falls and how much testing and how much data gathering needs to go into that. I think i think about the apple watch all the time when i brush my teeth. I'm very aware of the fact that someone someone has access to how many minutes i brush my teeth every day and how many strokes in which direction i do. I don't know that that data has any value but apple has access s. two that information. They know that hey it's about seven o'clock in the morning. This is a left handed person. There's a pretty good chance he's brushing his teeth right. Now i wonder under if any dental companies would like to have information like just from millions of people wow wow that is super interesting. It's something i hadn't thought of because is my watch doesn't go on until after i brushed my teeth but that is very very interesting so but today we're going to talk about a specific product. We're going to talk about the limelight lighting control system yes exactly so. Why don't you tell us a little bit about what that is. Yeah aso limelight is a very unique project. It's a once a decade kind of project for us. As i mentioned already we do our day jobs. Working for large organizations is that <hes> need innovation and <hes> they either forgot how to do it themselves so they call us up to help. Remind them of how how the innovation process works irks or we have some <hes> design or technical skills that they lack or that. They just need new bandwidth. They need more ban with their extremely busy and they can't get all their work done so they would would call us limelight different in that <hes> we intentionally decided to <hes> step into the shoes of our customers who were always always saying that hey it's very important that you constantly invest in innovation so that your business is sustainable. We personally invested ourselves. So so we made an observation well we generated an insight based on our <hes> oftentimes insatiable curiosity and we said there's there's something broken broken. There's something wrong. I wonder if that could be fixed and that gave birth to the idea that has lime light. Wow that's that's incredible so <hes> <hes> so you generally do work with other companies but in this case you decided that you had your you guys had an idea and you decided to <hes> kind of <hes> <hes> put it bring it to market yeah yeah in fact we we had a very simple insight and we we <hes> begin the process of <hes> understanding the problem i mean before you can solve a problem you have to deeply understand it so we spent weeks and months studying being this problem and verifying that nobody else has solved it and <hes> as as well as we could verify that no one else was actually trying to solve it <hes> <hes> we did some <hes> brief <hes> low cost experiments to verify that it was technically feasible usable and then we wrote ourselves business plan <hes> and we hired some guy. I was gonna use the word consultant but this gentleman actually refers to himself off as an insult because he's not paid to be kind. He's paid to be blunt in helpful and <hes> this gentleman was instrumental instrumental in helping us sober-minded li <hes> scope out what it would take to bring something like this to life and of course along the way we learn about all sorts sorts of technical challenges that were so deep into the crystal ball that we couldn't possibly see them <hes> in the first few months but that's what that's what gave way to <hes> limelight limelight of parking structure <hes> flat lot lighting control system gotcha so okay so <hes>. There's a lot of stuff you just said there that i'd love to unpack but <hes> i is limelight is a wireless outdoor lighting control system right you specifically mentioned <hes> parking lots and garages and there is is it that they're like smart lights or they're. They okay cool so what's what's the main. If if you don't mind sharing what's the main observation <hes> that you made so so here it is one of our we we go to a lot of trade shows because <hes> we work in virtually every industry <hes> someone from our staff we had just finished up a project for a client and <hes> and it was focused on one space so say they wanted to you bring lighting control into the manufacturing space in a unique way that allows you to individually address individual light fixtures in a million in square foot warehouse environment or manufacturing environment so that when manufacturing cells shift and change you can actually turn on lights lights only where you want them and you're not to turn on breakers and big random blocks fifty lights that was the big idea so we had just finished that project for a client and <hes> one of our employees was flying back from vegas at ozark hundred and they saw one of the <hes> forty thousand parking structures in north america that was lit up like a christmas tree at three in the morning and he scratched his head and he said that seems kinda stupid. Why don't we do stuff like that you know and of course we we like ate them up because they're they they still safety and confidence you don't no one wants to walk into a dim or dark parking structure ever so they they were all sorts of energy keeping these things when there's nobody inside so the thought was is there a better way what if we could individually the address all of the lights in a space what if we could put a an eyeball on every single light what if we could put a brain in a mouth on every single light and what if we could make make them behave intelligently so that when nobody's around they're behaving appropriately and then when somebody's shows up there incredibly brilliant and smart and add new value you so that was the genesis of the limelight idea yeah that that's fantastic and certainly i'm sure we'll save money for the people who own the parking structure and make <hes> patrons feel safe so <hes> you you mentioned that you did a lot of research to see if it was feasible to make sure that no one was doing it what was that process like <hes> i would call that ad hoc and we were doing it between tween projects <hes> when we had time but one of the biggest challenges was imagined parking structures i if we want to communicate if we want late fixtures to communicate with each other in the entire parking structure itself <hes> we're we're having to punch through a lot of concrete and a lot of <hes> steel rebar. That's a hostile the environment for a radio signal propagation and then you throw in a bunch of sheet metal. That's there sometimes and not there at other times and it creates for an unforgiving environment for <hes> radio frequency communication so we had to make sure that it was feasible and it was possible yeah. That was the big technical hurdle. Frankly that's the reason no one had done it before. <hes> we for for two decades. Our team has been working with every single radio a protocol under the sun and in fact. I don't know if it's true anymore. But five years ago we were running and managing the largest zubi radio mesh networks in north america as a result of the limelight project so <hes> once. We determined that it was feasible <hes> we we basically just started building the system gotcha. So that makes sense right. I mean everybody has wi fi now and if you have let's say a concrete basement or something thing. You're going to need to add like another access point. In order to get internet in that basement or signals can only travel so far through certain materials so that's incredibly interesting you want. The main research was to try to figure out hey can. We put smart lights in a mostly concrete structure right yeah and then and then if we could <hes> how much energy could we save and what other things we could we do what other user experiences could we bring to life that people would value so we knew that the one of the largest costs for parking structure was <hes> variable energy usage. They really can't <hes> the the the real estate cost isn't variable <hes> the maintenance costs in general are pretty consistent but the energy use is a dial that they can turn turn so we started to calculate how far we could turn that down while still being perceived as as bright or brighter than any garage ever at any any time in the in the beauty is what we learned through. This process is <hes> the outer perimeter of parking structure at night must be well lit the the outside spaces need to be well. Let the core of a parking structure doesn't need to be well that could be stepped in that could be half brightness because there's no one there but as soon as someone goes in then it has to be brought up to full brightness and then as soon as those people leave you can bring it back down to a dim state doing that. <hes> provides the opportunity to save a lot of money and then you layer on things like daylight harvesting so we're not gonna overdrive these lights in the morning on the east side out of the building. That would be foolish. There's plenty of light there at that time of day and you can see how adding a brain adding sensors and algorithms and.

apple north america consultant vegas ozark ninety fifth two decades five years
"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

How I Built It

15:48 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

"Luminaires that we're going into parking structures so that our business model completely wheatley shifted from being a fixture <hes> an ecosystem provider to just being <hes> an ecosystem provider and we sold the the radio module to the fixture companies. Wow so that sounds really interesting. I feel like you know there's there's some <hes> <hes> some analogous things between <hes> that shift umeda similar shifts that i made with selling my online courses which was i was really <music> only going to focus on creating these one off course sales and then i realized that <hes> most of most of what <hes> can make money he is licensing so generalized the course material i- licensing licensed to larger organizations who then provide it as a free service to their our customers or their employees so it's interesting to see kind of that shift based on where the market is going and how you can work with other strategic partners partners to to evolve your business model bingo we we call it in a network sale and we used to have to own all and we had all these big large heavy physical products that were shipping out the door and we're arranging for their manufacturing shipping and and overnight we worshiping really small modules goals to manufacturers and they would attach them themselves in their own factories it completely shifted our business model and instead of just having one light fixture we had access to everybody's is best the best greatest pun intended that's great and then and then you could focus on right what what you do best right which is work on this ecosystem yeah and and what we learn through this whole process is that we were way ahead of our time the people in the you know shocker the a parking structure industry is not the most <hes> early adopter technology centric business model on the planet. These are big vending machines and instead of bags of potato chips. You have s._u._v.'s and sedans and so forth and and they really weren't thinking about how technologies other other than capturing your cash via your credit card at the front door. They weren't thinking about how technology could revolutionize their business so there is a lot <hes> <hes> education required. We i say we it wasn't me it was a business partner. Bob has been to every trade show around parking working in north america and beyond many many times proselytizing the benefits before it actually caught traction. Wow that's it's so what what was it like then breaking into <hes> this <hes> you know probably an industry that is very slow to move on and things that don't that don't directly affect their bottom line is in a super obvious way. I mean right like capturing credit cards. Yes we can collect money any more easily <hes> so so because i mean being ahead of your time can almost be a death knell sometimes for technology companies right if yes too far ahead so what was it like you know getting traction and breaking into that industry. It was really really hard. Frankly it was incredibly difficult. We'd we'd show at these trade. Shows and people would walk over <hes> sales people for parking structure equipment would walk over and say boy. This looks really need and everything but you know people aren't asking asking for this yet into which we would say well sometimes you can't you know that old henry ford quotas if you asked if he asked people what they wanted to say a faster her horse sometimes you gotta leave you gotta explain the art of the possible and open people's eyes and one thing that i was at the top of our list at the beginning of this process that we thought would resonate with people was energy savings. We proved that we could save an enormous amount of energy and that translates literally into dollars into the pockets of the people who own these structures so we thought that was the number one compelling selling proposition for the system and and it's it's very important important but what we learned over time was the maintenance story was equal equally compelling and in some cases more compelling so imagine how maintenance used to work in like let's say you own ten parking structures and every day you had to roll the truck and pay pay human beings to drive through your instructors to look for lights that were out. That's how it used to work now. The way that works is someone gets a text message and it tells them exactly where in what building and what fixture is and they just put one in their truck and then go and swap it up off. It's it's a revolutionary idea and then you translate that into one of our largest jobs which was <hes> all of the parking structures that feed into the washington d._c. Metro train lines so we're everybody parks their car and gets on a train and goes in and d._c. There are <hes> dozens of parking structures fourteen thousand lighting fixtures in those parking structures every single one of them has our lighting control system in it so fourteen thousand radios and they're always assessing the health of every light fixture and they're reporting out their status breath that helps phillips so that or obtain that job wow yeah right because that makes a lot of sense right if you <hes> and with the cost savings aspect i mean i don't know the scale is like but <hes> you know if you say you know you could save ten percent or forty percent or whatever <hes> in in your electric bill every month versus. Hey we are going to make your employees more efficient that you know i i feel like that is a a really good story to tell and clearly it is it is and you were actually pretty accurate with a forty percent. I mean that is the type of savings that we're looking at. It's it's sometimes larger larger sometimes a little bit smaller but it's in that zone but then when you think of a human being and the cost of an employee i mean not to say i'm not trying to get rid of employees. He's or anything there's there's a lot of cost associated with gainfully employing a human being <hes>. There's there's you can just imagine all of them. So if so if you were traditionally hiring three people to do that job and now you can get by with a half a person who's being deployed in a more useful way for a human being some you know engaging their minds and their hands and so forth and not just driving a car around looking at lighting fixtures it gets it gets really exciting duro absolutely and then i mean yeah right like you said i mean you know you.

north america partner s._u._v. Bob washington phillips forty percent ten percent
"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

How I Built It

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on How I Built It

"Pay only when it goes live. Thanks so much to pantheon for their support port of this episode and this season of how i built it. Let's get to the title question here <hes> because you know you say you're giving this these lights. It's a brain in an eye and how did you build it. Let's talk a little bit about the hardware side of it <hes> and what kind of sensors you put in it and and then the software like neural network like cidre because they're all talking to each other yeah we call that a mesh network so there is a daisy chain communication asian pattern and <hes> and it and it doesn't have to connect to anyone's i._t. System what we've also learned in creating these <hes> innovative iot infrastructure. You're safe for a wide range of of clients is that nobody wants no i._t. Organization wants any of our products to connect to their i._t. They want this battle star galactica firewall if you will between i know i know that you're a trekkie and stuff so you know what i'm talking about right yeah yeah yeah exactly exactly so so we create these environments and they communicate with the outside world cellular early so there's a cellular gateway so whether it's five thousand i'm sorry two hundred desks per floor in <hes> a campus building for a large organization that is service service by herman miller <hes> you know those desks will all talk to each other and then they will talk to the outside world via cellular network and each level of that building has its two hundred desks and they're all talking outside that way so i refer to that as a as a mesh network communicating with the outside world via gateway so in this case the way we started and the way we really you know after after working on this system for over eight years very the different business models we started selling light fixtures with embedded radios wow wow and we and we and this was at a time when l._e._d.'s adi's were becoming more popular but there is still very costly. They were still somewhat unreliable but it was it was obvious and inevitable that the l._e._d. A d <hes> salami was approaching us was was going land is gonna hit the beach but it wasn't very it wasn't ready yet so we launched with sealed fluorescent light fixtures with this brain and eyeball and everything embedded into them and and what seemed like the blink of an eye <hes> l._e._d.'s adi's became reliable. They became cost effective. They <hes> they they they. They just landed a little faster than everybody thought they would and so we shifted to only supporting <hes> l._e._d..

herman miller l._e._d. eight years
"stannis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"stannis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"For Stannis today and Amy king has an update from the newsroom so you were just talking about Gary calories police chief says the shooter at the garlic festival in Gilroy used an assault style weapon the chief says the guy engaged police when they confronted him and was quickly shot and killed the chief says it could've been worse of police hadn't acted so quickly we have thousands of people there in a very small area and you don't have done so much worse so so fast and so I'm really proud that they got there as quickly as they did in that they were successful in taking that threat right out of the equation a six year old boy a thirteen year old girl and a man in his twenties were killed when the shooter opened fire and fired of what appeared to be randomly into the crowd last night more than a dozen others were hurt the man accused of killing an off duty LAPD officer in Lincoln heights is still out there somewhere officer one D. as was fatally shot while hanging out with friends at a taco stand the LAPD says the young officer tried to stop some men from painting graffiti nearby one of the suspected gang members pulled a gun early Saturday morning and fatally shot DS a friend of the officers was also hit but survived the shooting police say the shooter clean the area was his gang's territory police have not put out a sketch or description of the killer and we're calling back KFI news news brought to you by American vision windows president trump has announced his director of national intelligence Dan coats will leave the job after more than two years trump is nominating Texas congressman John Radcliffe to replace cote reckless gave a trump friendly performance last week during the testimony a former special counsel Robert Muller respectfully director it was not the special counsel's job to conclusively determine Donald trump's innocence or to exonerate him because the bedrock principle of our justice system is a presumption of innocence reckless worked during the George W. bush administration as a national security official and US attorney the job of national intelligence director requires Senate approval and a famous sixteen year old Swedish climate activist says she has found a carbon neutral way to travel to the U. S. Greta Thornberry plants across the Atlantic next month in a sailboat she was invited to a United Nations climate summit in New York but she never flies because of the admission our emissions from the southern California Toyota dealers traffic center we make it easy it's slowing Glendora on.

New York California Toyota United Nations U. S. Greta Thornberry Senate US attorney George W. bush Robert Muller congressman Texas president KFI assault Glendora Amy king Atlantic official Donald trump